4 Months in a F500 Consulting Firm, But I Need to Move For Personal Reasons. What do I do?

rt2k15's picture
Rank: Monkey | 65

Hey everyone, I'm wondering what's the protocol I should follow about changing jobs and/or moving after recently joining a new company.

I graduated from a good midwestern school a year ago, and moved back to my east coast home city because my college GF was also moving there. My first job out of school wasn't great, and it took me many months to find a new one. I started at my new company in April, and it's a great job at a well known, highly respected consulting firm. Problem is, I need to move. The long term relationship ended very sadly/badly, and I just can't live in this city any more. I really need a change of scenery, and I have a ton of friends and family in a city near where I went to school. I'd like to move there.

I am planning on talking to my career development counselor about this in October, which will be 6+ months after my start date and right after the busiest period of the year for us ends. How do I approach this? So far, I like the work and the company, and I'd like to stay in the same role/similar role (corporate finance). Several people on my team work remotely already; do you think moving for "personal reasons" and explaining why is a valid reason? I could easily do my job at the same level in a different city, and like I said, several people on my team already do it, although they probably had stronger reasons than "I'm miserable in this city." I believe the company requires internal transfers to new roles to stay in their original role for 12 months minimum; do you think the company/my bosses would be open to me working remotely in the new city for another 5-6 months, and then seeing if I should stay in my role or internally transfer? I'm already doing good work, and I'm confident my bosses do/will think highly of me.

Or, would it really hurt my resume if I just quit in October and moved? I know job hopping isn't a good look, especially for a generic finance guy like myself. But, my happiness and sanity is paramount. I've tried to adapt and make things work here, but it's just not working. I have enough spare money and motivation to be unemployed/underemployed for a little bit while I look for a new job. I'm worried, though, that the job hopping will really hurt a potential job hunt, either internally or externally. I have a few connections in the city I'd like to move to, but I'm worried that won't be enough to help with the multiple job changes on my resume.

What should I do? Thanks for your time and advice in advance.

tldr; 4 months into new job, need to move for personal reasons. Not sure if I should try to work remote, change roles internally, or move and find a new job in the new city. Need advice on how to approach this and how to talk to my bosses about it

Comments (10)

Jul 8, 2016

bump anyone?

Best Response
Jul 8, 2016

First, take a deep breath. Second, if you actually like your job, just not your location, there is probably no harm in bringing it up in October. At worse, they say no and you are in the same spot you were before.

It sounds like the breakup was hard, but that will fade with time. I'm guessing you work for ACN? If so, start hanging out with the other analysts on the weekend, or alt-traveling somewhere fun. You honestly just need to get over it. That probably sounds harsh, but moving cities because of a breakup is a pretty extreme course of action.

Your job isn't the source of your stress, so why do you want to jeopardize something going well in your life? Don't assume that moving will fix all your problems. Stop moping around and start dating again.

    • 2
Jul 8, 2016

Hey, I appreciate the reply. I've tried to make things work out here post-split, but it just isn't working. The breakup isn't the only reason I want to move, though; I've been unhappy in my current city basically since I got here, and now that I don't have any reason to stay, it's best for me to move on. I actually looked for work in the new city after school and while looking for a new gig, so it's not like this is out of the blue. I work on a small, specialized team with only a few analysts, so it's tough to meet new people, and I have a few friends from high school that I live with, but we really don't share the same interests anymore. I have way more friends and social/networking opportunities in the new city, and it's in my best interest to move.

I agree that there wouldn't be much harm in asking about moving in October. Worst case, I can work there for awhile longer and try to move internally down the road. I'm mainly curious about the best way to phrase it so I don't come across as "I'm sad let me move." I'm legitimately unhappy in my current city, and while I don't want to jeopardize a good job, happiness is more important. Hopefully my supervisors sympathize with my position.

Jul 8, 2016

I'd phrase it more like "I grew up here and am itching to stretch my wings and tackle a new challenge. I like working for the team and the company, but am looking for a fresh environment."

    • 1
Jul 8, 2016

That sounds good! I'll definitely try to phrase it like that. Probably don't want dwell on the negatives and seem like I'm lookin for a hasty exit.

Jul 8, 2016

Try taking your balls out of your purse.

Jul 8, 2016

Thanks for the advice, bud

    • 1
Jul 8, 2016
rt2k15:

Thanks for the advice, bud

Act on the advice and your career will flourish.

You're welcome.

Jul 9, 2016

Some perspective: if you've only been out of school about a year and already have had two jobs you kind of already may be perceived as a risky hire, or at very best someone who doesn't know what they are looking for and how to obtain it. If you like the job you have, I'd encourage you to stick with it and evaluate the possibility of transferring to another office or using the opportunity to network. It's very tough out there for experienced consulting candidates with the cutbacks at several big four firms.

In my experience, generally when people say they left a job for "personal reasons" it is often perceived as a code for "there is more to the story [than I am willing to share in an interview]". As awful as it is people DO judge harshly especially among hiring decisions and I would hate for you to get caught in that trap.

In sum, I'd say get at least another year under your belt and try to find something else from a position of strength. Maybe try to meet new people or explore new areas of your current city you haven't seen before or even take a few trips. Of course you have to do what works for you, but I would strongly advise against leaving a good job w/o something lined up at this juncture.

    • 1
Jul 9, 2016
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