Battling constant fatigue

chestnutxyz's picture
Rank: Gorilla | 643

What do others do to battle constant fatigue when on the job? I've been tired pretty much 24/7 over the past few weeks, considering taking a leave and working with a doctor but don't want to endanger my job.

Comments (23)

Aug 16, 2016

what're your hours & overall health like?

Aug 16, 2016
thebrofessor:

what're your hours & overall health like?

Honestly the hours aren't so bad, better than I expected which is why I think its something health related. I've never felt this fatigued in my life... In college I could sleep 2-3 hours a night and not miss a beat, now I find myself not able to get enough sleep.

I guess my question really boils down to would a short term medical leave impact my career? I'm an Analyst and don't want to risk anything but I don't think I can continue on like this forever.

Aug 16, 2016

Unless you are literally some form of superhuman monkey that was spawned of most bankers wet dreams, you cannot operate on 2-3 hours of sleep at night. It just took longer to catch up with you than it would with most people.

Obviously there are nights/weeks where sleeping 2-3 hours average is unavoidable, but if you don't average like at LEAST 5 over the course of 6+ months you are actually slowly killing yourself. Start there.

Best Response
Aug 16, 2016

I'm not going to discourage you from going to the doctor, but I would try to make lifestyle changes. I have a family member that has a cardiac disorder causing chronic fatigue (not to scare you), but the docs would have to do all kinds of tests to determine what, if anything, is wrong with you.

do you have a good diet? are you in shape? are you hydrated? how's your stress level? do you sleep the right way (sleep cycles and such)? are you in front of a screen all the time even away from work?

I suggest this because I believe if you have a healthy lifestyle and then something's still not right, go ahead and try traditional medicine, but doctors are largely trained in symptom management rather than curing people. best of luck bro

also not being able to get enough sleep I'm betting is how you budget your time instead of work. if your hours aren't that bad you should be able to get at least 6hrs a night. if you're not, evaluate how you spend your time

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Aug 16, 2016
thebrofessor:

I'm not going to discourage you from going to the doctor, but I would try to make lifestyle changes. I have a family member that has a cardiac disorder causing chronic fatigue (not to scare you), but the docs would have to do all kinds of tests to determine what, if anything, is wrong with you.

do you have a good diet? are you in shape? are you hydrated? how's your stress level? do you sleep the right way (sleep cycles and such)? are you in front of a screen all the time even away from work?

I suggest this because I believe if you have a healthy lifestyle and then something's still not right, go ahead and try traditional medicine, but doctors are largely trained in symptom management rather than curing people. best of luck bro

also not being able to get enough sleep I'm betting is how you budget your time instead of work. if your hours aren't that bad you should be able to get at least 6hrs a night. if you're not, evaluate how you spend your time

Thank you! I am working on getting healthy, been completely changing my diet and I've recently signed up for one of those healthy living/nutrional programs. I've met with a doctor who recommended taking short-term leave, but I don't know if that'll hold back my career - then again, without my health I won't have much of a career regardless.

Aug 16, 2016

any substances ? coffee is a substance too...

Aug 16, 2016

Sound like you may have mono. Try going to a doctors to get your blood tested.

Aug 16, 2016

I had similar symptoms. Blood tests show that I am anemic, with an acute Vit D deficiency.
Iron and Vit. D tablets seem to have helped!

Aug 16, 2016

Like others have said, the fatigue may be tied to your overall health. A proper diet with lots of greens, routine exercise, and efficient sleep can do you wonders.

I will say that you might be getting hit hard because of the overall schedule. Your body has a natural sleep schedule that is regulated by your circadian rhythm and underpinned by regular hormonal patterns.

If you're not used to getting up and going to bed everyday at certain times there can be an adjustment period until you become entrained to the routine. It's pretty analogous to being jet lagged. Try playing around with when/how long you sleep and see if that improves your condition. It might sound counterintuitive but less sleep can actually be better. For example, I ALWAYS feel like shit if I sleep 7 hours but feel good if I get a little more than 6 hours in. This can also be affected by your sleep cycle as well.

In general, sleeping between 6.5 and 8.5 is ideal for an average person in the long run. Oversleep and you feel like shit. Stay up all night and you feel like shit.

Aug 16, 2016

Emotional exhaustion? If there's something going on in your life that's weighing on you emotionally (dislike work, stress, family, lovers) you could be emotionally exhausted.

Aug 16, 2016

Have you considered getting your T levels checked...?

Aug 16, 2016

This. The thyroid affects energy levels and metabolism. OP could totally be hypothyroid (I know from my own experience). Either way, it can't hurt to take a blood test.

Aug 16, 2016

You are probably iron deficient.

Aug 16, 2016

Don't know about how taking sick leave will affect your career (you do have sick leave, right?), but I can give you some of my fresh anecdotes.

As other users have given their own recommendations on what's wrong with you, you should get a full workup for: hormones (thyroid, full testosterone panel, estrogen, etc.), metabolites (the "Comprehensive Metabolic Panel" will give you a rough overview, but you can ask for a more thorough one or order one online), and an infection panel (Lyme's hell) if you're really worried that it's something health-wise and not your ass sleep schedule.

In all likelihood it's probably your hours (from what you've posted). I used to have catch-up sleep on the weekends (10 hours of sleep from only 7 hours on the weekdays - now I sleep 9 everyday) too, but once I got my schedule sorted out that fixed itself. If you have trouble doing all of this shit by yourself, I'd urge you to book an appt with a sleep-specialist/counselor/what-have-you. Just tell them on the phone that you work long hours and you're looking for someone that can help you maximize the amount of sleep you get. They should be able to help you get back on track without you having to miss out on work.

In the meantime experiment with supps if you can. Stuff like ashwghanda, ginseng, rhodiola rhodesia, Redline Xtreme (or 5 hour energy if you're a bankerchick), FRS energy chews to see if any of it can help you get through the days while you're getting your life back in order.

Good luck fam.

Aug 16, 2016

I would say start with a simple blood test / physical. It's easy and doesn't take much time, should be very telling. Immediate next step is making lifestyle adjustments. Too easy to run to a doctor assuming you are sick in some way, it's highly likely you are simply making a few poor lifestyle decisions that could be easily fixed. Best of luck.

PS I had certain vitamin deficiencies as mentioned above, specifically VitD and magnesium. Fixing that helped me a lot.

Aug 16, 2016

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Aug 17, 2016

Not to be an ass, but you should use that search bar up on the top right of the screen. Aside from kids wondering their chances of getting in and what clothes are acceptable, this is one of the more common topics on this forum.

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Aug 17, 2016

Get checked out w/ your doctor, have him/her run a blood test/analysis, at the very least for peace of mind. Assuming all's okay like others have said, your diet and what you put into your body for fuel has a bigger impact than you'd expect at your age.

If you're taking in a surplus of calories from processed, simple carbohydrates on a daily basis, for example, it will contribute to feeling tired and sluggish. Combine that with a lack of exercise and your metabolism can drop like a rock, again leading to decreased energy levels and increased fat stores.

As a junior banker, you're living a sedentary lifestyle sans any exercise. Being sedentary will naturally elevate your resting heart rate and can worsen the effects of stressful situations. It's tough finding time to get consistently to the gym or for a run working analyst hours, and this makes maintaining a healthy diet all the more important.

Try tracking what you eat, at the very least making mental notes, and minimize the number of carbohydrates you consume on a daily basis and restrict the carb's you do eat to complex sources like whole grain rice, sweet potatoes, black beans, etc. It's not as tasty and immediately satisfying (simple carb's digest much quicker and studies have shown they can trigger the release of serotonin). Give a more balanced, healthy meal plan a try for a few weeks and I bet you'll notice the impact on your overall well beeing and energy levels.

Aug 17, 2016
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