Bonus - Salaries when changing jobs

UFOinsider's picture
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IS THIS TRUE?

This post is an addendum to the previous question about salaries when changing jobs: what is the protocol for listing your bonus? Is the below conversation true?

goingbrokeinNYC:
UFOinsider:
manbearpig:
mcnameo:

Wouldn't HR check with your previous employer regarding what your salary was?

Not that they would, but even if they wanted to check, they could only get your base pay. There's a lot of room to play with when you give them your all-in comp (i.e. bonus, overtime, expenses, travel, benefits).

They can't verify the bonus? At all?

Your bonus is one of your most profound secrets. If HR could find out your bonus per annum, they probably also have access to information of your cock size

Comments (19)

Jun 14, 2011

Interested as well...tagged

Jun 14, 2011

I've never ever heard of HR disclosing this type of information to anyone. They will disclose your position, your tenure, and maybe your base salary (even this I don't think is allowed).

Jun 14, 2011

Can't they request a W-2 form? A friends most recent employer asked for his

Jun 14, 2011

I said this in the other thread too - they can request a pay stub, and you can request that they go fuck themselves. Which is exactly what I would do if anyone besides the government or my mortgage broker asked me for a pay stub. That's none of their business, and you're not required to provide it.

HR at your previous employer is required by law to disclose two things and two things only - that you in fact worked there during certain dates, and your job title. Anything more is forbidden by law, and you can actually sue if they disclose it.

Jun 14, 2011
CaptK:

I said this in the other thread too - they can request a pay stub, and you can request that they go fuck themselves. Which is exactly what I would do if anyone besides the government or my mortgage broker asked me for a pay stub. That's none of their business, and you're not required to provide it.

HR at your previous employer is required by law to disclose two things and two things only - that you in fact worked there during certain dates, and your job title. Anything more is forbidden by law, and you can actually sue if they disclose it.

Thank you for this information Capt

The answer to your question is 1) network 2) get involved 3) beef up your resume 4) repeat -happypantsmcgee

WSO is not your personal search function.

Jun 15, 2011
CaptK:

I said this in the other thread too - they can request a pay stub, and you can request that they go fuck themselves. Which is exactly what I would do if anyone besides the government or my mortgage broker asked me for a pay stub. That's none of their business, and you're not required to provide it.

HR at your previous employer is required by law to disclose two things and two things only - that you in fact worked there during certain dates, and your job title. Anything more is forbidden by law, and you can actually sue if they disclose it.

I thought they could also disclose the terms upon which you left the company no? i.e. mutual; terminated with / without cause; etc.

People tend to think life is a race with other people. They don't realize that every moment they spend sprinting towards the finish line is a moment they lose permanently, and a moment closer to their death.

Jun 15, 2011

This is very interesting

Jun 15, 2011
Angelus99:

This is very interesting

AGREE

The gray areas where things aren't too clearly defined offer the best opportunities. I'm curious how far this can be exploited.

Jun 15, 2011

funny you say that if they knew how much your bonus was that theyd know your cock size;

mine are both interrelated. LONG FOR SIIIIIIIIZE

Jun 16, 2011
shorttheworld:

funny you say that if they knew how much your bonus was that theyd know your cock size;

mine are both interrelated. LONG FOR SIIIIIIIIZE

Okay, short.

Jun 15, 2011

I've changed jobs twice and NEVER had an issue with this. At my old firm I was pretty good friends with an HR chick and I asked her about this once.

She claimed that she didn't know the details of the law, but that the policy was to give the new company your employment dates only. I guess they used to give you final title as well, but have tried not to disclose that anymore either. If someone is very persistent they would get your employment dates and possibly your final title, but that was all. At least with this particular small firm, there was a 0% chance any other information was being disclosed.

twitter: @CorpFin_Guy

Jun 15, 2011

I never knew that asking for pay stubs/W2 was illegal practice. That is interesting.
However, if asked for it, i would have no issues providing it since I would be upfront and honest about what my pay is and has been.

Jun 15, 2011

For Bschool, you're required to disclose your compensation, which would include salary, and bonus (cash, equity). If you work for a large company, HR may only disclose position, tenure. In this case, Kroll or whatever verifying service the school uses may ask you for pay stubs. If this were illegal, they wouldn't do it.

I wouldn't rule them out on verifying whatever you've stated. If it's in your application/resume, it's fair game. And, it'll look fishy if you're not helping them verify what you listed in your application.

Jun 15, 2011

For Bschool, you're required to disclose your compensation, which would include salary, and bonus (cash, equity). If you work for a large company, HR may only disclose position, tenure. In this case, Kroll or whatever verifying service the school uses may ask you for pay stubs. If this were illegal, they wouldn't do it.

I wouldn't rule them out on verifying whatever you've stated. If it's in your application/resume, it's fair game. And, it'll look fishy if you're not helping them verify what you listed in your application.

Jun 15, 2011

Scanning this thread, it looks like you guys have it right. Here's the deal. HR at your old company is only supposed to confirm employment (i.e. dates and position). However, the new company can request your W-2s / pay stubs, so playing games with total comp #s won't fly. A warning to those of you thinking about doing this: I heard of an instance recently where the firm rescinded three offers because the individuals lied about their comp . . . one person "only" inflated their pay by $5K, got caught, and offer was taken away. Be careful. Nothing wrong with negotiating as much as you can for yourself, but you look foolish lying and losing an offer.

Jun 16, 2011

Ok, there is a stupid way to do things, and a smart way to do things. If your all-in comp is 100K which includes a base pay of 80K and a bonus of 20K, don't tell the new employer "I have a base salary of 90K and an expected bonus of 25K". Instead, say "depending on bonus and other variable compensation, I'm currently in the 115K ballpark and I'd like to at least remain there".

Then, if they do somehow find out that you only make 100K all in, say you were including the value of your benefits in the number you gave.

Jun 16, 2011

What about long-term, post-grad internships where you're paid as a "Independant Contractor" - will your internship company be able to verify your hourly wage?

Jun 16, 2011

if they made you an offer and rescinded it after you told them to go fly a kite would that not open them up to litigation

Jun 16, 2011
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