hard science majors are objectively vastly superior to liberal arts students

donek221010's picture
Rank: Chimp | -27

We STEM majors actually care about doing well in school and making a living for ourselves. We work hard to learn difficult and marketable skills (the curves are way harsher in engineering courses than in English), and we are intelligent, logical, and disciplined. Time management is way better among STEM majors than humanities majors.

We don't waste our time protesting something political, like the liberal arts majors at my school (UC Berkeley) do. We are smart to realize that yelling loudly and occupying buildings is illogical: the opportunity cost is huge, and the tie would be better spent on doing well in school, gaining marketable skills, and pursuing activities that won't land us in jail.

We know how to work the system and laugh at those liberal arts students who complain about getting shitty jobs and complain about the system being stacked against them, etc. You know, I took out a lot of student loans too, but I'm not worried b/c I know I could easily land a six figure job on Silicon Valley. I bet you many of the people complaining about "gentrification" and "google buses" in San Francisco were lazy in high school and didn't take math and science seriously. Serves them right for not pursuing higher education in a rigorous degree. Many of these protesters don't understand basic microeconomics, that gentrification is happening because demand for housing is exceeding supply, and this is a result of zoning laws. The problem is the government, not "techies."

We are more intelligent about social issues, economics, and politics than many humanities majors. And many STEM majors are also good at writing and public speaking, whereas few humanities majors are strong in math and science. So we're better rounded and more intelligent. STEM majors are in demand, and IT is the future of our de-industrialized economy. Employers are demanding workers who are strong in quantitative skills, and are creative, innovative, and have strong public speaking skills. I can assure you that most English majors would get their butts kicked in intermediate calculus. History majors would get destroyed in organic chemistry, whereas I've aced my way through History and English courses.

Even Presidents Obama and Trump have said we should get more people interested in math and science b/c the value of a liberal arts degree is diminishing. Advanced manufacturing, like prosthetic research, telecommunications, alternative energy, etc, are the industries of the future.

And the funny thing is, b/c we're more intelligent, we STEM majors have a more logical and nuanced perspective of politics than many liberal arts majors. Many don't understand basic logic and economics, which is why they approach every issue from such an emotional vantage point. We transcend emotions and thus are more fit to be political leaders than they are.

It's very easy to bs through humanities courses b/c since there's no concrete answer to any question, you can make up whatever you want. In science, however, you have to be very precise. The answer is either right or wrong. The stakes are a lot higher. If we're designing a bridge, a wrong calculation, however minor it is, could cause the entire bridge to fall apart, resulting in many deaths. Doctors need to learn very precise and specific knowledge when they offer diagnoses and perform surgeries. They can't afford to get one thing wrong. This is why grading in science is so harsh. In contrast, the stakes aren't as high in the humanities and you can afford to get things wrong, and since everything is a shade of gray, you can bs your way through essays and assignments provided that you can write well.

As a result, science is more meritocratic whereas grading in liberal arts courses is very subjective. You just have to agree with your instructors. Also to do well in science, you need to build up a hierarchy of knowledge (algebra 1 to linear algebra, chemistry through organic chemistry, etc), whereas with liberal arts courses, you can get through most of them without any background knowledge. Science builds upon skills and concepts we learn in previous courses.

Humanities courses are only "rigorous" when there's a lot of reading and memorization involved. Basically, it's hard only because you have a lot of busy work. In STEM, there's a lot of busy work in addition to learning a lot of difficult concepts at a rapid pace. Our tests don't require you to simply regurgitate material you memorized: they require you to internalize the concepts and use your brain to apply them to unconventional situations. Honestly, it's not uncommon for us to study 7-8 hours a day, and sometimes much more if we have a project. In comparison, humanities majors have a lot of free time. STEM encourages students to build up their mental chops, which makes us very marketable. Humanities majors only know how to recite facts. In STEM, you can't just be hard working: you also have to be SMART to survive.

The only liberal arts majors I respect are philosophy and economics. Economics is very rigorous on a mathematical level, and many philosophers were also mathematicians. Everything else is pretty much bs.
Also math and engineering majors tend to also kick ass on various graduate school admissions tests, like the GRE, GMAT, and LSAT. Look that up. It's a fact that math is more rigorous than humanities. And people who are competent in math (whether or not they like doing math) are superior intellectually to those who aren't.
I think humanities majors have NO right to complain about poor job prospects because they willingly CHOSE a major that isn't marketable.

Our economy is undergoing de-industrialization and structural shift, meaning that most future jobs will be in the service sector. These jobs require people who are competent quantitatively.

There is excess of supply of English majors than there is demand for them. It's the opposite in IT: many companies are even sponsoring apprenticeships where they train community college students in tech skills.
People should suck it up and take harder classes if they want a job. It's fine to take English or History classes for fun or for a minor, but treat it like a hobby. Don't major in it if you know that you can't get a good job when you graduate in it. Is someone who plays music for fun inferior to a music major? I think not.

Therefore major in a science subject, and take humanities courses for fun if you like learning those subjects. I'm saying this b/c most of the time, even humanities majors don't find jobs that they find enjoyable. So better to find a job you don't like that pays well than a job you don't like that doesn't pay well. So suck it up and major in engineering.

Comments (17)

Jul 15, 2017

I'm an upcoming CS major and will say that I can't interpret Shakespeare's pieces to save my life...but will be able to solve real world problems :)

+1 , I also hope you consider us Engineers as well :)

Best Response
Jul 15, 2017

stop trying to affirm your ego with these long ass posts

    • 5
Jul 15, 2017

I'm a math major and while I agree with a few things you said, my writing is pretty terrible and so is yours. Being able to write how history/English majors do would be hugely beneficial. Being technically/logically superior only gets you so far, then I'd say communication becomes more important, which is something myself and tons of my STEM peers definately lack.

You say take English/history for fun. I don't get it. They develop different parts of you. I haven't learned anything applicable in my math major, but it's helped me think logically through problems and changed how I look at things. English/history help how you communicate and argue your point (aka sales) which is also extremely important. Both majors don't teach you any useful material, but rather develop your mind in certain ways and both add value.

    • 1
    • 1
Funniest
Jul 15, 2017

If you were really that superior you wouldn't be ranting on WSO. Stem majors often have the inability to communicate others because of high levels of autism. You seem like one of them.

    • 3
Jul 15, 2017

Didn't read the post, but even the phrase "objectively vastly superior" makes you sound autistic.

    • 1
Jul 15, 2017

Why aren't you certified anymore :-) ?

    • 1
Jul 16, 2017

Being certified is MAINSTREAM and DUMB.

Jul 15, 2017
donek221010:

We STEM majors actually care about doing well in school and making a living for ourselves. We work hard to learn difficult and marketable skills (the curves are way harsher in engineering courses than in English), and we are intelligent, logical, and disciplined. Time management is way better among STEM majors than humanities majors.

We don't waste our time protesting something political, like the liberal arts majors at my school (UC Berkeley) do. We are smart to realize that yelling loudly and occupying buildings is illogical: the opportunity cost is huge, and the tie would be better spent on doing well in school, gaining marketable skills, and pursuing activities that won't land us in jail.

We know how to work the system and laugh at those liberal arts students who complain about getting shitty jobs and complain about the system being stacked against them, etc. You know, I took out a lot of student loans too, but I'm not worried b/c I know I could easily land a six figure job on Silicon Valley. I bet you many of the people complaining about "gentrification" and "google buses" in San Francisco were lazy in high school and didn't take math and science seriously. Serves them right for not pursuing higher education in a rigorous degree. Many of these protesters don't understand basic microeconomics, that gentrification is happening because demand for housing is exceeding supply, and this is a result of zoning laws. The problem is the government, not "techies."

We are more intelligent about social issues, economics, and politics than many humanities majors. And many STEM majors are also good at writing and public speaking, whereas few humanities majors are strong in math and science. So we're better rounded and more intelligent. STEM majors are in demand, and IT is the future of our de-industrialized economy. Employers are demanding workers who are strong in quantitative skills, and are creative, innovative, and have strong public speaking skills. I can assure you that most English majors would get their butts kicked in intermediate calculus. History majors would get destroyed in organic chemistry, whereas I've aced my way through History and English courses.

Even Presidents Obama and Trump have said we should get more people interested in math and science b/c the value of a liberal arts degree is diminishing. Advanced manufacturing, like prosthetic research, telecommunications, alternative energy, etc, are the industries of the future.

And the funny thing is, b/c we're more intelligent, we STEM majors have a more logical and nuanced perspective of politics than many liberal arts majors. Many don't understand basic logic and economics, which is why they approach every issue from such an emotional vantage point. We transcend emotions and thus are more fit to be political leaders than they are.

It's very easy to bs through humanities courses b/c since there's no concrete answer to any question, you can make up whatever you want. In science, however, you have to be very precise. The answer is either right or wrong. The stakes are a lot higher. If we're designing a bridge, a wrong calculation, however minor it is, could cause the entire bridge to fall apart, resulting in many deaths. Doctors need to learn very precise and specific knowledge when they offer diagnoses and perform surgeries. They can't afford to get one thing wrong. This is why grading in science is so harsh. In contrast, the stakes aren't as high in the humanities and you can afford to get things wrong, and since everything is a shade of gray, you can bs your way through essays and assignments provided that you can write well.

As a result, science is more meritocratic whereas grading in liberal arts courses is very subjective. You just have to agree with your instructors. Also to do well in science, you need to build up a hierarchy of knowledge (algebra 1 to linear algebra, chemistry through organic chemistry, etc), whereas with liberal arts courses, you can get through most of them without any background knowledge. Science builds upon skills and concepts we learn in previous courses.

Humanities courses are only "rigorous" when there's a lot of reading and memorization involved. Basically, it's hard only because you have a lot of busy work. In STEM, there's a lot of busy work in addition to learning a lot of difficult concepts at a rapid pace. Our tests don't require you to simply regurgitate material you memorized: they require you to internalize the concepts and use your brain to apply them to unconventional situations. Honestly, it's not uncommon for us to study 7-8 hours a day, and sometimes much more if we have a project. In comparison, humanities majors have a lot of free time. STEM encourages students to build up their mental chops, which makes us very marketable. Humanities majors only know how to recite facts. In STEM, you can't just be hard working: you also have to be SMART to survive.

The only liberal arts majors I respect are philosophy and economics. Economics is very rigorous on a mathematical level, and many philosophers were also mathematicians. Everything else is pretty much bs.
Also math and engineering majors tend to also kick ass on various graduate school admissions tests, like the GRE, GMAT, and LSAT. Look that up. It's a fact that math is more rigorous than humanities. And people who are competent in math (whether or not they like doing math) are superior intellectually to those who aren't.
I think humanities majors have NO right to complain about poor job prospects because they willingly CHOSE a major that isn't marketable.

Our economy is undergoing de-industrialization and structural shift, meaning that most future jobs will be in the service sector. These jobs require people who are competent quantitatively.

There is excess of supply of English majors than there is demand for them. It's the opposite in IT: many companies are even sponsoring apprenticeships where they train community college students in tech skills.
People should suck it up and take harder classes if they want a job. It's fine to take English or History classes for fun or for a minor, but treat it like a hobby. Don't major in it if you know that you can't get a good job when you graduate in it. Is someone who plays music for fun inferior to a music major? I think not.

Therefore major in a science subject, and take humanities courses for fun if you like learning those subjects. I'm saying this b/c most of the time, even humanities majors don't find jobs that they find enjoyable. So better to find a job you don't like that pays well than a job you don't like that doesn't pay well. So suck it up and major in engineering.

People who take the LSAT are usually English or History or Poly Sci or Crim Justice majors (or pre-law for schools that have that).

A lawyer isn't going to get an engineering degree. There are plenty of History majors with 99 percentile LSAT.

Oh, but you're still in college and don't know jack.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Jul 15, 2017
donek221010:

We STEM majors actually care about doing well in school and making a living for ourselves. We work hard to learn difficult and marketable skills (the curves are way harsher in engineering courses than in English), and we are intelligent, logical, and disciplined. Time management is way better among STEM majors than humanities majors.

We don't waste our time protesting something political, like the liberal arts majors at my school (UC Berkeley) do. We are smart to realize that yelling loudly and occupying buildings is illogical: the opportunity cost is huge, and the tie would be better spent on doing well in school, gaining marketable skills, and pursuing activities that won't land us in jail.

We know how to work the system and laugh at those liberal arts students who complain about getting shitty jobs and complain about the system being stacked against them, etc. You know, I took out a lot of student loans too, but I'm not worried b/c I know I could easily land a six figure job on Silicon Valley. I bet you many of the people complaining about "gentrification" and "google buses" in San Francisco were lazy in high school and didn't take math and science seriously. Serves them right for not pursuing higher education in a rigorous degree. Many of these protesters don't understand basic microeconomics, that gentrification is happening because demand for housing is exceeding supply, and this is a result of zoning laws. The problem is the government, not "techies."

We are more intelligent about social issues, economics, and politics than many humanities majors. And many STEM majors are also good at writing and public speaking, whereas few humanities majors are strong in math and science. So we're better rounded and more intelligent. STEM majors are in demand, and IT is the future of our de-industrialized economy. Employers are demanding workers who are strong in quantitative skills, and are creative, innovative, and have strong public speaking skills. I can assure you that most English majors would get their butts kicked in intermediate calculus. History majors would get destroyed in organic chemistry, whereas I've aced my way through History and English courses.

Even Presidents Obama and Trump have said we should get more people interested in math and science b/c the value of a liberal arts degree is diminishing. Advanced manufacturing, like prosthetic research, telecommunications, alternative energy, etc, are the industries of the future.

And the funny thing is, b/c we're more intelligent, we STEM majors have a more logical and nuanced perspective of politics than many liberal arts majors. Many don't understand basic logic and economics, which is why they approach every issue from such an emotional vantage point. We transcend emotions and thus are more fit to be political leaders than they are.

It's very easy to bs through humanities courses b/c since there's no concrete answer to any question, you can make up whatever you want. In science, however, you have to be very precise. The answer is either right or wrong. The stakes are a lot higher. If we're designing a bridge, a wrong calculation, however minor it is, could cause the entire bridge to fall apart, resulting in many deaths. Doctors need to learn very precise and specific knowledge when they offer diagnoses and perform surgeries. They can't afford to get one thing wrong. This is why grading in science is so harsh. In contrast, the stakes aren't as high in the humanities and you can afford to get things wrong, and since everything is a shade of gray, you can bs your way through essays and assignments provided that you can write well.

As a result, science is more meritocratic whereas grading in liberal arts courses is very subjective. You just have to agree with your instructors. Also to do well in science, you need to build up a hierarchy of knowledge (algebra 1 to linear algebra, chemistry through organic chemistry, etc), whereas with liberal arts courses, you can get through most of them without any background knowledge. Science builds upon skills and concepts we learn in previous courses.

Humanities courses are only "rigorous" when there's a lot of reading and memorization involved. Basically, it's hard only because you have a lot of busy work. In STEM, there's a lot of busy work in addition to learning a lot of difficult concepts at a rapid pace. Our tests don't require you to simply regurgitate material you memorized: they require you to internalize the concepts and use your brain to apply them to unconventional situations. Honestly, it's not uncommon for us to study 7-8 hours a day, and sometimes much more if we have a project. In comparison, humanities majors have a lot of free time. STEM encourages students to build up their mental chops, which makes us very marketable. Humanities majors only know how to recite facts. In STEM, you can't just be hard working: you also have to be SMART to survive.

The only liberal arts majors I respect are philosophy and economics. Economics is very rigorous on a mathematical level, and many philosophers were also mathematicians. Everything else is pretty much bs.
Also math and engineering majors tend to also kick ass on various graduate school admissions tests, like the GRE, GMAT, and LSAT. Look that up. It's a fact that math is more rigorous than humanities. And people who are competent in math (whether or not they like doing math) are superior intellectually to those who aren't.
I think humanities majors have NO right to complain about poor job prospects because they willingly CHOSE a major that isn't marketable.

Our economy is undergoing de-industrialization and structural shift, meaning that most future jobs will be in the service sector. These jobs require people who are competent quantitatively.

There is excess of supply of English majors than there is demand for them. It's the opposite in IT: many companies are even sponsoring apprenticeships where they train community college students in tech skills.
People should suck it up and take harder classes if they want a job. It's fine to take English or History classes for fun or for a minor, but treat it like a hobby. Don't major in it if you know that you can't get a good job when you graduate in it. Is someone who plays music for fun inferior to a music major? I think not.

Therefore major in a science subject, and take humanities courses for fun if you like learning those subjects. I'm saying this b/c most of the time, even humanities majors don't find jobs that they find enjoyable. So better to find a job you don't like that pays well than a job you don't like that doesn't pay well. So suck it up and major in engineering.

"Time management is way better among STEM majors than humanities majors."

Stop making generalizations. This cannot be quantified very easily. Are you going to compare the 4.0 BA student to the 2.5 BS student? Really dude?

The 4.0 BA student from an Ivy will probably land some consulting job and get higher pay than the 2.5 'good to go' engineer.

Get real bro.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Jul 15, 2017
donek221010:

We STEM majors actually care about doing well in school and making a living for ourselves. We work hard to learn difficult and marketable skills (the curves are way harsher in engineering courses than in English), and we are intelligent, logical, and disciplined. Time management is way better among STEM majors than humanities majors.

We don't waste our time protesting something political, like the liberal arts majors at my school (UC Berkeley) do. We are smart to realize that yelling loudly and occupying buildings is illogical: the opportunity cost is huge, and the tie would be better spent on doing well in school, gaining marketable skills, and pursuing activities that won't land us in jail.

We know how to work the system and laugh at those liberal arts students who complain about getting shitty jobs and complain about the system being stacked against them, etc. You know, I took out a lot of student loans too, but I'm not worried b/c I know I could easily land a six figure job on Silicon Valley. I bet you many of the people complaining about "gentrification" and "google buses" in San Francisco were lazy in high school and didn't take math and science seriously. Serves them right for not pursuing higher education in a rigorous degree. Many of these protesters don't understand basic microeconomics, that gentrification is happening because demand for housing is exceeding supply, and this is a result of zoning laws. The problem is the government, not "techies."

We are more intelligent about social issues, economics, and politics than many humanities majors. And many STEM majors are also good at writing and public speaking, whereas few humanities majors are strong in math and science. So we're better rounded and more intelligent. STEM majors are in demand, and IT is the future of our de-industrialized economy. Employers are demanding workers who are strong in quantitative skills, and are creative, innovative, and have strong public speaking skills. I can assure you that most English majors would get their butts kicked in intermediate calculus. History majors would get destroyed in organic chemistry, whereas I've aced my way through History and English courses.

Even Presidents Obama and Trump have said we should get more people interested in math and science b/c the value of a liberal arts degree is diminishing. Advanced manufacturing, like prosthetic research, telecommunications, alternative energy, etc, are the industries of the future.

And the funny thing is, b/c we're more intelligent, we STEM majors have a more logical and nuanced perspective of politics than many liberal arts majors. Many don't understand basic logic and economics, which is why they approach every issue from such an emotional vantage point. We transcend emotions and thus are more fit to be political leaders than they are.

It's very easy to bs through humanities courses b/c since there's no concrete answer to any question, you can make up whatever you want. In science, however, you have to be very precise. The answer is either right or wrong. The stakes are a lot higher. If we're designing a bridge, a wrong calculation, however minor it is, could cause the entire bridge to fall apart, resulting in many deaths. Doctors need to learn very precise and specific knowledge when they offer diagnoses and perform surgeries. They can't afford to get one thing wrong. This is why grading in science is so harsh. In contrast, the stakes aren't as high in the humanities and you can afford to get things wrong, and since everything is a shade of gray, you can bs your way through essays and assignments provided that you can write well.

As a result, science is more meritocratic whereas grading in liberal arts courses is very subjective. You just have to agree with your instructors. Also to do well in science, you need to build up a hierarchy of knowledge (algebra 1 to linear algebra, chemistry through organic chemistry, etc), whereas with liberal arts courses, you can get through most of them without any background knowledge. Science builds upon skills and concepts we learn in previous courses.

Humanities courses are only "rigorous" when there's a lot of reading and memorization involved. Basically, it's hard only because you have a lot of busy work. In STEM, there's a lot of busy work in addition to learning a lot of difficult concepts at a rapid pace. Our tests don't require you to simply regurgitate material you memorized: they require you to internalize the concepts and use your brain to apply them to unconventional situations. Honestly, it's not uncommon for us to study 7-8 hours a day, and sometimes much more if we have a project. In comparison, humanities majors have a lot of free time. STEM encourages students to build up their mental chops, which makes us very marketable. Humanities majors only know how to recite facts. In STEM, you can't just be hard working: you also have to be SMART to survive.

The only liberal arts majors I respect are philosophy and economics. Economics is very rigorous on a mathematical level, and many philosophers were also mathematicians. Everything else is pretty much bs.
Also math and engineering majors tend to also kick ass on various graduate school admissions tests, like the GRE, GMAT, and LSAT. Look that up. It's a fact that math is more rigorous than humanities. And people who are competent in math (whether or not they like doing math) are superior intellectually to those who aren't.
I think humanities majors have NO right to complain about poor job prospects because they willingly CHOSE a major that isn't marketable.

Our economy is undergoing de-industrialization and structural shift, meaning that most future jobs will be in the service sector. These jobs require people who are competent quantitatively.

There is excess of supply of English majors than there is demand for them. It's the opposite in IT: many companies are even sponsoring apprenticeships where they train community college students in tech skills.
People should suck it up and take harder classes if they want a job. It's fine to take English or History classes for fun or for a minor, but treat it like a hobby. Don't major in it if you know that you can't get a good job when you graduate in it. Is someone who plays music for fun inferior to a music major? I think not.

Therefore major in a science subject, and take humanities courses for fun if you like learning those subjects. I'm saying this b/c most of the time, even humanities majors don't find jobs that they find enjoyable. So better to find a job you don't like that pays well than a job you don't like that doesn't pay well. So suck it up and major in engineering.

"And many STEM majors are also good at writing and public speaking,"

nope nope nope

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Jul 15, 2017
donek221010:

We STEM majors actually care about doing well in school and making a living for ourselves. We work hard to learn difficult and marketable skills (the curves are way harsher in engineering courses than in English), and we are intelligent, logical, and disciplined. Time management is way better among STEM majors than humanities majors.

We don't waste our time protesting something political, like the liberal arts majors at my school (UC Berkeley) do. We are smart to realize that yelling loudly and occupying buildings is illogical: the opportunity cost is huge, and the tie would be better spent on doing well in school, gaining marketable skills, and pursuing activities that won't land us in jail.

We know how to work the system and laugh at those liberal arts students who complain about getting shitty jobs and complain about the system being stacked against them, etc. You know, I took out a lot of student loans too, but I'm not worried b/c I know I could easily land a six figure job on Silicon Valley. I bet you many of the people complaining about "gentrification" and "google buses" in San Francisco were lazy in high school and didn't take math and science seriously. Serves them right for not pursuing higher education in a rigorous degree. Many of these protesters don't understand basic microeconomics, that gentrification is happening because demand for housing is exceeding supply, and this is a result of zoning laws. The problem is the government, not "techies."

We are more intelligent about social issues, economics, and politics than many humanities majors. And many STEM majors are also good at writing and public speaking, whereas few humanities majors are strong in math and science. So we're better rounded and more intelligent. STEM majors are in demand, and IT is the future of our de-industrialized economy. Employers are demanding workers who are strong in quantitative skills, and are creative, innovative, and have strong public speaking skills. I can assure you that most English majors would get their butts kicked in intermediate calculus. History majors would get destroyed in organic chemistry, whereas I've aced my way through History and English courses.

Even Presidents Obama and Trump have said we should get more people interested in math and science b/c the value of a liberal arts degree is diminishing. Advanced manufacturing, like prosthetic research, telecommunications, alternative energy, etc, are the industries of the future.

And the funny thing is, b/c we're more intelligent, we STEM majors have a more logical and nuanced perspective of politics than many liberal arts majors. Many don't understand basic logic and economics, which is why they approach every issue from such an emotional vantage point. We transcend emotions and thus are more fit to be political leaders than they are.

It's very easy to bs through humanities courses b/c since there's no concrete answer to any question, you can make up whatever you want. In science, however, you have to be very precise. The answer is either right or wrong. The stakes are a lot higher. If we're designing a bridge, a wrong calculation, however minor it is, could cause the entire bridge to fall apart, resulting in many deaths. Doctors need to learn very precise and specific knowledge when they offer diagnoses and perform surgeries. They can't afford to get one thing wrong. This is why grading in science is so harsh. In contrast, the stakes aren't as high in the humanities and you can afford to get things wrong, and since everything is a shade of gray, you can bs your way through essays and assignments provided that you can write well.

As a result, science is more meritocratic whereas grading in liberal arts courses is very subjective. You just have to agree with your instructors. Also to do well in science, you need to build up a hierarchy of knowledge (algebra 1 to linear algebra, chemistry through organic chemistry, etc), whereas with liberal arts courses, you can get through most of them without any background knowledge. Science builds upon skills and concepts we learn in previous courses.

Humanities courses are only "rigorous" when there's a lot of reading and memorization involved. Basically, it's hard only because you have a lot of busy work. In STEM, there's a lot of busy work in addition to learning a lot of difficult concepts at a rapid pace. Our tests don't require you to simply regurgitate material you memorized: they require you to internalize the concepts and use your brain to apply them to unconventional situations. Honestly, it's not uncommon for us to study 7-8 hours a day, and sometimes much more if we have a project. In comparison, humanities majors have a lot of free time. STEM encourages students to build up their mental chops, which makes us very marketable. Humanities majors only know how to recite facts. In STEM, you can't just be hard working: you also have to be SMART to survive.

The only liberal arts majors I respect are philosophy and economics. Economics is very rigorous on a mathematical level, and many philosophers were also mathematicians. Everything else is pretty much bs.
Also math and engineering majors tend to also kick ass on various graduate school admissions tests, like the GRE, GMAT, and LSAT. Look that up. It's a fact that math is more rigorous than humanities. And people who are competent in math (whether or not they like doing math) are superior intellectually to those who aren't.
I think humanities majors have NO right to complain about poor job prospects because they willingly CHOSE a major that isn't marketable.

Our economy is undergoing de-industrialization and structural shift, meaning that most future jobs will be in the service sector. These jobs require people who are competent quantitatively.

There is excess of supply of English majors than there is demand for them. It's the opposite in IT: many companies are even sponsoring apprenticeships where they train community college students in tech skills.
People should suck it up and take harder classes if they want a job. It's fine to take English or History classes for fun or for a minor, but treat it like a hobby. Don't major in it if you know that you can't get a good job when you graduate in it. Is someone who plays music for fun inferior to a music major? I think not.

Therefore major in a science subject, and take humanities courses for fun if you like learning those subjects. I'm saying this b/c most of the time, even humanities majors don't find jobs that they find enjoyable. So better to find a job you don't like that pays well than a job you don't like that doesn't pay well. So suck it up and major in engineering.

"And the funny thing is, b/c we're more intelligent, we STEM majors"

.......

So now you think if one is a STEM major, they are intelligent?

bro, you're proving you're not intelligent

Your logic is horrendous.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Jul 15, 2017
donek221010:

We STEM majors actually care about doing well in school and making a living for ourselves. We work hard to learn difficult and marketable skills (the curves are way harsher in engineering courses than in English), and we are intelligent, logical, and disciplined. Time management is way better among STEM majors than humanities majors.

We don't waste our time protesting something political, like the liberal arts majors at my school (UC Berkeley) do. We are smart to realize that yelling loudly and occupying buildings is illogical: the opportunity cost is huge, and the tie would be better spent on doing well in school, gaining marketable skills, and pursuing activities that won't land us in jail.

We know how to work the system and laugh at those liberal arts students who complain about getting shitty jobs and complain about the system being stacked against them, etc. You know, I took out a lot of student loans too, but I'm not worried b/c I know I could easily land a six figure job on Silicon Valley. I bet you many of the people complaining about "gentrification" and "google buses" in San Francisco were lazy in high school and didn't take math and science seriously. Serves them right for not pursuing higher education in a rigorous degree. Many of these protesters don't understand basic microeconomics, that gentrification is happening because demand for housing is exceeding supply, and this is a result of zoning laws. The problem is the government, not "techies."

We are more intelligent about social issues, economics, and politics than many humanities majors. And many STEM majors are also good at writing and public speaking, whereas few humanities majors are strong in math and science. So we're better rounded and more intelligent. STEM majors are in demand, and IT is the future of our de-industrialized economy. Employers are demanding workers who are strong in quantitative skills, and are creative, innovative, and have strong public speaking skills. I can assure you that most English majors would get their butts kicked in intermediate calculus. History majors would get destroyed in organic chemistry, whereas I've aced my way through History and English courses.

Even Presidents Obama and Trump have said we should get more people interested in math and science b/c the value of a liberal arts degree is diminishing. Advanced manufacturing, like prosthetic research, telecommunications, alternative energy, etc, are the industries of the future.

And the funny thing is, b/c we're more intelligent, we STEM majors have a more logical and nuanced perspective of politics than many liberal arts majors. Many don't understand basic logic and economics, which is why they approach every issue from such an emotional vantage point. We transcend emotions and thus are more fit to be political leaders than they are.

It's very easy to bs through humanities courses b/c since there's no concrete answer to any question, you can make up whatever you want. In science, however, you have to be very precise. The answer is either right or wrong. The stakes are a lot higher. If we're designing a bridge, a wrong calculation, however minor it is, could cause the entire bridge to fall apart, resulting in many deaths. Doctors need to learn very precise and specific knowledge when they offer diagnoses and perform surgeries. They can't afford to get one thing wrong. This is why grading in science is so harsh. In contrast, the stakes aren't as high in the humanities and you can afford to get things wrong, and since everything is a shade of gray, you can bs your way through essays and assignments provided that you can write well.

As a result, science is more meritocratic whereas grading in liberal arts courses is very subjective. You just have to agree with your instructors. Also to do well in science, you need to build up a hierarchy of knowledge (algebra 1 to linear algebra, chemistry through organic chemistry, etc), whereas with liberal arts courses, you can get through most of them without any background knowledge. Science builds upon skills and concepts we learn in previous courses.

Humanities courses are only "rigorous" when there's a lot of reading and memorization involved. Basically, it's hard only because you have a lot of busy work. In STEM, there's a lot of busy work in addition to learning a lot of difficult concepts at a rapid pace. Our tests don't require you to simply regurgitate material you memorized: they require you to internalize the concepts and use your brain to apply them to unconventional situations. Honestly, it's not uncommon for us to study 7-8 hours a day, and sometimes much more if we have a project. In comparison, humanities majors have a lot of free time. STEM encourages students to build up their mental chops, which makes us very marketable. Humanities majors only know how to recite facts. In STEM, you can't just be hard working: you also have to be SMART to survive.

The only liberal arts majors I respect are philosophy and economics. Economics is very rigorous on a mathematical level, and many philosophers were also mathematicians. Everything else is pretty much bs.
Also math and engineering majors tend to also kick ass on various graduate school admissions tests, like the GRE, GMAT, and LSAT. Look that up. It's a fact that math is more rigorous than humanities. And people who are competent in math (whether or not they like doing math) are superior intellectually to those who aren't.
I think humanities majors have NO right to complain about poor job prospects because they willingly CHOSE a major that isn't marketable.

Our economy is undergoing de-industrialization and structural shift, meaning that most future jobs will be in the service sector. These jobs require people who are competent quantitatively.

There is excess of supply of English majors than there is demand for them. It's the opposite in IT: many companies are even sponsoring apprenticeships where they train community college students in tech skills.
People should suck it up and take harder classes if they want a job. It's fine to take English or History classes for fun or for a minor, but treat it like a hobby. Don't major in it if you know that you can't get a good job when you graduate in it. Is someone who plays music for fun inferior to a music major? I think not.

Therefore major in a science subject, and take humanities courses for fun if you like learning those subjects. I'm saying this b/c most of the time, even humanities majors don't find jobs that they find enjoyable. So better to find a job you don't like that pays well than a job you don't like that doesn't pay well. So suck it up and major in engineering.

So bro, let me tell you a story. My roommate in college was a STEM major. Civil Engineering. He talked about how hard it was blah blah blah. Talked about how many jobs there were for engineers and how superior his pay was going to be.

I had a B.S. in business with a higher GPA. I was placed in management consulting.

Guess who started out with a higher salary? Not the STEM major.

A lot of finance people could do STEM but pick business/finance.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Jul 15, 2017

Keep posting on here, I like tearing you to pieces.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Jul 16, 2017

Ppl like you need to keep their head in the books and let the ppl who know how to write persuasively and develop relationships run companies. Go do your homework inbred.

Jul 16, 2017

I majored in a hard science but it was a life science, for the most part useless. Classmates in my major were lame while all the hot girls and fun people were over in advertising and media type of majors. I regret not doing a more fun major, even the finance dudes have way more fun than any of the lame boners in the pre-med course.

All that time spent in the books on a topic where professors were trying to fail you and knowing it would all be useless without medical school or further schooling. My friends in other majors were learning key social skills that would help them progress in life and with people in general.

Also knowing that just having your degree alone will make it tough to get a job. Should have majored in something more fun.

CS and engineering degrees are legit though.

Jul 16, 2017

You should try leaving the library once in awhile to see all the fun with gorgeous women and booze that non-STEM majors have.

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Jul 16, 2017
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