9/8/12

My boyfriend is going to HBS next year (he got admission for this academic year, but deferred till next year because of work) and we're saving up for b-school now. I'm going to transfer to my firm's Boston office. On my income and his savings we could live very comfortably, but since b-school is so expensive most of the money is going into that.

Where do HBS students live to save money but get decent apartments? Most of the people I've spoken to live on campus in dorms, or they live in university housing on Western Ave. But from what I've heard, it's a very "campus" feel and it's not like you have interesting restaurants or music venues right on your doorstep. We're moving from New York, so we definitely don't want to constantly be in a campus environment.

Are there places in Allston that are affordable and where you can find decent-sized 1-bedroom apartments? Or is it just a better deal to live in university housing? Do people tend to prefer Allston or Cambridge?

Comments (53)

9/7/12

Well, we know who your boyfriend isn't.

Financial Modeling

9/7/12
trazer985:

Well, we know who your boyfriend isn't.

hahahaa

better marry him quickly without a prenup, after HBS he will be running off with 10 models.

9/7/12
trazer985:

Well, we know who your boyfriend isn't.

I lol'ed

Here to learn and hopefully pass on some knowledge as well. SB if I helped.

9/7/12
biglawgirlfriend:

My boyfriend is going to HBS next year (he got admission for this academic year, but deferred till next year because of work) and we're saving up for b-school now. I'm going to transfer to my firm's Boston office. On my income and his savings we could live very comfortably, but since b-school is so expensive most of the money is going into that.

Where do HBS students live to save money but get decent apartments? Most of the people I've spoken to live on campus in dorms, or they live in university housing on Western Ave. But from what I've heard, it's a very "campus" feel and it's not like you have interesting restaurants or music venues right on your doorstep. We're moving from New York, so we definitely don't want to constantly be in a campus environment.

Are there places in Allston that are affordable and where you can find decent-sized 1-bedroom apartments? Or is it just a better deal to live in university housing? Do people tend to prefer Allston or Cambridge?

This is a tough one because HBS is a bit isolated...and when it gets cold, you (or your BF) doesnt want to be way off campus away from fun events/parties. I'd suggest right across bridge in Cambridge so you have Harvard Square close by, but that might make it really hard for you to get into downtown unless you are on Red Line?

Where is your Boston office?...that will likely determine what T line you want to be on (unless you're driving?)

Also, look forward to seeing you on jdOasis.com with a username like that :-)

-Patrick

9/7/12
WallStreetOasis.com:
biglawgirlfriend:

My boyfriend is going to HBS next year (he got admission for this academic year, but deferred till next year because of work) and we're saving up for b-school now. I'm going to transfer to my firm's Boston office. On my income and his savings we could live very comfortably, but since b-school is so expensive most of the money is going into that.

Where do HBS students live to save money but get decent apartments? Most of the people I've spoken to live on campus in dorms, or they live in university housing on Western Ave. But from what I've heard, it's a very "campus" feel and it's not like you have interesting restaurants or music venues right on your doorstep. We're moving from New York, so we definitely don't want to constantly be in a campus environment.

Are there places in Allston that are affordable and where you can find decent-sized 1-bedroom apartments? Or is it just a better deal to live in university housing? Do people tend to prefer Allston or Cambridge?

This is a tough one because HBS is a bit isolated...and when it gets cold, you (or your BF) doesnt want to be way off campus away from fun events/parties. I'd suggest right across bridge in Cambridge so you have Harvard Square close by, but that might make it really hard for you to get into downtown unless you are on Red Line?

Where is your Boston office?...that will likely determine what T line you want to be on (unless you're driving?)

Also, look forward to seeing you on jdOasis.com with a username like that :-)

-Patrick

I don't want to get too specific, but my office would be in downtown Boston - which is anywhere from Back Bay to the Seaport district. Yep it's a law firm, funnily enough though I never really looked at jdoasis.

While I don't use a car in New York, I was going to get one for Boston so I think that won't be an issue. I'm guessing parking in Boston is like $180-$200 a month if you're in Cambridge/Allston/Brookline?

9/7/12

Yeah - I guess that got off track

9/7/12
<a href=//www.wallstreetoasis.com/company/goldman-sachs rel=nofollow>GS</a>:

I thought Patrick was actually. There's an ACTUAL JDOasis? There are actually people who sit around talking about how to get into law school? I thought the answer was obvious. Law school is a numbers game - GPA + LSAT - That's it.

4.0 HYPS + 180 = HLS/YLS . And too far away from that equals neither.

Not just law school...also about different legal careers and all things blawggish. Big Law, public interest, small law, etc...actually not a ton out there about the different options and definitely not as strong a community on the legal side that bridges the gap between law school + law career. That's where JDO comes in.

We already have a nice line-up of bloggers that are putting out great content and we are seeing some nice traction now...still not over the hump yet, but we are in it for the long haul.

9/7/12
WallStreetOasis.com:
<a href=//www.wallstreetoasis.com/company/goldman-sachs rel=nofollow>GS</a>:

I thought Patrick was actually. There's an ACTUAL JDOasis? There are actually people who sit around talking about how to get into law school? I thought the answer was obvious. Law school is a numbers game - GPA + LSAT - That's it.

4.0 HYPS + 180 = HLS/YLS . And too far away from that equals neither.

Not just law school...also about different legal careers and all things blawggish. Big Law, public interest, small law, etc...actually not a ton out there about the different options and definitely not as strong a community on the legal side that bridges the gap between law school + law career. That's where JDO comes in.

We already have a nice line-up of bloggers that are putting out great content and we are seeing some nice traction now...still not over the hump yet, but we are in it for the long haul.

Ah I see. I just visited. You're right - it's a bit sparse right now. I hope it takes off like WSO. You could port this model to a lot of professions actually. Hell , you could make a good tech startup board where people bounce ideas off each other.

But come on , confusing JDOasis and Jdate was a hilarious freudian slip!

9/7/12

There has to be like 430 better places to ask this question. You might have ~5 people here that went to HBS and would be able to help you. This seems more like a cry for attention than anything.

If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

9/7/12
happypantsmcgee:

There has to be like 430 better places to ask this question. You might have ~5 people here that went to HBS and would be able to help you. This seems more like a cry for attention than anything.

I dunno, this is like the only Internet forum I visit frequently (apart from Top Law Schools, which is just a whirlpool of neurotic madness). Or do you mean I should just stick to asking people I know in real life? I do that too, but I really don't know that many people at HBS.

9/7/12
biglawgirlfriend:
happypantsmcgee:

There has to be like 430 better places to ask this question. You might have ~5 people here that went to HBS and would be able to help you. This seems more like a cry for attention than anything.

I dunno, this is like the only Internet forum I visit frequently (apart from Top Law Schools, which is just a whirlpool of neurotic madness). Or do you mean I should just stick to asking people I know in real life? I do that too, but I really don't know that many people at HBS.

I was thinking you should ask people that are familiar with Boston. I guess this isnt as bad an option as I initially thought though an apt broker or similar in Boston would be more helpful.

If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

9/7/12
biglawgirlfriend:
happypantsmcgee:

There has to be like 430 better places to ask this question. You might have ~5 people here that went to HBS and would be able to help you. This seems more like a cry for attention than anything.

I dunno, this is like the only Internet forum I visit frequently (apart from Top Law Schools, which is just a whirlpool of neurotic madness). Or do you mean I should just stick to asking people I know in real life? I do that too, but I really don't know that many people at HBS.

Be careful about where your info comes from -- people from HLS typically live in a completely different neighborhood than people from HBS.

9/7/12

So I guess big law girl and banker relationships can lost.

Never been to Boston- so no help.

9/7/12

OK currently living in Boston so I can offer my two-cents. Patrick was right and basically it depends where your office is and how close you want to be to HBS vs. your office. If you are using mainly the T/bus then I would suggest Porter Square area. Its less money than Harvard and you can catch the 77 bus to the bridge and then cross the bridge to HBS. It is also on the red line which serves most of the Cambridge/Boston area that people want to be in (MIT, Downtown, Financial District).

Hope this helps

9/7/12

Also if you are getting a car, parking on street in Cambridge is 75 a year

9/7/12
hockey1316:

Also if you are getting a car, parking on street in Cambridge is 75 a year

Thats fuckin CHEAP.

9/7/12
TheKid1:
hockey1316:

Also if you are getting a car, parking on street in Cambridge is 75 a year

Thats fuckin CHEAP.

does not include ice pick and shovel to get your car out from behind a 7 foot bunker of snow....

9/10/12
WallStreetOasis.com:
TheKid1:
hockey1316:

Also if you are getting a car, parking on street in Cambridge is 75 a year

Thats fuckin CHEAP.

does not include ice pick and shovel to get your car out from behind a 7 foot bunker of snow....

Haha, ever since I moved to the suburbs of NYC, I have had to shovel to get my car, but prob nothing as bad as in Boston.

Financial Modeling

9/7/12

touche... but with global warming and barely any snow last winter in boston ill take my chances...plus its free exercise every morning so you save on the gym too !

9/10/12

Cambridge

Or the Mandarin Oriental

9/10/12

shorttheworld:

Or the Mandarin Oriental


if you're SX you get a discount i hear

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My story | My Linkedin

9/10/12

AndyLouis:

shorttheworld:

Or the Mandarin Oriental

if you're SX you get a discount i hear

highly doubt... broke mexican from texas

9/10/12

Hey guys, i'm in Section X. We like to have really awesome parties at the Mandarin.

This Friday we're having a GTA V party. Got popcorn, soda, everything.

9/10/12

I'd live in Beacon Hill and take the red line to Cambridge.

"I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is that moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle - victorious." "

9/10/12

For a more serious answer...

A good number of HBS students live in an apartment complex called Peabody Terrace. If you would like to live on campus and be close to everything, that would be one of my top recommendations.

If you prefer to be off campus, you may be able to find housing near Porter Square (which is one subway stop away from the Harvard subway station on the Red Line). There is also a lot of housing available all over Cambridge. Craigslist may be a good place to find some bargains.

If you are able to get it, however, my top recommendation would be to apply to be a resident tutor at one of Harvard's undergraduate dormitories (known as "Houses").

A "resident tutor" is similar to what an RA is at other colleges, except that resident tutors are not undergraduates (usually graduate students or post-docs). These positions are competitive, but if you can get one of them, the perks are your room and board will be covered for your entire 2 years at HBS.

You will be living inside a dormitory suite (essentially an oversized undergraduate dormitory) with a private kitchen and private bathroom. Plus, you get free access and use of everything inside the dormitory (e.g. gym, weight-room, grand pianos, snacks, fruit, soda fountain inside dining hall, etc.) In exchange for free room and board, you will be required to serve as a "resident tutor" for the undergraduate students in your dormitory.

Your mileage may vary here, but basically that means you will be responsible for the occasional meeting or two, some admin stuff including taking turns being on evening duty for parties (e.g. making sure students don't get too loud or rowdy when hosting parties) and serving as an academic or career advisor / mentor for undergraduate students.

Low stress, low time commitment (probably 10 hours or less a week, though again, your mileage may vary) and FREE room and board as well as FREE ancillary benefits (e.g. free gym, etc.) means a decent chunk of change saved.

Send me a private message if you have any questions or would like to know more about the resident tutor positions.

-Deo et Patriae

9/10/12

Deo et Patriae:

For a more serious answer...

A good number of HBS students live in an apartment complex called Peabody Terrace. If you would like to live on campus and be close to everything, that would be one of my top recommendations.

If you prefer to be off campus, you may be able to find housing near Porter Square (which is one subway stop away from the Harvard subway station on the Red Line). There is also a lot of housing available all over Cambridge. Craigslist may be a good place to find some bargains.

If you are able to get it, however, my top recommendation would be to apply to be a resident tutor at one of Harvard's undergraduate dormitories (known as "Houses").

A "resident tutor" is similar to what an RA is at other colleges, except that resident tutors are not undergraduates (usually graduate students or post-docs). These positions are competitive, but if you can get one of them, the perks are your room and board will be covered for your entire 2 years at HBS.

You will be living inside a dormitory suite (essentially an oversized undergraduate dormitory) with a private kitchen and private bathroom. Plus, you get free access and use of everything inside the dormitory (e.g. gym, weight-room, grand pianos, snacks, fruit, soda fountain inside dining hall, etc.) In exchange for free room and board, you will be required to serve as a "resident tutor" for the undergraduate students in your dormitory.

Your mileage may vary here, but basically that means you will be responsible for the occasional meeting or two, some admin stuff including taking turns being on evening duty for parties (e.g. making sure students don't get too loud or rowdy when hosting parties) and serving as an academic or career advisor / mentor for undergraduate students.

Low stress, low time commitment (probably 10 hours or less a week, though again, your mileage may vary) and FREE room and board as well as FREE ancillary benefits (e.g. free gym, etc.) means a decent chunk of change saved.

Send me a private message if you have any questions or would like to know more about the resident tutor positions.

-Deo et Patriae

what are the exit ops like for a Resident Tutor?

9/10/12

monty09:

Deo et Patriae:

For a more serious answer...

A good number of HBS students live in an apartment complex called Peabody Terrace. If you would like to live on campus and be close to everything, that would be one of my top recommendations.

If you prefer to be off campus, you may be able to find housing near Porter Square (which is one subway stop away from the Harvard subway station on the Red Line). There is also a lot of housing available all over Cambridge. Craigslist may be a good place to find some bargains.

If you are able to get it, however, my top recommendation would be to apply to be a resident tutor at one of Harvard's undergraduate dormitories (known as "Houses").

A "resident tutor" is similar to what an RA is at other colleges, except that resident tutors are not undergraduates (usually graduate students or post-docs). These positions are competitive, but if you can get one of them, the perks are your room and board will be covered for your entire 2 years at HBS.

You will be living inside a dormitory suite (essentially an oversized undergraduate dormitory) with a private kitchen and private bathroom. Plus, you get free access and use of everything inside the dormitory (e.g. gym, weight-room, grand pianos, snacks, fruit, soda fountain inside dining hall, etc.) In exchange for free room and board, you will be required to serve as a "resident tutor" for the undergraduate students in your dormitory.

Your mileage may vary here, but basically that means you will be responsible for the occasional meeting or two, some admin stuff including taking turns being on evening duty for parties (e.g. making sure students don't get too loud or rowdy when hosting parties) and serving as an academic or career advisor / mentor for undergraduate students.

Low stress, low time commitment (probably 10 hours or less a week, though again, your mileage may vary) and FREE room and board as well as FREE ancillary benefits (e.g. free gym, etc.) means a decent chunk of change saved.

Send me a private message if you have any questions or would like to know more about the resident tutor positions.

-Deo et Patriae

what are the exit ops like for a Resident Tutor?

I'm guessing you are being facetious, but I will answer this question seriously.

Resident Tutors do not have any direct exit ops (at least not any that I am aware of) in the traditional sense of the word, but there are significant benefits including the aforementioned free housing and board (you will be able to eat meals for free inside the dormitory dining hall). In some cases, if you take on additional responsibilities (e.g. librarian, web master, etc.) you will also be given a stipend.

Another benefit which is harder to put a monetary value on is that you get to live amongst some of the brightest undergraduate students in the world, whether it be through playing soccer out on the lawn or discussing business and politics over a meal at the dining hall. Though you might be 5 years, 10 years, of even 15 years older than them, you should not underestimate them, and you will find that on the contrary, there may be many things that you could learn from them. There are boundaries that obviously should not be crossed, but there is also nothing wrong with a resident tutor genuinely befriending an undergraduate student. You never know. One day, that kid who you served as an advisor/mentor for when he was an undergraduate becomes the CEO of a Fortune 500 company. If you kept up the friendship over the years, how would it feel to know that this person was only a phone call or email away?

In that same vein, and let me preface this by saying that I personally do not condone befriending someone solely for leveraging their social capital, keep in mind that there are some kids at Harvard who are EXTREMELY well connected. If you became close to them, helped them out in some way, or even did something as simple as played sports together with them, it could open doors that were previously not there.

Case in point, I know of a resident tutor who became close friends with an undergraduate student 10 years his junior. Turns out the undergraduate student's father was the President and CEO of a major fortune 500 company. Through this connection, the resident tutor was able to get a fast-track interview for an entry level management position and is now a director at the company.

Of course, you cannot really count on things such as this due to the huge level of randomness/chance involved, but it's probably the closet way one could answer the original question about what "exit ops" there are for a Resident Tutor.

Hopefully that helps.

-Deo et Patriae

9/10/12

lol.

9/10/12

Deo et Patriae:

monty09:
Deo et Patriae:

For a more serious answer...

A good number of HBS students live in an apartment complex called Peabody Terrace. If you would like to live on campus and be close to everything, that would be one of my top recommendations.

If you prefer to be off campus, you may be able to find housing near Porter Square (which is one subway stop away from the Harvard subway station on the Red Line). There is also a lot of housing available all over Cambridge. Craigslist may be a good place to find some bargains.

If you are able to get it, however, my top recommendation would be to apply to be a resident tutor at one of Harvard's undergraduate dormitories (known as "Houses").

A "resident tutor" is similar to what an RA is at other colleges, except that resident tutors are not undergraduates (usually graduate students or post-docs). These positions are competitive, but if you can get one of them, the perks are your room and board will be covered for your entire 2 years at HBS.

You will be living inside a dormitory suite (essentially an oversized undergraduate dormitory) with a private kitchen and private bathroom. Plus, you get free access and use of everything inside the dormitory (e.g. gym, weight-room, grand pianos, snacks, fruit, soda fountain inside dining hall, etc.) In exchange for free room and board, you will be required to serve as a "resident tutor" for the undergraduate students in your dormitory.

Your mileage may vary here, but basically that means you will be responsible for the occasional meeting or two, some admin stuff including taking turns being on evening duty for parties (e.g. making sure students don't get too loud or rowdy when hosting parties) and serving as an academic or career advisor / mentor for undergraduate students.

Low stress, low time commitment (probably 10 hours or less a week, though again, your mileage may vary) and FREE room and board as well as FREE ancillary benefits (e.g. free gym, etc.) means a decent chunk of change saved.

Send me a private message if you have any questions or would like to know more about the resident tutor positions.

-Deo et Patriae

what are the exit ops like for a Resident Tutor?

I'm guessing you are being facetious, but I will answer this question seriously.

Resident Tutors do not have any direct exit ops (at least not any that I am aware of) in the traditional sense of the word, but there are significant benefits including the aforementioned free housing and board (you will be able to eat meals for free inside the dormitory dining hall). In some cases, if you take on additional responsibilities (e.g. librarian, web master, etc.) you will also be given a stipend.

Another benefit which is harder to put a monetary value on is that you get to live amongst some of the brightest undergraduate students in the world, whether it be through playing soccer out on the lawn or discussing business and politics over a meal at the dining hall. Though you might be 5 years, 10 years, of even 15 years older than them, you should not underestimate them, and you will find that on the contrary, there may be many things that you could learn from them. There are boundaries that obviously should not be crossed, but there is also nothing wrong with a resident tutor genuinely befriending an undergraduate student. You never know. One day, that kid who you served as an advisor/mentor for when he was an undergraduate becomes the CEO of a Fortune 500 company. If you kept up the friendship over the years, how would it feel to know that this person was only a phone call or email away?

In that same vein, and let me preface this by saying that I personally do not condone befriending someone solely for leveraging their social capital, keep in mind that there are some kids at Harvard who are EXTREMELY well connected. If you became close to them, helped them out in some way, or even did something as simple as played sports together with them, it could open doors that were previously not there.

Case in point, I know of a resident tutor who became close friends with an undergraduate student 10 years his junior. Turns out the undergraduate student's father was the President and CEO of a major fortune 500 company. Through this connection, the resident tutor was able to get a fast-track interview for an entry level management position and is now a director at the company.

Of course, you cannot really count on things such as this due to the huge level of randomness/chance involved, but it's probably the closet way one could answer the original question about what "exit ops" there are for a Resident Tutor.

Hopefully that helps.

-Deo et Patriae

I was kidding. I am married so will prob buy or lease a home close to campus. Would ideally like to be close to shopping for my wife

9/10/12

Isn't HBS round 1 decision coming out in early December? Or were you already accepted last year and choosing to defer entrance?

9/10/12

mbavsmfin:

Isn't HBS round 1 decision coming out in early December? Or were you already accepted last year and choosing to defer entrance?

I didnt apply expecting to be denied

9/10/12

Oops. Never mind. I remember reading your HBS round 1 thread earlier. You have as good of a shot as anyone else. No point in counting yourself out already.

9/10/12

mbavsmfin:

Oops. Never mind. I remember reading your HBS round 1 thread earlier. You have as good of a shot as anyone else. No point in counting yourself out already.

I would be worried at Wharton

9/10/12

monty09:

Deo et Patriae:
monty09:
Deo et Patriae:

For a more serious answer...

A good number of HBS students live in an apartment complex called Peabody Terrace. If you would like to live on campus and be close to everything, that would be one of my top recommendations.

If you prefer to be off campus, you may be able to find housing near Porter Square (which is one subway stop away from the Harvard subway station on the Red Line). There is also a lot of housing available all over Cambridge. Craigslist may be a good place to find some bargains.

If you are able to get it, however, my top recommendation would be to apply to be a resident tutor at one of Harvard's undergraduate dormitories (known as "Houses").

A "resident tutor" is similar to what an RA is at other colleges, except that resident tutors are not undergraduates (usually graduate students or post-docs). These positions are competitive, but if you can get one of them, the perks are your room and board will be covered for your entire 2 years at HBS.

You will be living inside a dormitory suite (essentially an oversized undergraduate dormitory) with a private kitchen and private bathroom. Plus, you get free access and use of everything inside the dormitory (e.g. gym, weight-room, grand pianos, snacks, fruit, soda fountain inside dining hall, etc.) In exchange for free room and board, you will be required to serve as a "resident tutor" for the undergraduate students in your dormitory.

Your mileage may vary here, but basically that means you will be responsible for the occasional meeting or two, some admin stuff including taking turns being on evening duty for parties (e.g. making sure students don't get too loud or rowdy when hosting parties) and serving as an academic or career advisor / mentor for undergraduate students.

Low stress, low time commitment (probably 10 hours or less a week, though again, your mileage may vary) and FREE room and board as well as FREE ancillary benefits (e.g. free gym, etc.) means a decent chunk of change saved.

Send me a private message if you have any questions or would like to know more about the resident tutor positions.

-Deo et Patriae

what are the exit ops like for a Resident Tutor?

I'm guessing you are being facetious, but I will answer this question seriously.

Resident Tutors do not have any direct exit ops (at least not any that I am aware of) in the traditional sense of the word, but there are significant benefits including the aforementioned free housing and board (you will be able to eat meals for free inside the dormitory dining hall). In some cases, if you take on additional responsibilities (e.g. librarian, web master, etc.) you will also be given a stipend.

Another benefit which is harder to put a monetary value on is that you get to live amongst some of the brightest undergraduate students in the world, whether it be through playing soccer out on the lawn or discussing business and politics over a meal at the dining hall. Though you might be 5 years, 10 years, of even 15 years older than them, you should not underestimate them, and you will find that on the contrary, there may be many things that you could learn from them. There are boundaries that obviously should not be crossed, but there is also nothing wrong with a resident tutor genuinely befriending an undergraduate student. You never know. One day, that kid who you served as an advisor/mentor for when he was an undergraduate becomes the CEO of a Fortune 500 company. If you kept up the friendship over the years, how would it feel to know that this person was only a phone call or email away?

In that same vein, and let me preface this by saying that I personally do not condone befriending someone solely for leveraging their social capital, keep in mind that there are some kids at Harvard who are EXTREMELY well connected. If you became close to them, helped them out in some way, or even did something as simple as played sports together with them, it could open doors that were previously not there.

Case in point, I know of a resident tutor who became close friends with an undergraduate student 10 years his junior. Turns out the undergraduate student's father was the President and CEO of a major fortune 500 company. Through this connection, the resident tutor was able to get a fast-track interview for an entry level management position and is now a director at the company.

Of course, you cannot really count on things such as this due to the huge level of randomness/chance involved, but it's probably the closet way one could answer the original question about what "exit ops" there are for a Resident Tutor.

Hopefully that helps.

-Deo et Patriae

I was kidding. I am married so will prob buy or lease a home close to campus. Would ideally like to be close to shopping for my wife

Just to let you know, resident tutors are allowed to have their spouse (and young children too, if you have them) live together with them. I knew a resident tutor who did this. The husband was a graduate student, the wife was not affiliated to Harvard, but she lived together with us and was nice. Some students made some money off of them by babysitting their kid when they wanted to go out for dinner or a movie, etc.

Also, I don't know anything about you, but if you are an entrepreneur as your profile suggests, I'm sure you would be on the shortlist for a resident tutor position. e.g. providing advising/mentoring for undergrads who are interested in entrepreneurship, etc. The committee that makes these decisions would absolutely eat that up.

Remember, the perks are:
1) Free housing
2) Free meals
3) Free gym/weight-room
4) Free internet/wi-fi
5) Free fruit
6) Free snacks
7) Free drinks (tea/coffee, soda fountain in dining hall)
8) Free use of very nice Steinway grand pianos (this was one of the highlights of my undergrad years)
9) 1 in 5,000,000 chance of encountering the next Bill Gates/Mark Zuckerberg and investing in his start-up as an Angel investor, making billions in the process and then retiring on your own private island

Of course, if your wife doesn't want to live inside an undergrad dormitory (though these are actually nice buildings that are really more "house" and less "dormitory") or prefers the privacy of your own home, then that would be the way to go.

I am done trying to sell you the benefits of being a resident tutor as a grad student at Harvard, but just in case you are still open to the possibility, I will include the link for the application.
http://osl.fas.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k651...

Good luck!

9/10/12

Deo et Patriae:

monty09:
Deo et Patriae:
monty09:
Deo et Patriae:

For a more serious answer...

A good number of HBS students live in an apartment complex called Peabody Terrace. If you would like to live on campus and be close to everything, that would be one of my top recommendations.

If you prefer to be off campus, you may be able to find housing near Porter Square (which is one subway stop away from the Harvard subway station on the Red Line). There is also a lot of housing available all over Cambridge. Craigslist may be a good place to find some bargains.

If you are able to get it, however, my top recommendation would be to apply to be a resident tutor at one of Harvard's undergraduate dormitories (known as "Houses").

A "resident tutor" is similar to what an RA is at other colleges, except that resident tutors are not undergraduates (usually graduate students or post-docs). These positions are competitive, but if you can get one of them, the perks are your room and board will be covered for your entire 2 years at HBS.

You will be living inside a dormitory suite (essentially an oversized undergraduate dormitory) with a private kitchen and private bathroom. Plus, you get free access and use of everything inside the dormitory (e.g. gym, weight-room, grand pianos, snacks, fruit, soda fountain inside dining hall, etc.) In exchange for free room and board, you will be required to serve as a "resident tutor" for the undergraduate students in your dormitory.

Your mileage may vary here, but basically that means you will be responsible for the occasional meeting or two, some admin stuff including taking turns being on evening duty for parties (e.g. making sure students don't get too loud or rowdy when hosting parties) and serving as an academic or career advisor / mentor for undergraduate students.

Low stress, low time commitment (probably 10 hours or less a week, though again, your mileage may vary) and FREE room and board as well as FREE ancillary benefits (e.g. free gym, etc.) means a decent chunk of change saved.

Send me a private message if you have any questions or would like to know more about the resident tutor positions.

-Deo et Patriae

what are the exit ops like for a Resident Tutor?

I'm guessing you are being facetious, but I will answer this question seriously.

Resident Tutors do not have any direct exit ops (at least not any that I am aware of) in the traditional sense of the word, but there are significant benefits including the aforementioned free housing and board (you will be able to eat meals for free inside the dormitory dining hall). In some cases, if you take on additional responsibilities (e.g. librarian, web master, etc.) you will also be given a stipend.

Another benefit which is harder to put a monetary value on is that you get to live amongst some of the brightest undergraduate students in the world, whether it be through playing soccer out on the lawn or discussing business and politics over a meal at the dining hall. Though you might be 5 years, 10 years, of even 15 years older than them, you should not underestimate them, and you will find that on the contrary, there may be many things that you could learn from them. There are boundaries that obviously should not be crossed, but there is also nothing wrong with a resident tutor genuinely befriending an undergraduate student. You never know. One day, that kid who you served as an advisor/mentor for when he was an undergraduate becomes the CEO of a Fortune 500 company. If you kept up the friendship over the years, how would it feel to know that this person was only a phone call or email away?

In that same vein, and let me preface this by saying that I personally do not condone befriending someone solely for leveraging their social capital, keep in mind that there are some kids at Harvard who are EXTREMELY well connected. If you became close to them, helped them out in some way, or even did something as simple as played sports together with them, it could open doors that were previously not there.

Case in point, I know of a resident tutor who became close friends with an undergraduate student 10 years his junior. Turns out the undergraduate student's father was the President and CEO of a major fortune 500 company. Through this connection, the resident tutor was able to get a fast-track interview for an entry level management position and is now a director at the company.

Of course, you cannot really count on things such as this due to the huge level of randomness/chance involved, but it's probably the closet way one could answer the original question about what "exit ops" there are for a Resident Tutor.

Hopefully that helps.

-Deo et Patriae

I was kidding. I am married so will prob buy or lease a home close to campus. Would ideally like to be close to shopping for my wife

Just to let you know, resident tutors are allowed to have their spouse (and young children too, if you have them) live together with them. I knew a resident tutor who did this. The husband was a graduate student, the wife was not affiliated to Harvard, but she lived together with us and was nice. Some students made some money off of them by babysitting their kid when they wanted to go out for dinner or a movie, etc.

Also, I don't know anything about you, but if you are an entrepreneur as your profile suggests, I'm sure you would be on the shortlist for a resident tutor position. e.g. providing advising/mentoring for undergrads who are interested in entrepreneurship, etc. The committee that makes these decisions would absolutely eat that up.

Remember, the perks are:

1) Free housing

2) Free meals

3) Free gym/weight-room

4) Free internet/wi-fi

5) Free fruit

6) Free snacks

7) Free drinks (tea/coffee, soda fountain in dining hall)

8) Free use of very nice Steinway grand pianos (this was one of the highlights of my undergrad years)

9) 1 in 5,000,000 chance of encountering the next Bill Gates/Mark Zuckerberg and investing in his start-up as an Angel investor, making billions in the process and then retiring on your own private island

Of course, if your wife doesn't want to live inside an undergrad dormitory (though these are actually nice buildings that are really more "house" and less "dormitory") or prefers the privacy of your own home, then that would be the way to go.

I am done trying to sell you the benefits of being a resident tutor as a grad student at Harvard, but just in case you are still open to the possibility, I will include the link for the application.

http://osl.fas.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k651...

Good luck!

Thank you and sounds like a great deal. However, I rather have my family life private.

9/10/12

Deo et Patriae:

monty09:
Deo et Patriae:
monty09:
Deo et Patriae:

For a more serious answer...

A good number of HBS students live in an apartment complex called Peabody Terrace. If you would like to live on campus and be close to everything, that would be one of my top recommendations.

If you prefer to be off campus, you may be able to find housing near Porter Square (which is one subway stop away from the Harvard subway station on the Red Line). There is also a lot of housing available all over Cambridge. Craigslist may be a good place to find some bargains.

If you are able to get it, however, my top recommendation would be to apply to be a resident tutor at one of Harvard's undergraduate dormitories (known as "Houses").

A "resident tutor" is similar to what an RA is at other colleges, except that resident tutors are not undergraduates (usually graduate students or post-docs). These positions are competitive, but if you can get one of them, the perks are your room and board will be covered for your entire 2 years at HBS.

You will be living inside a dormitory suite (essentially an oversized undergraduate dormitory) with a private kitchen and private bathroom. Plus, you get free access and use of everything inside the dormitory (e.g. gym, weight-room, grand pianos, snacks, fruit, soda fountain inside dining hall, etc.) In exchange for free room and board, you will be required to serve as a "resident tutor" for the undergraduate students in your dormitory.

Your mileage may vary here, but basically that means you will be responsible for the occasional meeting or two, some admin stuff including taking turns being on evening duty for parties (e.g. making sure students don't get too loud or rowdy when hosting parties) and serving as an academic or career advisor / mentor for undergraduate students.

Low stress, low time commitment (probably 10 hours or less a week, though again, your mileage may vary) and FREE room and board as well as FREE ancillary benefits (e.g. free gym, etc.) means a decent chunk of change saved.

Send me a private message if you have any questions or would like to know more about the resident tutor positions.

-Deo et Patriae

what are the exit ops like for a Resident Tutor?

I'm guessing you are being facetious, but I will answer this question seriously.

Resident Tutors do not have any direct exit ops (at least not any that I am aware of) in the traditional sense of the word, but there are significant benefits including the aforementioned free housing and board (you will be able to eat meals for free inside the dormitory dining hall). In some cases, if you take on additional responsibilities (e.g. librarian, web master, etc.) you will also be given a stipend.

Another benefit which is harder to put a monetary value on is that you get to live amongst some of the brightest undergraduate students in the world, whether it be through playing soccer out on the lawn or discussing business and politics over a meal at the dining hall. Though you might be 5 years, 10 years, of even 15 years older than them, you should not underestimate them, and you will find that on the contrary, there may be many things that you could learn from them. There are boundaries that obviously should not be crossed, but there is also nothing wrong with a resident tutor genuinely befriending an undergraduate student. You never know. One day, that kid who you served as an advisor/mentor for when he was an undergraduate becomes the CEO of a Fortune 500 company. If you kept up the friendship over the years, how would it feel to know that this person was only a phone call or email away?

In that same vein, and let me preface this by saying that I personally do not condone befriending someone solely for leveraging their social capital, keep in mind that there are some kids at Harvard who are EXTREMELY well connected. If you became close to them, helped them out in some way, or even did something as simple as played sports together with them, it could open doors that were previously not there.

Case in point, I know of a resident tutor who became close friends with an undergraduate student 10 years his junior. Turns out the undergraduate student's father was the President and CEO of a major fortune 500 company. Through this connection, the resident tutor was able to get a fast-track interview for an entry level management position and is now a director at the company.

Of course, you cannot really count on things such as this due to the huge level of randomness/chance involved, but it's probably the closet way one could answer the original question about what "exit ops" there are for a Resident Tutor.

Hopefully that helps.

-Deo et Patriae

I was kidding. I am married so will prob buy or lease a home close to campus. Would ideally like to be close to shopping for my wife

Just to let you know, resident tutors are allowed to have their spouse (and young children too, if you have them) live together with them. I knew a resident tutor who did this. The husband was a graduate student, the wife was not affiliated to Harvard, but she lived together with us and was nice. Some students made some money off of them by babysitting their kid when they wanted to go out for dinner or a movie, etc.

Also, I don't know anything about you, but if you are an entrepreneur as your profile suggests, I'm sure you would be on the shortlist for a resident tutor position. e.g. providing advising/mentoring for undergrads who are interested in entrepreneurship, etc. The committee that makes these decisions would absolutely eat that up.

Remember, the perks are:

1) Free housing

2) Free meals

3) Free gym/weight-room

4) Free internet/wi-fi

5) Free fruit

6) Free snacks

7) Free drinks (tea/coffee, soda fountain in dining hall)

8) Free use of very nice Steinway grand pianos (this was one of the highlights of my undergrad years)

9) 1 in 5,000,000 chance of encountering the next Bill Gates/Mark Zuckerberg and investing in his start-up as an Angel investor, making billions in the process and then retiring on your own private island

Of course, if your wife doesn't want to live inside an undergrad dormitory (though these are actually nice buildings that are really more "house" and less "dormitory") or prefers the privacy of your own home, then that would be the way to go.

I am done trying to sell you the benefits of being a resident tutor as a grad student at Harvard, but just in case you are still open to the possibility, I will include the link for the application.

http://osl.fas.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k651...

Good luck!

This is really helpful, thanks

http://ayainsight.co/ Curating the best advice and making it actionable.

9/10/12

Deo et Patriae:

I'm guessing you are being facetious, but I will answer this question seriously.

Resident Tutors do not have any direct exit ops (at least not any that I am aware of) in the traditional sense of the word, but there are significant benefits including the aforementioned free housing and board (you will be able to eat meals for free inside the dormitory dining hall). In some cases, if you take on additional responsibilities (e.g. librarian, web master, etc.) you will also be given a stipend.

Another benefit which is harder to put a monetary value on is that you get to live amongst some of the brightest undergraduate students in the world, whether it be through playing soccer out on the lawn or discussing business and politics over a meal at the dining hall. Though you might be 5 years, 10 years, of even 15 years older than them, you should not underestimate them, and you will find that on the contrary, there may be many things that you could learn from them. There are boundaries that obviously should not be crossed, but there is also nothing wrong with a resident tutor genuinely befriending an undergraduate student. You never know. One day, that kid who you served as an advisor/mentor for when he was an undergraduate becomes the CEO of a Fortune 500 company. If you kept up the friendship over the years, how would it feel to know that this person was only a phone call or email away?

In that same vein, and let me preface this by saying that I personally do not condone befriending someone solely for leveraging their social capital, keep in mind that there are some kids at Harvard who are EXTREMELY well connected. If you became close to them, helped them out in some way, or even did something as simple as played sports together with them, it could open doors that were previously not there.

Case in point, I know of a resident tutor who became close friends with an undergraduate student 10 years his junior. Turns out the undergraduate student's father was the President and CEO of a major fortune 500 company. Through this connection, the resident tutor was able to get a fast-track interview for an entry level management position and is now a director at the company.

Of course, you cannot really count on things such as this due to the huge level of randomness/chance involved, but it's probably the closet way one could answer the original question about what "exit ops" there are for a Resident Tutor.

Hopefully that helps.

-Deo et Patriae

The only thing worse than being exiled to the Quad as an undergrad must be being exiled to the Quad as an HBS student. Yech.

(Also, isn't being an RT a much bigger commitment than you're making it out to be? I remember them giving actual advice on things related to their specialty, helping students navigate the world of academia, etc. Are you referring to the freshman live-ins, who I think were called resident advisors -- RAs. Maybe I'm just not remembering things correctly.)

9/10/12

I had a couple friends do this, one as a tutor in an upper class house who was a doctor and had to mentor premed kids, write them letters of recommendation and the like. She decided not to be an advisor her second year.

Another friend lived in one of the freshmen dorms. She liked it a lot more, but she had a generally motherly attitude. I only remember her missing a few social things because of her work.

9/10/12

A friend of mine is looking to lease a 2 bed in the Back Bay if anyone needs housing. Can take the 1 right to Cambridge on Mass Ave.

Lana? Lannaa???? LANA!!!!!!!!!?!?!?!


See my WSO Blog | See my WSO interview

9/10/12

On campus, the popular options are One Western Avenue and Soldiers Field. Stay away from the official HBS dorms; they're awful.

9/10/12

Bumping this thread as I just found it. Good overview of HBS housing options is provided by the Partners Club: http://www.hbspartnersclub.org/housing.html and http://www.hbspartnersclub.org/HBS_Guide_11.pdf.

I'll note that very few students live outside the immediate area either on campus or in Allston. Those few are concentrated across the river in Harvard or Central squares. Onesy-twosey are in the rest of the Boston metro area to include the rest of the city and some of the outer burbs.

Edited to add: plenty of time to find housing after you get accepted, especially if you're applying round 1 or 2. It's probably not worth too many brain-bytes thinking about until you're in.

9/10/12

Do any of the on-campus housing options have washer/dryer in the room?

9/10/12

For others -- not married types too -- the dorms for first year are actually great for getting to know classmates and for being within tunnel-walking distance to class. Hey, in the cold winter, being able to go underground from your dorm room to Aldrich and the library is pretty sweet. And believe it, there is a fair amount of late-night to-ing and fro-ing from one dorm to another. (I lived in Chase. BF lived in Hamilton?).
Second year I lived in Soldiers Field apartments. VERY comfortable. (don't remember doing laundry in the room) The place at the time was almost exclusively second-years. Some lived in Peabody Terrace, which is further, but it is an old building and kind of hideous looking, but it's serviceable. And of course, there are those living in Cambridge, maybe a few in Allston. I do know some married students with working spouses who actually did live in Soldiers Field, but if I were the spouse, I would feel a bit claustrophobic by that option.

Map at this link: http://lesath.hbs.edu/bulletin/blog/2010-11-16_4.html

Betsy Massar
Come see me at my Q&A thread
http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-...

Ask away!

9/10/12

If you bought a place in Allston over the last few years, you probably ended up better than breakeven even if you sold at graduation (i.e. appreciation + saved rent + equity > transaction costs + mortgage payments + down payment).

9/7/12

If we have a repeat of last winter then snow should be the least of your concerns. On a side note if you want to get some cheap eats I recommend Fire and Ice in Harvard Square. Crowds young and if I remember correctly they do offer discounts to Harvard students once a week. Get some udon noodles, throw in a little garlic, add the sirloin, if you want add some veggies and have them stir fry in greenberg tereyaki sauce. In no time you'll be gaining that freshman 15.

9/9/12
bearing:

If we have a repeat of last winter then snow should be the least of your concerns. On a side note if you want to get some cheap eats I recommend Fire and Ice in Harvard Square. Crowds young and if I remember correctly they do offer discounts to Harvard students once a week. Get some udon noodles, throw in a little garlic, add the sirloin, if you want add some veggies and have them stir fry in greenberg tereyaki sauce. In no time you'll be gaining that freshman 15.

The Fire n Ice in Back Bay is actually even cheaper than the one at Harvard Square. It is like $9.99 all you can eat lunch, a lot cheaper than if you cook at home, especially with all the salmons and burgers and all. I wish there were a smilar franchise in NYC. The mongolian bbq type of places here charge you something like $10/lb.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

9/8/12

There's always Somerville if you want to save a few bucks. That's not far from HBS. Or just live right in Cambridge, it's quite nice there.

9/8/12

Id recommend getting a place downtown. The archstone in Boston is reasonable, as are most places in Beacon Hill and near Copley, as well as on Beacon St/Comm ave. This is made much easier if you/he have/are willing to get a car - its about a 10 minute drive from these locations to HBS.

"...all truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

  • Schopenhauer
9/8/12

I'd just point out that I think bschool is structured in a way where proximity to home is really very convenient. Dropping off class stuff and going right out to social events, changing for recruiting/networking events, etc. all work out much better if you live near Cambridge.

From that perspective, it might make more sense to live close to Cambridge and for you to take the longer commute unless your bf has friends attending HBS and he can use their places to drop stuff off and/or change? Very logistical details, but especially during recruiting season it's probably a non-trivial issue.

9/8/12
9/9/12
9/9/12
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