In theory you never broke in, what are you now?

financekid02's picture
Rank: Baboon | banana points 100

In theory you failed all of your interviews and never landed the FT position you have today, Where are you now?

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Comments (82)

Jul 7, 2017

You dream your an analyst. You dream you go to B-school You dream your an associate. You dream your an VP. You dream you become a MD or Partner. But what if it all never go as plan and you ended up getting fired or not securing a offer.

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Jul 13, 2017
financekid02:

You dream your an analyst. You dream you go to B-school You dream your an associate. You dream your an VP. You dream you become a MD or Partner. But what if it all never go as plan and you ended up getting fired or not securing a offer.

You dream of getting to wall street, but haven't mastered "your vs you're" yet, or the usage of "if". Also, haven't mastered a dictionary to know what it is to theorize.

Sad story.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Jul 7, 2017

Are you really that lonely that you force yourself to bait people into arguments on the internet? Is corporate finance really taking a toll on you? If so you can always PM me to talk about your issues.

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Jul 20, 2017

I don't have to give you theory because I actually did fail at one of your steps.

I went to a mediocre but expensive undergrad where banking was completely foreign except to the rich and/or very driven kids who've known what IB was since their days of summer camp and capri sun. I was a middling student with enough APs and sense to get an IT (not computer science) degree and got a job at a large consulting firm making ok money at a time when most of my friends and most college graduates were moving into their childhood rooms or working bar shifts and sending out resumes every day to get a real job. I don't consider this the point at which I failed.

After about 4 years and steady promotions in my field, I stumbled upon this website and found out what IB was. I realized it was one of the only career paths which offered significantly better earning potential than mine. I also realized that with my mediocre pedigree I would need stellar GMAT scores to get into any school that would have OCR and give me a good shot at breaking in. I took the Kaplan course, and half-assed my studies. My GMAT scores displayed that half-assed effort. That's where I would say I failed.

A few weeks after I fucked up the GMAT, I got an offer to move across the country and start something new at a fairly prestigious firm (not MBB but yes I'm in consulting) and I've been there since. I get ownership over my career, I have people that look to me for direction not on a project level but on an entire firm level, and the money is pretty good. I don't make IB/PE/HF money but failing on that path led me to a very good place.

This comment might be misplaced but I do want it to serve as a reminder to everyone who has "failed" at the prescriptive HYPS->GS->KKR->HBS/GSB career path that there's still hope.

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Jul 11, 2017

the same person I am now....

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Jul 11, 2017

I'd be a janitor who roams the hallways of MIT after hours solving complex mathematics.

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Jul 11, 2017

+1 to you for that reference. One of my favorite movies ever.

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Jul 11, 2017

Harvard no less

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Jul 11, 2017

Plan B coming out of undergrad was an offer I had in hand for Citi Ops. Would have probably gone to b-school sooner for another roll of the dice because I would have been bored to tears with the work. However else I may have ended up, I can't say.

I have noticed that when I'm in a position I don't like I kick my efforts to advance into overdrive (i.e. consuming more information, personal development, making connections, etc.). If life is good, I will admit I can slip into complacency, which is something I need to work on.

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Jul 13, 2017

Exactly. I do this as well. When I thought I was 'behind' I consumed every piece of finance information I could. Networked hard af. Watched valuation videos. The works. When I'm where I want to be at, I slip into complacency. I found that when I set weekly, monthly, quarterly, and yearly goals for myself just above my current abilities I'm much more motivated and satisfied.

Jul 11, 2017

Plan B for me was doing market research at a CRE Data firm and turned that down for the place I'm at now. Overall I've been pretty unhappy with my company the past few years and wish I had taken the other job, or atleast should have kept looking. At this point I would definitely still be in commercial real estate, but probably would have found my way to a little better firm by now.

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Jul 13, 2017

Physician

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Jul 11, 2017

Probably at some corporation or regional bank in their finance department. To a certain degree, life is about being happy with what you have.

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Jul 11, 2017

I'd run a Communist-themed restaurant called "Fidel's" and cook Cuban food all day. I'd dress up as an MD every Halloween.

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Jul 13, 2017

I'd live in a van down by the river.

I'd have ended up in CRE brokerage, or maybe underwriting for a regional bank, which are still solid gigs but I wouldn't have liked it as much.

Jul 13, 2017

A hunting and fly fishing guide in Montana/Wyoming.

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Jul 13, 2017

Hollywood screenwriter, rather than a cranky quanty WSO troll driving around in a clunky used ford fusion (which replaced a rusty honda).

%& why did I have to get an offer from Lehman Brothers? I could be in a beachfront mansion in Malibu right now looking out at the Pacific Ocean typing up another movie script.

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Jul 13, 2017
IlliniProgrammer:

Hollywood screenwriter, rather than a cranky quanty WSO troll driving around in a clunky used ford fusion (which replaced a rusty honda).

%& why did I have to get an offer from Lehman Brothers? I could be in a beachfront mansion in Malibu right now looking out at the Pacific Ocean typing up another movie script.

What's stopping you?

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Best Response
Jul 13, 2017
Esuric:
IlliniProgrammer:

Hollywood screenwriter, rather than a cranky quanty WSO troll driving around in a clunky used ford fusion (which replaced a rusty honda).

%& why did I have to get an offer from Lehman Brothers? I could be in a beachfront mansion in Malibu right now looking out at the Pacific Ocean typing up another movie script.

What's stopping you?

I always said I'd focus on building up savings first and doing what I loved later. I don't think that's a bad approach, but if the rug gets pulled out from under you, sometimes being forced to do what you love is very healthy. That said, what I love today is different from what I loved at 20 (computer games).

TBH I'm much closer to my dream job right now if I stay a quant a few more years. (doing aerobatics at airshows, discovering new shipwrecks in Lake Michigan)

My honest to goodness career advice is to do your job during the week. Do what you love on the weekends. Last weekend I was at 150 feet on one of the best preserved shipwrecks on the lake (due to depth it probably gets about 15-20 divers to visit it each year). This week I'm back at work, earning the money to pay for the fun I'll be having this upcoming weekend.

Have fun, guys.

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Jul 14, 2017

This sounds like a copypasta, especially with the program that "makes it impossible for the CCTV to detect you." What a joke.

Jul 14, 2017

Probably end up working slightly less hours, with a slightly smaller house, in a slightly worse location, and drive a slightly inferior car and take slightly cheaper vacations and drink slightly cheaper wine and wear slightly cheaper clothes.

In order words (spoiler alert) the world would not end. Gasp!

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Jul 14, 2017

Still trying to break in?

Jul 19, 2017

sometimes i ponder about this as well. i wouldn't even know where to start if i told you everything i did to try to even get an SA position - FT is a completely different story. However, something tells me that things would've worked out just fine...right?

Jul 20, 2017

corp fin position with a banker's work ethic to move up, or law school

(I'm still an intern so hopefully I get that FT role)

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Aug 18, 2017

.

Jul 20, 2017

I'm interning my last summer now, graduate in December. If I don't get into energy within a year I'm probably going to re-enlist in the Army.

Jul 20, 2017

If I never broke into IB? I'd probably be working in Consulting

Jul 7, 2017

@AndyLouis can you please remove the MS in this thread or please delete it I am constantly getting MS barraged ever since Isiah called out the sentence I wrote on purpose the mob mentality is ruining my banana count.

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Jul 14, 2017

They're fake internet points, @financekid02

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Jul 22, 2017

Probably happy

Jul 24, 2017

Probably an assistant high school lacrosse coach at a top prep school with a full time job doing something I resent because I never put forth the effort I should have many years ago and am now suffering for it by not achieving my dreams

Aug 19, 2017

Cocaine Cowboy

Aug 19, 2017

Back to the military. Or veterinarian. I have a lot of identity issues.

Aug 19, 2017

At this point, 3 years work experience... you are considered an experienced candidate. I would consider an MBA. At a top school of course

Aug 19, 2017

An MBA would probably be your best bet. It wouldn't guarantee you a position, but it would be a significant boost to your current situation (depending on the school).

Aug 19, 2017

Some of it could depend on your use of the word "top" for accounting firm. Most people see it as Big 4 and then the rest. Accountants or others who are familiar in the industry usually see it as Big 4, 3-5 other ok national practices, then the rest. If you have Big 4 experience, you can probably get in somewhere (althought not necessarily BB) that's what I did. If your experience is somewhere else it may be a little tougher unless you know someone. However, from what I've seen there are boutiques that really like accountants.

It's a complete pain in the ass and generally worthless in IB, but getting your CPA could help get your foot in the door somewhere.

Aug 19, 2017

I would agree that a top flight MBA would ensure you access into banking as an associate. You already have enough work experience, a solid GPA, and depending on your GMAT score/extra-curricular/leadership/essays you should be able to matriculate in 08' or 09'.

Why would anyone with work experience want to regress and be an analyst for 2 years. My advice to you is skip the analyst stint; our bannker analysts sound miserable on a regular basis when I speak with them.

Aug 19, 2017

Thank you all for your input.
to answer some of the questions....
i worked at RSM richter, which is not considered the big four, but in north america... it is considered to be between 5-8.
WIth my work experience.... i wouldnt mind working as an analyst at a boutique or something smaller. I just really want to gain the experience starting from the bottom up. I know it might sound ridiculous that i want to be an analyst, but i truly believe that it is the best way for me to get started.. rather than getting my MBA and then starting at an associate position.
I dont know, i could be wrong, but personally, i like to start from the very beginning and move my way up.

Aug 19, 2017

Have your considered Big 4 TAS Valuation groups?

Aug 19, 2017

No. Despite what most people on this site believe, having FO experience is not a pre-requisite to summer analyst positions after junior year. Just do something interesting and don't be a dunce and you'll be fine assuming stats and networking efforts are there.

Aug 19, 2017

Definitely not. As a sophomore you will be well ahead of the game with any actual internship. You would be surprised, you are overestimating your competition.

Aug 19, 2017

Not weird but try and get an internship doing something finance related at a F500. I think PWM is extremely overrated.

Aug 19, 2017

don't do PWM unless its GS/JPM/MS.

Aug 19, 2017

I disagree. You need an internship preferably in banking and definitely in finance to be competitive. I'm a jr and I thought I was ahead of the game through my internship, but its ridiculous how many people have internships at budge brackets as sophomores

Aug 19, 2017

I'm a few years older than you but in the same boat
I did countless interviews, did great on some, not so great on others, went to final rounds numerous times but failed all of them. I ended up taking a shitty job that pays about half of what I could've gotten at the other jobs I interviewed for and it's a bad feeling.