Quitting time - views on how to leave your job

Mod Note (Andy) - as the year comes to an end we're reposting the top discussions from 2015, this one ranks #48. This one was originally posted 3/8/2015.

I've been exchanging PMs with a fellow poster who didn't like his current role and had the good sense to line up another job.

With his permission, I've pasted below the advice I gave him on how to tell his current employers that he's exiting. I've made a few tidy up edits, but it's still a little rambly.

Make sure your new job is firm first

Don't tell your current employers anything until the key paperwork is signed with your new employers.

That is, make sure the legal position is solid. You don't want to tell your existing employers you're leaving, then find something has gone wrong on your new employer's side and you don't have a job. If you've only got oral offer and acceptance, that's not enough.

You want the formal offer letter, you want it signed by you and you want confirmation that they have received your acceptance letter, plus confirmation from their HR that the position is final.

You can tell them that you want to confirm this before you tell your old employers and they should be fine, as this is pretty much par for the course and common sense. These sorts of questions are better directed at the new job's HR people rather than the guy whose team you'll join. That confirmation should be in e-mail form.

If you don't have a HR contact yet, ask the director who made you the offer for a contact in his HR so you can confirm this stuff.

Be ready to bug out

You may find your current bank has policies for how to deal with leaving employees. Have your desk packed and everything you want to take with you handy in a bag or box, because you may well find yourself having to walk straight out the door under bank policies.

This also means you'll need to have any personal files, e-mails etc you have on work systems out of the system and somewhere with your control (eg e-mailed to gmail account, on USB drive). Make sure that you DON'T take any work files or anything that could look like work files, as often banks will check your logs and you could end up in hot water, even if it's innocent stuff.

Telling them "I'm out of here"

Tell your current employer that you're leaving as soon as the position is firm with the new employer. "As soon" means as soon as you've got e-mail confirmation from the new employer's HR people that everything is locked in, stand up and walk into the office of your boss with the news.

If you've got several people in your reporting chain, I'd target most senior person in the team who you have contact with, rather than with your immediate reports. That's the respectful way to do it.

You should ask him/her how he/she would like the news handled, as your exit impact on the remaining team is his/her issue to manage and, to be respectful, you give him/her control over how the news should be released.

When an employee tells a boss he's quitting, the boss goes into damage control mode, thinking about how he/she can cover the gap in the team and how he/she controls the news. The former is much more important, the latter only a significant issue if there have been a lot of quits and your departure could have a significant impact on morale or viability of the team. At a junior level resignation, the latter is not likely to be significant.

Before giving the news, you should go through your main work projects and come up with a rough plan for reallocating the work and have them ready and tidy to hand over. You should tell your old boss that you've done this early in the conversation. It demonstrates you're being a gentlemen and also helps reduce the "damage control" element of his/her thinking.

They should appreciate it. No one likes it when someone ups and leaves and everyone else has to sort out the shit they left.

Do NOT tell them who your new employer is

Even if you have confirmation from the new employer that the job has been locked in, don't tell your old employer or anyone in your team where you are going at any stage until you've started at the new bank.

I've heard stories of people pulling strings to get the new job revoked. In all the areas of banking I've worked in, no one tells people where they are going until they start the new job.

It's likely people at your current work will ask where you are going. Your boss will likely ask you very directly.

You should tell them "I wouldn't mind telling you, except I've been discussing the move with a long term banker who has told me I should not tell anyone under any circumstances until I start. This doesn't really make sense to me, but I respect this guy's opinion and I trust that he knows what he's talking about." Or something like that.

Don't even tell your co-workers who are your friends and who you trust deeply. This is industry standard.

Justifying why you're leaving

When you're explaining why you're going, the most important thing is not to burn bridges and certainly not to settle scores.

If this means you don't give full disclosure on why you're unhappy, so be it. You may feel the urge to let them know you feel there was some injustice, but that sort of emotional vindication is only short term reward and you may find they respond with comments which catch you unawares and possibly remove the emotional victory, leave you feeling worse.

Life is not Hollywood and I've never seen a Hollywood-like scene where someone monologues for 3 minutes why they are unhappy, followed by everyone seeing the light and realising what a fantastic person they are about to lose etc. That sort of emotional pay off just doesn't happen. At least, never when you're quitting a job. Consistent with this point, see my comment above about the immediate reaction of the boss ie "how does my team now meet its deliverables with one less team member?", not "What injustices have we done to this man?"

In explaining why you are going to the new role, all the reasons you give should be about the opportunity etc the new role presents, without comparing those to your existing role. Inevitably, there will be implicit comparisons and your boss will likely ask why you need the new job to achieve X, Y or Z, because he thinks you could do that in your current role.

Again, you may not be able to avoid him/her coaxing the reasons for your unhappiness out of you and you may not be able to avoid some direct or indirect criticisms of the current role, but you should not volunteer those yourself and you should try as much as possible to talk more about the exciting new opportunity, your desire for a change, wanting to keep your career path fresh, etc. The boss will be able to read between the lines and should be able to tell what is shitting you about the current job, but you'll look a lot more professional by not complaining.

The key thing is to justify the decision as a story about going forward and developing in your career by getting a broad range of experiences, the excitement of new learning etc. That is, a forward looking story. You don't want to look like your quitting because you don't like where you are now, which is backward looking perspective. No boss wants to hear people are quitting because they are unhappy (although that implicitly why many people quit) and you don't want you old boss to end up writing you off as a sore quitter.

Sweet goodbye

For sweeter exit relations, do some analysis on how your team works, how it could be improved and be prepared to spend some time in conversation with your big boss talking high level talk about your thoughts on the existing team and business. In this analysis, focus more on the business itself, rather than on the team members/personalities involved.

That said, if this conversation happens, he/she will likely ask for some comments on personalities or personalities will come up in some way. Keep the analysis of the business itself as the main meat, discussion of personalities towards the end.

When discussing personalities, avoid bitching and negativity. If someone has limitations, handle it as positively as possible ie "John does good work on analysis. If he could coordinate that work better with the rest of the team, I think that would really supercharge productivity" is better than "John is really bad at communicating his work and never delivers on time".

On discussing the business, this is where you can give the big boss valuable insights, demonstrate that you have some strategic thinking and aren't just stuck in the trenches and thinking like a peon. This should leave a good impression and you'll never know when/how that could work in your favour in your career. It should also give your big boss new reasons to respect you, even if he/she doesn't agree.

When I left my IB job, I ran my exit process in line with the above and organised a lunch with my regional division head (ie the guy I told I was leaving) to give him my views on the division's business, both the work that I did and the broader division's work. I was SVP there and was also leaving to join another division & region in the same bank (ie inevitably I would come across this guy again), so it may be a little different for you at a more junior level.

I do suggest that you ask your boss if he would like to have coffee with you one morning either before or after you leave for this sort of conversation. Again, this sort of offer demonstrates you want to leave constructively, respectfully etc.

If you're not sure you can sustain a 15-30 minute conversation of your analysis on the business with the boss, you may be better off not putting this on the agenda. However, at least listen carefully to how the boss responds, as he/she may want to have this sort of session so he/she can run you through questions on what you've thought about the business, the personalities etc. There are not many opportunities as a team manager that you get someone who knows the team from the inside who will answer questions honestly as they have nothing to lose. If the boss is a good manager, he/she will seek out this conversation. Listen carefully, as he/she may hint at wanting this sort of catch up. If so, offer a coffee.

A little contrary to what I said above, if you do end up having this sort of conversation separate from the immediate discussion when you are telling the boss you're leaving, you can disclose the sources of your unhappiness. However, you should let him/her coax that out of you rather than dropping it on the table yourself. The former approach is more politic and makes you look better, less of an unhappy quitter.

A lot of these tips assume that the boss is a smart manager and is willing to deal with your resignation constructively, plus thinks that there is value getting your insights into the team. You may find that he/she just wants you out the door ASAP and doesn't even want to hear why you are quitting. If that's the case, try to be as pleasant and understanding as possible.

If you're a grad recruit less than 1 year into your employment with them, your resignation could trigger some unavoidable bitterness. With graduate recruits, the typical view is that it's an investment where you're largely useless for the first year, but will start providing net value some time in year 2. So leaving after 11 months can leave a sour taste in the mouth of your boss.

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Comments (138)

Feb 28, 2015 - 6:28pm

bennybanker:

What is the average length of time you should stay with a company before jumping ship?

If you're leaving with less 1-2 years, a future interviewer will want to know why. If you have a good explanation, it should be fine. But serial early departures will raise a lot of suspicion.

Those who can, do. Those who can't, post threads about how to do it on WSO.
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Feb 28, 2015 - 9:58pm

This is a great article. Common sense for sure but still a good read.

Get busy living
Mar 1, 2015 - 12:32am

I think the first time that you quit a job, it's the hardest. I quit for the first time a year ago and I still remember being totally freaked out the day I actually resigned. I was afraid to be asked all kinds of questions, that my boss might be mad...especially because I just quit after a pretty good bonus...so when I walked into the guy's office to resign, it was very hard to keep it together. I had memorized everything I was going to say, but of course I forgot it all. In the end, the whole thing was pretty easy, painless and straight forward. He just asked me if I am sure, I said yes, he asked if I could stay on for one more day to hand over some things I was working on, I said yes and done. My notice period was 3 months, but in banking nobody wants you to stick around anyhow, mostly you leave immediately. I know that the next time I resign, I will be much better at it. No need to make such a big deal out of it. I also recently talked to a guy who I know pretty well and who had worked in banking for 30+ years. He just retired. He basically said that resigning is not that big of a deal. Think about the guy you are resigning to, if that guy has had any length of time of managerial experience, then this is pretty routine. People resign all the time for all kinds of reasons, you have to fire people/let people go from time to time, so most managers are very experienced in how to handle this type of situation. You are also not that important in the grand scheme of things. So in regards to not telling where you are going, I don't know, I personally have been very open on that. I think it's a bit unlikely that anyone would go to the lengths mentioned above. If you resign, you are clearly not that keen on your job and want to go somewhere else and once you have gotten to that point, you probably thought about it for some time.

Also, this is not the time to air your grievances. In my case there was an "exit survey" where you could write why you are leaving or any other issues of unhappiness, but they also had a box on whether you would ever consider working for this firm again, definitely check YES...this goes as part of your record, you never know what will happen in the future and if you checked NO...then they might not hire you back some years down the road. I kept my exit survey very tame, this is a written record that will go into my file and who knows, maybe I want to work there again one day. If you have anything you want to say, I would do it verbally if the opportunity arises.

And if you really have an immature manager who gets kind of upset or makes the whole thing unpleasant, just get up, say you resign, then walk to HR/call HR and inform them and ask how to proceed. (Friend of mine had this happen, total freak show of a boss). Work is not prison, you can leave whenever you want. Just make sure you follow the procedure that HR prescribes. If someone is a total asshole, there is only so much you can do to keep it all civil. But as long as you are not the one yelling/cussing etc, you will be fine.

Mar 1, 2015 - 1:19am

Gini:
I think it's a bit unlikely that anyone would go to the lengths mentioned above. If you resign, you are clearly not that keen on your job and want to go somewhere else and once you have gotten to that point, you probably thought about it for some time.

I agree with this and I'd be surprised if someone tried to kill your new job opportunity. If anything, it should reflect badly on the person trying to cause problems.

However, this is so (suprisingly to me) standard with all the people I've seen jump ship that I recommend following the approach of not disclosing.

Those who can, do. Those who can't, post threads about how to do it on WSO.
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Mar 1, 2015 - 12:10pm

SSits:

Gini:

I think it's a bit unlikely that anyone would go to the lengths mentioned above. If you resign, you are clearly not that keen on your job and want to go somewhere else and once you have gotten to that point, you probably thought about it for some time.

I agree with this and I'd be surprised if someone tried to kill your new job opportunity. If anything, it should reflect badly on the person trying to cause problems.

However, this is so (suprisingly to me) standard with all the people I've seen jump ship that I recommend following the approach of not disclosing.

Good points ... SB'ed

Mar 1, 2015 - 3:40pm

Quitting after a bonus is always great no matter what, regardless of the bonus and the industry. Could anybody shed some light of leaving a position within the company for something better? My bank has a stupid policy of letting your manager know that you're interviewing within the company..

Greed is Good!
Mar 1, 2015 - 11:42pm

CUBuffwg:

Quitting after a bonus is always great no matter what, regardless of the bonus and the industry. Could anybody shed some light of leaving a position within the company for something better? My bank has a stupid policy of letting your manager know that you're interviewing within the company..

From my experience this is pretty routine. In addition, they will likely want you to have been in your role for a period of time prior to pursuing a new role within the firm to keep various departments from poaching employees and frequent job hopping. I switched roles within the same firm and spoke to my manager about it prior to interviewing for the new position. It was awkward but definitely not unpleasant ...if you have good rapport with your manager it shouldn't be an issue.

Mar 1, 2015 - 3:03pm

When I got hired my boss told me he looked forward to the day when I leave for a better job. For the most part everyone is here to use the place as a stepping stone and management knows it. Since I've been here 1/3 of our team changed and it's only been 4 months.

Mar 2, 2015 - 3:59am

Way too long - Go to your boss, tell him you are quitting. Give him no info - except better money or opportunity.
No need to give him hints about what works and what doesn't, if he doesn't have that figured out he shouldn't be in the job in the first place.
It's the best day of your life, enjoy it. Bask in your glory.
Do not shit at your company under any circumstances though, as they might make you work your garden leave in the basement. 1. Don't tell them where you are going 2. Quit

Your boss' have done it themselves, they can't blame you for it.

They might try to match you, so you you can tell them what package you are going on. Except that's a dangerous game to play as the following year you won't be kindly looked after if you decide to stay. I am of the school of thought that if you decide on leaving you leave for good.

The info about sending stuff on USB stick sounds a bit dangerous, you will send loads of red flags to IT and I am pretty sure that's illegal in a lot of banks to carry a USB stick around. Sending stuff to your gmail is also not ideal, but if personal should be fine as long as you don't do too often, as IT will see it and you are not supposed to do personal things on your work time, at least at the banks I worked at.

Mar 2, 2015 - 12:14pm

Great analysis.

I really like that you mentioned not to mouth off about the company's negatives. When you quit, you are essentially firing your boss and the company, and anything negative you say will just be used as a way to write you off as a troubled employee. So, if you are trying to settle a score, the best revenge is to just be professional.

Mar 2, 2015 - 2:28pm

Going Concern:
What kind of experience do you have with reference checks from your current employer in order to finalize the role with your new employer?

Practically none, as I've networked into every job I've had in my ~16 year career, other than my first grad role. In each case, the company and team I've gone into has worked with me in my previous job.

Going Concern:
Doesn't not disclosing the new employer weaken the bridge with your existing employer, especially if it's not from one bank to another bank?

No in my experience. It's such an accepted industry standard approach that no one takes offence not being told.

Those who can, do. Those who can't, post threads about how to do it on WSO.
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Mar 6, 2015 - 3:18pm

SSits:

Going Concern:

Doesn't not disclosing the new employer weaken the bridge with your existing employer, especially if it's not from one bank to another bank?

No in my experience. It's such an accepted industry standard approach that no one takes offence not being told.

'genuinely curious if this is a rule or a guideline? Also, would you know if that applies to leaving corp fin roles as well? Everyone that I know who has quit my company (not from the finance dept.) talks about where s/he is going.

Mar 6, 2015 - 10:20pm

Great article. I am leaving my current role for another firm and this was much needed advice. I told them where I was going...I had no idea this was a potential issue. Could someone elaborate more on this? An example?

Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.
Mar 7, 2015 - 4:36am

example your supervisor who has more experience and contacts presumably, could express interest in the position. this happened to a coworker we were in a downsizing department and a coworker got an offer first and our supervisor thought he was more qualified. he had the contact info BC he was listed as a reference. so whether he called or not we don't know but he said he was going to.

Mar 7, 2015 - 4:36am

example your supervisor who has more experience and contacts presumably, could express interest in the position. this happened to a coworker we were in a downsizing department and a coworker got an offer first and our supervisor thought he was more qualified. he had the contact info BC he was listed as a reference. so whether he called or not we don't know but he said he was going to.

Mar 8, 2015 - 9:30pm

Solid advice. I did tell my previous employer where I moved to though. Seemed like nothing fatal came from doing that.

Fortes fortuna adiuvat.
Mar 13, 2015 - 9:52am

Good post.

I think you can mention the company if it is not obvious which group you are getting into. Then again, maybe someone has it out for you. If you have generally chill co-workers I'd doubt they would begin callng every group in a bank to get you denied. That would be so messed up though.

Dec 18, 2015 - 11:46am
undefined:

Good post.

I think you can mention the company if it is not obvious which group you are getting into. Then again, maybe someone has it out for you. If you have generally chill co-workers I'd doubt they would begin callng every group in a bank to get you denied. That would be so messed up though.

Speaking from recent experience, I would recommend against telling them the place you are going. My old boss threatened to call someone they knew at my new shop and badmouth me if I didn't finish some BS project. Nothing ever really came of it (and I d'gafed the project anyway because that pissed me off), however it was an uncomfortable situation. Don't discount how quickly kool-aid drinking coworkers can start to dislike after you opt for a different career path.

Dec 17, 2015 - 11:22am

Whats the big deal everyone has about quitting after you get a bonus, it's not like a bonus is a deposit on you staying at your job. It is additional payment for a job well done.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Dec 17, 2015 - 11:28am

Fantastic advice, Just went though this myself. Sbd

“Elections are a futures market for stolen property”
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Dec 20, 2015 - 2:08pm

Thanks for the post. This is some great advice. How do you handle any questions about how you got the job/found time to interview (since you made have had to make up excuses to get out of work during recruiting)?

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:13pm

I did interviews before I went into work. Just say you had an appointment that couldn't be rescheduled. I'm already checked out, but don't make it obvious. I'm actually writing my notice as we speak and turning it in tomorrow.

Greed is Good!
Dec 20, 2015 - 3:14pm

How to quit (Originally Posted: 12/02/2007)

I am lateraling from an MM IBD to a BB IBD and am looking for advice as to how to quit without burning my bridges.

Once I let my group know I've taken an offer from another bank, would I have 2 weeks or would that day be my last day? Would I be expected to give 2 weeks?

I am well-liked by the group and a top analyst, and so I expect disappointment from my bosses - ideas how to weather any flak?

Do I even entertain them making an offer for me to stay (is that even realistic?)?

Any other tips or advice about how to quit would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:15pm

I've seen people leave for other banks, for buy-side jobs and for lots of other things midway through the year. The long and short of it is that you're going to burn bridges and people will be pissed no matter what you do, but they'll be especially pissed that you're going to another bank.

You'll most likely be escorted out immediately or shortly thereafter once you tell them your plans.

Basically the only thing you can do to weather the flak is to remain calm and make your reasons as impersonal as possible. Be appreciative and say you enjoyed your time there, but feel you want to stay in banking long-term/want to work on different kinds of deals/etc. make up any reason that doesn't insult them.

It's going to be a painful day but it will be over very quickly.

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:16pm

Depending on how much they want you to stay, they might try to convince you to change your mind. You should listen to what they say, but if you're intent on leaving, politely decline. If they ask you why you're leaving, be polite and don't burn any bridges. They might tell you you're making a huge mistake, but don't let it get to you - people always have second thoughts about these sorts of things.

If you're going to another bank, I'd expect that you'll be out the door almost right away - you might want to covertly take your personal belongings with over the the few days before you formally quit. It beats waiting for them to send things to you.

And depending on what your contract says, you'll might get some time off before you start your new job - you probably have to give notice before quitting (two weeks is the norm). It's just that they won't want you in the office for it, since you're moving to another bank. You'll just sit at home waiting it out.

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:17pm

How about models? I would like to keep some of my models - could I email these to myself en masse on that day or could I face any type of legal issues? Risks associated with that?

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:19pm

Do people typically give notice only after the bonus hits the bank account? I would imagine so as otherwise you might run the risk of the bank docking some of your payout for unknown and unjustified reasons.

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:20pm

Don't think I even need to say this, but you never know with banks. Some of my friends who left after their first year were super paranoid and even transferred the money from their bank account to multiple other accounts once it cleared. :) You probably don't need to be quite this paranoid but definitely wait til the bonus hits your account.

Truthfully even if you left before that you'd probably be fine just because of how banks' payroll systems are set up, but why take the chance?

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:22pm

Walk into boss's office. Say "I quit." Walk out. Pack up your stuff. Leave.

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-
Dec 20, 2015 - 3:24pm

so i guess the best practice is to download every model you have worked on into a UBS drive on an ongoing basis, rather than doing it after you decide to quit.

Is it illegal to email a copy of my model to my hotmail account on an ongoing basis (before I decide to quit)

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:31pm

So anyone who has done it? i am sure there are people who manage to retain their models and work product.

The other way is to just print the model out. you lost the formulas of course, but at least you can see the model set-up.

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:33pm

Someone I work with e-mailed a ton of documents to himself before he left, no one has caught him so far.

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:34pm

Have your computer adversely possessed.

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-
Dec 20, 2015 - 3:35pm

Just be a man about it. Go to your boss, look him in the eyes and let him know your are giving your two weeks notice.

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:37pm

How to quit like a boss? (Originally Posted: 11/10/2011)

So I am working for my current employer right now, it's been about 3 months. Work flow sucks and the city sucks too so I have been actively looking for other opportunities ever since, and I have finally secured a FT offer elsewhere. I am to start next month, so I need to notify my current employer ASAP. It's at-will employment so I'm all good, but I want to maintain a good relationship with my MD. So I think I need to sugarcoat how I approach this subject rather than saying "I hate this place so I decided to go somewhere else."

Any suggestion or advice? Or thoughts or mockery?

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:41pm

See you later, gay boys!

Under my tutelage, you will grow from boys to men. From men into gladiators. And from gladiators into SWANSONS.
Dec 20, 2015 - 3:43pm

if its only 3 months with a shitty shop then go all out (cake, shit on debra's desk, see you later gay boys). let us know what you ended up doing, I think you will have a more fulfilling time doing this. Ive burnt bridges in the financial services industry and I haven't even graduated yet.

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:52pm

it's like 3~5 man shop, you think i'll need to give him 2-weeks notice? I mean the hiring contract doesn't specify any notice period and it's at-will employment, so I should be able to quit right away, right?

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:55pm

give a two weeks notice. He might say leave right away but at least you gave him the option.

Beast
Dec 20, 2015 - 3:56pm

two weeks notice dude...if you have anything that sounds like a reasonable reason to move cities (family, gf, etc.) that might soften it a bit by allowing them to think its not their lack of dealflow/prestige that caused you to quit

Dec 20, 2015 - 3:57pm

How to quit and make it sting? Rant about me not getting promoted! (Originally Posted: 11/21/2013)

So I have been working my ass of for my company for a couple years now (2.5 to be exact-entry level post college F500). I got passed up on a promotion last quarter and I've been pissed as all hell. I've been passed up for jobs before and never been upset but this time it really got me. Why?

  1. My manager/boss/mentor(who is fairly senior at the firm) told me I'm a great fit for this position and he pretty much guaranteed it to me.
  2. I've pretty much gotten perfect quarterly reports. I'm the top performer of my group/position. Also, on I show up earlier and stay later then pretty much everyone at my firm.
  3. They were hiring 3-5 people for this role. Both internal and external hires. They hired 3, all externally. I also believe they opened up applications because they are still looking.

After they told me I didn't get the offer I was truly disappointed. I truly love my job and the company I work for but because you can only stay in my role for a max of 3 years it feels like I am essentially being shown the door.

When I asked for feedback from the group head I was given some BS political mumbo jumbo about not being exactly what she was looking for. She said how she knew I was a "rockstar" for the company and would keep her eye out if anything else came up. However today I did some digging and asked on my senior level friend the real reason. He told me that everyone on the committee gave me a thumbs up besides the group head. After I heard the real reason why I thought he was kidding. She pretty much lied to the entire committee and said I told her "my coworkers were unintelligent and there is a lot of work to be done" when asked about negatives. My mouth dropped wide open when I heard this. I thanked my friend for the info, went home, drank a ton, wrote this post.

Now i'm thinking about quitting before the 3 year limit because I can't stand to devote my time to such a workplace. I respect my boss and coworkers, many of which are now my close friends so I want to leave on good terms, however this [email protected]#$% is not right and I want to leave with that on their minds.

Any advice on how to leave on good terms but also tell them why I can't stand working here. I'm pretty much sure no one will care because I low on the totem poll but any suggestions would be welcomed. Should I even make a big deal or should I just leave without saying anything.

Thanks for reading,
Mr. GoshIhatePoliticsInTheWorkplace

Dec 20, 2015 - 4:00pm

Hit up the recruiters tomorrow morning after your hangover wears off. Apply to grad school. Network. Get out as fast as you can.

Leave these people in the dust and move on to greener pastures. Just be glad you found sooner rather than later. Use your current position as leverage towards something else.

Don't retalliate within the context of work, you're in a no win situation and you don't want to ruin your chances at your next gig. Everyone will know why you are leaving. Look at it this way: you're jumping ship on a lousy group of people.

Get busy living
  • 3
Dec 20, 2015 - 4:04pm

How to quit (and not piss people off)? (Originally Posted: 12/23/2013)

I've been at my firm for 1.5 - 2.5 years and started looking for new opportunities half a year ago. I finally got an offer at a company/role that wants me to start immediately (or after I hand in the customary 2 weeks notice). Unfortunately the timing is pretty horrible as I'm only 2-4 weeks in on a 4-8 month implementation project. I personally am happy to leave immediately but can imagine this would piss the partner/manager off. I will be moving into an industry role (not another consulting firm). Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can approach this to lessen the blow? I've had good reviews and have a positive reputation at the firm, so what kind of push-back should I expect?

Another general question - how should I announce my resignation? Since I don't have a fixed boss, should I be talking to my career adviser, followed by the project partner/manager, and finally HR?

Dec 20, 2015 - 4:05pm

Don't know what is the protocol at your organization but there should be something stipulated about this in your employment contract. Generally speaking you want to be professional and accountable about this. So give them some advanced notice if at all possible. If you have any active assignments, the firm will likely ask some of your colleagues to take over your duties. So get them up to date on your assignments so they can readily take over your works as you disengage yourself from these.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.
  • 1
Dec 20, 2015 - 4:06pm

People quit all the time in the middle of projects. Assuming you work at a big firm, they'll be used to it.

That being said, you can still piss people off if you do it the wrong way. Figure out what you want (to leave immediately) and what you're willing to do (stay for X amount of weeks), and then sit down with your manager to discuss. Once you guys discuss, tell him what you're thinking. Maybe it's two weeks, maybe you stay two months, depending on the situation.

Either way, be up front, and then make sure to leave things in good shape for your team. Nothing worse (and no better way to burn bridges) than someone staying on for a month or two extra and not doing a single thing. In the end, it's your career, so do what's best for you without screwing anyone over too badly.

Dec 20, 2015 - 4:07pm

Let's be real - you're not staying on for 4-8 months. Sit down with your project manager and say you've gotten a new opportunity that you couldn't say no to, they would like you to start as soon as possible and ask what you can do to help make the transition as smooth as possible. He won't ask for anything too unreasonable - it's not the first time anyone has quit. Even if he asks for a month, I'm sure your new job will understand and would rather want you to not burn your bridges.

Sep 10, 2017 - 11:05am

Typically when moving firms, there is the offer (formal) then background checks etc. Do you typically wait until after the background checks are done to make your announcement or once the offer letter is signed?

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:00am

How do I quit? (Originally Posted: 04/24/2008)

I started an internship 2 weeks ago. It's part time and was supposed to go FT during the summer.

Anyways, I just received a summer analyst offer, so no way in hell I'm staying in my operation internship. The thing is, during the interview/when I got my offer they made me assure them I would stay for the summer/wasn't interviewing anywhere else. they are going to be PISSED if I leave.

How would you handle this situation, I'm not above lying.

Its employment at will, not a summer analyst contract, so I'm not in some legal issue.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:08am

1 - I think you posted the most key thing: this is "at will" employment. Essentially that means they can fire you any time and not think twice about it; you should feel the same about quitting, just go ahead and do it.

2 - Be prepared to offer 2 weeks but also be prepared for them to say, "no thanks, today is your last day". That wouldn't be uncommon in the situation you describe.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:06am

i wonder if the folks from Citi and UBS that are firing people as we speak actually contemplate how they'll go about the process.

dude, don't hesitate to let them know you're getting out of there. just don't be an asshole about it, and i can't imagine that anything bad will happen.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:07am

2 weeks is the most professional, but given that you will be burning a bridge, i'm not so sure if it matters.

are you on good terms/freinds with people there? if you feel a decent connection, it can't hurt to give 2 weeks, but yea it could suck on your end.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:11am

To Quit (Originally Posted: 10/16/2007)

I am going to quit soon, but I have no idea how to approach the situation. I have never quit a job before, I have always left to move on with natural progression. Quit my high school job to go to college, internships naturally end, and so on.

I feel bad because BoA did me a favor letting me go to Russia for 6 months. How do I approach it. Any insight is great.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:12am

First, before you do anything, clean house.

Delete any personal stuff from your computer and get your personal items out of there. You should be prepared to lose all of your online access and possibly be escorted out within a few minutes of giving your notice. Not saying it will happen that way, but you need to be prepared.

Offering two weeks notice is a good courtesy, but you should be prepared for them to decline. If you're going to a competitor, they will definitely want you out sooner, for confidentiality reasons.

I've never quit a banking job (only corporates), so I can't advise as to which specific people you should notify first - HR, your staffer, your group head? Probably a judgment call. Or the day and time of day to make your approach? I would lean towards a Friday morning. Definitely should be done in person.

Just a few opinions. I'd be interested in what others have to say.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:14am

If anyone is from BoA here, they are going to be pretty shitty when they work out who you are. Dropping the word on an internet forum? Talk about burning your bridges...

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:15am

You quit banking and you just burned a village nevermind a bridge. I am quitting banking for a corporate job. Yea I have been slowly taking out personal items and deleting anything non work related so I can really be out of here in less than 5 minutes, but great advice. I am going to let my staffer know, MD (and senior bankers), HR, and then friends. I am going to give 2 weeks but I expect a decline of that offer. Any other ideas.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:17am

How long have you been in the job?

Can't you "Man Up" for your 2 year obligation.... I find quitting rather silly when the "time frame is so fixed, absolute, and you knew what you were getting yourself into.

Why'd you waste everyone's time?" (the " " represent what BofA people will think)

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  • Rank: Chimp
Jan 31, 2018 - 4:18am

Net worth or nothing is right. I've heard way worse stories from people who have quit early (sworn at, yelled at, shown the middle finger, etc). Probably depends on how old school your MDs and head are.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:19am

analysts are easily replacable. Most analysts quit. that's why it's a 2 year program. Just be nice and courteous when you give your notice and thank your manager for the opportunity. Not to be rude, but in 3 months, they won't even remember you. You have to do what is best for your career and yourself. Maybe this corporate job wouldn't be there at the end of your program??

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:21am

Like I said...2 years is a nice, neat number. You don't have to explain to employers... "i started with a bank, but decided it's not for me".... to alot of people, they don't like that crap. It sounds too ephemeral, too dandy-mandy, too fairy-like, etc.

It would be great to hear "I quit my job at a BB so I could build orphanages, I decided my skill-set is better used in A,B, C"

"the quotes represent what people will think"

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:23am

In normal circumstances I would stay for 1.5 more years, but this is an excellent opportunity and the timing is now. It is a group that does usually have openings and they usually require 2-3 years of prior MA experience, but I have an in. This is what I want to do in the future so why not now.

Also, I know in a few months I will be an afterthought and that is exactly what I want to be. I do not want people to give a shit that i leave because I completed nothing earth shattering during my stay, no less than the average analyst does in his two years.

I did not come in to this trying to waste anyone's time. Using this rationale no one would ever leave a job because they were wasting people's time. It is all about advancing my career, looking out for number one.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:24am

My comment on 'wasting time' is the 1) cost of recruiting you 2) cost of training you 3) cost of keeping you on the first 1/4 of the year only to have you quit 4) the opportunity John ABC didn't get because you got a position and he didn't

If you stay at a company, you've at least added value in some way (I don't want to start an argument over this theory, it's just a theory...possibly wrong)

It seems like you're smart and are making a good decision, good look man.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:25am

Just give two weeks, if you're given the opportunity to say thanks then do so. Obviously, if you ever want to return to banking (less so other high finance jobs), even with an MBA, you're greatly lessening the chances.

On the other hand, you are employed at will and thus can leave at will. Analysts are tools for higher-ups to leverage to make more money, nothing more - don't mistake all the development crap and doublespeak for caring, it's just a retention tool. If you hate the job, or have found a better opportunity, no need to stay, it's not like you'd want to go back anyway, and investment bankers only have power in their own little world.

  • 2
Jan 31, 2018 - 4:28am

don't sweat it

"In normal circumstances I would stay for 1.5 more years, but this is an excellent opportunity and the timing is now. It is a group that does usually have openings and they usually require 2-3 years of prior MA experience, but I have an in. This is what I want to do in the future so why not now."

do what you have to, be gracious when you leave. it's not like you're going to be friends with these ppl afterwards, no one will take it personally.

  • 1
Jan 31, 2018 - 4:29am

I quit a bank after 1 year to go to another bank. I don't think bank A really cared that much I was leaving. Most banks are looking to shrink their staff now anyways so your just helping. Analysts are a dime a dozen anyways.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:30am

I mean for every analyst that quits, there's probably another 30 college grads lined up to take his/her place anyway.

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-
Best Response
Jan 31, 2018 - 4:31am

Best Way to Quit Your Job (Originally Posted: 01/20/2012)

Now that we're in the throes of what promises to be the most depressing bonus season on record, I thought it might be fun to indulge the fantasy we all think about from time to time: quitting in spectacular fashion. To that end, the good folks over at IFC have compiled the 20 Best Job Quitting Movie Scenes of All Time.

The first two are no-brainers: the scene from Fight Club where Ed Norton kicks his own ass in his boss's office and collects his next year's salary as severance, and the scene from American Beauty where Kevin Spacey manages the same feat through blackmail. The rest are all classics: Jennifer Anniston in Office Space (perhaps her only worthwhile movie role), John Malkovich in Burn After Reading, and who could forget Tom Cruise's "don't leave me hangin'" scene in Jerry Maguire?

Quitting has always been my favorite part of any job, which is probably why I'm such a terrible employee. A lot of you are pretty angst-ridden over the long hours you've been putting in and the miserable bonuses the banks are handing out. I can't tell you that it's not worth it to hang in there; most of you wouldn't believe me anyway. But I can tell you I placed a higher value on my 20's. I walked away from two six-figure finance careers before I was 30. Sometimes the juice just isn't worth the squeeze.

Anyway, I thought I'd send you guys into the weekend with these inspirational career-enders. Here's a pretty good one, although I haven't seen the movie:

    <a href="http://movieclips.com/YgTK-wanted-movie-go-f-yourself/">Go F*** Yourself</a><br /> <a href="http://movieclips.com/sxqb-wanted-movie-videos/">Wanted</a> <a href="http://movieclips.com/">at MOVIECLIPS.com</a>

Remember kids, when you're mad as hell you don't have to take it any more.

Have a great weekend, guys!

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:32am

One of Jennifer Aniston's TWO worthwhile roles.
The other being horrible bosses

But great post as usual

"You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. -Wayne Gretzky. Said by Michael Scott." - Michael Scott
Jan 31, 2018 - 4:35am

Ask my boss if he has a few minutes. Walk into his office and sit down. Ask for a pen. Write some obscene amount of money on the piece of paper he has in front of him.

"What's this?"

"Can you match it?"

"Are you serious?"

"Can you match it?"

"Haha of course not"

"Thanks for the opportunity. I have enjoyed my time here at XYZ."

Stand up, offer my hand, have an awkward handshake, walk out of the office straight out of the building.

Not exactly ridiculous, but a bit of a fantasy right there.

"For I am a sinner in the hands of an angry God. Bloody Mary full of vodka, blessed are you among cocktails. Pray for me now and at the hour of my death, which I hope is soon. Amen."
  • 1
Jan 31, 2018 - 4:41am

Wanted was a great movie. I completely forgot that's how it started.

I am permanently behind on PMs, it's not personal.

Jan 31, 2018 - 4:43am

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Jan 31, 2018 - 4:45am

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Nothing short of everything will really do.
Jan 31, 2018 - 4:47am

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If your dreams don't scare you, then they are not big enough. "There are two types of people in this world: People who say they pee in the shower, and dirty fucking liars."-Louis C.K.
Jan 31, 2018 - 4:46am

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XX
Jan 31, 2018 - 4:48am

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  • Analyst 2 in IB - Cov
Oct 25, 2021 - 3:06pm

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