7/19/13

I graduated from a non-target school with a 3.3 GPA a year ago and have been working in back office operations for a global Asset Management firm. My end goal is to get an MBA from a top b-school and work in IB, and to help get me there I'm considering getting a second BA from UPenn. They have a program where you can enter as a "non-traditional student", and get the same exact undergraduate degree as anyone who went there right after high school. It's expensive, but with scholarships I'm thinking it may be worth it. A BA from an ivy league school could get me into an IB right after graduation, and would definitely help in MBA admissions. Thoughts? How beneficial do you see this being? Aside from costs, do you see any downsides?

Comments (48)

7/19/13

I don't even think you'd qualify. Did you check? Those programs are for people with no bachelors and have non-traditional backgrounds.

Financial Modeling

7/19/13

I asked them and they said I would qualify. They accept people who want to get a second bachelor's degree, but it has to be in a different area (I'd probably want to do their "philosophy, politics and economics" major).

7/19/13

How long would it take?
If it's anything over 2 years, it's such a bad idea. Focus on Master's programs instead (MFin, MS Econ, etc)

7/19/13

With the credits that would transfer, it would take 3 years.

7/19/13

Another question is, are you sure that you can get scholarships?

Talent is hitting a target no one can hit.
Genius is hitting a target no one can see.

7/19/13

It is likely that I would get scholarships, based on past students who have been awarded significant scholarship amounts. The school is quite generous.

7/19/13

dude, that's too long. Just go for a 1 year master's program. Be sure to do your research on who recruits at the programs you look at.

7/19/13

There's a good chance you will regret it when you are into your 30s and realize you spent all of your 20s in education or slaving away in an analyst role.

7/19/13

I didn't read the details, but getting a second bachelor's degree is stupid. Get a masters, or get work experience. I've never heard of anyone getting any extra benefit from going back to school for a second bachelor's. You'd have to go back for engineering or something along those lines, and no one ever does that. If you were smart enough for that, you would have figured it out before you finished school the first time.

7/19/13

No, with your background your better off getting a Master's degree in finance at a more prestigious school

7/19/13

well its only a year, and if it's cheap then go for it. It's not a guarantee that it will help but its possible.

7/19/13

how do you intend to spin your chem major as something lucrative for your employer?

7/19/13

Apply for some of the one year MSc Finance programs, if you don't get in you can use this as a fallback option

7/19/13

.........

7/19/13

i heard guys form Doostang said MBA is very useful, and i don't think a second degree would help.

7/19/13

go for a masters.

I ave 2 bachelor degrees, all beit mine are very similar (banking and finance) and (accounting), so really was a waste of time and I dont think it gavce me any advantage. Yours could help, since they will be so different. But I reckon go for the masters rather, and dingus such as myself can get a bachelor

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Financial Modeling

7/19/13

reach-arounds

7/19/13

HFer_wannabe:

reach-arounds

This to all my hatin' folks seeing me getting guac right now..

7/19/13

Don't be a career student. Go and get a job.

7/19/13

get straight A's in all of your classes, it's foolproof

"The four most dangerous words in investing are: 'this time it's different.'" - Sir John Templeton

"The investor's chief problem - and even his worst enemy - is likely to be himself." - Benjamin Graham

7/19/13

thebrofessor:

get straight A's in all of your classes, it's foolproof


This shit is genius
7/19/13

Study.

7/19/13

2nd bachelors from CUNY?

A 4.0 from CUNY still won't help you...

Get a grad degree

7/19/13

A. If you go to Columbia, you don't go to Big 4. You're good for McKinsey, Bain, Boston Consulting Group.

B. Cooper Union is a great school, people do know about it, and you can make it to a good masters program with that degree.

C. Unless you want to do a MSFE or something very, very quant-oriented, you don't need all that many high-level quant courses. Honestly, your degree in architecture is probably as good prepartion, in terms of math, as an undergrad econ degree.

D. I think a MS is much more worth your time. Especially a MS at Columbia or another top school.

in it 2 win it
7/19/13

FSC,

Thanks for your reply. Do you have any MS programs in mind? The only MS program I was able to look into at Columbia is the MS in Financial Economics, which has the following prerequisites: Probability, Statistics, Microeconomics, Two Semesters of Calc, Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory, and Computer Programing.

Unfortunately (fortunately when I did) I received credit for my high school Calculus class and have only taken a microeconomics elective and 4 semesters of Structures (which would not count for prerequisites) while at Cooper.

7/19/13
dvaron:

FSC,

Thanks for your reply. Do you have any MS programs in mind? The only MS program I was able to look into at Columbia is the MS in Financial Economics, which has the following prerequisites: Probability, Statistics, Microeconomics, Two Semesters of Calc, Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory, and Computer Programing.

Unfortunately (fortunately when I did) I received credit for my high school Calculus class and have only taken a microeconomics elective and 4 semesters of Structures (which would not count for prerequisites) while at Cooper.

You could always take the pre-reqs at your local CC..

This to all my hatin' folks seeing me getting guac right now..

7/19/13

Since you don't have a quantitative background, why are you considering a switch? What job will some calc classes get you that you can't get right now? Why not specialize in architectural consulting instead?

Either:
1) Take Calc 1-3, Linear Algebra, a few basic stats, and a calc-based stats class then apply to quantitative MS.
2) Apply for MBA.

I can't understand how you're an architect yet haven't taken any calc... Isn't an architect a specialized engineer? You can draw it up, but you have no idea if it'll stand once you build it? Seems odd...

I'll do what I can to help ya'll. But, the game's out there, and it's play or get played.

7/19/13

pplstuff,

A bachelor of architecture only requires up to Calculus I (which I received credit for). I have taken a semester of Physics, and have continually taken Structures (engineering for architects) which covers some elements of arithmetic and algebra, but nothing past that.

I am hoping to make a switch into management consulting/Asset Management. This is why I have been looking into a different degree.

7/19/13

Also, have you guys heard about the Tuck Business Bridge Program? Any thoughts on it?

7/19/13

all the hottest girls at my school are marketing majors.

it probably wasn't a stupid choice when you were making it...

If I disagree with you, it's because you're wrong.

7/19/13
cold pizza 2:

all the hottest girls at my school are marketing majors.

it probably wasn't a stupid choice when you were making it...

Lol, the girls were smoking hot. From a social standpoint by time in college has been awesome.

7/19/13
cold pizza 2:

all the hottest girls at my school are marketing majors.

it probably wasn't a stupid choice when you were making it...

Lol, the girls were smoking hot. From a social standpoint by time in college has been awesome.

7/19/13

The schools you mentioned are barely target schools to begin with, and unless you're going back for a specialized degree [ie: nursing] a second B.A. / B.S. is totally unwarrented. I'd go with the master's program and really, really, REALLY, learn how to make it work for you.

Get busy living

7/19/13

if the school is AACSB for accounting - then it doesn't matter where you go.

Just go to the cheapest place and get a master's there.

If I disagree with you, it's because you're wrong.

7/19/13
cold pizza 2:

if the school is AACSB for accounting - then it doesn't matter where you go.

Just go to the cheapest place and get a master's there.

Not true at all.

I actually really agree with the MAcc recommendation, but do not go to another no name school.

OP - my background was worse than yours, I had a 3.0 in accounting from total no name school. I had a crappy internship, but with a decent F500 company (in a small manufacturing facility). I spun that, some leadership activities and a pretty good GMAT into a MAcc at Indiana. It was the best move I could have made. With a top MAcc you'll be turning down really good offers, with a no name MAcc you'll be struggling to get a decent offer.

I know a lot of people from my no name undergrad (which is AACSBD accredited for accounting) that went on to grad school their. They all graduated and went to work for regional accounting firms, small companies or even banks (as loan officers and retail bank management). At IU I had offers from 3 of the Big 4 and other quality companies. My friends from undergrad would've died to have even 1 of my offers, while I was turning down interviews for decent roles. Things may have changed slightly in the last 5 years, but I would go for a brand name MAcc - that's what I did and it worked out well.

If you put in the work to do fairly well on the GMAT (650+) you'll be fine. I was under 700 and I even got a small scholarship offer from a top 10-15 MAcc program with my background.

If you are seriously considering a MAcc check out ANT's website and feel free to send me a PM.

7/19/13
accountingbyday:
cold pizza 2:

if the school is AACSB for accounting - then it doesn't matter where you go.

Just go to the cheapest place and get a master's there.

Not true at all.

I actually really agree with the MAcc recommendation, but do not go to another no name school.

OP - my background was worse than yours, I had a 3.0 in accounting from total no name school. I had a crappy internship, but with a decent F500 company (in a small manufacturing facility). I spun that, some leadership activities and a pretty good GMAT into a MAcc at Indiana. It was the best move I could have made. With a top MAcc you'll be turning down really good offers, with a no name MAcc you'll be struggling to get a decent offer.

I know a lot of people from my no name undergrad (which is AACSBD accredited for accounting) that went on to grad school their. They all graduated and went to work for regional accounting firms, small companies or even banks (as loan officers and retail bank management). At IU I had offers from 3 of the Big 4 and other quality companies. My friends from undergrad would've died to have even 1 of my offers, while I was turning down interviews for decent roles. Things may have changed slightly in the last 5 years, but I would go for a brand name MAcc - that's what I did and it worked out well.

If you put in the work to do fairly well on the GMAT (650+) you'll be fine. I was under 700 and I even got a small scholarship offer from a top 10-15 MAcc program with my background.

If you are seriously considering a MAcc check out ANT's website and feel free to send me a PM.

Accountingbyday,

Thank you so much for your informative reply. At one point I did consider attending IU for a MAcc, but honestly I dislike accounting (mom does it for a living, makes a decent salary but hated the job). But if I really have to, I will buckle down and enter a well ranked MACC program. My only concern is that I will be only well qualified for accounting type jobs. Is there a possibility with a Macc from a good school, I could use it to try to break into a F500 financial analyst type role, or consulting?

7/19/13

in NY, as long as you are AACSB, you're good - they don't give a shit. I know this for a fact.

Maybe it's because there isn't as much demand in the mid-west - I doubt that - but I don't see how it would even matter given that accreditation, considering you're learning the same bullshit...

If I disagree with you, it's because you're wrong.

7/19/13
cold pizza 2:

you're learning the same bullshit...

...and getting recruited by VERY different networks / companies. The accreditation is just to be allowed to keep the doors of the program open. Some schools will make it much easier to get the job you want.

OP, do your homework: what is your current career goal?

Get busy living

7/19/13

UFO is spot on.

At the time, IU was one of only a handful of schools that was recruited nationally by the Big 4. I had an offer from Deloitte NYC because their national recruiting coordinator came to our recruiting events.

While I'm sure PwC Louisville recruits at Kentucky, someone at UK does NOT have the same opportunities outside of that small office in the Big 4. And even worse, the AACSB accredited directional state school I went to undergrad at had NO Big 4 representation. No one from the school made the Big 4 and despite my best efforts I never got an interview for an internship or fulltime.

The current F500 I work at only recruits new hires from 5 schools. While this is just one example, it also is not an anomaly.

7/19/13

Thanks everyone, for the replies so far. So it looks like getting a Masters, is the best choice for me to make. Could someone explain why getting a second undergrad degree in Economics from UVA or UT-Austin is such a bad idea in detail. I'm not looking or expecting to get a IB job from Goldman Sachs or Consulting gig from Bain (though both choices would be amazing). I am aiming at more realistic jobs such as getting a consulting job with a second tier consulting firm such as Accentue or a Finance based job with a F500 like GE,etc. Also I will be only 22 when I graduate with a second undergrad (since I am onlytaking three years with my business undergrad).

Thanks again guys

7/19/13

how will you only be 22 with a second undergrad???????

If I disagree with you, it's because you're wrong.

7/19/13
7/19/13
7/19/13

Get busy living

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