Snubbed for promotion - What would you do?

Hello All,

Long time lurker, but I've had an event at work happen and would like to hear what others would do. I work in a GSE underwriting/production role

In the late fall of last year, my manager of 3 months was let go. I wasn't sure of the reason, just that my big boss asked me to cover my offices until they came to a solution. I was an analyst doing the job of two people, both the manager and analyst. I got great experience and spent a long time in this role, with consistently being told that I was right where I needed to be. Early in the summer, I was promoted to "Senior Analyst" and given a slight raise. It was this time, I was told again by the person in charge that they were looking to hire a manager and that I was on the fast track to becoming manager. My interpretation of this meant "keep up the good work and you'll get recognized around the end of the year." Fast forward to today, I just found out they hired a new person that would step in above me as the new manager and it was my job to get him going/up to speed.

I am not really sure how to react, from my perspective...I spent considerable time working as the manger doing the job, while getting paid as an analyst. Now I've not only been relegated back to being an analyst, but there is no longer a clear path to being promoted until a new spot opens up (aka someone leaves). This feels like an insult as someone who's already been an analyst for 3.5 years and I'm not sure what to do. Stay here and spend another 1-2 years waiting? Leave to go somewhere else? Right before shit hits the fan, with hopes to get a title bump and a raise? Most recruiters seem to only target me for analyst positions, but you'd think as someone with a masters and almost 5-years of CRE experience, shouldn't be an analyst for more than half a decade just before getting promoted.

How would you react or what would you do? I was tempted to go elsewhere, but everyone I talk to wants me to stay cause they'd hate for the company to lose me.

Comments (34)

Most Helpful
Aug 9, 2019

Time to leave. Don't take a role without a title bump.

    • 14
Aug 9, 2019

Resign and let the new guy work it out himself. I faced similar situation, stayed and regretted it.

just to give a bit more context, the last year after i decided to stay i essentially clocked out. instead of working 55-60h per week, through a combination of coming in late, leaving early and taking longer breaks (coffee, lunch, chat, smoke etc) i was working closer to 30-35 real h per week. i was able to do this because i was really good at my job and ran a few crucial processes that no one else could. i just stopped bothering going above and beyond. Still got top rating and full bonus payout.

All in all this gave me the pro-rate salary bump i desired and allowed me to focus on landing my dream job a year later. could have got it 1 year early but it was a very chill year which was good timing for someone with new family

    • 6
Aug 12, 2019

Why did you regret it? Sounds like you still came out on top

    • 2
Aug 12, 2019

it was a v.chill year but i literally added 0 new stuff to my resume apart from things i began doing on my own which wasn't really part of day to day req. just so i could add to it / be able to talk about it. most of the change in my resume was formatting. the job i did get and could have probably got back then if they were recruiting for it. plus it looks like a long period (3+yrs) without promotion so bad on CV even if actual responsibilities were grade above.

whilst i agree about not resigning without something lined up one can always do 1-2 weeks of hard core CV sending out, take 2 weeks of holiday for the year to interview non stop then put in resignation afterwards.

i got a great job out of Big4 after a career break because i had a story and was immediately available - played big part in hiring.

    • 1
Aug 12, 2019

No he/she should not resign. The job market out there is not great, and you should never have to look for a job while you don't have one, especially since he has one.

I think he should at least ask for a bump to associate regardless of pay and lateral that way.

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Aug 12, 2019
C.R.E. Shervin:

No he/she should not resign. The job market out there is not great, and you should never have to look for a job while you don't have one, especially since he has one

This. By all means should he look for a new job...but not at the expense of a paycheck.

Aug 9, 2019

I found myself in a similar situation before, not in banking but at an established healthcare technology firm. This sort of company politics stuff happens in a lot of places. The organization has great employees but instead of promoting from within the upper level management just has a tunnel vision mindset that the talent they need is elsewhere. The only way out of that situation is to move to a different department or company. Do whatever will get you working with a new team that better appreciates you.

    • 3
Aug 9, 2019

It's clear they don't see you fit for this "manager" role. I would start looking elsewhere while the market is hot.

    • 2
Aug 9, 2019

Look elsewhere. Might take time, so don't just resign.

    • 1
Aug 9, 2019

So you got f*cked. Congrats. I've seen people done in much worse than a snub. This is bound to happen a few times in your career and that's okay.

I tend to take more aggressive routes so my word certainly is not gospel.

Threaten to resign. Sit down w/ whomever made the decision to bring on the new guy and tell him you feel slighted by this move and you're beginning your search now. If you are as valuable as it sounds in this thread then they'll work something out. Doubtful they'll fire your cause they need you apparently to get this dude up to speed.

A masters w/ 5 yrs exp should not have analyst in their title.

    • 4
Aug 12, 2019

you don't threaten to leave without already having a good offer in hand that you would consider taking...because that might actually happen.

this is job negotiating 101

just google it...you're welcome

    • 4
Aug 13, 2019

Absolutely. Don't risk getting fired by pissing off your superior unless you have another option ready to go. Even if you are valuable, they could drop you if they think you're a liability because you're spending all your time looking for another job.

Aug 9, 2019

Time to find a new job.

    • 2
Aug 11, 2019

think of the people who are in prison, working a job they hate, or are without friends or family. Buddha perspective

    • 1
    • 9
Aug 11, 2019

The fact that I am getting monkey shit for this demonstrates why some of you guys will never be happy

    • 1
    • 8
Aug 13, 2019

You can be not angry about the thing, but realize you've been taken in the ass in a stoic way and make a move to something better.

Buddha is accepting things you do not have control over; OP does have the control to search for a better job & environment where he/she is recognized correctly.

Aug 11, 2019

so just let people take advantage of you because there is always someone else who has it worse than you? that makes zero sense

    • 3
Aug 13, 2019

This is too far over the head of a forum where the majority of posters worship money...

    • 1
Aug 11, 2019

It can take a while to find another position so I would start quickly before your bitterness negatively impacts your performance.

    • 1
Aug 12, 2019
Chicken Pot Pie:

I am not really sure how to react, from my perspective...I spent considerable time working as the manger doing the job, while getting paid as an analyst. Now I've not only been relegated back to being an analyst, but there is no longer a clear path to being promoted until a new spot opens up (aka someone leaves). This feels like an insult as someone who's already been an analyst for 3.5 years and I'm not sure what to do. Stay here and spend another 1-2 years waiting? Leave to go somewhere else? Right before shit hits the fan, with hopes to get a title bump and a raise? Most recruiters seem to only target me for analyst positions, but you'd think as someone with a masters and almost 5-years of CRE experience, shouldn't be an analyst for more than half a decade just before getting promoted.

How would you react or what would you do? I was tempted to go elsewhere, but everyone I talk to wants me to stay cause they'd hate for the company to lose me.

First off, if your original manager hadn't left and you were still an analyst working for him today, would you feel differently than you do now? If your expectation was that you would be an analyst at this point all along, then I'm not sure how you're any worse off than expected a year ago. Still on the same path.

And as for recruiters... all they see is someone in an analyst role. Why should they offer you managerial positions? After all, your current company hasn't seen fit to. Not saying you aren't deserving, trying to be a Devil's Advocate.

And finally, and not deliberately trying to be a dick... are you sure you did a good job? It isn't out of the question, given the information you provided, that your bosses didn't think you executed on the job the way they were looking for and thus they sent you back down to the role you're good at.

That being said, you have plenty of experience and there is no reason to stay in a job you don't find reasonably fulfilling. If you feel like your talents aren't be appreciated, then definitely start job hunting on the sly. But if everyone is offering you the same kinds of positions, maybe your resume isn't as strong as you think it is?

Aug 13, 2019

One can be super good at their job and still not get a fancy title because of company politics and cliques. It happens everywhere. OP needs to look somewhere else.

Greed is Good!

    • 1
Aug 12, 2019

Do you look really young?

Don't listen to anyone, everybody is scared.

Aug 13, 2019

To the OP - I think another key aspect of this is to take a step back and take an objective look at your performance as a Manager. Were you truly performing as a Manager is expected to within your organization? Or were you just getting them by until they found a solution? Especially while juggling two roles, it is possible that your performance in both dipped slightly - this isn't meant to be critical, just making sure you have looked at this from multiple angles.

I agree with all the above that it's probably time to start looking elsewhere, but when you have a conversation with upper management, I also think it would be good to find out why they did not see you as a fit for the job right now. It's possible that you get some constructive feedback which could help you get to that next level at your current company or your next.

    • 1
Aug 13, 2019

Did you communicate to them that you wanted the position and were ready to take on all applicable responsibilities? If you didn't say anything that was a big mistake - squeaky wheel gets the grease...

    • 1
Aug 13, 2019

Time to leave OP... Dust that resume/CV off and apply often.

Greed is Good!

Aug 13, 2019

I would leave as it's clear there is no upward mobility

Aug 13, 2019

They didn't appreciate you enough to give you an offer to move up. What makes you think that they'll change their mind about that in a year or two?

Drop them once you find another job, not before. People who don't appreciate what you're doing aren't worth your time. This sounds like an office politics thing rather than a performance thing.

Also --- next time you take on a superior's responsibilities for a significant period of time you should require to be paid for the responsibilities that you take on. If you put on your resume the title of the job that you've been doing in addition to your analyst title, and describe the responsibilities that you took on in that manager role it will stand out more to recruiters.

You aren't just an analyst, so don't just put down analyst as your title. Do something like Analyst and the time period, and then the manager title for the time the manager role was filled by you, and make it clear on the resume that you were doing both jobs. If you were doing both jobs then it isn't lying.

    • 1
Aug 13, 2019

Sometimes you just need some patience, it's always a grind to manager level at most financial institutions, but the progression from there takes off if you are truly a capable person, and vice versa many stall at mgr level for a long time

Aug 14, 2019

I'm going to take a more contrarian approach to this one. First, I'm not really clear on the exact timelines of how long you were in this manager role. That said:

Chicken Pot Pie:

In the late fall of last year, my manager of 3 months was let go. I wasn't sure of the reason, just that my big boss asked me to cover my offices until they came to a solution.

OP literally said they needed cover until they found a new manager, whether internally or externally. Flub number one might have been not fully understanding the extent of the cover and what that meant for your career and promotion potential prior to accepting this responsibility. There was also no discussion of a pay raise while taking on greater responsibilities, so you kind of screwed yourself in that regards and stayed at the same baseline. But, I digress. Farther down in the post it's noted that they mentioned you were doing a great job and to keep up the good work. Again, I wouldn't immediately think this means you've got the slot for the manager role. Your firm isn't responsible for what you think you heard. Maybe you were doing a great job. Maybe they do see you as a manager. Did you discuss it?

Don't get me wrong. I'm all for promoting internally and rewarding those who work hard. And, if you feel slighted, by all means start looking elsewhere while you're gainfully employed. And maybe I'm not reading between the lines correctly, but it seems more like you're just sour you thought you had a manager role lined up when maybe you didn't really. Tell me I'm wrong and the tone might change. But it doesn't seem like anything was in writing, they didn't outright tell you it was yours and t doesn't seem like many other discussions were had either about how you were performing when you were filling in. You're the captain of your own ship. Take ownership of that. Remove real estate from the equation, this is a huge part of the corporate/office politics I personally hate, but is sooo important to master. You must look out for Number 1 at all times.

Think of it this way: you were an analyst filling in for a Manager and you feel slighted when you only got promoted to Senior Analyst and they hired someone externally. Is it normal for Analysts to get promoted straight to Manager? How many other Senior Analysts are at your firm that got passed over as well? Just like personal priorities, business priorities change too. Maybe they found a rock star who would take their business to the next level. Or, they felt you needed more time to attain manager qualities as myself and a few others have previously note.

Now, if you did have multiple conversations about how you were doing (as it isn't expressly stated) and you were promised the role, that's a different story. I think not, though. At the least, if you branch out and receive an offer on a new role, before you accept, consider speaking with your superiors about how you felt slighted and ask them what happened. If you don't like the response, take the offer and move on with your head high. If you like their response and see light at the end of the tunnel, you can not accept the offer, stay at your firm, and no one will be the wiser. I think this is really only reliable and valid if you receive an offer within the next few months. Otherwise, the longer it takes to have the discussion it becomes more of a moot point. The "hey boss, remember when you said I was on the fast track to manager 8 months ago? What happened there?" scenario will do you no good.

That's just my $0.02.

    • 2
Aug 15, 2019

In my opinion; the company isn't at fault for anything and it's not a "snub". That said, OP now has limited upward mobility with brand new manager, so it is nevertheless potentially in OP's best interest to use his interim manager as a stepping stone somewhere else

Aug 14, 2019

Did not read the rest of the thread so apologies if this is a repeat... Have you tried talking to someone internally about this? I get sometimes it is better to play things close to the vest, but perhaps, in this case, it is worth voicing your concerns with your boss's boss in an open-air conversation. No expectations obviously, but simply talking through your thought process with them and explaining why you came to your conclusion and subsequent disappointment.

Maybe they had their reason for not picking you, but I would want to know those reasons so I can asses whether they are fair reasons, fix them, and find my path to the next level.

Similarly, if they are not open in conversation and do not give you fair reasons as to why you weren't chosen - then maybe that is a sign and it is time to move on.

    • 1
Aug 15, 2019

I would push for promotion to associate, and simultaneously look for exit opportunities.

But I would recommend you exit on your own terms, not just quit.

You worked for a while as a manager, but that's not necessarily a bad thing.
You had the opportunity to get leadership experience, and that's positive.

For whatever reason, they didn't find you to be fully manager-ready.
Maybe you could get feedback as to why.

They are likely now feeling the need to placate you since the job that they had indicated was yours has now gone to someone else.
Use that to your advantage to get the rank and salary bump you desire.

And as for quitting - don't quit until you have your next job in-hand.
That's just common sense.

    • 1
Aug 15, 2019
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Sep 9, 2019
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