What does “Low Energy” really mean?

EbbsAndFlows's picture
Rank: Gorilla | 675

Been looking for a role in MMPE and have had pretty good success in most processes. The feedback I've gotten consistently and for the 4th time in a row now is that I'm "low energy" or not "high energy enough".

To me this is a somewhat weird reason to not get an offer and even stranger that I've gotten that exact same phrase each time.

Any help from someone in the industry would be helpful.

Comments (19)

Feb 19, 2020

There's nothing special here, it means what you would expect. Do some mock interviews with peers / mentors to see what they say.

Would keep amping up the energy showbiz-style until you naturally get the opposite, that you are way over the top with high energy. Semi-serious

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Funniest
Feb 19, 2020

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Feb 21, 2020

JEB!

Feb 20, 2020

Not to be political but look at Donald trump vs Jeb bush in the old debates. You need to give off energy like you are always fully rested ready to take on whatever gets in your way. It's hard to describe so that's why I would say to watch them in those debates. A large Critic of Biden in the past has been the same, it's a big deal and it's noticeable

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Most Helpful
Feb 20, 2020

You probably are perceived as someone a bit boring and dull, not someone you would spend a 8-hour flight with or an evening having dinner with the management team of a prospective target.

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Feb 20, 2020

To me, the term "low energy" means pretty much the same thing in most industries. Whenever I've been told I've had low energy, it usually had something to do with lack of eagerness or enthusiasm. Even if I was getting work done, if I was doing work as if I just doing what I am told, or not contributing anything socially, I'd get told this sometimes.

Not that I'm saying you're robotic or lacking enthusiasm in any way, but this has been the case for me. I think people generally like it when you have an air of looking forward to the work that you're about to do. You don't necessarily have to be bouncing off the walls with excitement as that can get annoying too, but maybe you can clarify with them what they mean exactly when they say that to you? From there, maybe you can discuss and come to terms and adjust your "energy" accordingly.

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Feb 20, 2020

My best advice would be to realize that nobody sees the thoughts inside your head. Even if you are excited about an opportunity or project or deal, the only way people know that is through expressing it in words and actions.

Given that low energy is your starting point, you need to go out of your way to express enthusiasm and eagerness. Silly things like exclamation points on emails and verbal variation in tone go a long way to changing a perception.

Array

Feb 20, 2020

Low energy means other people are perceiving your character to be somewhat reserved, chill, not as talkative and the tonality of your voice is coming across as less interested and boring.

High energy would be someone really hyped, expressive in how they talk, positive body language and tonality, excited and living in the moment and generally more vibrant and happier.

Working in sales this is super important, would advise you to learn how to be high energy especially at work to increase other peoples impression of you.

Feb 20, 2020

Try smiling more.

  • Prospect in Other
Feb 20, 2020

Get similar feedback at times. As someone who is pretty stoic, how can I balance appearing more enthusiastic without coming across as corny or contrived?

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Feb 20, 2020

"Low Energy" is a horrific descriptor. I'm shocked that multiple people in a row used the same word.

I would get a coach who can give you real time feedback. This is a very serious concern. You are giving off apathy as your modus operandi. I doubt that is your intent.

Feb 21, 2020

it's a dumb piece of feedback and not indicative of your energy level. Lots of "zen" people come off as low energy but their minds are as sharp as anyone. Anyway here are the two tricks to keep in mind: 1) Sit on the edge of the chair and lean-into the speaker, your body language will convey interest. 2) nod your head quickly when you agree on something. Slow nods don't convey energy, and no nods convey lack of interest. 3) through out the interview make sure that move in some way. write notes quickly, tap your pen noiselessly and anything else that makes sense for you. when you get up from your chair to shake someone's hand , do it quickly. A firm handshake is a must.

Feb 21, 2020

Take B12 pills.

Feb 21, 2020

Most typical example I can think of as "low energy" in an interview setting is someone who says the minimum when asked a question. Doesn't feel conversational.

Feb 21, 2020

So it's an ambiguous and subjective conversation on what truly defines 'High Energy' vs. 'Low Energy'. But for work, it can usually fall into the following buckets:

  • Vitality aka physical energy. Meaning, do you lack a sense of urgency, are more reserved, out of shape, etc. While I think it's unfair to punish people for not always looking well-rested, in-shape, etc. I don't think it will help them in their careers
  • Adaptability/Socialability aka mental energy. Are you fluid when change comes? Are you curious to explore things outside of your comfort zone? Do you work with a group on a challenge? If the answer to those is 'no', then you might be 'Low Energy'

Just my two cents, but I wouldn't let it get you down. If you have to put on a face during an interview and/or at work, then I'd say you should probably do it.

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  • Prospect in IB-M&A
Feb 21, 2020

Low energy means as a person you aren't energetic. In other words you don't have much energy.

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Feb 21, 2020
Prospect in IB-M&A:

Low energy means as a person you aren't energetic. In other words you don't have much energy.

+1. That's deep. I'd love to hear more of your explanations of how to define terms. For instance, how would you define "fast-paced"? Or, "tall person"? Anyway, very insightful, thank you.

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Feb 21, 2020

Do more crack

Feb 21, 2020
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