Business School Case Books

Consulting Case Book PDF's

I went through the consulting interview process a few months ago and found these case books really useful for practicing, both with people in mock interviews and for solo issue tree practice. I have also really benefited time and time again from WSO so thought I might give something back by leaving all this here. It includes older Harvard consulting case books and Wharton Consulting casebooks.

these books are all readily "findable" on the internet if you look hard enough but can be a little time consuming.

Hope they help someone out!


Recommended Reading

AttachmentSize
PDF icon Darden 20121.5 MB
PDF icon fuqua 20143.25 MB
PDF icon HBS (older)2.93 MB
PDF icon Illinois 20154.02 MB
PDF icon INSEAD 20111.19 MB
PDF icon LBS 20133.09 MB
PDF icon McCombs 2008801.46 KB
PDF icon McGill 20134.68 MB
PDF icon Wharton 2007412.78 KB
PDF icon Wharton 20091.54 MB
PDF icon Wharton 2010758.61 KB
PDF icon HBS 20111.94 MB

Consulting Case Interview Course

  • 2,037 questions across 209 consulting firms. Crowdsourced from over 600,000 members.
  • 11 Detailed Exclusive Cases developed by a McKinsey Associate and 10+ hours of video.
  • Trusted by over 1,000 aspiring consultants just like you.

Comments (70)

Apr 3, 2017

Thank you @DropBear

Array
Apr 3, 2017

Thank you for uploading all these resources. Was curious how many times did you go over these cases in order to feel pretty confident in the interview? I've seen some on this forum gone through 25-50+ cases to be prepared for case interviews.

    • 1
Apr 3, 2017

I went through consulting recruiting last year, and from what I've seen, 25-50 is not at all uncommon for successful candidates. That said, the ideal number varies from person to person.

Personally, I hit diminishing returns around my 20th case, although I still did about 30 by the end. Looking back, I think I plateaued earlier than most people, since I had pretty good business intuition to start with (probably thanks to my multiple internships in finance beforehand). Recruiting went quite well for me, as I reached the final round at 3/4ths of the places I interviewed before I took an equity research offer instead.

However, if you have no business experience/intuition whatsoever, you'll probably need to do 50 at minimum -- I had a pre-med friend who still needed a lot of improvement at his 30th case, and I doubt 40 would've been enough for him either. And there are also some people out there who virtually never hit diminishing returns with practice. The more they practice, the better they get.

    • 3
Apr 4, 2017

I think @Fantastic is spot on with regards to the amount of case interviews. I do not come from a business background at all, so probably did around 50 actual, sit down in front of someone for 30-40 minute style interviews.

But some of the older more simple case books were easy to just go through to practice you initial structure and math. In these ones I would just read the initial prompt and go from there and just give myself a few minutes to make an issue tree, then if there was any math further down I would do that too. Obviously this method won't do anything for you communication skills but is a great way to practice lots of case's quickly (about 10 minutes per case) and doesn't require a partner.

You will also find that you start turning every little thing you hear in the news into an issue tree... Or at least I did.

Apr 5, 2017

YOU ARE THE MAN!!!
Can't thank you enough for this, SB'ed!

Learn More

2,037 questions across 209 consulting firms. 11 Cases developed by a McKinsey Associate, 10+ hours of video. The WSO Consulting Interview Prep Course has everything you’ll ever need to ace your consulting case interviews. Learn more.

Apr 5, 2017
DropBear:

Hi Everyone,I went through the consulting interview process a few months ago

Oh and did you secure an offer if you don't mind me asking?

Apr 5, 2017

Unfortunately I didn't get the role I was after, but I did get to the final interview and was given some great feedback. I have a pretty strange background which made me a bit of a wildcard at best.

Apr 5, 2017

Sorry to hear, hope you are keeping at it!

I am from a non-business background trying to break in too, I would love to hear more background of your story

Apr 5, 2017

Thanks @willois - I am still looking at a few things in consulting, but have a very attractive offer from Amazon that I am very happy to take.

As far as background, I joined the Army out of high school, where I served for 10 years before working for Schlumberger on offshore drilling operations. I took the GMAT and started B-School last year of moving into something consulting/professional services. I have a few big things I have to overcome on my background, being; no undergrad, no business background, and military (which can in some circles be a bit of a red flag).

It's all good fun though and am enjoying the process!

Apr 7, 2017
DropBear:

Thanks @willois - I am still looking at a few things in consulting, but have a very attractive offer from Amazon that I am very happy to take.

As far as background, I joined the Army out of high school, where I served for 10 years before working for Schlumberger on offshore drilling operations. I took the GMAT and started B-School last year of moving into something consulting/professional services. I have a few big things I have to overcome on my background, being; no undergrad, no business background, and military (which can in some circles be a bit of a red flag).

It's all good fun though and am enjoying the process!

Man, with that kind of a unique story! Respect, bro, and all the best!

GoldenCinderblock: "I keep spending all my money on exotic fish so my armor sucks. Is it possible to romance multiple females? I got with the blue chick so far but I am also interested in the electronic chick and the face mask chick."

Mar 15, 2018

Replied to wrong person, my bad

Mar 15, 2018

Thank you for posting these, will definitely be a big help.

More importantly, thanks for your service.

Good luck in your future endeavors.

Apr 5, 2017

Much obliged to you for transferring every one of these assets. Was interested how often did you go over these cases keeping in mind the end goal to feel really certain about this.

Apr 5, 2017

Because I don't have a business background, I spent a lot of time going over cases. I did a lot of practice interviews, and also spent a lot of time just practicing issue trees and mental math. I found though that once you start doing a lot of that even listening to the news is case practice because you constantly run through issue trees in your head for EVERYTHING.... Even what to have for dinner!

    • 1
Mar 15, 2018

I am preparing for my case interview in July. You can add me to your skype or email me. My skype ID is arun.bhota

Mar 15, 2018

I'm also preparing for case interviews (not yet scheduled though)....my skype name is albert-choi

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-

Mar 15, 2018

Another one here. I also have a decent collection of casebooks I can share. Skype name: neelguru , and I'm in the LA area if anyone here would like to meet up and do face to face cases.

Apr 5, 2017

Side note to keep in mind for those using case books for preparation: the actual cases that companies give in interviews evolve over time. For that reason, be careful not to get too accustomed to a case "style" that you find in an earlier (>3 years old) casebook.

This is a minor consideration, mostly for those in business school that have a solid fundamental base for casing and are refining their approach (probably after the ~20 case mark for most people). Early on, a case is a case and every new situation is a way to stretch your mind, but later on some of the finer details start to matter.

    • 1
Apr 5, 2017

good advice @dmw86" whether practicing by myself of or in interviews these were mostly just a guide and were a good source of business questions when I and my friends were feeling too lazy to think of something original. You can find excellent sources for case interviews by watching the news.

Mar 15, 2018

wharton 1962 what's your mailing address

Mar 15, 2018

OMG 16 is too much! I got 4 and I think that's enough :-s

My formula for success is rise early, work late and strike oil - JP Getty

Mar 15, 2018

i pm'd you

Learn More

2,037 questions across 209 consulting firms. 11 Cases developed by a McKinsey Associate, 10+ hours of video. The WSO Consulting Interview Prep Course has everything you’ll ever need to ace your consulting case interviews. Learn more.

Apr 19, 2017

Thanks

Mar 15, 2018

thx

Mar 15, 2018

good find.

Mar 15, 2018

thanks

Mar 15, 2018

Thank you.

Mar 15, 2018

Great material, thanks.

ak

Mar 15, 2018

Interesting stuff

Mar 15, 2018

I haven't read it, but I'm sure it would help me a lot. thanks.

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-

Mar 15, 2018

anyone have it for HBS?

Mar 15, 2018

http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/student/club/c...
Some are behind a login but others like the HBS cases and the Duke cases can be freely accessed.

Apr 23, 2017

Excellent material, Cheers!!

Apr 24, 2017

Thanks for the materials. Is there any way to get access to recent casebooks (do they even exist)? I've been hard pressed to find anything after 13' from major business schools. Is it that many M7 schools have just done such a good job of hiding their casebooks from the public for 5+ years or there just hasn't been a new one released for a while?

Apr 25, 2017

The newest book my school has is 2012 (M7 school). We are working on developing a new one but may not be until next year.

Apr 26, 2017

Care to forward it when it's released?

Apr 26, 2017

I would say it's a little from column (a) and a little from column (b).

I wouldn't think there is a great deal that needs to be changed in them though from year to year. Some time ago McKinsey moved to a more interviewer lead format so business schools spent a lot of time revising their case books. I'm not sure there has been anything particularly significant like that over the last few years to justify re-writing new books other than to just refresh the cases from time to time.

Just my thoughts though...

    • 1
Apr 29, 2017

Thanks for this @DropBear, you're owed a beer or two from everyone here!

Apr 30, 2017

You are very welcome - hope it helps!

May 1, 2017

Thank you so much @DropBear
You're very kind and I, and I'm sure everyone here, send you lots of positive energy!

May 3, 2017

You're welcome @Monkey44 - I hope it's useful

May 22, 2017

Thank you so much @DropBear .

May 28, 2017

You're very welcome @chocopudding - Tell your friends to drop by and grab it too!

Jun 1, 2017

@DropBear Just to let you know..This is really appreciated.. Thank you. I am a fresh graduate and I have my interviews in 2 weeks without any prior knowledge about case interviews due to my engineering background and i feel this would be very helpful. Thanks!

Jun 1, 2017

Yes, great resources!! Btw, let me know if you would like to do some case practice online in the coming days.

Jun 1, 2017

Yh, I would love to!! I've sent you a PM.

Jun 1, 2017

Hi @moseswso - Be sure to drop by and let us know how you go!

Jun 2, 2017

@DropBear @DCM17 Yeah I would. I recently passed the McKinsey PST a week ago and would be having 1st round Interviews upper Friday. I'm really nervous cos it all seems new to me. I'm trying my best in preparing though. I have read the theoretical aspects of the HBS and Wharton Case books and also Victor Cheng's book. I just need to start practicing cases now. I have few partners to practice with so i'm gonna do the bulk of my case practice alone

Best Response
Jun 3, 2017

That's the critical ingredient - "practice".

Although it's certainly ideal to practice in person with someone so you can practice your communication and adaptability when you are challenged on your logic, you can still get a lot out of practicing yourself. Just read the case opening and practice making your issue trees, take your time and do it very thoroughly, speed can come later.

One thing that surprised me when I did my interviews, was how much time you actually have to do things like your issue trees and lay out your structure. In many cases I would take a minute or two to do my introductory issue tree and I would go to start talking and they would remind me not to rush and take all the time I need. So don't ever feel like you are in a rush... You probably won't be remembered if you take 1 minute longer than usual, but you will if you rush it and perform poorly.

Another key piece of advice which worked for me was taking time to think about how to segment each piece of analysis and to keep it as un-technical (or fancy) as possible for as many layers as necessary. As an example, I come from an oil and gas drilling background, and when the question was, words to the effect of "how our client, big oil, increase their production across the reservoir portfolio" my mind starts thinking of all sorts of technical things like seawater steam injection, advanced perforation stimulation etc. But the correct answer in this case would probably be something like:

how our client, big oil, increase their production across the reservoir portfolio?
There are two options (one or both of the following):
1) increase recovery per reservoir
2) increase number of reservoirs

This is a completely non technical answer, and anyone who did grade 5 math can probably follow the logic, but this is what you should be aiming for. If you then wanted to look at 1. above, you would do something like:

Increase recovery per reservoir (one or both of the following):
a) increase number of wells
b) increase flow rate per well

*potentially at this point you might have to start looking at something a little more technical, but this would almost certainly be out of scope for a strategy case interview.

On the other side "2) increase number of reservoirs" you would do something like the following:

a) Find new reservoirs (Notice how plain and simple the language is. don't try and sound sophisticated)
b) Buy reservoirs

Under "a) Find new reservoirs", you could look at something like:

i) further explore current fields
ii) explore new fields

The next question could be something like how would you select which field to explore from the following list (or something like that)

This is all fictitious and likely more simple then the interviews you might see at MBB, but it's an illustration as to the sort of simplicity you need to be thinking with.

I have attached an example of how you could do this in an interview, and how simple it would look. I would have another sheet where I have scribbled down the actual question and as a bit of a scratch pad, but the actual issue tree should be as clean as possible. You can then talk through your logic while pointing to each section of your tree.

They will almost certainly have a specific area they want you to look at anyway, so this is all just to see how your logic works. They could have a sheet of paper with some semi technical information about where they could explore next, some different reservoirs they might be able to purchase, a few options for increasing flow etc etc. Your job would then be to show some sort of logical and structured approach to choosing a specific recommendation and why, that part will almost certainly have some math involved.

If anyone has any more questions I am more than happy to help. I am certainly no expert, but have spent so much time on this over the last year, it would be a shame not to pass it on to at least one person.

Good luck!!!

    • 10
Jun 3, 2017

one more easy practical tip that comes to mind for those who have interviews coming up to consider...

When you have a math Problem, explain every step while you are doing it, regardless of how simple it may look to you. They will often ask you to do this anyway, but for whatever reason, some might not. There are three reasons that come to mind for why you do this:

  1. Time: It gives you a precious few moments to collect yourself and slow the pace down a bit
  2. Communication: It showcases your client-facing skill, explaining something that may or may not be simple in a way that is not condescending or convoluted. It also forces you to be neat and methodical.
  3. Help!: believe it or not, it is very easy for an interviewer to catch and quickly correct a minor mistake if they see exactly where it happened in real time.

Conversely, lets say that after you get your math problem, you bury your head in your paper, scratch numbers all over your page, and after an awkwardly long time, produce you answer, and it's is wrong! The interviewer suggests you have another go, you go back and try again, even more anxious than you were the first time, and make another mistake. At this point you are basically cooked.

I would split math problems in two two main types:
1. Defined: when you are given all the data you need to complete your calculation and really all you have to do, is walk them through your process. eg "If price is your only consideration, which company should you use to paint the inside of the clients pool" and you have a table in front of you with the dimensions of the pool, and a table containing a few different companies, each with how many coats of paint they recommend, how thick a coat is when wet, and a volume price for the paint. They may be even more tricky and trow in a few colors or something.

  1. Undefined: as above but you are missing bits of the information. The missing information might be:
    a) something you will need to ask for because there is no way of knowing, i.e. the dimensions of the pool
    b) something you might need to make an assumption on: i.e. how much the paint costs. With this type of situation it's good to try and make an educated guess and justify it, eg "well I think paint costs about $100 for a 5 gallon tin at the hardware store, so assuming they get this in much larger volumes with cheaper packaging spread over larger individual units, I think it's fair to assume that this will cost half as much as the stuff from the store, so lets say $10 a gallon". prepare to be challenged on your assumptions as to why you think it would be this price, i.e. do you think this would need to be specialty paint that is more expensive etc. This is all just to see that you can back up assumptions, think on your feet, and think logically/structurally.

My preferred process when I came across one of these problems was as follows:
1. Repeat the question back to them, and WRITE IT DOWN. So many times when I was practicing I would passively listen to the question, race into all the math, and then at the end forget that the question was, for example, how the paint will cost, not how much of it you will need. This sounds simple, but your brain can do weird things in the heat of the moment.
2. Ask to take a moment... then use that moment to think about the problem and sketch out your thoughts on your scratch paper (not your neat one), how you will solve it, what you currently know, and what you will need to know.
3. If you are missing inputs, then go through the process outlined above.
4. talk them through your process: this sounds simple enough, but don't try and be Einstein, just think back to how you did it at school, write the actual formula down i.e. "profit = revenue - cost", then sub in the things you need, then perform the calc. chances are, that after you listed your assumptions, the interviewer will give you the assumptions they would like you to use (just so it's easy for them to follow the math). Because you are doing this with them and explaining every single step, and writing it down as you go, if you do something silly like drop a zero, mess a decimal point, or forget that 4/2=2 they will say something like "hmmm, hold on, take another look at that bit" (hopefully).
5. Get to the end, check you answered the actual question and put it forward confidently

Guys and girls, I know some of this sounds like really basic simple stuff, but I am deliberately writing this with so much detail because these little things can be the difference between coming off polished and taking a few extra minutes, and coming off like you are in a rush and sloppy... No amount of MECE practice can redeem getting the same math problem wrong 3 times in a row.

A few examples to think about below (do yourself a favour and refrain from jumping on wiki, I know this is full of unknowns, but practice making some assumptions):

How much oil flows out of an oil well each day?
How much will it cost to re-carpet all the floors of the empire state building?
What is the sales revenues from coca-cola vending machines in Chicago?

    • 5
Jun 3, 2017

Thank you all for the Bananas! if you like any of my posts throughout this page and want to give me a Banana (or throw some monkey shit at me) could you please do it to the top post in the thread, it will ensure that this post stays fresh for others to use. Cheers!

    • 2
Jun 4, 2017

Thank you so much!

Jun 6, 2017

I Would like to say thanks for this knowledgeable resource it really helpful for who want to gain tips about interviews

Jul 3, 2017

Much obliged to you for transferring every one of these assets. Was interested how often did you go over these cases keeping in mind the end goal to feel really certain about this.

Jul 27, 2017

I was probably doing these at least a few times a week. Whenever I had a spare 20-30 minutes I would open a new one, read the prompt and practice making an issue tree. I personally didn't find the communication style too difficult to learn, but was not familiar with MECE issue trees so in my case it was fine to practice by myself. However don't neglect the communication aspect of this so practice with friends/colleagues as much as possible. You need to be able to solve the case and actually communicate it while you do it.

    • 2
Jul 3, 2017

Excellent! Thank you so much!

Sep 22, 2017

Glad I could help...

Dec 31, 2017

Thanks for sharing your materials and your insight - so useful. SB'd.

Jan 18, 2018

As someone who recently went through the whole application process (and got multiple offers) I can also recommend the Yale casebook and the casebook from Esade. I can upload them if someone is interested.

Also, the Wharton casebooks are pretty mathematical (at least the ones I got; 2005 & 2010). Practice some of this cases with people you are not that familiar with and see how well you do to the math when you are a bit under stress because you do not want to fail.

Another tip: Most casebooks start with different frameworks, different ways to open a case. Do not learn every method from every casebook, you'll get confused in the end. Choose a couple frameworks you feel comfortable with and that can cover most of the different case types and tweak every framework to make it work for a specific case.

    • 1
Jan 18, 2018

that would be most appreciated! which year are they published? I am on the lookout for more recent case books as the ones here are quite dated.

Jan 25, 2018

Pm me your email and I send it. It does not seem possible to attach files in a comment or thread. At least I do not know how.

Jan 25, 2018

If you send me your email I will get in touch about getting the books uploaded on here. Or if you have a link to where you can download them from you can send that to me too.

Jan 18, 2018

Agreed! Please post the Yale & Esade casebooks!

TYIA

Jun 30, 2018
Jul 5, 2018
Oct 15, 2018
Jan 5, 2019