Difference between a MiM and Ms in Finance

MEvolutionToday
Rank: Baboon | banana points 166

Hi,

basically, by reading the title, some of you might wonder why I'm asking this question that can sound stupid or easy to answer.

I've googled this question and I couldn't find an answer here or on any other websites.

While browsing through a few career development pages on university websites, I found out that a lot of students attending a MiM program actually end up in investment banking, financial services, Asset Management, etc position.

Why do these people do not attend a finance degree? What's the point of taking a MiM if you're going to work in a finance related job?

I hope that what I'm asking makes sense and I am wondering if I'm the only one having questions about this topic

Comments (23)

May 23, 2012

A MiM is a one year, graduated degree in management and business sciences. The Masters in Finance is a one year, graduate degree entirely focus on finance.

If you have a liberal arts background, not a lot of math or business classes, etc, the MiM might be the optimal degree for you since it would provide that business education that you do not previously have. If you have a finance background you can really choose either degree.

Both the MiM and MSF will place you in banking if you work at it, but the MiM will provide more of an advantage for consulting or other types of non finance related careers. The MSF will provide you with an advantage if you are looking to work in finance and targeting places that might not have the resources to bring everyone up to speed all at once.

In the US the main MiM programs are Duke and Wake Forest. Duke places as well into banking because of the brand and quality of education coming out of Duke. Outside of these two schools most specialized business degrees with banking placements are MSF programs (UT-Austins MAcc being the exception, but most likely no longer with the advent of their MSF program).

Hope this helps. Let me know if you want further clarification.

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May 23, 2012

Thank you for your answer!

Considering that I am pursuing a bachelor's degree in business administration and that I know that I want to work in IB. A masters in finance would be a better choice (?) BUT what would be the positive and negative aspects of doing a MiM instead?

May 24, 2012
MEvolutionToday:

Thank you for your answer!

Considering that I am pursuing a bachelor's degree in business administration and that I know that I want to work in IB. A masters in finance would be a better choice (?) BUT what would be the positive and negative aspects of doing a MiM instead?

Brand is a big factor. A Duke MMS might be a general business education, but the Duke brand will go further than a specialized masters somewhere with no OCR or little alumni help.

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May 24, 2012

If you already have a BSBA and plan on working in Finance I personally don't understand why you would get a MiM over an MSF.

Search WSO and I'm sure you'll find many threads on this but TNA's comment is really good.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_of_Managementh...

May 25, 2012

The UVA MS Commerce degrees are also highly regarded from what I have read but I don't think you can apply if you are a BSBA.

May 25, 2012

Yeah, the UVA program is great. I put that more into the MSF category with the caveat that you can't have a business undergrad. Interesting enough though, you CAN have an econ undergrad (which I consider to be pretty interchangeable with finance/business).

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May 25, 2012
TNA:

Yeah, the UVA program is great. I put that more into the MSF category with the caveat that you can't have a business undergrad. Interesting enough though, you CAN have an econ undergrad (which I consider to be pretty interchangeable with finance/business).

yeah I found that interesting.

There are two different "tracks" to the UVA program.

The Financial Services track - more MSFish

And the Management and Marketing track- more MiMish.

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May 26, 2012

Thanks for your input.

Basically, a guy like me could either do a MiM or MSF to end up in finance, but depending on the brand.

(From a european point of view) A LBS MiM would be much better than an unknown university MSF. Then again, a MSF would be better than a MiM, at, let's say LSE?

Again, the sloan MSF will be much better than the LBS MiM, if finance is my goal?

May 26, 2012

Yeah, I'd be interested in finding out whether a MiM from LBS is better than their Masters in Finance programme if the goal is HF/PE or asset management? I would naturally be more interested in the Finance programme, but it requires 2 years work experience.

Also finally, how would a MiM from LBS compare to a Finance programme from LSE/Cambridge/Imperial if the end goal is again HF/PE/Asset management?

Thanks.

May 27, 2012
Impossible_Living:

Yeah, I'd be interested in finding out whether a MiM from LBS is better than their Masters in Finance programme if the goal is HF/PE or asset management? I would naturally be more interested in the Finance programme, but it requires 2 years work experience.

Also finally, how would a MiM from LBS compare to a Finance programme from LSE/Cambridge/Imperial if the end goal is again HF/PE/Asset management?

Thanks.

For the first question, I'm pretty confident about saying that their MSF will give you MUCH more than their MiM if you want to work in finance.

May 29, 2012
Impossible_Living:

Yeah, I'd be interested in finding out whether a MiM from LBS is better than their Masters in Finance programme if the goal is HF/PE or asset management? I would naturally be more interested in the Finance programme, but it requires 2 years work experience.

Also finally, how would a MiM from LBS compare to a Finance programme from LSE/Cambridge/Imperial if the end goal is again HF/PE/Asset management?

Thanks.

Correct me if I'm wrong but I think the LBS MSF is post-experience.

You would have to ask more people about the second question, but from my limited research/experience/knowledge I'd guess an Oxbridge/LSE/Imperial MSF would be better.

May 29, 2012

dont think it damages nor does it replace unless you have work experience and go to something like princeton or sloans or etc that will give you an 'associate' placement

May 29, 2012

yeah agree, in my experience if you dont have the work experience you'll still only be considered for an Analyst position.

"I can calculate the motion of heavenly bodies but not the madness of people"

May 29, 2012

MSF/MiM are not viewed by the people hiring as a replacement for MBAs, because you cannot replicate real working experience. If I was going into IB I would consider going back to a target MBA program. However, being on the S&T side of the business the odds of me going back for an MBA are < 5%. I can only see myself getting an MBA to leverage a career switch. Odds are I'll do the CFA and be done with it.

I cant see how MSF/MiM would hurt someone as lon as they made good grades

May 29, 2012

Thanks! I guess the only problem with doubling up on the Master's degrees is student loans...

May 29, 2012

Well i have a MiM degree from ESCP which is a top MiM school in the EU, and i think it works really well as a replacement for an MBA degree, especially in the wee years of you career. You get excellent job opportunities at top companies in every sector, though granted the levels offered are entry or mid management positions. But then again the MiM students usually have less than 2 years of work ex, so it is a good start for them.

As for doing an MBA later on, well i think it will be counter productive as i already have most of the skills an MBA grad has and have almost the same education. After a few years of work ex, there hardly will be any difference between me( a MiM grad) and an MBA grad.
As for the last question on whether an MiM will harm your chances for an MBA. Well on the contrary it will greatly increase your chances of acceptance. An MiM will give you the brand of a great school plus loads of other skills which MBA schools greatly value. Add to that the work ex gained at an awesome company after graduation and you have a winning MiM application.
You can google "MiM Essay" to check out much more information about the MiM degree and the schools that offer it.

Hope the answer helped.

Abhyank Srinet
Founder at www.MiM-Essay.com

May 29, 2012

The GRE is going to make or break your application. I'd focus on that right now. Imo, as a history major you'd probably do better gpa wise in a MiM.

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May 29, 2012

Add Ohio State, they are generous with schollys. As to which is better for careers it depends, Duke opens a lot of non-finance doors to you. Most people go into one of the following 3: Finance, Marketing and Consulting. So if you're not IB or bust it may be a better bet.

May 29, 2012

Thank you for the suggestions. Are there any other MiM programs that you would recommend me applying to?

May 29, 2012

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