1/24/12

Where do Financial Leadership Analyst/Rotational programs typically lead? For example, I currently have applications in for internships at F500's like Verizon, Lockheed Martin, and AmerisourceBergen that would give me an opportunity (if I'm good) to work FT out of undergrad in leadership/rotational programs. After the 2-3 years in these programs, what job titles and comps are typically available within the company?

Comments (21)

1/24/12

I second that question.

And how does competition at F100-500 compare to investment banking?

Competition is a sin.

-John D. Rockefeller

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1/24/12
Hooked on LEAPS:

I second that question.

And how does competition at F100-500 compare to investment banking?

I'd also like to know this. I know one girl who is starting at a O&G firm in their finance leadership rotational program. She said only something like a dozen got hired, so that's not a whole lot, but is the competition slightly less tough than banking or is it pretty substantial?

1/24/12

"Sincerity is an overrated virtue" - Milton Friedman

1/24/12
OhYeah:

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/the-other-ro... you need to know.

Corp dev ? F500 Finance Leadership Program though.

MM IB -> TMT Corporate Development

1/24/12
SECfinance:
OhYeah:

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/the-other-ro... you need to know.

Corp dev ? F500 Finance Leadership Program though.

Yea, I've actually read through that entire thread. There's some great info there. While harvardgad08 came out of a leadership program and went into CorpDev, I'm sure there are other tracks.

For the record, I am interested in CorpDev also, but just looking for what options would be there.

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1/26/12

Competition is definitely less than banking. Still not easy to get but definitely attainable, especially for non targets. Comp is generally 70-80 base after graduating the program, depending on the industry. Tech pays more, industrials pay less, etc. Generally you'll go into a middle management type role in fp&a, accounting, etc. FLDP's are best for people who want to stay in corporate finance.

1/27/12

Where does the pay tend to hit after, say, 5 to 10 years?

"When I was young I thought that money was the most important thing in life; now that I am old I know that it is."
- Oscar Wilde
"Seriously, psychology is for those with two x chromosomes."
- RagnarDanneskjold

1/27/12

Depends on how you do what area you get into. But it increases like you would expect in a f500. It's possible ten years out to be making ~150k but that's not normal for CF jobs. High 5 figures low 6 figures is going to be the norm for most graduates.

1/27/12

Agree with most of the sentiment. I did a leadership program with a large European bank and enjoyed the experience and exposure. Not banking, but still great experience and good on your resume. If you want to go to business school I think it would be a strong addition to the application.

Much better than just going into a F500 position without the program though.

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1/27/12

Some things that come to my mind are corp dev, business dev, FP&A Manager, or to join a startup at a high level

I have a tender spot in my heart for cripples, bastards, and broken things

1/27/12

B-school if you want to change functions totally. It seems like you would be a good candidate if you got a good score on the GMAT.

1/27/12

To go into any area of business you want, go for a top MBA. Without the MBA your options probably include:
-Corporate Development
-Corporate Strategy (more like high-level internal consultants)
-FP&A (financial strategy)
-Startup (you can and will do anything/everything)
-Consulting (but it will probably be a tough switch - worth a shot though if you want it)

"You stop being an asshole when it sucks to be you." -IlliniProgrammer
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1/27/12

@rarbayview Just curious, any update? Can PM me if you like... I'm fast approaching the same sort of situation.

1/27/12

I'm in a similar situation and interested in any additional info. I know some people who have left for start ups and consulting but it does not seem to be an easy move. Would something like passing a level or 2 of the CFA make the switch to equity research possible/likely? Fell free to PM me. Thanks!

1/27/12

Yes, especially if you have that goal in place for your internship between year 1 and 2 as well as during networking events over those two years in school.

1/27/12

Hi Brutus, I have a similar background to you F500 FLDP (tech) to corpdev/M&A at my company. I have seen 1-2 folks from our program leave to go to IBD...so it's definitely possible. I would say that your best bet it to wait until you complete your rotation in M&A then start trying to network your way into IBD. In your M&A rotation you will most likely be working with bankers that come and pitch to you. I would suggest that in the course of these types of conversation you try to network and then you try to make the jump over. Hopefully during your 6 mo. M&A rotation you will be able to get some deal experience so that you can pitch the IBD guys on your interest in M&A, deals, the industry, etc. In all reality the folks I've seen that have done it have moved over as analysts and then have been successful in moving to associate roles after 2 years in banking meaning that although you may have 3-4 years experience and move into an associate role (so a bit behind your "class") if banking is what you want then its worth it to take the 1-2 year hit in career trajectory. If you are not able to network your way in then the next best bet is to go the MBA route then try to move to IBD.

1/27/12

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