Msc Finance ranking Europe

Merlo97's picture
Rank: Baboon | banana points 149

Hi there!

From what you' ve heard/seen throughout your whole career, what are the best school for a MSF in Europe? (I know that it depends on the field we are considering, let's say for IBD for instance).

(It would be great to have a comprehensive ranking).

I'd say LSE/LBS/Oxbridge >= HEC > Bocconi/Escp/Edhec > Essec/Imperial/SSE > IE/Esade/CBS > RSM/WHU

Is it legit? Thanks in advance

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Comments (46)

Nov 3, 2018

I'd probably rank Oxford above LSE and LBS and rank Cambridge lower than LSE and LBS. Would also rank Imperial higher if you want to work in London (probably just below HEC).

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Nov 3, 2018
notsoquant:

I'd probably rank Oxford above LSE and LBS and rank Cambridge lower than LSE and LBS. Would also rank Imperial higher if you want to work in London (probably just below HEC).

You are right. I have a point tho
Why rankings such as the FT one sort them in a different order? (I know, we are talking about LDN, but it is the pin of the European finance).

Nov 4, 2018

It's simply because of the metrics used, which you can find on the website. They look at salary increase (which is a bit odd for a pre-experience program), salary compared to the cost of living (London isn't exactly cheap), if you go to another country after graduation (most people who study in the UK seem to stay there), and many other factors. I've also heard stories some French universities focus a lot on improving their FT ranking simply by focusing on the metrics used.

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Most Helpful
Nov 6, 2018
Carlo-Mereu:

Why rankings such as the FT one sort them in a different order? (I know, we are talking about LDN, but it is the pin of the European finance).

Let me give you some sound advice that many on this board pretty much agree on:
Never rely on the skewed mainstream FT Rankings. You must analyze with rigor each and every program's employment reports if it is publicly published, preferably.

(PS: Essec >>>>> Edhec)

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Nov 6, 2018
Starfall:
Carlo-Mereu:

Why rankings such as the FT one sort them in a different order? (I know, we are talking about LDN, but it is the pin of the European finance).

Let me give you some sound advice that many on this board pretty much agree on:
Never rely on the skewed mainstream FT Rankings. You must analyze with rigor each and every program's employment reports if it is publicly published, preferably.

(PS: Essec >>>>> Edhec)

thank you, appreciate it!!
So, generally speaking, do you agree on my assessment ? (Except for the essec/edhec thing)

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Jan 4, 2019

Well, I'd say that Tier1 UK-based Programs enjoy the clear main advantage of their locarion: LBS/LSE/Oxbridge.
(Although Cambridge's M.Phil. Program is far less marketed than its competitors. Very little info on this specific one, compared to the others.

Also bear in mind that these are professional, business programs, with great emphasis on professional networking and job seeking. So, in my humble point of view, being already located in London, and thus being able to commute freely & frequently for networking events and/or job interviews, assessment centers, and non-OCR related activities, also remains a highly critical advantage.

This is a one-year (or two-years, for Continental Europe) Program. There is very little time to waste. Being "at the heart" of the job market, geographically, is important. This, for me, trumps a potential Oxbridge prestige: That's why I think LBS/LSE should be prioritized over Oxbridge.

HEC, Bocconi, and SSE are on the exact same Tier (with a slighet edge in favor of HEC & Bocconi over SSE). Selection here should be based on language and geographical preferenge. If you don't speak French, nor Italian, nor Swedish, I'd say go for HEC: you can get to London in two hours by train.

HEC's MIF class goes to London in october and meets with a total of 60 firms for networking. And you pick and choose the ones you'd like to speak with etc. Many Bocconi UG, in fact, enroll to HEC's MIF (including for the current 2018-2019 academic year). Btw, the program doesn't require any previous finance work experience (which would be a plus, for applicants with no experiences. There are a few of you out there).

HEC-Bocconi-SSE are generally prefered over UK Tier2 Programs: Imperial, Warwick, UCL, Cass. (By judging by the number/proportion of graduates in front office entry-level positions).

ESSEC [SLIGHTLY] > ESCP. But Essec's campus is way too far from Paris itself (more than 20 miles), whereas ESCP enjoys a privileged central Paris location. But ESCP's Program is 100% french-taught; and a Master thesis also has to be published (in french). To be frank, not b******* straight-talking: for french schools, if you don't get into HEC, gun for the slightly-less selective Programs at LSE (Finance & Accounting, etc.). Frankly: To many downsides in attending a french program if it's not HEC. Imho: not worth the cost of attendance.

EDHEC below ESSEC & ESCP.

Pretty sure RSM & CBS are mostly regional programs: interesting if you're a national of the country and/or speak the local language. But this last information needs to be confirmed. Not quite well-versed on those particular schools, nor on the other schools listed.

Best of luck for your applications.

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Jan 4, 2019

How do LBS and LSE compare in your opinion?

Jan 5, 2019
Starfall:

Well, I'd say that Tier1 UK-based Programs enjoy the clear main advantage of their locarion: LBS/LSE/Oxbridge.
(Although Cambridge's M.Phil. Program is far less marketed than its competitors. Very little info on this specific one, compared to the others.

Also bear in mind that these are professional, business programs, with great emphasis on professional networking and job seeking. So, in my humble point of view, being already located in London, and thus being able to commute freely & frequently for networking events and/or job interviews, assessment centers, and non-OCR related activities, also remains a highly critical advantage.

This is a one-year (or two-years, for Continental Europe) Program. There is very little time to waste. Being "at the heart" of the job market, geographically, is important. This, for me, trumps a potential Oxbridge prestige: That's why I think LBS/LSE should be prioritized over Oxbridge.

HEC, Bocconi, and SSE are on the exact same Tier (with a slighet edge in favor of HEC & Bocconi over SSE). Selection here should be based on language and geographical preferenge. If you don't speak French, nor Italian, nor Swedish, I'd say go for HEC: you can get to London in two hours by train.

HEC's MIF class goes to London in october and meets with a total of 60 firms for networking. And you pick and choose the ones you'd like to speak with etc. Many Bocconi UG, in fact, enroll to HEC's MIF (including for the current 2018-2019 academic year). Btw, the program doesn't require any previous finance work experience (which would be a plus, for applicants with no experiences. There are a few of you out there).

HEC-Bocconi-SSE are generally prefered over UK Tier2 Programs: Imperial, Warwick, UCL, Cass. (By judging by the number/proportion of graduates in front office entry-level positions).

ESSEC [SLIGHTLY] > ESCP. But Essec's campus is way too far from Paris itself (more than 20 miles), whereas ESCP enjoys a privileged central Paris location. But ESCP's Program is 100% french-taught; and a Master thesis also has to be published (in french). To be frank, not b******* straight-talking: for french schools, if you don't get into HEC, gun for the slightly-less selective Programs at LSE (Finance & Accounting, etc.). Frankly: To many downsides in attending a french program if it's not HEC. Imho: not worth the cost of attendance.

EDHEC below ESSEC & ESCP.

Pretty sure RSM & CBS are mostly regional programs: interesting if you're a national of the country and/or speak the local language. But this last information needs to be confirmed. Not quite well-versed on those particular schools, nor on the other schools listed.

Best of luck for your applications.

Thank you for the valuable suggestions. I appreciate it!

Jan 6, 2019
Starfall:

Well, I'd say that Tier1 UK-based Programs enjoy the clear main advantage of their locarion: LBS/LSE/Oxbridge.
(Although Cambridge's M.Phil. Program is far less marketed than its competitors. Very little info on this specific one, compared to the others.

Also bear in mind that these are professional, business programs, with great emphasis on professional networking and job seeking. So, in my humble point of view, being already located in London, and thus being able to commute freely & frequently for networking events and/or job interviews, assessment centers, and non-OCR related activities, also remains a highly critical advantage.

This is a one-year (or two-years, for Continental Europe) Program. There is very little time to waste. Being "at the heart" of the job market, geographically, is important. This, for me, trumps a potential Oxbridge prestige: That's why I think LBS/LSE should be prioritized over Oxbridge.

HEC, Bocconi, and SSE are on the exact same Tier (with a slighet edge in favor of HEC & Bocconi over SSE). Selection here should be based on language and geographical preferenge. If you don't speak French, nor Italian, nor Swedish, I'd say go for HEC: you can get to London in two hours by train.

HEC's MIF class goes to London in october and meets with a total of 60 firms for networking. And you pick and choose the ones you'd like to speak with etc. Many Bocconi UG, in fact, enroll to HEC's MIF (including for the current 2018-2019 academic year). Btw, the program doesn't require any previous finance work experience (which would be a plus, for applicants with no experiences. There are a few of you out there).

HEC-Bocconi-SSE are generally prefered over UK Tier2 Programs: Imperial, Warwick, UCL, Cass. (By judging by the number/proportion of graduates in front office entry-level positions).

ESSEC [SLIGHTLY] > ESCP. But Essec's campus is way too far from Paris itself (more than 20 miles), whereas ESCP enjoys a privileged central Paris location. But ESCP's Program is 100% french-taught; and a Master thesis also has to be published (in french). To be frank, not b******* straight-talking: for french schools, if you don't get into HEC, gun for the slightly-less selective Programs at LSE (Finance & Accounting, etc.). Frankly: To many downsides in attending a french program if it's not HEC. Imho: not worth the cost of attendance.

EDHEC below ESSEC & ESCP.

Pretty sure RSM & CBS are mostly regional programs: interesting if you're a national of the country and/or speak the local language. But this last information needs to be confirmed. Not quite well-versed on those particular schools, nor on the other schools listed.

Best of luck for your applications.

What's your view on IE?

Nov 3, 2018

I would also rank Imperial higher, would also rank Bocconi > Edhec/Escp. I would also add Warwick to that list..

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Nov 3, 2018
FutureHFM:

I would also rank Imperial higher, would also rank Bocconi > Edhec/Escp. I would also add Warwick to that list..

Oh yes warwick (I d put it just behind the French schools you just mentioned).
I still think Bocconi place better than imperial tho

Nov 3, 2018

I would rank Warwick higher than Edhec/Ecsp, especially when it comes to recruiting in the UK and other EU countries that aren't France.

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Nov 7, 2018

agreed.

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Nov 3, 2018

Rankings are increadibly subjective and depend on a lot of aspects. One of the most important aspects imo that is often forgotten is your nationality / languages you speak

  • French: HEC >>>>>> anything else
  • Italian: Bocconi >>>> anything else
  • German: WHU >>>>> anything else

Of course this is a bit extreme but keep in mind that a target school highly depends on the region you are in / want to work for.

Another aspect which you need to consider is which offices recruit on campus. For example if you go to WHU you can be sure that you have ALL banks from Frankfurt on campus, however, they mostly target German students. Of course a lot of people also go to London etc but it is much easier for a German to go to Frankfurt. With this in mind, don't let exit stats from unis fool you. I have a friend who went to RSM because he wanted to get into consulting but guess what... most of the companies come there to recruit for their Amsterdam office and are accordingly looking for Dutch people..

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Nov 4, 2018
axmal:

Rankings are increadibly subjective and depend on a lot of aspects. One of the most important aspects imo that is often forgotten is your nationality / languages you speak

  • French: HEC >>>>>> anything else
  • Italian: Bocconi >>>> anything else
  • German: WHU >>>>> anything else

Of course this is a bit extreme but keep in mind that a target school highly depends on the region you are in / want to work for.

Another aspect which you need to consider is which offices recruit on campus. For example if you go to WHU you can be sure that you have ALL banks from Frankfurt on campus, however, they mostly target German students. Of course a lot of people also go to London etc but it is much easier for a German to go to Frankfurt. With this in mind, don't let exit stats from unis fool you. I have a friend who went to RSM because he wanted to get into consulting but guess what... most of the companies come there to recruit for their Amsterdam office and are accordingly looking for Dutch people..

The question was about LDN recruiting. What you said is not an absolute rule tho, Bocconi and Hec place better than Warwick and sometimes imperial in LDN

Nov 4, 2018

Do you know whether foreigners that are fluent in German do have any chances at getting a job in Germany? And considering the tuition fees for WHU, what more value can one get from studying at WHU versus, say, at Mannheim?

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Nov 4, 2018
CommadantCipher:

Do you know whether foreigners that are fluent in German do have any chances at getting a job in Germany? And considering the tuition fees for WHU, what more value can one get from studying at WHU versus, say, at Mannheim?

For the first question, i think the nationality thing is not a problem.
I have honestly no idea about that, never heard of manheinm uni,sorry.

Nov 6, 2018

Nationality/Citizenship in itself is not indeed a problem, but language proficiency is. Back to the same problem mentioned above on region & language fit regarding OCR recruiting & post-graduate career outcomes.

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Jan 4, 2019

If you are fluent in German you are fine.
Mannheim and WHU are on par in Germany and you'll find plenty of Alumni from either at any bank, fund, consultancy

Nov 4, 2018

Agree for France and Germany but in Italy LSE is still an impressive name so will be on par with Bocconi even for Milan recruiting. If anything, if you're Italian and have studied at LSE you may have a leg up compared to Italians who studied in Bocconi.

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Nov 4, 2018
The Pharma Guy:

Agree for France and Germany but in Italy LSE is still an impressive name so will be on par with Bocconi even for Milan recruiting. If anything, if you're Italian and have studied at LSE you may have a leg up compared to Italians who studied in Bocconi.

totally agree!

Nov 5, 2018

For the UK market - don't think the tiers are as granular:

Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, LBS, HEC, Bocconi - probably all on the same tier (with the UK universities here having a slight advantage in the UK due to better name recognition, most recruiters would've heard of HEC and Bocconi by now but there are still a few that are not too familiar with them).

Imperial, St. Gallen, SSE - less name recognition in the UK, Imperial has an argument for being in the first group.

UCL, Warwick, Cass, ESCP, Essec, WHU, IE and other comparable places.

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Nov 7, 2018

Imo, I think it's more relevant to compare Masters, not Universities. The ranking would be:

  1. LSE (Msc Finance) / HEC (International Finance) / Oxford (MFE) (i would include Cambridge here as well, but it's a research master and the class is very small)
  2. Imperial (Msc Finance) / LBS (MFA) / St Gallen (Banking and Finance) / ESCP (Finance) / Bocconi (Finance)
  3. IE (Finance) / Esade (Finance) / LSE (Acc and Fin) / Edhec (Finance) / Essec (Finance) / Imperial (Acc and Finance)
  4. RSM (Finance and Inv.) / SSE (Finance) / Mannheim (Finance) / WHU (Finance).

Some notes: Bocconi has a very strong bachelor degree, but most of its top students go for their master either in UK or France (HEC), and a few in Switzerland (St. Gallen).

Mannheim and WHU also offer strong bachelor degrees (Mannheim > WHU imo), but also their top students go either to UK or HEC and St Gallen for their masters.

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Nov 7, 2018

Judging from my personal experience going to one of the schools you listed and signing a FT BB offer in London lately, this is the most accurate ranking in this thread with regard to IB positions in London. Tiers for Frankfurt / Paris / Milan could look a bit different.

"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of its behind."

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Nov 7, 2018

Sorry, but that ranking is wrong. In the best interests of other people looking at the thread in the future it should be clarified that the distinction between courses at the same university (provided the courses relevant) is not important whatsoever from a recruiters point of view. You signing a FT offer does not make the ranking more credible. There is no way that ESCP for example is comparable to LSE Accounting and Finance.

Nov 7, 2018

What would make you think that courses don't matter? The finance programmes at schools like LSE, Bocconi and Imperial are usually significantly tougher to get into than let's say A&F or certain non-finance subjects and therefore, have a very different signalling effect. Who would you say has better chances to land an interview Oxford/Said MFE or Oxford ancient philosophy (I bet it's a great course but you get my point)?

I am aware that sometimes uni matters more than a certain major in countries such as UK or US, however, in mainland Europe that is also very different. For example, if you don't have a Finance/Management/Economics/STEM or similar background, 9/10 times you don't even need to apply for IB positions in Frankfurt.

Regarding the ranking I might be wrong in some cases, since I don't know all the mentioned schools/programmes that well (e.g. Cambridge, ESCP), but I feel generally the tiers are quite accurate.

"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of its behind."

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Nov 8, 2018

I disagree, you're quite far off the mark .

LSE A+F is more difficult to get into than some of the top MSc Finance programmes you've mentioned. Here are the realistic requirements to get into each (I'd know since I applied to all three):

LSE A+F - First class degree, 680-690+ GMAT
LBS MFA - Mid 2.1, 650+ GMAT
Imperial Finance - Mid 2.1, 650+ GMAT
The above comes from admissions tutors from all three universities.

Anecdotally, LSE A+F had a lot of people who turned down Imperial MSc Finance and LBS MFA offers - OK fair enough, this isn't the best argument since the other two courses probably had students that turned down LSE A+F, but this shows it is not as clear cut as you make out.

Regarding the signalling effect:
- It does not matter for London - the largest finance market in Europe - university is more important.
- Many Germans and other continental Europeans had no difficulty landing FO roles with a degree such as A+F or Management back in their home countries. Especially when A+F at somewhere like LSE is considered superior to the likes of WHU, EBS, WU etc.
- Doing A+F vs. Finance doesn't really signal anything. Most A+F courses have a heavy finance component, and a lot of FO roles, particularly in the corporate finance / M&A advisory side require accounting. PE is also heavy on accounting, so there is no reason why employers would look down at this. Contrary to what students think, learning overly-theoretical markets theory doesn't impress anyone. The signalling effect only applies to students, it does not extend to employers.
- Even if the employers do think a non-finance course is weaker, the overall CV is more an indication of how good a candidate is, rather than the programme alone (assuming we are comparing two different programmes from the same university). So even if Course A attracts a higher calibre student than Course B, employers won't care unless this is immediately clear from the CV.

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Nov 12, 2018

The 2019 class for LBS MFA has an average GMAT score 716. It may be that 650 is the minimum required for the programme, but if you have <700 I'm quite sure you'll need very decent work experience/high GPA to compensate for it.

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Jan 4, 2019
notsoquant:

The 2019 class for LBS MFA has an average GMAT score 716. It may be that 650 is the minimum required for the programme, but if you have <700 I'm quite sure you'll need very decent work experience/high GPA to compensate for it.

They do officially discourage applicants with a <600 to go forward with the application process.
(Source: LBS Admission Webinar (late 2018)).

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Nov 7, 2018
aintnotimetowaste:

Imo, I think it's more relevant to compare Masters, not Universities. The ranking would be:

  1. LSE (Msc Finance) / HEC (International Finance) / Oxford (MFE) (i would include Cambridge here as well, but it's a research master and the class is very small)
  2. Imperial (Msc Finance) / LBS (MFA) / St Gallen (Banking and Finance) / ESCP (Finance) / Bocconi (Finance)
  3. IE (Finance) / Esade (Finance) / LSE (Acc and Fin) / Edhec (Finance) / Essec (Finance) / Imperial (Acc and Finance)
  4. RSM (Finance and Inv.) / SSE (Finance) / Mannheim (Finance) / WHU (Finance).

Some notes: Bocconi has a very strong bachelor degree, but most of its top students go for their master either in UK or France (HEC), and a few in Switzerland (St. Gallen).

Mannheim and WHU also offer strong bachelor degrees (Mannheim > WHU imo), but also their top students go either to UK or HEC and St Gallen for their masters.

I honestly think that the Finance program at SSE is way better than esade/ie
What about escp/lbs/hec exc... MIM (I know it is not a master in finance but it has a great placement in IB) ?
For instance sth like the 30% of the 2017 class of LBS MIM went to IBD).

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Jan 4, 2019
Merlo97:

For instance sth like the 30% of the 2017 class of LBS MIM went to IBD).

Enrolling at the LBS MiM can be a good strategy for any LBS MFA prospective applicant who feels that:
*His GMAT isn't competitive enough (mean GMAT is lower in the MiM);
*His quantitative background isn't strong enough for either eligibility to apply, and/or being able to adjust the mostly quanty MFA curriculum (vs way more balanced in the MiM).

Because it is indeed a very good point to make:
From reading the most recent employment statistics, the MiM still remains to this day a very solid IBD feeder program.

It all comes down to admission/application strategy, based on each and everyone's individual profile.

Jan 5, 2019
Starfall:
Merlo97:

For instance sth like the 30% of the 2017 class of LBS MIM went to IBD).

Enrolling at the LBS MiM can be a good strategy for any LBS MFA prospective applicant who feels that:
*His GMAT isn't competitive enough (mean GMAT is lower in the MiM);
*His quantitative background isn't strong enough for either eligibility to apply, and/or being able to adjust the mostly quanty MFA curriculum (vs way more balanced in the MiM).

Because it is indeed a very good point to make:
From reading the most recent employment statistics, the MiM still remains to this day a very solid IBD feeder program.

It all comes down to admission/application strategy, based on each and everyone's individual profile.

What do you mean with "not competitive enough" ? (i mean, what score are not competitive in your opinion? I got a 700)

Nov 7, 2018
aintnotimetowaste:

1. LSE (Msc Finance) / HEC (International Finance) / Oxford (MFE) (i would include Cambridge here as well, but it's a research master and the class is very small)

Agree with your assessment but I would just argue that you could knock HEC down to Tier 2 IF you work in France afterwards. In France, the holy grail is for someone to have attended HEC in PGE, as a follow-up to the classes preparatoires and concours Grandes Ecoles. If you attend in a MsF, people might eye you suspiciously as having "bought" the brand name since you were admitted on your resume and transcript rather than your performance in the national exams. But that's something you'll only get, if ever, from pretentious upper-class people. "Oh he didn't do prepa LOL !", you get it...

While as abroad people won't care about the distinction and "HEC is HEC. What's a PGE by the way ?"

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Nov 7, 2018

Very true my friend. It is the same for all the other flagship french schools. If you don't go through the grind of the prepa you get no respect. I think that's what's so impressive about the french schools is that you cannot buy your way to elite schools (LENA etc), ask Macron he failed the entry exam so did Lagarde. The master program at HEC will be respected internationally, but might get discounted locally. On the other hand, the tax system/social security cost is so absurd that I wouldn't want to work in France anyway except for Lazard TMT in Paris maybe.

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Nov 7, 2018

Macron failed for the ENS I think though, and entered l'ENA after Sciences Po. He did very well for himself too since he graduated to be Inspecteur General of the Finances.

Nov 7, 2018

You are correct @Frogbefinancing, good catch. Anyway, my point was Macron was well connected, but couldn't get past the entry exam which is a testament to the independence of the education system in France.

PS: look at my username, I'm definitely a Macron fan.

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Nov 7, 2018

Very true. Of course you're already off to better prospects if born into the right family but the system is otherwise pretty airtight : can't mention names on the exam and all that in the case of nepotism..

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Nov 7, 2018

No Jared Kushner getting into Harvard kind of bullshit

Nov 12, 2018

I agree with your points mentioned, but need to specify that the "being looked down on" for people in the GE program that have been admitted directly (i.e. without prepa) is decreasing in general and especially for non-French.
More and more French students (esp the ones that have some money) decide to rather go doing an elite undergrad abroad (e.g. UK or Canada) and then come back for Masters. Internally they might be looked down upon by prepa students, but in general they have the same opportunities on the French market.
For non-french it is even less looked down upon since everyone understands that the prepa program is not a choice for foreigners for undergrad. So, subject to being fluent in French, students that only do the 2 year GE w/o prepa are seen on the same level as the ones who did prepa.

Dec 10, 2018
aintnotimetowaste:

Imo, I think it's more relevant to compare Masters, not Universities. The ranking would be:

  1. LSE (Msc Finance) / HEC (International Finance) / Oxford (MFE) (i would include Cambridge here as well, but it's a research master and the class is very small)
  2. Imperial (Msc Finance) / LBS (MFA) / St Gallen (Banking and Finance) / ESCP (Finance) / Bocconi (Finance)
  3. IE (Finance) / Esade (Finance) / LSE (Acc and Fin) / Edhec (Finance) / Essec (Finance) / Imperial (Acc and Finance)
  4. RSM (Finance and Inv.) / SSE (Finance) / Mannheim (Finance) / WHU (Finance).

Some notes: Bocconi has a very strong bachelor degree, but most of its top students go for their master either in UK or France (HEC), and a few in Switzerland (St. Gallen).

Mannheim and WHU also offer strong bachelor degrees (Mannheim > WHU imo), but also their top students go either to UK or HEC and St Gallen for their masters.

And what about MIM (I know it is not a master in finance but a lot of grads get there) from lbs or even the French schools (in them you can specialise in finance during your 2nd year)?
Btw I d put also Finance and economics and finance and PE from LSE in the first group.

Dec 19, 2018
aintnotimetowaste:

Imo, I think it's more relevant to compare Masters, not Universities. The ranking would be:

  1. LSE (Msc Finance) / HEC (International Finance) / Oxford (MFE) (i would include Cambridge here as well, but it's a research master and the class is very small)
  2. Imperial (Msc Finance) / LBS (MFA) / St Gallen (Banking and Finance) / ESCP (Finance) / Bocconi (Finance)
  3. IE (Finance) / Esade (Finance) / LSE (Acc and Fin) / Edhec (Finance) / Essec (Finance) / Imperial (Acc and Finance)
  4. RSM (Finance and Inv.) / SSE (Finance) / Mannheim (Finance) / WHU (Finance).

Some notes: Bocconi has a very strong bachelor degree, but most of its top students go for their master either in UK or France (HEC), and a few in Switzerland (St. Gallen).

Mannheim and WHU also offer strong bachelor degrees (Mannheim > WHU imo), but also their top students go either to UK or HEC and St Gallen for their masters.

What about IE? Why third and ESCP 2nd? When you write about ESCP do you consider the Advanced master in Finance (which requires a 4 year undergraduate program, or the MIM with 2 semesters doing Finance and 2 management?

Dec 20, 2018

What makes you think LSE and HEC are better than LBS?

Jan 5, 2019

For what it's worth: Elite US undergrads who decide to ultimately pursue a M.Sc. In European business school, almost always choose to enroll at LBS.

Recently, saw the examples of nos less than two Harvard Econ. Majors, one UCLA Econ. 4.0 GPA, one NYU Stern. All went to LBS.

Never seen such [Ivy League & Public Ivies] students at HEC, LSE.
(US students at HEC: Most of them come from Top 40 US universities. Not necessarily Ivy League. Even far from it (despite what their website would want you to believe). Still a great school though, don't get me wrong: Just pointing out top-performing American undergrads' preference for LBS. Nothing more. ^^)

If their own judgement and preferences can be any indication.

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Jan 5, 2019
Jan 5, 2019
Jan 6, 2019