Comments (22)

Apr 13, 2014

Also interested...

Apr 15, 2014

Wouldn't it conflict with your work? Especially since youre getting paid to do it
I see this disclaimer
Author payment: $0.01 per page view. Authors of PRO articles on small and mid-cap stocks receive a minimum guaranteed payment of $150-500

Apr 15, 2014

I didn't realize you could get paid to write articles. If you plan on writing a detailed report for an interview/meetup, it couldn't hurt to also upload it to SA afterward to get greater exposure. I don't see any real downside to posting articles.

Apr 15, 2014

Hey man, I've written two articles in total, and made around 200 dollars. They were both published instantly, but the first one was for a small cap and only gained about 2,000 views. The second one was picked as an editor's pick and made it to the top of the front page, and that gained around 15,000 views or something. And then they gave me 50 dollars for my second article to reward me for writing a good article.

But writing articles take time. It generally isn't a great way to make money. I did it to receive some feedback from the financial industry, the money was more of a side thing.

Apr 15, 2014

Insight

Apr 15, 2014
Yeesh:

Insight

Correction made. =]

I also meant to post this in the ER forum as well. I think I'm still drunk from last night.

Competition is a sin.

-John D. Rockefeller

Apr 15, 2014

Interesting...so you're saying I can talk my own book AND get paid at the same time?!

Does anyone read the esoteric articles on there? or are most of the popular articles about MSFT & GOOG?

Apr 15, 2014
Cries:

Interesting...so you're saying I can talk my own book AND get paid at the same time?!

Does anyone read the esoteric articles on there? or are most of the popular articles about MSFT & GOOG?

Yes, however they only accept 1 in 4 paid contributor accounts and only 1 in 2 of the articles submitted meet the editorial requirements for publication, which is kind of odd, because from my personal experience the bar is really not set that high. As long as you're a half decent writer and know about the stock market you should be fine. The average article by a paid contributor receives 6500 hits once published.

Most of the popular articles are about blue chips. My AAPL article for example is approaching 27,000 hits. However, if you write about some obscure small cap stock and it gets published it will be on Yahoo Finance, Google Finance, and Morningstar (probably some other websites as well.) But obviously your not going to get the same kind of views AAPL/GOOG/MSFT would get.

Competition is a sin.

-John D. Rockefeller

Apr 15, 2014

I don't really use SeekingAlpha and only rarely read SumZero, but I've always wondered, what are the inherent ethical conflicts present on such websites? I know you are supposed to disclose if you have a position. Most of the stuff on SeekingAlpha is rampantly bullish and reads like a bunch of retail noobs gang banging each other in a greater fool orgy. I'm not implying your content is like that. But I am wondering, is it basically a platform for people to pump their own holdings? How does SeekingAlpha control for that?

In other words, what stops someone from building a position in an under followed stock, pumping the shit out of it with some plausible sounding story (true or not), and then selling into the retail noob mania?

Apr 15, 2014
Ravenous:

I don't really use SeekingAlpha and only rarely read SumZero, but I've always wondered, what are the inherent ethical conflicts present on such websites? I know you are supposed to disclose if you have a position. Most of the stuff on SeekingAlpha is rampantly bullish and reads like a bunch of retail noobs gang banging each other in a greater fool orgy. I'm not implying your content is like that. But I am wondering, is it basically a platform for people to pump their own holdings? How does SeekingAlpha control for that?

In other words, what stops someone from building a position in an under followed stock, pumping the shit out of it with some plausible sounding story (true or not), and then selling into the retail noob mania?

Seeking Alpha does not have any form of regulatory oversight over positions of its authors. Although, I would think most people are smart enough not to buy on a string of Seeking Alpha articles. I'd hope so anyway. But the scenario you present probably does happen every now and then and would probably be some excellent reference material for a pump and dump brokerage firm.

Competition is a sin.

-John D. Rockefeller

Apr 15, 2014
Hooked on LEAPS:

I am a Seeking Alpha super star. My average article gets 17,000 page views and I get paid $170.00 for 2-3 pages of work. It is not uncommon for me to receive comments from 100+ people thanking me for my insight.

If my main goal is to obtain a more legitimate ER internship, what is the best way I can make use of my talent?

1) Keep doing what I'm doing. I currently work for a prop trading and write for their Seeking Alpha account. The plus side is I get to write "Equity Research Intern" on my resume. The downside is that there are about a dozen other interns that do what I do and even though my name is in the byline of all my articles, it will be difficult to prove that most of our followers are a direct result of my work.

2) Make my own account. I won't be able to say that I'm an "Equity Research Intern" anymore, but I will get to build a following and a brand name under my own name.

Mind asking what your username is for seeking alpha? Just wanna follow more "superstars" to gain more knowledge

Apr 15, 2014
Mr.Saxman:
Hooked on LEAPS:

I am a Seeking Alpha super star. My average article gets 17,000 page views and I get paid $170.00 for 2-3 pages of work. It is not uncommon for me to receive comments from 100+ people thanking me for my insight.

If my main goal is to obtain a more legitimate ER internship, what is the best way I can make use of my talent?

1) Keep doing what I'm doing. I currently work for a prop trading and write for their Seeking Alpha account. The plus side is I get to write "Equity Research Intern" on my resume. The downside is that there are about a dozen other interns that do what I do and even though my name is in the byline of all my articles, it will be difficult to prove that most of our followers are a direct result of my work.

2) Make my own account. I won't be able to say that I'm an "Equity Research Intern" anymore, but I will get to build a following and a brand name under my own name.

Mind asking what your username is for seeking alpha? Just wanna follow more "superstars" to gain more knowledge

Sorry, can't do that. I've made way too many sexist statements on this website to have that in anyway tied to my real name.

Competition is a sin.

-John D. Rockefeller

Apr 15, 2014

Who cares if people think what you do is 'prestigious' as long as you enjoy it, are good at it and get paid for it.

Regarding Seeking Alpha and investing, I think it's a nice place to get some ideas but definitely warrants your own personal research (as does everything!).

Apr 15, 2014

Yeah, I mean it's legal for a brokerage firm, so why not an individual? All you have to do is look at Roth Capital (among others, Roth is just the worst) and some of their shitty pump coverage in front of secondary offerings to know that this happens. Not gonna lie, the capital markets are rife with very questionable activity, if not outright fraud.

I'm not sure I agree about people being smart enough after having read some of the comments about QCOR on SeekingAlpha before it shit its pants in September. It was kind of awesome how many people stepped up to the trade after the Citron report came out. Looks like a lot of people on that site just buy stocks that are going up and never actually do any real research, but you could say that about most of the market.

Apr 15, 2014
Ravenous:

Yeah, I mean it's legal for a brokerage firm, so why not an individual? All you have to do is look at Roth Capital (among others, Roth is just the worst) and some of their shitty pump coverage in front of secondary offerings to know that this happens. Not gonna lie, the capital markets are rife with very questionable activity, if not outright fraud.

I'm not sure I agree about people being smart enough after having read some of the comments about QCOR on SeekingAlpha before it shit its pants in September. It was kind of awesome how many people stepped up to the trade after the Citron report came out. Looks like a lot of people on that site just buy stocks that are going up and never actually do any real research, but you could say that about most of the market.

Roth Capital! Have they ever even put out a neutral rating before?!?! Maybe 1 sell rating at most? God I would love to start a F- Roth Capital group, they really bother me, and their stuff reads like shit verbage wise as well.

Apr 15, 2014

since when did getting page views = having a unique value adding perspective? SS research gets lots of "page views" (or auto delete in the inbox) too. of course people are reading your articles - you are writing on AAPL and retail investors love that sh!t.

Apr 15, 2014

Asatar beat me to it.

Apr 15, 2014

Wow made me realize why seeking alpha reads like such crap...

Apr 15, 2014
Comment

"My dear, descended from the apes! Let us hope it is not true, but if it is, let us pray that it will not become generally known."

Apr 15, 2014
Comment

Competition is a sin.

-John D. Rockefeller