What cities will be the top places to live in the next 5-10 years?

It seems as though many people are fleeing California because of soaring rent increases, weak infrastructure/high traffic, high taxes, and lack of water. Where will the top places to live and develop real estate be in the next 5-10 years?

It seems as if the best places would be business friendly, moderate temperatures, low cost of living, and booming economies.

Austin Texas ( although it seems as if the word is out and a lot of traffic)

Seattle ( prices already soaring though)

Charlotte

Raleigh

Tampa

Dallas

Atlanta

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Comments (137)

Aug 2, 2018

This highly depends on what you are looking for out of your experience. There are many great places to live if you are looking to work in a particular industry. But maybe you are looking more for a rich cultural experience? Maybe somewhere you can enjoy the outdoors and pursue a more active lifestyle?

There are a few cities that have been rapidly expanding over the past several years. Many online articles will even mention that places like Oklahoma City are great places to live considering the low COL and availability of cheap real estate, but on the flip side, the lifestyle there may be subpar to you if you consider the lack of things to do or don't like the people or culture there.

Another thing to consider as far as "top places to live" is maybe you can look into moving to where they are implementing the new "Smart Cities". These are places like Dallas, San Francisco, Sacramento, Los Angeles (mostly California, but there are several other cities across the country that are doing this).

Smart cities will be cities that are implementing complete connectivity and is said that it will drastically revolutionize the way we experience life. There are many videos on YouTube that go into more detail about it, and the possibilities of these "Smart Cities" are definitely interesting...but at the same time a big concern about this is the health risks associated with implementing 5G technology (which is the technology that will allow for these smart cities to thrive and function). The 5G wireless signal is transmitted at a MUCH higher frequency than the 3G/4G signals and many have warned that it is harmful to human life. On top of that, what many critics have said about smart cities is that it is literally Big Brother on steroids. Basically everything will be connected and your privacy will be non-existent...

Anywho, apologies for the Mensa-level response, but just wanted to point out that your question is a bit loaded. At the end of the day, it really depends on what you are looking to get out of your relocation experience.

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Most Helpful
Aug 2, 2018

I am bullish on three cities that will continue to do well, DC, Seattle & LA.

Seattle due to the influx of tech talent, google, facebook, etc continue to lease millions of SF since the beginning of 2018. AI, cloud, etc are all driven by firms out of Seattle, bread and butter business for Microsoft and Amazon as well as other tech firms opening shop in Seattle to ride the wave. While Amazon leases more space than the next 40 combined largest companies in Seattle, HQ2 helps to diversity leased space in Seattle and it's a good thing. You still have a shit load of crains and the class A multifamily is starting to soften with landlords giving concessions. Office and Industrial are BOOMING and so is class B & C multifamily.

DC is another favorite, most likely home of Amazon HQ2. DC/NOVA area will continue to do well due to government contractors, almost recession proof! Trump will get us into war in the near future once the 4% BS GDP is back to 2% so I am somewhat bullish on DC due to government contracts and cyber security shops making $$$ to protect various government agencies.

LA due to the Olympics in 8-10 years and it's starting to become a stronger tech hub.

Smart Cities is a buzz word! You can expect any live, work, play city with young folks with $$$ to grow in the coming years as folks move from the burbs to the city center. This is happening all over the US. It's similar to the SHIFT from garden style to mid rise / high rise apartment buildings. I am sure in a few years, there would be a study that garden style communities are BACK!!

Tech or telecommunication firms creating 5G are going to have the products in the most densely populated cities that will yield $$$. It's common sense!!

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Aug 2, 2018

Agree with DC. I'm a native of NoVA and it's amazing how much the entire city and surrounding metro has changed. There was an article that shared before/after pictures of what places like H Street, Navy Yard and SW Waterfront looked like from 10 years ago, and it's remarkable. The city used to be predominantly a company town for the government and contractors, but that's been changing a lot over the past few years. Way more financial and tech firms moving into the area. Places that used to be no-go zones 5 years ago are now covered with luxury apartments charging $2,000 for a studio with 95% occupancy.

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Aug 3, 2018

Not sure betting on a city because they will have the Olympics in 10 years is great logic..

Aug 3, 2018

I don't think the Olympics itself will have a large impact. However, the city is setting up MAJOR infrastructure improvements in anticipation of it.

https://la.curbed.com/2017/8/4/16098474/olympics-t...
Legitimate question - is there a single city in this country that is making a more drastic improvement to its public transit than Los Angeles right now?

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Aug 3, 2018

I agree with you on that. I'm very bullish on Los Angeles. It's getting a lot of supply in the pipeline right now. And for those who aren't familiar, LA has affordable areas but they aren't the safest (Inglewood, South LA, ELA) but they're getting gentrified quickly. Echo Park was where they shot some of the movie Training Day with the iconic "pull out the gun in the intersection" scene. Now that area is hard to touch under $1MM. And the west side just saw major CRE investment sales.
https://therealdeal.com/la/issues_articles/trophy-...

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Aug 3, 2018

@REValuation if I recollect, the OP does say 5-10 years out. if you think like an investor, in 6-7 years when bullish developers want land to build shit for the Olympics, that will increase prices and overall demand for real estate. real estate is about future needs and supply and demand, if you can buy now and exit right around the Olympics, you should make $$$. also, investors are super bullish today in LA with investors paying all cash for private capital type deals due to compressed cap rate.

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Aug 4, 2018

Athens is looking pretty spiffy nowadays

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Funniest
Aug 9, 2018

Heres the economics of the years until the Olympics:

Year 1: Growth
Year 2: Growth
Year 3: Growth
Year 4: Olympic Happens
Year 5: City goes bankrupt
Year 6: Amazon buys the whole city and converts it into a distribution warehouse

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Aug 9, 2018

Except the fact that Los Angeles is the only city to have had a profitable Olympics in the modern area. The city does not have to build any new infrastructure (stadiums, etc) to support the games.

Aug 17, 2018
TeddyTheBear:

Heres the economics of the years until the Olympics:

Year 1: Growth
Year 2: Growth
Year 3: Growth
Year 4: Olympic Happens
Year 5: City goes bankrupt
Year 6: Amazon buys the whole city and converts it into a distribution warehouse

To see the infrastructure remaining today from the Athens' games is beyond depressing...

Aug 17, 2018

Lived there in the height of the debt crisis. Can confirm it sucked.

Aug 9, 2018

Great post, despite bringing Trump into it.

Aug 17, 2018
yoruba123:

DC is another favorite, most likely home of Amazon HQ2. DC/NOVA area will continue to do well due to government contractors, almost recession proof! Trump will get us into war in the near future once the 4% BS GDP is back to 2% so I am somewhat bullish on DC due to government contracts and cyber security shops making $$$ to protect various government agencies.

Great insight - I couldn't agree more!

Aug 10, 2018
Neutrino_CFO:

Anywho, apologies for the Mensa-level response, but just wanted to point out that your question is a bit loaded.

lol

Aug 2, 2018

New York will never fade

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Aug 3, 2018
Aug 3, 2018

NYC, SF, LA, DC, Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas, etc.

Not too different from now really

I'm real bullish on places like Charlotte, Raleigh, etc. but they will remain second tier cities. Fantastic, sure, but not at the top.

When it comes to development, right now, I think you need to look further down the list to third or fourth tier cities like Birmingham, AL.

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Aug 3, 2018

Apparently Greenville, SC is scoring some major companies and new developments. Bank Of America just committed to moving a bunch of their non-IB groups there and I believe there's a growing tech scene.

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Aug 3, 2018

I think BMW opened a plant there too.

Aug 3, 2018

I think that plant opened like 25 years ago. Greenville is the only non-coastal SC town that doesn't suck.

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Aug 3, 2018
REPE God:

Apparently Greenville, SC is scoring some major companies and new developments. Bank Of America just committed to moving a bunch of their non-IB groups there and I believe there's a growing tech scene.

Greenville is already well into the cycle though. Tons of MF has popped up in the last 4-5 years. Not that there isn't more opportunity out there (I don't have the supply/demand numbers in front of me) but it isn't a secret anymore.

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Aug 4, 2018

This is 100% correct. Downtown was/still is a bloodbath. Plenty of opportunities in suburban submarkets still.

Aug 15, 2018

I don't care how cheap the land is. With current construction costs, developing anything in a 3rd or 4th tier city isn't any easier given the rents you need.

"Capitalism: God's way of determining who is smart and who is poor." Ron Swanson

Aug 17, 2018

I have a body of water theory that a top city cannot exist w/o being near a large body of water ( Ocean, Lake Michigan)

Aug 17, 2018

dallas

Aug 17, 2018

Fastest growing cities in America are Plano/Frisco

Aug 3, 2018

In anticipation of the 2028 Olympics, Los Angeles is building a very robust public transit system (with over 8+ metro lines). To the extent that this is successful and alleviates traffic (which is the largest knock on LA), I think LA will continue to draw a considerable number of people to it. Technology firms are starting to move in droves to Los Angeles. In addition, firms like Amazon, Apple, Netflix, etc are spending tens of billions of dollars to build out their content streaming platforms, which will result in tons of jobs for the city.

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Aug 3, 2018

I'm interested to see if Elon Musk's Boring Company actually takes off in LA. It's a cool concept.

Aug 16, 2018

it's about time LA get a decent public transport system. It's seriously a bitch to get around. You waste 25% of your time in commute. Other than that, LA's not bad.

Aug 3, 2018

Agree on Tampa. Also, St. Petersburg right across the bay has become a very popular place

Aug 3, 2018

Denver is seeing a ton of development right now.

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Aug 3, 2018

Its actually insane how much development is happening in Denver. The amount of supply that has come on in recent years (and been absorbed) is astronomical, lots more on the way as well. Cap rates for MF developments are around 4.5-5%. Definitely bullish on Denver as well!

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Aug 10, 2018

I'm hearing that Salt Lake City is attracting many from Denver as the population continues to swell. Same weather, same geography, lower cost of living. Even Goldman Sachs is establishing a presence there.

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Aug 14, 2018

Boise/SLC/Bozeman are definitely pulling people away. Mostly the crowd that came for the outdoors element and can't stand the traffic or fact that COL is increasing. I always hear people complaining about all the new development downtown but at the same time love the trendy new stuff coming. They don't realize the two are connected.

Aug 22, 2018
feeguy:

I'm hearing that Salt Lake City is attracting many from Denver as the population continues to swell. Same weather, same geography, lower cost of living. Even Goldman Sachs is establishing a presence there.

Agreed. Salt Lake City is exponentially growing!

Aug 10, 2018

Denver is starting to bust at the seams and I think some real changes need to happen before this level of growth can continue. Traffic has become horrendous and you have no alternative to driving. Pay in Denver is, on average, lower than a number of other cities where people are relocating from Houston, Dallas, Chicago, LA, SF etc. and the cost of housing is still materially higher than other comparable second tier cities. People view living in Denver as a lifestyle upgrade, but eventually the housing prices will become prohibitively expensive unless there is significant wage growth. I still like the city and the future, but it was not prepared for this level of growth.

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Aug 3, 2018

LA resident here. CA does have its issues with high taxes, high costs, poor infrastructure, etc., but I'm not sure people are leaving in droves (yet). A lot of people talk about it (me included), but talking about it and actually doing it are two different things.

The way I think of LA / CA right now is there are a lot of people trying to do big things (e.g. ramp up the tech scene, build Rams stadium, develop the entire corridor from Inglewood to Torrence, etc.) but there are just as many politicians and community organizers determined to stop them.

I'd suggest watching the rent control prop (on the ballot this fall), the proposal to tax carried interest (an assembly bill), and the governor's race to get a read on how things will tilt. If the politicians can be kept at bay, I think LA will have some pretty huge opps (particularly the corridor around Rams stadium). If not, word is places like Austin and Vegas could be exit routes.

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Aug 9, 2018

Wow - All over the Prop 10 and rent control stuff but hadn't heard about taxing the carry. If that ever came into play it will literally force real estate guys like me right out of the state. Just when I think California can't get any crazier politics wise... Visited Austin for the first time last week. Stunning how many new high rises going up. Amazing to see what can get built without CEQA abuse, normal zoning and YIMBY politicians who put their money where their mouth is. Rant over.

Aug 14, 2018

Yeah supposedly the tax on carried interest (Assembly Bill 2731) is not likely to pass since Dems lost a supermajority in the Legislature, but that's not all there is to worry about. Gavin Newsom (likely next gov) is a big advocate of single payer, and LASD (largest school district in the country) is on the rocks financially and will probably need a bail out in the next few years. Upshot is I can't see a scenario where taxes go anywhere but up in the Golden State.

Heard good things about Austin but also heard anti-development sentiment and bad politics are starting to emerge there. Plus they're getting a lot of people from the Bay / NYC so will likely get worse. Not what you're seeing?

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Aug 3, 2018

Chicago. COL with the city feel and opportunity. I can actually dream of buying a nice town home or condo.

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Aug 3, 2018

Reno, Nevada

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Aug 13, 2018

Second this. I just toured two deals there last weekend and was honestly blown away by the rent and job growth in the past few years, and it seems it's only the beginning. Who would have thought?

Aug 10, 2018

Chicago (and Illinois in general) have terrible fiscal situations. That means higher taxes and businesses moving out of state.

Aug 3, 2018

I recently spent a layover in downtown Columbus Ohio and it appeared to be booming both in construction and nightlife. We walked around in a really nice area called Short North that had lots of multifamily and hospitality being constructed there along with most of the downtown.

Pdx and Vancouver WA are also experiencing a flood of new residents mostly from CA as well.

Aug 10, 2018

Columbus is booming. The city won a sizable SmartCity Grant from the Department of Transportation in 2016.

Aug 4, 2018

Nashville! Already getting pretty gentrified and boujee. And you can't beat the hot chicken!

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Aug 13, 2018

I second this, Nashville is great, there are a lot of similarities to Atlanta, but I believe Nashville has a more vibrant arts and music (obviously) scene.

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Aug 16, 2018

Third, East Nashville has the most upside potential.

Aug 16, 2018

Fourth... We have a ton of office in the pipeline that will need to be absorbed though. Multifamily has cooled off as well. East Nashville has all the potential in the world, but I don't think you'll see a lot of Class A commercial come out of the ground for a while.

Aug 16, 2018
RobertMoses:

Third, East Nashville has the most upside potential.

Not more than West Atlanta

Aug 16, 2018

Very true. West Midtown is blowing up

Aug 4, 2018

Anyone with any insight on Houston, TX?

Aug 4, 2018

download CBRE, Cushman, Studley, etc market report to understand local trends.

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Aug 4, 2018

Oook well I am looking for insights from users on here not CBRE, CW, etc insights, thanks though.

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Aug 10, 2018

Houston is very cyclical with the energy industry.

Aug 4, 2018

I'm here in the SF Bay area. I have been seeing a lot of people move to Seattle, Austin and most recently Denver.

California is becoming less and less affordable so people are moving to these more affordable cities with your inflated SF salaries.

Aug 4, 2018

Detroit--underrated development, proximity to great universities. property prices picking up, huge redevelopments of downtown, new offices for microsoft, quicken loans, etc. huge shipping channel/trade hub, will grow rapidly once the question about fresh water access (looking at you, Las Vegas) grows in coming decades

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Aug 9, 2018

Big believer in this, too.

Aug 9, 2018

Ok in all seriousness, Detroit actually has some pretty nice parts. They even got a Whole Foods in their downtown area. If that doesn't say revitalized I don't know what does.

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Aug 4, 2018

Everyone seems to be moving out to Denver these days.

Aug 9, 2018
TheGrind:

Everyone seems to be moving out to Denver these days.

It sucks here...please stay away!!

Aug 10, 2018

Why do you say that? I've not really heard too many negatives

Oct 29, 2018

Detroit used to be one of the top 10 largest cities in the United States. Still has a metropolitan size top 15 around the same population as Boston

Aug 9, 2018

After this summer heat down south, Anchorage is looking real good right about now.

Aug 9, 2018

I'm pretty big on ATL - which sits on the boarder of tier 1 and tier 2. There is lots of room for growth here with a constant cycle of new Fortune 500 companies making ATL their HQ, recently it has attracted a strong pipeline of tech companies, and on top of this it definitely has the night life and fun youth are looking for. There are also a bunch of massive developments that will come to fruition in the next couple of years and hopefully even more long-term.

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Aug 10, 2018

Atlanta is great. All we need is more police officers.

Aug 9, 2018

It depends on what you're looking for. I think cheaper cities such as Denver, Atlanta, Raleigh, Charlotte, will offer great value for married professionals looking to raise kids. If we are talking about singles coming out of top schools, NYC and SF will remain big hubs due to their respective dominance in finance and tech and the high concentration of human capital.

Can other cities replace NYC and SF? Seattle could give SF a run for the money in terms of tech, but Seattle tech is still Amazon+Microsoft and satellite offices of SF based firms. There is very little tech VC or PE.

I think L.A. is super intriguing: amazing weather, great lifestyle, beautiful women, and reasonable cost of living compared to NYC and SF. The one major downside is traffic. In terms of industry, it's surprisingly more diverse than what the conventional wisdom would suggest. There is a decent amount of finance (PE and fixed income investing), traditional tech, digital media, entertainment, gaming (e.g. Snapchat, Netflix, YouTube, Riot Games, Activision, PlayStation, Warner Brothers, etc.). The tech jobs for obvious reasons are more geared towards the media and entertainment space. The diversity of industries is a breath of fresh air from SF and Seattle.

I think Austin is overrated (Texas in general). Aside from cost of living and taxes, I'm not sure what the draw is. It loses to LA in weather, beaches, outdoor stuff, and lifestyle. It loses to Seattle and SF in tech opportunities. It loses to Chicago and NYC in all urban amenities.

Atlanta is growing, but it's still a Southern city, and it has a tough time attracting top tier talent. It needs to drastically improve its public transportation before it can even compete with the big boys.

D.C. is underrated, although I am not a huge fan. I think it is a top contender for Amazon HQ2, and with the increasing growth of the federal government, there will be ton of opportunities. The city has an active singles scene, and nightlife and restaurants are surprisingly strong.

I'm very curious to see what happens to Chicago in the coming years. I love that city and wrote a long WSO post about it. However, there just aren't that many great jobs there, despite its size and importance. Trading is virtually dead, and the city has fewer top finance opportunities than even Boston and L.A. The tech scene is nascent, struggling to break through. And Rahm's horrible mismanagement of the city, with the out of control crime rates, has warped the public's perception of Chicago.

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Aug 10, 2018

Good post. TX does lose to those cities you mentioned on those things, although I could flip some of those around (i.e. Seattle and SF lose to TX in energy opportunities). For your somewhat successful young finance person, making $100k in TX gives you ~$15k more disposable income than in LA (half due to state taxes, rest due to rent and other general COL), for example (only gets worse if you look at NYC/SF). So it's a fairly meaningful amount of money to most. I recently moved from LA to TX. I miss the shit out of the weather and unique things to do, but it's just so expensive to raise a family there when a decent house costs $1MM+. So TX is a nice, if unspectacular, meeting in the middle - you can save a ton while still living in decent cities. It's not super sexy, but it's also not living in Des Moines.

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Aug 19, 2018

Spent a little time in Texas (Dallas area specifically) and biggest thing that stuck out to me was how interested the local cities (Dallas + the suburbs) seemed to be in making day to day life better and more pleasant, and in attracting new residents. This is the opposite of what I'm used to in LA and other "tier 1 cities," where city / state officials are constantly throwing up roadblocks and locals are complaining about gentrification and "displacement."

Kind of refreshing.

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Aug 10, 2018
Dances With Newfoundland:

Aside from cost of living and taxes, I'm not sure what the draw is.

That IS the draw, though it also beats SF in hot women and, oh yeah, not dealing with feces in the streets and an army of homeless

It also beats Seattle in just about every front unless you're an SJW. Same goes for DC which is one big ghetto with a few nice parks

Aug 10, 2018

You're preaching to the choir here. I absolutely despise Seattle and SF. But in terms of top job opportunities, Austin is way behind NYC/LA/SF/Seattle. For single professionals looking to advance their careers with big name brands, Austin falls short. What elite financial and tech firms are based there? (Aside from Vista Equity Partners and satellite offices of SF based tech firms, I can't think of any).

Aug 10, 2018

Intel, Paypal, HP, IBM, and Dell are all in Austin, not to mention a ton of start-ups. The place is a known incubator.

I would argue that Austin isn't worth the cost of living given that it's essentially one big college town. But there are plenty of opportunities there if Tech is your bag.

Aug 10, 2018

Those aren't "elite" at all.

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Aug 10, 2018

Maybe not for WSO, but they pay very well and have partly driven up the cost of living to absurd levels for a college town.

Aug 10, 2018

None of those are desirable tech jobs. And Austin is not exactly cheap. It's a glorified college town stuck in fucking Texas with oppressive humidity.

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Aug 14, 2018
TheGrind:
Dances With Newfoundland:

Aside from cost of living and taxes, I'm not sure what the draw is.

Same goes for DC which is one big ghetto with a few nice parks

Laughable...

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Aug 14, 2018

LA cost of living is not far behind SF and NYC these days. You're looking at $3K / month rent for a one bedroom in a good spot and homes in decent neighborhoods are in the $1K / sq foot range.

Other negative is LA is a poorly run city. Infrastructure is bad, gridlock is 24/7, and homelessness is out of control.

LA has some great potential but I could see it going either way (see my other comments in this thread).

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Aug 9, 2018

Raleigh, Dallas, Austin for sure. Add Scottsdale to the list.

What about Los Angeles? I know people are fleeing the SF bay area due to cost of living and street pooping, but if I had to pick a city on the west coast it would be LA.

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Aug 9, 2018

Once Los Angeles has completed its massive public transportation project before the Olympics in 2028, I'm not sure what someone can knock it about other than high state income taxes (which SF faces as well).

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Aug 13, 2018

Nobody is stating that Los Angeles or California are without problems. To respond to your comments:

  • "The entire state is on fire" - Los Angeles is not.
  • Earthquakes - I agree that Los Angeles is due for a major earthquake at some point in the future. However, there are several areas at risk of catastrophic weather (e.g. Southeast - Hurricanes, Midwest / South - Tornados).
  • People experiencing homelessness - Yes, California has a significant homeless problem. It is partly due to favorable year-round weather that is attractive to someone who lives on the streets. In addition, it is partly due to the fact that that the cost of living and renting are so high. This effects areas such as New York, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. It has a small effect on the desirability of the area.
  • Crime - Los Angeles does not have a significantly high crime rate. Cities with a higher crime rate - Nashville (#25), Chicago (#24), Minneapolis (#23), Washington DC (#16)
  • Weather - Global warming is effecting all cities, not just Los Angeles.
  • Worlds Worst Traffic - Again, this is an issue. However, once the public transportation is built out over the next 5-10 years, I would argue that LA's transit system will be in the top 3 to 5 in the nation. Once traffic is mitigated in Los Angeles (which it will be in 10 years), there will be very little to complain about living here.
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Aug 13, 2018

triggered eh?

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Aug 13, 2018

Very. It must be all California's gay frogs and chem trails that are doing this to me.

Feel free to counter my points. I'm just making my case as you are making yours.

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Aug 13, 2018
The Duke of Wall Street:

Nobody is stating that Los Angeles or California are without problems. To respond to your comments:

  • "The entire state is on fire" - Los Angeles is not.
  • Earthquakes - I agree that Los Angeles is due for a major earthquake at some point in the future. However, there are several areas at risk of catastrophic weather (e.g. Southeast - Hurricanes, Midwest / South - Tornados).
  • People experiencing homelessness - Yes, California has a significant homeless problem. It is partly due to favorable year-round weather that is attractive to someone who lives on the streets. In addition, it is partly due to the fact that that the cost of living and renting are so high. This effects areas such as New York, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. It has a small effect on the desirability of the area.
  • Crime - Los Angeles does not have a significantly high crime rate. Cities with a higher crime rate - Nashville (#25), Chicago (#24), Minneapolis (#23), Washington DC (#16)
  • Weather - Global warming is effecting all cities, not just Los Angeles.
  • Worlds Worst Traffic - Again, this is an issue. However, once the public transportation is built out over the next 5-10 years, I would argue that LA's transit system will be in the top 3 to 5 in the nation. Once traffic is mitigated in Los Angeles (which it will be in 10 years), there will be very little to complain about living here.
The Duke of Wall Street:

Very. It must be all California's gay frogs and chem trails that are doing this to me.

Feel free to counter my points. I'm just making my case as you are making yours.

You're not making much sense.

You basically quibbled on 2 pts, agreed & didn't even address all of my "points". Soooo don't know what I'm countering.

But hey, great job pulling crime rates A+

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Aug 19, 2018

What's the story on Scottsdale?

Aug 10, 2018

Eu citizen here, though one of my close friends is from NYC.
He has been saying me a lot of time that he is bullish on:
- Austin, Dallas
- Denver (yet he tells me that has a big potential)
- Charlotte
- LA area
- Nashville (don't remember why)

Aug 10, 2018

Charlotte's explosion is pretty insane. I grew up in the South, and when I was a kid Charlotte was a sleepy Southern town with a population of around 300K. Now, its population is around 900K and unrecognizable. BAML and Wells Fargo have brought a lot of out of state professionals into the city. Last time I was there, an Uber driver told me that people from NYC are moving in like crazy.

Aug 13, 2018

Uber drivers on my site visits have proven to be pretty amazing sources of information.

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Aug 10, 2018

Tampa and Orlando are experiencing tremendous population growth, but the growth primarily stems from retiring boomers on fixed-income and millennials relocating for the lifestyle. Tampa and Orlando need major corporate relocation - if this occurs, the cities are primed to boom.

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Aug 13, 2018

Can confirm this for Tampa. We have growing suburbs and new neighborhoods all over the place but very few banking opportunities. We have Raymond James HQ in St. Pete and JP Morgan Treasury here but mostly lots of wealth management and financial advisory.

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Aug 10, 2018

Any thoughts on Baltimore? Given proximity to DC/Philly/NYC, lower cost of living, semi strong economy - national perception is not strong but I think it could become another Tier II city in 5-10 years.

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Aug 10, 2018

Having lived there for a bit. I see the potential due to location, but no signs of a strong future just yet. In fact, its still pretty rough. Not alot of new companies being announced. Underarmour building a new office, but thats about it for now. Literally two blocks from inner harbor is a ton of run down buildings with crappy tenants or vacant brick buildings. Imagine how bad it is when your five blocks in.

Aug 13, 2018
jtd1215:

it could become another Tier II city in 5-10 years.

Hahahaha, thanks I needed a good laugh.

Aug 11, 2018

Dallas, Houston, Austin, Seattle, DC, Denver, Phoenix, Miami, Nashville, Atlanta, Charlotte.

Basically all of the large non T1 cities that tons of people are moving to.

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Aug 11, 2018

Business-friendly (low tax) cities that do not harbour undesirables (i.e. NOT sanctuary cities) will dominate in growth. Also helps to be away from the snow belt.

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Aug 13, 2018

I 100% agree with this. Individuals will continue to move to low COL areas with favorable business and tax climates.

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Aug 14, 2018

In case people are looking for more international options, Hong Kong is an amazing city to live and work in! 17% tax, very diverse group of individuals, high pay, huge development in China right now. Lots of growth potential here.

Aug 14, 2018

honestly, i'd love to move to HK (i grew up in the US), but isn't it like $2,500USD/month for a 350 sf apartment?

Aug 14, 2018

Yes that is correct unfortunately. My MD at the bank pays $13,000USD/Month for his family apartment, its crazy! But so worth it if you get a good job here.

Aug 16, 2018

correct, but California cities are worse. In Cali the rooms are bigger but certainly no cheaper, and the taxes are higher.

Aug 14, 2018

Isn't it extremely humid also?

Aug 14, 2018

Yes extremely humid at times. But you get used to it!

Aug 14, 2018
Unknown2You:

you get used to it!

not necessarily

https://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/humidity-is...

Aug 14, 2018

Having moved to LA two years ago, I can say that it has a lot more going for it than I initially thought and should continue to built on its strengths:

  • Entrepreneurial spirit. not just those in the entertainment industry but literally everyone has a side hustle or is taking evening classes or trying to start something. Infectious in a good way
  • City layout. bare with me here. Traffic is atrocious but once public transport is improved and much of driving becomes automated it will be a dream: Mountains on one side and many beaches on the other, all easily accessible. No claustrophobia like NY or London either.
  • Diverse opportunites. Hollywood to Silicon Beach (SpaceX and Google), to the boutique PE firms and investment banks. If you cant find work within the city limits, head on down to Orange County where PIMCO and a bunch of hedge funds reside.

Really I think LA takes too much shit, people come here and expect a fantasy land. It's not. But there is a lot more depth to it (and employment opportunities/ recreational activities) than you first think. Just don't recommend living next to the SA fault right now.

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Aug 14, 2018

Calling @StaphyBone

Aug 15, 2018

Born and raised in CA, lived mostly in LA, also lived in SF & SD

Living in CA is amazing. Hard to find a place as cool, historic, or entertaining as LA, & I love SD more than anywhere I've ever been

sooooo uh ya

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Aug 15, 2018
londontola:

Having moved to LA two years ago, I can say that it has a lot more going for it than I initially thought and should continue to built on its strengths:

  • Entrepreneurial spirit. not just those in the entertainment industry but literally everyone has a side hustle or is taking evening classes or trying to start something. Infectious in a good way
  • City layout. bare with me here. Traffic is atrocious but once public transport is improved and much of driving becomes automated it will be a dream: Mountains on one side and many beaches on the other, all easily accessible. No claustrophobia like NY or London either.
  • Diverse opportunites. Hollywood to Silicon Beach (SpaceX and Google), to the boutique PE firms and investment banks. If you cant find work within the city limits, head on down to Orange County where PIMCO and a bunch of hedge funds reside.

Really I think LA takes too much shit, people come here and expect a fantasy land. It's not. But there is a lot more depth to it (and employment opportunities/ recreational activities) than you first think. Just don't recommend living next to the SA fault right now.

This is good. I'm currently interviewing with firms in LA, and I'm very intrigued by the city. Surprised at how much finance and tech the city has. Underrated.

Aug 14, 2018

Pittsburgh

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Aug 15, 2018

San Antonio is very under the radar booming right now, especially if oil prices continue to go up. Greater MSA has over 2.5mm people.

Aug 20, 2018
InVinoVeritas:

San Antonio is very under the radar booming right now, especially if oil prices continue to go up. Greater MSA has over 2.5mm people.

Just curious have you been to SA before? Spent a weekend there and wasn't a huge fan. It was one of the rare times I thought to myself "I'd rather be back in Houston". (only other time I re call is when I visited Galveston, TX to see the ocean).

Aug 15, 2018

Reykjavik, Iceland

Aug 15, 2018

Only one mention of Boise in this thread. I second it. Forbes ranked them #1 in growth in the US. Their ranking is #1 for all the reasons mentioned in this thread that make all these other cities viable. They are drawing tech for sure. Low cost of living. I'm hearing more and more Californians talking about moving there.

San Diego is the biggest sleeper out of every city and again, only one other person mentioned it. We have everything here...everything. Nobody ever shows up here and wants to leave. Our traffic isn't that bad either. Our real estate can be pricey but doesn't have to be.

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Aug 16, 2018

What's the vibe in Boise like?

SD is one of my favorite cities but the tough thing about SD is you have high costs typical of coastal CA but fewer ways to make money vs. in an LA, OC, or SF.

Aug 16, 2018

My understanding is that it has the potential to be Austin with mountains. I looked at housing there. It's not as cheap as I thought it would be. Downtown is expensive for new condo's. So, the wages there must moving up nicely.

SD is not known for it's wages. You get paid with sunshine here, lol. We are still cheaper than OC and LA by a long shot. A 500k house in SD or neighboring cities will still put you in a middle class safe neighborhood. Not sure if that can happen in LA. SD is an entrepreneurs dream. Lots of money to be made here.

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Aug 16, 2018
PacNumber:

SD is not known for it's wages. You get paid with sunshine here, lol. We are still cheaper than OC and LA by a long shot. A 500k house in SD or neighboring cities will still put you in a middle class safe neighborhood. Not sure if that can happen in LA. SD is an entrepreneurs dream. Lots of money to be made here.

so true

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Aug 16, 2018

Shanghai I'd say is the place to be. A city where everything is possible. China remains the economic future and Shanghai is at the economic heart of it all. it's a city that truly never sleeps.

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Aug 17, 2018

Someone is a hater...

Aug 19, 2018

Why do you want to stay in the US? If you want a liveable place go to the most liveable city in the world: Vienna. It was voted as the most liveable city AGAIN. I think it has had this status for several years now (in a row, obviously ;)).
Each year, the international consulting firm Mercer carries out a study in order to assess the quality of life in 231 cities around the world. The results of the study in 2018 also gave Vienna top marks and made the Austrian federal capital the most livable city in the world for the ninth time in a row.

The survey compares the political, social and economic climate, medical care, education, and infrastructural conditions such as public transportation, power and water supply. It also takes into consideration recreational offers such as restaurants, theaters, cinemas, sports facilities, the availability of all kinds of consumer goods from food to cars, as well as environmental conditions - from green space to air quality.
However, you have to learn German or at least get used to bad English^^

Aug 19, 2018

Though I like history, I found it to be a bit boring after a while.

Aug 20, 2018

As a native Austinite, I felt obligated to leave a comment here due to the large number of replies I'm seeing that mention Austin. OP, you are absolutely right that the word is out. Traffic sucks, real estate prices are soaring, city counsel is clueless, homeless people love it here, the friendly Austin culture that people used to rave about has been ruined by the droves of Californians moving here. Not to mention if you're not used to the heat you're going to suffer. Austin pretty much just feels like any other big city now.

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Aug 26, 2018

Can anybody tell something about Boston? It is totally neglected in this and other topics about cities.

Aug 27, 2018

What do you want to know about Boston?

Aug 27, 2018

Why isn't it discussed as one of top cities to live in the next 5-10 years? I see people mention Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, but not Boston, and I'd imagine Boston to be better place then those cities. Any thoughts on it? Also, any data point and point of view would be appreciated, as I am seriously thinking to move there from NYC

Aug 27, 2018

There's no happy hour there, for one.

Aug 27, 2018

No happy hour and out of state licenses must be 25+ to purchase alcohol haha.

I love Boston and am not shitting on it by any means. No specific data points, but in regards to RE, I think maybe Boston is being left out of the conversation a bit because it's an already historically well established city vs. a massive influx of population like Austin, Dallas, other cities mentioned above. Will it be a top place to live? Sure, I think people will always want to move to Boston, especially when companies move there (GE and lots of tech firms have opened space there).

Boston recently committed a lot of resources to developing the Seaport (South Boston area). East Boston (right by Logan) and Charlestown area are also getting built up. They are putting a casino in Charlestown:
https://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2017/09/wy...
There's still a lot of development/re-development going on in the city, I just think it falls off the list of top places because of its history vs. a city where people are flocking to in droves.

Kinda like NYC, you live there. NYC isn't mentioned as a top place in the next 5-10 years (in fact it might be the opposite if you cite rent and companies outsourcing to cheaper cities). NYC will always be there, always have constant development going on. But even with the expansions into Brooklyn, LIC, outer boroughs (consider that a parallel to East Boston/Charlestown/Dorchester), that's expansion outward vs. building up the concentrated downtown area.

I'm sure a broker or someone with specific data could torpedo my thoughts but that's my take.

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Aug 27, 2018

neat-o

Aug 28, 2018

I believe we are going to see the formation of mega-cities / metropolitan areas that are going to experience the majority of the US GDP growth over the next 25 years. These cities will include: Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, Miami, Nashville, New York, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington DC.

I'd also may include Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, but not quite sold on either. Which cities would other people add?

Robert Clayton Dean: What is happening?
Brill: I blew up the building.
Robert Clayton Dean: Why?
Brill: Because you made a phone call.

Aug 28, 2018

As much as I probably wouldn't like it, you left out Houston which is very diverse and likely going to continue expanding for a long time to come.

Aug 29, 2018

I don't think Houston is going to attract top talent for any fields besides energy, which in my opinion is way past its glory days. Alternative energy is here to stay. The Houston economy needs to diversify into new industries like UAE and Saudi Arabia are diversifying their economies. Today Houston remains one of the largest metros by both GDP and population, yet I imagine many of those aforementioned cities in my post will soon eclipse Houston by first GDP then population. In 2010, Houston was the 4th largest metro by GDP and today is 5th. In the next 10 years, I'd imagine Houston will continue to drop to about the 10th largest.

Robert Clayton Dean: What is happening?
Brill: I blew up the building.
Robert Clayton Dean: Why?
Brill: Because you made a phone call.

Aug 31, 2018
Aug 29, 2018
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