Worth Applying to LSE as an American?

semi.target's picture
Rank: Orangutan | 285

I am beginning the college application process this summer, and I am wondering what needs to be done to be a competitive applicant to the London School of Economics. Have any of you monkeys gone there as an international student? Is it even worth applying?

Thanks

Comments (29)

Feb 20, 2019

0

Mar 5, 2019
Henri Poincare:

They take US students, sure. Standards are comparable to a school like Cornell.

That low?

Mar 5, 2019

0

Feb 22, 2019

Nah dude, makes little sense. Assuming you still wanna work in the US, you study in the US.

If you wanna work internationally, any of the Ivies is still better than LSE (assuming Ivies are an option). Only pick LSE if you wanna work in London/Europe.

But a word of caution, London IBD just pays way lower than NYC IBD (45-55k GBP vs 85-95k USD for first year analysts, and comparable costs of living in both cities) - I assume that's what you wanna do given you're on this forum.

    • 2
    • 1
Feb 22, 2019

Whilst pay is lower in London, COL at the analyst level (read paying your rent as you can expense the rest) is lower in London.

Getting into IB is a walk in the park from LSE for London/HK. In terms of stats as the above poster said they look for stats comparable to lower Ivies but they are looking for students passionate about a subject and academia more than well-rounded students as in the US where extra curricular are key.

Most Helpful
Feb 22, 2019

I really disagree with this. First of all, suggesting that any Ivies are better than LSE outside of the US shows you have no idea what you are talking about. It's laughable to pretend that Brown or Cornell is a better brand than LSE in Europe / Asia / ME, etc. As far as finance is concerned, LSE is one of the world most reputable school and placement is better than any US schools bar Wharton and Harvard.

Secondly, going to college is not just about the brand, it's also about the experience. Studying and living in a financial center where the student body is 50%+ international and where any city in Europe is a super cheap short flight away is extremely valuable to your personal and professional development. It has shows to employers that you are not afraid to get out of your comfort zone and take the less beaten path. If anything, studying abroad just makes you a much more interesting person. Also, the drinking age is 18 ;)

I know a lot people who attended LSE for undergrad (including quite a few American) and those of wanted to come to the US all got top placement (ie. they couldn't have done better).

And if you decide to stay in London, there's no denying that the fall of the pound (and the strength of the $ relative to historical average) makes salary comparison a bit unfair, but keep in mind that most of your expenses will be in pound, housing is cheaper (at least to rent) in London so you do come out not that far ahead. Also note that bonuses are higher so the difference in total comp isn't as large as the difference in base.

The to OP, I would encourage you to explore and see whether it's the right fit for you.

    • 15
    • 2
Feb 22, 2019

Forgot about cost of studying - most of the time a 3 year program at ~19k/year in terms of tuition, giving you 57k debt at the end of your studies. Making it roughly $75k in terms of tuition cost, which on top of my head is the cost of one year at Georgetown roughly.

Feb 22, 2019

So much bad advice from delusional Europeans. LSE on par with Wharton? St. Andrew's better than Amherst? Oxbridge on par with HPY?

Complete joke. Only Brits care about the LSE.

    • 2
    • 7
Feb 22, 2019

Dude you're an accountant - I don't think you require a degree for such a job.

Jokes aside: What you pay for a degree is 1) education, 2) job prospects, 3) network, and 4) brand name
1) Education at LSE is taught by professors from the same standard as any professor in the top Ivies.
2) LSE places people into any job they want - be it Mck, IB, PE, HF all of this is possible from LSE. I am not sure what else you'd want in terms of job prospects
3) Network - LSE has a very strong network in Europe, ME, Asia. Yes it is not as strong as Wharton in the US but that is for obvious reasons. You won't go very far with you Wharton network in Europe
4) Brand name is top European school, easily on par with Top Ivies - maybe not in the US but hell the US is 25% of the world GDP and 330 million folks soon overtaken by emerging markets which perceive Wharton on par with LSE.

    • 2
    • 1
Feb 22, 2019

Dude, you're a stupid accountant with a shit background, wtf do you know???
https://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/rate-my-mba... https://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/when-to-tra...

BTW, you posted in Mar. 2015 and said you were a VP at RE PE. Then in July, you posted about working at Big 4. I think there's a bit of an issue with your story lol.

    • 3
Feb 22, 2019

LSE is on par with Wharton and Oxbridge is on par with HPY (you should also know outside of the USA Stanford has a better reputation than Princeton and Yale)

    • 2
Mar 3, 2019

I see.

    • 1
    • 2
Mar 6, 2019

have to completely agree with @mtnmmnn Americans have a very skewed perspective of their schools. Places like LSE and Bocconi(to a lesser degree) Have amazing placement rates in finance. Look a the stats, nearing everyone graduating gets into the industry.
If you somehow still deny its quality you can't deny cost and TIME. Its only 3 years, argo you could do a masters(only 1 year in UK) at another Ivy quality school like Imperial, Oxbridge,UCL and be better off.

Mar 3, 2019

I am an American attending LSE/Imperial/UCL, I absolutely have loved my experience so far and had no issues on the professional side. PM if you have any specific Qs that you would like to ask, more than happy to discuss it further.

    • 1
Mar 3, 2019

I'll chime in:
LSE will get you whatever job you want in finance. The people you will meet are far more interesting than any ivy will give you access to. You will learn a lot about yourself and progress in life this way. It's internationally minded and exciting and opens a world of opportunities. LSE is known worldwide Kennedy and Mike Jagger studied there, enough said!

Someone mentioned comparable salaries, remember that the pound collapsed recently, and all salaries between NY and London are generally the same, except they FXed at 1.6. If you believe in the strength of the dollar for the next 30 years of your career than go to the US, if you are humble enough that you know you can't predict this, I wouldn't look at this. The difference in salary is temporary and only a recent phenomena. When I started my career the pound was at 2.0 and you were getting paid a lot more in London (10 years ago). This fluctuates.

I went to LSE/Oxbridge/Imperial and I went to Wharton/Harvard for an MBA (not giving complete specifics). My experience in the UK was a world better than in the US. The US is focused on itself and not applicable if you want an international career. The US is a commoditised economy and you'll never really quite shine there. Go to Blackstone, you'll get paid well, but you'll never get fuck you paid well enough. I believe opportunities lay outside of the US in the long term. If you don't like risk and just want to play it safe - both London and NY investment banking -> PE are safe options in the long run. I just believe there is more juice outside of the US, especially when your AOCado lady will run the US, at which time I'll likely give up my passport.

One final word : you will always be able to work in the US after LSE - it has an incredible reputation all across the world. But true, it's easier to get a job in New York if you are on the east coast and can go there during the week to meet and interview.

    • 6
Mar 3, 2019

0

Mar 5, 2019
Henri Poincare:

UK unis are full of weird kids though

As opposed to any other university?

Mar 5, 2019

Are the above all in regards to undergrad? If so, any comments on getting an MBA there? US Citizen interested in international options

Mar 5, 2019
StoicHoosier:

Are the above all in regards to undergrad? If so, any comments on getting an MBA there? US Citizen interested in international options

undergrads only. LSE is not MBA-centered, it does not even have a full time MBA programme.
the FT's MBA rankings are the most reliable ones when it comes to European MBAs. You will always find London Business School and INSEAD on top, followed by IESE/IMD/HEC. The rest isn't worth crossing the Atlantic Ocean (imo).

Mar 6, 2019

Got it, thanks. I think I got LSE and LBS mixed up there. Might have the chance to work in London, so I may consider LBS depending on how I like working/living there

Mar 6, 2019
Comment
Mar 7, 2019