The sell-side 15 - how to stay fit yet still fit in

big unit's picture
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People talk about getting the freshman 15 from too much beer in the 1st year of undergrad...when in reality, if you don't make it into the gym at all when you have basically 12 free hours a day, you probably deserve it and should be mocked for laziness.

Compare that to your 1st year of sell-side trading (or sales/research). Not only are you going to be dining out with clients and going out for drinks, but you'll also be working 60-70 hours a week on top of that. It might be excusable to let yourself go...and become 'skinny fat'. Skinny fat is when you lose your muscle, your shoulders become narrower, and yet you get a bigger gut. At the same time, you need to go out and drink/eat with clients so you can build your network and meet your clients/potential employers on the buyside. Its a tough balancing act, so here are some tips from someone who did just this for many a year, trying to stay in shape while working from 6:30am-7pm and drinking 20+ drinks a week (half work related).

Don't let yourself go and gain the sell-side 15, but make sure you take advantage of networking that comes alongside client events... here are some quick tips on how to stay fit and fit in with the S&T guys, who are some of the wildest drinkers on the street, and some examples of what happens when you don't do things the right way

If you are in sales/trading you are expected to usually go to one client dinner a week at the least (usually steak), and go out for 'casual drinks' at least one or two other nights. Its hard to balance this with not getting obese and getting to the gym, yet its a big and necessary part of what your job as a junior trader/salesperson is.

Pro-tips on casual drinks with clients:
- When you are going out for drinks with senior people from your team, always hold a beer so you don't seem weird, because if you aren't drinking, you will be given one. If you are on a market-making desk with clients, no one wants someone stuck up and boring ("Oh, I have to wake up early tomorrow." will be met with angry yelling because everyone is waking up early tomorrow).
- If you are the junior person, you will likely be expected to stay out the latest with the clients, so suck it up and do it. No one wants a junior person who can't handle it, never be the first person to leave, and always use your one-on-one time with your clients to build a personal relationship.
- Don't be the life of the party unless you are asked - its not college, you aren't social chair of your fraternity anymore - don't demand people to take shots with you unless you know them from prior events and have a relationship with them. Also, no one cares about how awesome the Beta house was at your school.
- Clients want to talk about themselves, so get them to open up. Ask them about college or where their favorite bars are. Thats usually a good way to get things started.
- Meet your junior counterparts on the buyside - most junior buyside guys are probably going to be 3-5 years older than you if you are a 1st/2nd year analyst, but are going to be the people who have the most in common with. Keep in mind a lot of the buyside guys are in investment research, along with trading, so they might be on the quieter or 'intellectual' side of things.
- Have things to talk about - SPORTS is a big one. People can always relate over sports - its the most egalitarian conversation topic. College basketball is pertinent, but NFL usually takes the cake. NBA and MLB are secondary.
- REMEMBER NAMES AND FOLLOW UP - shooting someone an Bloomberg message or e-mail the next morning after a night out with something as simple as 'great seeing you, lets do it again' or even 'man my head hurts' if appropriate. It helps create a relationship that extends beyond meeting 1-2 times a quarter.

Tips on client dinners:
- Most of these dinners will occur at a steakhouse in Tribeca or Midtown. I can't explain it, but for some reason no one takes any risks when it comes to new restaurants - you'll probably go to one of 3-4 steakhouses every couple of weeks for the entirety of your sell-side S&T career. So be prepared for that.
- Get veggie appetizers to offset the red meat. Bacon strips are great, but you need fiber.
- You don't have to scarf everything down when you eat.
- Don't talk with your mouth full, and if there is a lull in a conversation, order a round of drinks - particularly if you are the lead on the dinner (smaller account, or covering for more senior guys)
- DO NOT TAKE ANYTHING TO GO

So now that you've constrained your 'inputs' (alcohol, red meat) its time to work on the 'output' - working out is tough because if you go out on a Tuesday, not only is Tuesday night terrible but Wednesday night is for passing out immediately. So you lose 2 days with one event. The key is to use your weekends - I always made either Friday/Saturday a big night, but tried to work out on Saturday/Sunday mornings. And outside of that, Monday nights and Wednesday nights were the most likely. If you can get 2-3 workouts in during the week, and a bonus one if you have time, then you are doing great.

What to do at the gym? Hit the weights for 30 minutes. Your goal is to maintain as much of your muscle from college as possible. Don't be one of those people that goes and runs on the tread milll at 5mph for an hour. Do 1-2 heavy weight exercises, and then 3-4 other exercises with lower weight/higher reps. That should be an optimal mix. As for cardio, running at a high speed on the treadmill is key. Also have yogurt/fruit/veggies at home.

Why is the above advice important? Let me give you three examples of people who came to Wall Street and should have gone about their first few years differently:

- The junior sales person who was hired out of undergrad and ended up sucking. His school was a non-target, and was considered more of a party school. People expected him to be the life of the party when he first started. Turns out, this kid would absolutely NOT drink. He would openly leave events as the first person to call it a night, he was so shy with clients that he would not interact with anyone and would huddle up with his seniors.

Since he went to a school with very strong college football, people would ask him about his team, and he would know NOTHING. If you don't drink, and you don't like sports, and can't start a conversation, why are you getting a sales job? He was 'demoted' to an internal operations team, and I think currently going to a web designer school which I guess is a good fit for him.

- The former lacrosse player gone sumo. He was actually in my analyst class though we didn't work together too closely...but I did party with him at work events. This guy was awesome. He was the life of the party - he would always stay out late, and in fact senior guys let him organize dinners with groups of clients all the time. He was always accurate with his trades, and a naturally smart guy and a smooth talker. It also helped that he was like 6'3 and ripped when he started.

Sadly, in about 2 years of him starting, he was almost unrecognizable. The bags under the eyes is a given, but the guy probably gained about 50 lbs. He had a massive gut, terrible posture, and had taken up smoking cigarettes. He's gotten better since then, and has taken a big step back from the partying - but unfortunately, his reputation as being the party guy has stuck with him, and he can't seem to shake it. Its a vicious cycle.

- My favorite: The junior trader who talked too much. This guy went to a top target, and was a math whiz. Actually a very well-meaning person. Unfortunately, he clearly didn't socialize that much in college. He had the unfortunate habit of cornering people at work events and talking to them about the worst thing possible - work. Working on a trade or investment pitch for 12 hours, and then having some 1st year analyst come ask you questions about it and grill you on it, trying to stump you, is an enraging experience.

Pretty soon, even clients asked our senior traders/sales guys what the deal with him was. One example was when we were out with a hedge fund PM, and for some reason this kid started talking to him about some of his trades, which was all good and well. But when the kid basically started implying that he 'would have done it differently' the PM got visibly irritated. Again - the goal of client events is to make them like you...not to make yourself seem smart.

His nickname soon became 'The Whiz' - based off of Seinfeld's 'I'm the Wiz' episode. If you are reading this and it sounds familiar, you probably know me so send me an PM. He was soon relegated to a risk role, and last I heard he was in graduate school for something. I was always cool with him, but when we went out, I also had to keep my distance from him. The trading floor is a lot like a middle school cafeteria sometimes, and you just have to go with it.

....

So I hope these few tips might be helpful, particularly to the kids who are starting their summer internships or FT this upcoming year. Building your reputation is a key part of sales/trading - you have to make people trust you, but more importantly make people like you. And you have to do all this while making sure you don't become terribly out of shape. In many ways, this is harder than banking work - numbers are easier to understand than people.

Comments (44)

Jan 16, 2014

    • 3
Jan 16, 2014

Nice post.

You ever try to hit the gym right after work before the dinner/drinks started?

Jan 16, 2014
Bobb:

Nice post.

You ever try to hit the gym right after work before the dinner/drinks started?

I would usually go straight from work - unfortunately, even though most of the big banks have gyms, its hard to get your end-of-day stuff done as a junior on my team, which was relatively short-staffed (making sure risk is correct, P&L is submitted properly, all the trades have been reconciled) before most people are already heading out. I always tried to make it a priority to get to events alongside senior staff - its already awkward enough being the only person under the age of 35 at some events, its even worse showing up late/not having a seat/missing introductions.

Prior to trading I was in research (same team, different role) and even then you get stuck with double checking stuff at the end of the day. Worst thing to go along with a hangover is to come in and get told you made errors the night before.

I do know some people who hop off the desk from noon to 1pm for a quick work out, but I was always too paranoid to do that.

    • 2
Jan 16, 2014

Love the "man my head hurts" comment

Jan 16, 2014

Don't drink beer. Stick to spirits / red wine.

Jan 16, 2014
Asatar:

Don't drink beer. Stick to spirits / red wine.

If we order a round of beers and you order a merlot.. that kind of thing earns you a nickname real quick

Pro tip: you don't want to be that guy

Jan 16, 2014

Damn Americans. Here we crack open the red straightaway.

Jan 16, 2014
Asatar:

Don't drink beer. Stick to spirits / red wine.

Some of the Asian men/women I worked with were allergic to beer or something and so they drank liquor instead. No respect lost there.

However, I don't recommend ordering a red wine if everyone else is drinking beer at a sports bar or something. Thats a quick way to stand out in a negative way. Instead, do exactly what your more senior colleagues do at the beginning of the night.

Jan 17, 2014
big unit:
Asatar:

Don't drink beer. Stick to spirits / red wine.

Some of the Asian men/women I worked with were allergic to beer or something and so they drank liquor instead. No respect lost there.

However, I don't recommend ordering a red wine if everyone else is drinking beer at a sports bar or something. Thats a quick way to stand out in a negative way. Instead, do exactly what your more senior colleagues do at the beginning of the night.

His comment comes with a UK point of view. You have to remember there are a lot of continentals here (French, Italians, etc.), we go to different restaurants all the time (but the "standard" lunch / dinner places still exist). But your equivalent of a sports bar is a pub to us, and you wouldn't want to drink the wine at a standard British pub in any circumstances.

Total relate to the only junior comment. It makes me wish I'd done a IBD stint, sometimes. But i found it great to get senior exposure (client and internal) straight out of the blocks.

Jan 16, 2014

Awesome insights and an overall great post!

Jan 16, 2014
big unit:

My favorite: The junior trader who talked too much. This guy went to a top target, and was a math whiz. Actually a very well-meaning person. Unfortunately, he clearly didn't socialize that much in college. He had the unfortunate habit of cornering people at work events and talking to them about the worst thing possible - work. Working on a trade or investment pitch for 12 hours, and then having some 1st year analyst come ask you questions about it and grill you on it, trying to stump you, is an enraging experience.

Pretty soon, even clients asked our senior traders/sales guys what the deal with him was. One example was when we were out with a hedge fund PM, and for some reason this kid started talking to him about some of his trades, which was all good and well. But when the kid basically started implying that he 'would have done it differently' the PM got visibly irritated. Again - the goal of client events is to make them like you...not to make yourself seem smart.

His nickname soon became 'The Whiz' - based off of Seinfeld's 'I'm the Wiz' episode. If you are reading this and it sounds familiar, you probably know me so send me an PM. He was soon relegated to a risk role, and last I heard he was in graduate school for something. I was always cool with him, but when we went out, I also had to keep my distance from him. The trading floor is a lot like a middle school cafeteria sometimes, and you just have to go with it.

....

So I hope these few tips might be helpful, particularly to the kids who are starting their summer.

Obviously the firm where you work at isn't selecting the right people if the guys you just described land jobs that require socializing and they don't socialize at all.

Best Response
Jan 16, 2014
xway00:
big unit:

My favorite: The junior trader who talked too much. This guy went to a top target, and was a math whiz. Actually a very well-meaning person. Unfortunately, he clearly didn't socialize that much in college. He had the unfortunate habit of cornering people at work events and talking to them about the worst thing possible - work. Working on a trade or investment pitch for 12 hours, and then having some 1st year analyst come ask you questions about it and grill you on it, trying to stump you, is an enraging experience.

Pretty soon, even clients asked our senior traders/sales guys what the deal with him was. One example was when we were out with a hedge fund PM, and for some reason this kid started talking to him about some of his trades, which was all good and well. But when the kid basically started implying that he 'would have done it differently' the PM got visibly irritated. Again - the goal of client events is to make them like you...not to make yourself seem smart.

His nickname soon became 'The Whiz' - based off of Seinfeld's 'I'm the Wiz' episode. If you are reading this and it sounds familiar, you probably know me so send me an PM. He was soon relegated to a risk role, and last I heard he was in graduate school for something. I was always cool with him, but when we went out, I also had to keep my distance from him. The trading floor is a lot like a middle school cafeteria sometimes, and you just have to go with it.

....

So I hope these few tips might be helpful, particularly to the kids who are starting their summer.

Obviously the firm where you work at isn't selecting the right people if the guys you just described land jobs that require socializing and they don't socialize at all.

Xway00 - That is totally correct - basically, most BB trading desks have a two-step hiring process - you hire the person in the the general "Sales and Trading" program, either as sales or trading (or structuring or research). Then, the next step is the product. So you get hired into sales, then you get put in either equity or rates. Or you get hired into trading, and get put into equity derivs or HY bonds. The judgments made to place you into a product group are primarily made off of your resume and a few short 15-20 minute interviews, whereas you have 3-4 interview days and +20 hours of interviewing to get the initial offer. This makes no sense, given your product placement (rates vs equities vs credit) has as much to do with how well you fit as your role placement (sales vs trading vs research).

Outside of the inherent errors within the BB S&T recruiting processes, it also seems that BBs just don't reward raw intellect as much if you don't have the full package.

Unfortunately, junior traders in many desks get rewarded more if they have decent skills in a number of things, as opposed to being really good at one thing. For example, my colleague 'The Whiz' was great at understanding risk and knew every relevant corporate/macro news story, but he was not good at relaying his thoughts or making people feel happy about working with him. He would have been better fit into a role in equity derivatives, where the product trades less on a relationship-basis and more on a 'true best offer' basis. But alas, he was screwed by the recruiting process.

When people saw Da Whiz's resume and saw "Oh man, a kid who went to MIT/Harvard/Stanford and majored in econ/math", they didn't ask the more important question which was, "Will he fit in with us, despite what he thinks as a 22 year old with no actual work experience."

Its actually tragic how many awesome, smart kids get put into roles that are fundamentally wrong for their personality, and so people write them off as having a poor work ethic or being unpleasant to work with.

Part of the reason I am looking forward to contributing to this site is so people can look at the things demanded of junior sales/trading staff at the BBs, outside of the intellectual side. Its a tough job from a social/personality perspective.

    • 4
Jan 19, 2014

You know, this is uncannily accurate. You basically described my situation to a T. Must happen a lot more frequently than I thought.

I think it would be incredibly helpful if you could list which products fall into the "relationship-based" and "true best offer" categories respectively. It's tough enough for someone in the business to source that info (you only really know about your own desk, and asking around arouses suspicion), much less for the college kids who are trying to figure this stuff out.

Thanks

Jan 16, 2014

Great contributions already OP.

Jan 16, 2014

An easier way with drinks is to drink on the rocks drinks. This way you can avoid the calories of mixers as well as hide that your drink is empty with the melting ice. Well that's if you can't handle your liquor, if that's the case man up.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Jan 16, 2014

Quickly digressing into a drinking thread

Jan 17, 2014

The fact that you Americans require an article explaining how to drink in a bar is a pretty damning indictment of your alcohol laws. A 21 year old in Britain has genuinely been drinking in the pub for 5/6 years and would be in no need of such instructions.

Also my advice (I put on about a stone when I started working in the city and it has taken me three years to get rid of it) - is a really simple one, drink slowly, take smaller sips from your beer or if at a restaurant drink your wine slowly - no one will notice, you will drink less, feel less hungover and put on less weight.

Jan 16, 2014
samoanboy:

The fact that you Americans require an article explaining how to drink in a bar is a pretty damning indictment of your alcohol laws. A 21 year old in Britain has genuinely been drinking in the pub for 5/6 years and would be in no need of such instructions.

Also my advice (I put on about a stone when I started working in the city and it has taken me three years to get rid of it) - is a really simple one, drink slowly, take smaller sips from your beer or if at a restaurant drink your wine slowly - no one will notice, you will drink less, feel less hungover and put on less weight.

I really take issue with this comment, given that most of the British kids I know are soft (ie can't drink a lot, get really emotional after 3 'merlots').

I'd love to see the average British 22-year old hang out with state school frat boys in the US.

I was focusing more on how to drink appropriately in a work setting with senior colleagues when you have not had that experience. The reasoning being in college most people drink like alcoholics, but then there are also some quieter types who don't drink in college at all, and wouldn't drink in college whether or not they are in the US or Great Britain.

Its a balance between fitting in and not being an unwanted center of attention.

Jan 16, 2014

I should add, always have a tie handy

Jan 17, 2014
big unit:
samoanboy:

The fact that you Americans require an article explaining how to drink in a bar is a pretty damning indictment of your alcohol laws. A 21 year old in Britain has genuinely been drinking in the pub for 5/6 years and would be in no need of such instructions.

Also my advice (I put on about a stone when I started working in the city and it has taken me three years to get rid of it) - is a really simple one, drink slowly, take smaller sips from your beer or if at a restaurant drink your wine slowly - no one will notice, you will drink less, feel less hungover and put on less weight.

I really take issue with this comment, given that most of the British kids I know are soft (ie can't drink a lot, get really emotional after 3 'merlots').

I'd love to see the average British 22-year old hang out with state school frat boys in the US.

I was focusing more on how to drink appropriately in a work setting with senior colleagues when you have not had that experience. The reasoning being in college most people drink like alcoholics, but then there are also some quieter types who don't drink in college at all, and wouldn't drink in college whether or not they are in the US or Great Britain.

Its a balance between fitting in and not being an unwanted center of attention.

No. Fucking. Way.

Lies, heinous lies. I could drink you yanks under the table! It's indicative of the US when they see blacking out (a term we don't have in the UK, only know it through TV) as being too drunk.

Jan 16, 2014

Challenge accepted. No light beers allowed.

Jan 17, 2014
samoanboy:

The fact that you Americans require an article explaining how to drink in a bar is a pretty damning indictment of your alcohol laws. A 21 year old in Britain has genuinely been drinking in the pub for 5/6 years and would be in no need of such instructions.

Also my advice (I put on about a stone when I started working in the city and it has taken me three years to get rid of it) - is a really simple one, drink slowly, take smaller sips from your beer or if at a restaurant drink your wine slowly - no one will notice, you will drink less, feel less hungover and put on less weight.

Sensible advice here.

Jan 19, 2014

i have worked in nyc and london and no london finance person should never claim that brits are "better" at drinking then americans. I am a client and won't even go out with london sales people unless someone can vouch for them in advance because I find the london culture of getting obliterated after work in crappy pubs that have zero women in them to be appalling. I like to drink but not like they drink in london pubs.

Jan 17, 2014

Business Insider just picked this up.

Jan 17, 2014

I drink dirty gin martinis and I don't care what people think. Three of those will get you pretty juiced up real fast. I think the olive brine adds a bit to the total cals.

Jan 17, 2014

If I don't watch ma drinks, I be giving bj's under the table.

Jan 16, 2014
Jan 17, 2014
captainkoolaid:

we made it brahs

http://www.businessinsider.com/trader-explains-avoiding-getting-fat-2014-1

haha exactly what i would have said
gjdm

Jan 18, 2014

Relatively sound advice; although I take exception to some of it.

You make it sound like you went on binges with clients every night of the week as a junior. As a junior the people you will be going out the most are your work colleague and your grad class. It seems there are also always "leaving drinks" or occasions to drink at work NOT with clients. It's perfectly acceptable not to hang out too long sometimes, just make sure you do stay on occasions and go on the lash so that people think you are not just an anti-social twat.

Trader going out with clients - sales do bring traders along sometimes - and if you are a junior trader your best bet is just to drink in silence. No one is expecting you to talk much, you are not a sales guy - so you will be excused if you don't. If you do not get smashed it does not matter either if you are a trader, your job is not to suck the cock of the client, but not to piss him off either as in your example.

Research geeks - you don't have to get smashed either in this role, you are supposed to be saying smart things and adjusting your excel to fit with the corporate deal pipeline. Some banks have the sale/research hybrid role, that's a bit different.

You make it seems like everyone from research to traders has to drink. It's not true.
If you are a sales trader, or a sale you drink - and I fully agree with you on this point. In the UK you drink beer as well, I've worked here and when you are at the pub you don't order wine, you order a pint. We do a round each with some pork scratchings and repeat until drunk and beyond. You don't have the option to drink slowly, as you order in turns, also we don't drink the piss you yanks call beer and it hits you harder. I am more senior now and get away with ordering a slim gin tonic, I get stick for it and get called various names, as a junior I wouldn't have dared do that; now, I don't give a fuck. And even so, that's because I am in equity and we are at the bottom of the social totem pole, in fixed income hybrid structured double derivatives they probably don't drink as much.

The only advice I can give is don't listen to anyone on how you should handle your drinking, everybody reacts differently to alcohol and deals with it differently. Just don't stick out like a soar thumb, and do what the seniors do.

For the gym, go before you go out if you have a client meeting, they always have to wrap shit up and usually stay in the office one hour more than the sell side. That's what I used to do.
I am also one of those "muppets" on the treadmill for 30 minutes not going fast, and I am perfectly fine with that, it works for me. Great if you lift weights if it works for you, to each his method. I am not fat, and do triathlon as that's what you start doing when you've worked in banking for a while and are approaching your thirties. Getting in the gym and exercising your body is what counts.
Monday is the best day to go - Friday I always went out with my friends, didn't have time for the gym. Saturday and Sunday punish yourself for having gone out and go for a long cycle or a nice heavy hitting run. Saturday, Sunday, Monday - 3 days of sport and you just need to fit in something Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday.

One final note - you don't have to order 500 grams of steak, even if the company pays for it! Just order smaller portions, fuck the heavy starters as OP said. Eat normally - simple porridge in the morning, light lunches, and light dinner. Kill the snacks and avoid them at all costs. Basically: live like a responsible adult, and be aware your metabolism changes with age...

Jan 16, 2014
Disjoint:

Relatively sound advice; although I take exception to some of it.

You make it sound like you went on binges with clients every night of the week as a junior. As a junior the people you will be going out the most are your work colleague and your grad class. It seems there are also always "leaving drinks" or occasions to drink at work NOT with clients. It's perfectly acceptable not to hang out too long sometimes, just make sure you do stay on occasions and go on the lash so that people think you are not just an anti-social twat.

Trader going out with clients - sales do bring traders along sometimes - and if you are a junior trader your best bet is just to drink in silence. No one is expecting you to talk much, you are not a sales guy - so you will be excused if you don't. If you do not get smashed it does not matter either if you are a trader, your job is not to suck the cock of the client, but not to piss him off either as in your example.

Research geeks - you don't have to get smashed either in this role, you are supposed to be saying smart things and adjusting your excel to fit with the corporate deal pipeline. Some banks have the sale/research hybrid role, that's a bit different.

You make it seems like everyone from research to traders has to drink. It's not true.

If you are a sales trader, or a sale you drink - and I fully agree with you on this point. In the UK you drink beer as well, I've worked here and when you are at the pub you don't order wine, you order a pint. We do a round each with some pork scratchings and repeat until drunk and beyond. You don't have the option to drink slowly, as you order in turns, also we don't drink the piss you yanks call beer and it hits you harder. I am more senior now and get away with ordering a slim gin tonic, I get stick for it and get called various names, as a junior I wouldn't have dared do that; now, I don't give a fuck. And even so, that's because I am in equity and we are at the bottom of the social totem pole, in fixed income hybrid structured double derivatives they probably don't drink as much.

The only advice I can give is don't listen to anyone on how you should handle your drinking, everybody reacts differently to alcohol and deals with it differently. Just don't stick out like a soar thumb, and do what the seniors do.

For the gym, go before you go out if you have a client meeting, they always have to wrap shit up and usually stay in the office one hour more than the sell side. That's what I used to do.

I am also one of those "muppets" on the treadmill for 30 minutes not going fast, and I am perfectly fine with that, it works for me. Great if you lift weights if it works for you, to each his method. I am not fat, and do triathlon as that's what you start doing when you've worked in banking for a while and are approaching your thirties. Getting in the gym and exercising your body is what counts.

Monday is the best day to go - Friday I always went out with my friends, didn't have time for the gym. Saturday and Sunday punish yourself for having gone out and go for a long cycle or a nice heavy hitting run. Saturday, Sunday, Monday - 3 days of sport and you just need to fit in something Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday.

One final note - you don't have to order 500 grams of steak, even if the company pays for it! Just order smaller portions, fuck the heavy starters as OP said. Eat normally - simple porridge in the morning, light lunches, and light dinner. Kill the snacks and avoid them at all costs. Basically: live like a responsible adult, and be aware your metabolism changes with age...

Totally agree with the 'you don't have to order the biggest steak' - even if its paid by the company, its your stomach that has to do the digesting. Also agree that every situation is different, though usually the sales coverage should have a good sense for what to expect at the client event so that everyone is on the same page.

Jan 19, 2014

I know this moved to a drinking thread, but to add some to the staying fit aspect, get in the habit of doing body weight exercises which can be squeezed in at home whenever you have time.

Push-ups, plank, burpees, a pull-up bar, etc can do wonders for your overall fitness and don't require a trip to the gym. They require discipline since it's harder to "get in the zone" at home than at the gym but they also void the excuses that come with "I don't have time to make a trip to the gym."

Short, intense workouts that engage your muscles and push up your HR can keep you looking like brad Pitt, while getting paid like, well, I guess Brad Pitt....

Having said that, as I believe has been stated, what you eat is more important than the exercise when it comes to keeping a lean body.

Jan 19, 2014

Sneaking in the gym 40 minutes before heading to the office is a great way to flush out the alcohol from the previous night as well.

Jan 16, 2014
Gmoney23:

Sneaking in the gym 40 minutes before heading to the office is a great way to flush out the alcohol from the previous night as well.

Some of my more senior colleagues would go to those morning spin classes after a big night out - I have no idea how they do it. I really can't do anything when I'm hungover besides complain. But mornings are a great time to get some fitness stuff in, since your schedule becomes uncertain once you get in.

Jan 29, 2014

interesting

Jan 29, 2014

Morning workouts are the only way to do it. Wake up early and slam a preworkout, your body gets used to it after a few weeks and its not difficult to get up anymore.

Jan 29, 2014
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Mar 14, 2014

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