Resume Question: Interests on Resume

Space is tight. I may have to cut the section out. How important is it for recruiters to see your personal interests/activities?

Include Interest Section on Resume?

Almost any professional reviewing your resume will tell you that the interest section on your resume can sometimes be the most important part. As recruiters and professionals scan through stacks of resumes, some reviewers will even look at the bottom of the resume first to see the interests that differentiate you from other people. Wall Street firms want to hire people that are interesting and relatable to the rest of the team.

Even more importantly, once you get to the interview, the interest sections shows that you have passions and interests outside of finance. It helps interviewers form common ground with you in the interview and gives you something to talk about other than finance or the potential job.

pk - Investment Banking Analyst:

It is actually one line interviewers look at and it will probably come up in all your interviews if you have something interesting there. They want to see what kind of person you are outside of academics and work, and if you are a well rounded candidate.

QHDraem:

Interests do help separate you from the crowd. With everyone going around these days with their BSD attitudes and overly exaggerated job experiences, interests can definitely help and especially if it's something the person looking at your resume can relate to.

That being said, obviously don't put shit that sounds stupid or lame on paper like "beer pong" or "professional gaming", but by all means put shit like graphics design, boxing, mountain climbing, etc.

However, some of our users shared that if your interests are very generic they will not be beneficial. Make sure to make your interests specific or interesting so that they can be points of conversation. For example, avoid listing "TV" as an interest and instead list your favorite show "Game of Thrones."

Check out some more links about this topic on WSO.

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Comments (122)

Aug 6, 2009

It is actually one line interviewers look at and it will probably come up in all your interviews if you have something interesting there. They want to see what kind of person you are outside of academics and work, and if you are a well rounded candidate.

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May 1, 2011

You haven't done a single intramural sport/community service thing?

Dec 14, 2012

Not important.

Mar 4, 2013

Having interests is overrated, both on your resume and in life. Nobody wants to work with someone with a "life outside of work", show me a guy with hobbies and I'll show you a guy without a job. Finance all day every day if you really want to make it to the top.

    • 1
Apr 28, 2013

Yes include them because they can really show your interests besides work and it shows you are well rounded.

"To achieve satisfactory investment results is easier than most people realize; to achieve superior results is harder than it looks."
--Benjamin Graham

B.K.

Feb 7, 2014

Interests do help separate you from the crowd. With everyone going around these days with their BSD attitudes and overly exaggerated job experiences, interests can definitely help and especially if it's something the person looking at your resume can relate to

That being said, obviously don't put shit that sounds stupid or lame on paper like "beer pong" or "professional gaming", but by all means put shit like graphics design, boxing, mountain climbing, etc

I think what you have is perfectly fine, just make sure you word it properly

May 25, 2014

The hit rate of people who get the joke will be de minimus. In London about 10% of people in finance care about football. Then eliminate the not Brits and you have 2.5% who may or may not ever like the idea that your making a joke on your cv. In the US, no one will get it / know you're making a joke.

To take it one step further and be slightly controversial: there's a class skew in banking, mostly slightly snobbish people who like themselves above the common man. An allegiance to a "lower class" football team may put people off. Indicate you may not be the right guy to put in front of clients. People who even know where Hartlepool is will instantly imagine a pasty northern kid eating a Greggs.To clarify, this is not my view, just an observation.

List the sports you play. Just saying a generic sports comment doesn't allow for the guy who also likes playing squash to like you more because of it.

"After you work on Wall Street it's a choice, would you rather work at McDonalds or on the sell-side? I would choose McDonalds over the sell-side." - David Tepper

Dec 29, 2014

Putting the soccer thing, yes. Putting the Arsenal fan.. no. Fashion enthusiast would be something to put, but different wording.

The interests section is mainly to show that you're a human being and not a robot. But in things like soccer, putting Arsenal fan is almost like saying you're a republican. (not equating Arsenal fans to republicans, it's just a metaphor.)

make it hard to spot the general by working like a soldier

Jul 23, 2015

If you put that as your interest then it looks like you have nothing of substance of interest (sports, hiking, running, whatever it is). You want your interests to look more proactive, not something you do when you get home every day. I wouldn't put it, if people like the same TV shows as you, you'll find out by working with them

Dec 29, 2014

Thanks a lot for your input!
How do you suggest I word the fashion thing then?
And Arsenal isn't that well supported here in the States. In fact, it's a rare occurrence indeed when I run into an Arsenal fan. Thus I don't think the republican analogy is very apt here (I'm assuming you meant that both Arsenal fans and Republicans are quite numerous).

Dec 30, 2014

I was saying that some people can be very into their respective clubs and putting republican or democrat or tea party is just something you don't put out there because it could sway someones view of you. Like Oh man, that guy is a republican, he won't be suited for this.

I'm obviously exaggerating a little bit here, but I'm just throwing it out there.

I also didn't know that you were in the states. Nobody here really cares about soccer anyways which is unfortunate.

make it hard to spot the general by working like a soldier

Dec 30, 2014

Haha I wouldn't be calling it soccer if I weren't in the States.

Dec 30, 2014

Haha that's true! I wish my club were doing a bit better this year. After their second place finish last year, Liverpool isn't living up to expectations.

make it hard to spot the general by working like a soldier

Aug 6, 2009

In short: they usually won't care if there's nothing interesting there, and they usually will care or at least be interested in it if there is something well...interesting in it. Your interests section won't get you the job, but if you have something interesting in there...so good talking points, you can certainly chew up a portion of the interview discussing that, which is much easier and more fun than answering additional technical or fit questions. I know that in the majority of my recent interviews, I have spent at least 5 minutes or so per interview talking about powerlifting, or competing, or bench pressing, or dieting, etc. For the interview, talking points are worth their weight in gold, so if you've got some interesting hobbies, show them.

IBanker
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May 1, 2011

Unless your only passion in life is finance, I think this suggests you have some bigger issues to work out...

Dec 14, 2012

Thank you. It's gone.

Mar 4, 2013

I have 1 Line, Hobbies/Interests include: X, Y, Z. Or X again but worded differently if you really are pretty one-dimensional.

From what I gather, it doesn't really hurt or help, but may spark a conversation point if you share a common interest w/ someone or have a particularly interesting hobby. And one line typically isn't too much of a premium.

Apr 28, 2013

in general, they aren't really necessary
maybe you want to add one or two on to prove that you aren't a total dork or something, but otherwise, if they don't apply or are not in some way relevant to your work, don't put them down

in my opinion, listing "trading equities" as a hobby sounds kind of retarded
i kind of like the genealogy one though

I'm not concerned with the very poor
-Mitt Romney

    • 1
Feb 7, 2014

One thing I have always been asked about is what I put in my interests. Every single interview I have ever had we have had a casual conversation about my interests which has made the interview flow and friendly.

Put them.

Don't put what you said though, sounds nerdy and weird. Banks are bland and stereotypical, you need to fit that mold.

Frank Sinatra - "Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy."

Dec 29, 2014

Fashion Enthusiast is just fine.

I don't think there's anything wrong with putting Arsenal on there. NFL Football is one of my interests and I put "Hometown Team" Fan on my resume and I've spoken about the team in almost every interview.

Jul 23, 2015

Interests is to be used to be filled with things that make you an interesting person. Things that would differentiate you from a robot. Watching TV doesn't really make someone interesting. Usually things like "plays football, avid kayaker, marathon runner, master mechanic" would go in there.

make it hard to spot the general by working like a soldier

Aug 6, 2009
BankonBanking:

For the interview, talking points are worth their weight in gold, so if you've got some interesting hobbies, show them.

Definitely agree on this point. I always tell younger friends in college who are in IB to spend at least an hour thinking about this one section. It seems tangential, but is definitely a way of bringing up talking points that show you're someone they can spend 16 hours a day with.

Apr 28, 2013
Mitt Romney:

in general, they aren't really necessary
maybe you want to add one or two on to prove that you aren't a total dork or something, but otherwise, if they don't apply or are not in some way relevant to your work, don't put them down

in my opinion, listing "trading equities" as a hobby sounds kind of retarded
i kind of like the genealogy one though

That's the one I was most hesitant about. While I spend more time trading than I spend on any other hobby, I don't remotely know what I'm doing compared to any professional. So a conversation about trading would make me sound like a retard to them. Whereas I can speak confidently and have some interesting shit to tell you about all of the others.

Apr 28, 2013
Little Engine Would:
Mitt Romney:

in general, they aren't really necessary
maybe you want to add one or two on to prove that you aren't a total dork or something, but otherwise, if they don't apply or are not in some way relevant to your work, don't put them down

in my opinion, listing "trading equities" as a hobby sounds kind of retarded
i kind of like the genealogy one though

That's the one I was most hesitant about. While I spend more time trading than I spend on any other hobby, I don't remotely know what I'm doing compared to any professional. So a conversation about trading would make me sound like a retard to them. Whereas I can speak confidently and have some interesting shit to tell you about all of the others.

I hadn't even thought about it like that.
All i meant was that if you put that down, it's going to look like you're trying way too hard
your credentials should already speak for themselves, i think

I'm not concerned with the very poor
-Mitt Romney

Apr 28, 2013
Mitt Romney:
Little Engine Would:
Mitt Romney:

in general, they aren't really necessary
maybe you want to add one or two on to prove that you aren't a total dork or something, but otherwise, if they don't apply or are not in some way relevant to your work, don't put them down

in my opinion, listing "trading equities" as a hobby sounds kind of retarded
i kind of like the genealogy one though

That's the one I was most hesitant about. While I spend more time trading than I spend on any other hobby, I don't remotely know what I'm doing compared to any professional. So a conversation about trading would make me sound like a retard to them. Whereas I can speak confidently and have some interesting shit to tell you about all of the others.

I hadn't even thought about it like that.
All i meant was that if you put that down, it's going to look like you're trying way too hard
your credentials should already speak for themselves, i think

I would argue that putting my own money (all of it, actually) on the line says something. And I've been averaging an 18% return for two years now.
But I still essentially know nothing about trading and couldn't speak intelligently about it with a trader. I just swing trade on news and macro moves.

Aug 6, 2009
BankonBanking:

In short: they usually won't care if there's nothing interesting there, and they usually will care or at least be interested in it if there is something well...interesting in it. Your interests section won't get you the job, but if you have something interesting in there...so good talking points, you can certainly chew up a portion of the interview discussing that, which is much easier and more fun than answering additional technical or fit questions. I know that in the majority of my recent interviews, I have spent at least 5 minutes or so per interview talking about powerlifting, or competing, or bench pressing, or dieting, etc. For the interview, talking points are worth their weight in gold, so if you've got some interesting hobbies, show them.

IBanker
www.BankonBanking.com
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Are you serious? Dude, who do you think you are fooling?! There is NO WAY you worked in a BB IB like you claim, and had time for powerlifting. Absolutely no way. With improper diet, irregular sleep, 80+ hour weeks, no way u "power-lift" thing except for your ruler to make sure your powerpoint boxes are even.

Apr 29, 2013
Mitt Romney:

in general, they aren't really necessary
maybe you want to add one or two on to prove that you aren't a total dork or something, but otherwise, if they don't apply or are not in some way relevant to your work, don't put them down

in my opinion, listing "trading equities" as a hobby sounds kind of retarded
i kind of like the genealogy one though

Sounds like the most non-dork to me. Did you read the other ones? Game Theory? Space Exploration? Badminton?

Aug 6, 2009

Way to be a tough guy on an internet forum dude. You're right, I just randomly made it all up - powerlifting, what an impressive and great web of lies I have crafted - I am too clever.

Seriously, take it as you will...it doesn't matter to me if you believe me or not. Fact is, I have competed in 4 or 5 local events, and have been into the sport for 4 or 5 years now. My personal record is 465lbs at 230lbs. I have not been crushed as often as some of my collagues, I will admit that, but it definitely involves flexibility. Thanks for contributing.

IBanker
www.BankonBanking.com
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Apr 29, 2013
peinvestor2012:
Mitt Romney:

in general, they aren't really necessary
maybe you want to add one or two on to prove that you aren't a total dork or something, but otherwise, if they don't apply or are not in some way relevant to your work, don't put them down

in my opinion, listing "trading equities" as a hobby sounds kind of retarded
i kind of like the genealogy one though

Sounds like the most non-dork to me. Did you read the other ones? Game Theory? Space Exploration? Badminton?

What can I say... I do what I does.

Should I put down, "Doing cocaine and wearing exclusively linen" ?

Apr 29, 2013
Little Engine Would:
peinvestor2012:
Mitt Romney:

in general, they aren't really necessary
maybe you want to add one or two on to prove that you aren't a total dork or something, but otherwise, if they don't apply or are not in some way relevant to your work, don't put them down

in my opinion, listing "trading equities" as a hobby sounds kind of retarded
i kind of like the genealogy one though

Sounds like the most non-dork to me. Did you read the other ones? Game Theory? Space Exploration? Badminton?

What can I say... I do what I does.

Should I put down, "Doing cocaine and wearing exclusively linen" ?

I prefer "ensconced in velvet".

''You can fool some of the people all of the time, and those are the ones you need to concentrate on.'' -- President George W. Bush
0.5 bb

Apr 29, 2013
Little Engine Would:
peinvestor2012:
Mitt Romney:

in general, they aren't really necessary
maybe you want to add one or two on to prove that you aren't a total dork or something, but otherwise, if they don't apply or are not in some way relevant to your work, don't put them down

in my opinion, listing "trading equities" as a hobby sounds kind of retarded
i kind of like the genealogy one though

Sounds like the most non-dork to me. Did you read the other ones? Game Theory? Space Exploration? Badminton?

What can I say... I do what I does.

Should I put down, "Doing cocaine and wearing exclusively linen" ?

Less concerned with your taste and more concerned that Mr. Romney picked equity trading as dorky.

Jul 19, 2016

haha. I have similar on my resume and a lady from AB asked me about carb backloading. It helps a ton. An associated from DB started to talk about pre workout.

Aug 6, 2009

I think you are clever.

Great name for a banker website. It's catchy and simple. I like that.

Anyone with a brain knows its BS, I'm just letting you know. Trust me, I worked at a BB for a year, (technically more if you count my SA). It's just not feasible that you trained 10hrs+ per week on weighlifting, particularly after fatigue, and random hours of the industry.

Btw, I guess I'll go try to cook your "meal of the week" in my cube.

That's like me saying I have a 15" cock... Well at first glance, I guess it's possible...

May 1, 2011

Really? You have no interests in life? That will not look good......

Get busy living

Dec 14, 2012

Very important. Gives you something to talk about and immediately connect with the interviewer on a personal level. Let's them know whether you pass the "fit test". I've had many interviews where they look at my resume and say "oh wow, you're into xyz, me too!" and we spend the whole interview exchanging stories. Really helps you differentiate yourself from other people.

Mar 4, 2013

Interests don't make an impact on them choosing you for interviews but they do have an impact on what you talk about in the interviews. Which is more important anyways. Yes put interests on there. They're important

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Apr 29, 2013

Include them if you have space on the resume. I did not have enough space so I omitted them.

Feb 7, 2014

My view is yes. But bear in mind that whatever you put there sends a message not just about you, but (even more so) shows how you think you should market yourself and how you think your interviewers will perceive you. If done badly, it can show how you are oblivious to how you are perceived (which is not someone I want to put in front of a client).

If you put "Designing 3D fursuit models for [whatever the equivalent of Second Life is these days]", that likely wouldn't be perceived well.

Also be prepared to talk about what you list. I recommend only listing interests that you can show some passion about and that are not common to most people. Eg I'm cool with cooking if you really know your stuff, not if you watch some chef TV show or cook ordinary recipes once a week.

If you're passionate about stuff that doesn't market yourself well (eg playing Magic The Gathering) - leave it off. Even if that is stuff I like as an interview (note: I don't like MTG), I'll still think you demonstrate poor risk assessment by listing it.

The risk to bear in mind is that your interviewer may have the same interest. If it turns out your interest is pretty half-arsed, then your not doing yourself any favours.

Examples of some interests I've seen on resumes that I don't think you should include: Pokemon, Tetris, Game of Thrones, Computer Gaming

Those who can, do. Those who can't, post threads about how to do it on WSO.

Dec 30, 2014

Any other opinions?

Jul 23, 2015

You might as well put "Call of Duty 4" on there in that case.

Under my tutelage, you will grow from boys to men. From men into gladiators. And from gladiators into SWANSONS.

Mar 9, 2013
kyleyboy:

Interests don't make an impact on them choosing you for interviews

100% untrue and very real evidence why no one should take the advice of high school kids masquerading as experts on this forum.

Mar 9, 2013
whatwhatwhat:
kyleyboy:

Interests don't make an impact on them choosing you for interviews

100% untrue and very real evidence why no one should take the advice of high school kids masquerading as experts on this forum.

It's common sense. Much of this forum does not have it. Interests directly will not get you an interview. You as a person may be able to turn your interests into a conversation that will get you an interview. Simply writing your interests on a resume will not get you anywhere if you cannot take advantage of it. And if you try to cheat the system by writing interests to cater to the interviewer then you are fucking yourself. The only time that interests may be the reason you get an interview on an actual resume would be if you have to identical resumes and your interests are different.

Mar 9, 2013
whatwhatwhat:
kyleyboy:

Interests don't make an impact on them choosing you for interviews

100% untrue and very real evidence why no one should take the advice of high school kids masquerading as experts on this forum.

Quit crying and read the rest of my post silly.

Mar 9, 2013
kyleyboy:
whatwhatwhat:
kyleyboy:

Interests don't make an impact on them choosing you for interviews

100% untrue and very real evidence why no one should take the advice of high school kids masquerading as experts on this forum.

Quit crying and read the rest of my post silly.

I did read the rest of it and the statement I quoted is still completely false. This:

peinvestor2012:

Yes, you need interests. Nothing will set you apart without them at the big shops. Applicants are a dime a dozen and it gives the interviewer a chance to ask a question he'll get a genuine response about. Not some bullshit story or an answer crafted by your career development center.

is a perfect example of why interests are important.

Btw, How many interviews have you had while in high school? How many of your posts on this board are informed by personal experience?

Commonsense:
whatwhatwhat:
kyleyboy:

Interests don't make an impact on them choosing you for interviews

100% untrue and very real evidence why no one should take the advice of high school kids masquerading as experts on this forum.

It's common sense. Much of this forum does not have it. Interests directly will not get you an interview. You as a person may be able to turn your interests into a conversation that will get you an interview. Simply writing your interests on a resume will not get you anywhere if you cannot take advantage of it. And if you try to cheat the system by writing interests to cater to the interviewer then you are fucking yourself. The only time that interests may be the reason you get an interview on an actual resume would be if you have to identical resumes and your interests are different.

I don't think anyone said that interests will directly will get you an interview. If you have a genuine and preferably unique interest that helps you stand out and the rest of your resume stacks up, that gives you an upper hand. Had he said don't make MUCH IMPACT rather than AN IMPACT I would have agreed. However, given how competitive hiring is right now, embracing any way to differentiate yourself from other candidates is extremely important.

Aug 6, 2009

Another clever response. Unfortunately, training takes a lot of dedication, and yes I did and do manage to find roughly 8 hours per week to train - it's not that difficult if you work out the whole weekend...then just 1 weekday or 2 per week (Mon through Thurs). It's not easy, but that's why most people don't bother. It's a lifestyle choice; I would never fault someone for choosing it, or for not choosing it - I will say that it comes with a lot of injuries.

IBanker
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May 1, 2011

robot...

Dec 14, 2012

If it's not there, they can easily ask you about what your interests are and you can hit it off that way. I would take Sir Trades A Lot advice, he seems to have a lot of experience in hiring.

Mar 5, 2013

Porn, skeet shooting, horseback riding, Civil War reenactments, urinal cake collecting, and the Force

Apr 29, 2013

100% include them.

My group (BB, top group) will sometimes throw out resumes without hobbies/interests on them. Many of us start the interview by asking you to tell us about yourselves and then jump into the hobbies section to get a conversation going. The resumes HR filtered for us all look the same. You've all memorized the same answers from vault guide. We want to see if you can carry out a conversation on a topic you care about, and we need the hobbies/interest section to start that conversation.

Feb 7, 2014

^What's wrong with Game of Thrones? I know it's a passive activity.

Robert Clayton Dean: What is happening?
Brill: I blew up the building.
Robert Clayton Dean: Why?
Brill: Because you made a phone call.

Jul 23, 2015

I would take it a step further. Everybody watches TV. Everybody plays sports (or has in the past). List INTERESTING interests that you actually care about. In this day and age, everyone has a netflix account. For example:

Instead of TV, you can say film blogger, or improve acting, etc.

Instead of traveling write, traveled to over 100 cities across the US, 16 countries and 5 continents.

People care about you having substance and someone they can get along with, interests start conversations in interviews many times if done right so don't add the same interests as 95% of other applicants. Interests likely wo't get you an interview but they add another dimension to your persona.

    • 1
Mar 5, 2013
BTbanker:

Porn, skeet shooting, horseback riding

Are these to be considered in one group BTbanker?

Frank Sinatra - "Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy."

Apr 29, 2013
gdxx:

100% include them.

My group (BB, top group) will sometimes throw out resumes without hobbies/interests on them. Many of us start the interview by asking you to tell us about yourselves and then jump into the hobbies section to get a conversation going. The resumes HR filtered for us all look the same. You've all memorized the same answers from vault guide. We want to see if you can carry out a conversation on a topic you care about, and we need the hobbies/interest section to start that conversation.

That's what I thought. Thanks for the reply.

Mar 5, 2013
yeahright:
BTbanker:

Porn, skeet shooting, horseback riding

Are these to be considered in one group BTbanker?

Giddy up

Apr 29, 2013
gdxx:

100% include them.

My group (BB, top group) will sometimes throw out resumes without hobbies/interests on them. Many of us start the interview by asking you to tell us about yourselves and then jump into the hobbies section to get a conversation going. The resumes HR filtered for us all look the same. You've all memorized the same answers from vault guide. We want to see if you can carry out a conversation on a topic you care about, and we need the hobbies/interest section to start that conversation.

Couldn't you just ask them even if it wasn't listed on the resume? Do I really need to write it out for you to have interest?:

Hobbies/Interests: Chopping wood at the ranch, painting, watching baseball

''You can fool some of the people all of the time, and those are the ones you need to concentrate on.'' -- President George W. Bush
0.5 bb

Apr 29, 2013
Dubya:
gdxx:

100% include them.

My group (BB, top group) will sometimes throw out resumes without hobbies/interests on them. Many of us start the interview by asking you to tell us about yourselves and then jump into the hobbies section to get a conversation going. The resumes HR filtered for us all look the same. You've all memorized the same answers from vault guide. We want to see if you can carry out a conversation on a topic you care about, and we need the hobbies/interest section to start that conversation.

Couldn't you just ask them even if it wasn't listed on the resume? Do I really need to write it out for you to have interest?:

Hobbies/Interests: Chopping wood at the ranch, painting, watching baseball

It's an awkward transition if you jump to something that's not listed on the resume.

"Tell us about yourself."
*Spiel*
"Sooooooooo... what do you like to do for fun?"

Result: creepy, especially if the candidate is a girl.

Also, we usually get a bundle of resumes in PDF form before the candidates get on the floor. MDs will flip through them and sometimes self-select to interview certain people because they played the same sports or whatever. You lose out on an opportunity to pique someone's interest early if you wait til the interview to verbally tell inform people of your outside interests.

Simply put, it's just one interesting line that makes you stand out a bit.

May 1, 2011

Only include an interest line if you have something interesting to talk about. Your call on whether or not you want to go out of your way to find interesting things to include, but if you're an inherently boring person, it will shine through in the interview anyway, so it's best to pick up interests you can actually become passionate (or at least genuinely intrigued) about.

Think of it this way:

All else being equal (Technical knowledge, experience, academics, pedigree, etc.), which one of these guys is going to have an advantage in the interview?

Person A: "Interests: Reading, Traveling, Music, Volunteering, Movies"

Person B: "Interests: Creative Writing, Beach Volleyball, Martial Arts (Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Taijiquan, & Eskrima), Competitive Sailing, Fly Fishing, Microdredit Lending (Kiva.org)"

Dec 14, 2012

Important. At least in my experience, people have always responded warmly when they see how much passion you can convey in an interview when prompted to discuss one of the unique things you've included in that section.

If your 'Interests' read "Poker, chess, reading the WSJ and FT, financial modeling, basketball" then yes, take it off. If you have actually taken some time to reflect on the things you find cool and like to do in your spare time (and it certainly helps if you're actually an interesting person) and can capture that with a few keywords at the bottom of your resume, it can be immensely helpful.

I remember interviews where more than half the time was consumed in a discussion about value systems, social mores, and how cultural norms can vary from country to country ... which then led to a warm discussion about our respective study abroad experiences, then which Romance languages are most appealing, then which cuisines each of us most enjoyed, then favorite restaurants in the city, then around the world, then dream vacation destinations ... point is, you can do yourself an immense favor just by being an interesting person:
- take up a huge chunk of your interview period which otherwise might be technical
- connect personally with your interviewer, leading to them pulling for your offer
- develop new friendships, even get great referrals from someone with a mutual interest
- build a reputation as a personable guy before even beginning the analyst program

It's kind of challenging to map out verbally, but these are the things that set you apart from the herd. It may seem absolutely inconsequential to include one or two lines on your resume and that there's no way all these benefits can come just from having a strong 'Interests' section, but I think that something as small as this is just one of the marks of those rare, high-achieving, master-of-their-domain people everyone is amazed by and aspires to be. Engage your world. Live life to the fullest, be vibrant, be passionate, and share that with those around you. Your experience will be tenfold beyond your expectations. Apply this beyond mere interviews. Live every day with these convictions, and your school, job, friendships, relationships, and hobbies will take new life.

    • 1
Mar 5, 2013

just have one line on it at the end. put interesting specific things: they're conversation starters. almost every interviewer I had asked me about this one specific interest I had put down, and it helped me.

Apr 29, 2013

I'd include Road & Mountain Biking, Alpine Skiing, Comedy, Badminton, and maybe Genealogy. I just don't know how comfortable people are talking about the last one. Space/Biotech, etc. are cool stuff, but you can't really share stories with someone else about it (unlike oh hey where did you go skiing last winter). Adding trading as hobby feels like listing Excel Modeling as hobby/interest (which someone suggested to me, wth). As some people already mentioned, its a big conversation starter, and I had more than enough people spend more time there than middle of the page bullet point about some experience 4 years ago.

Feb 7, 2014

I agree add some interests. Almost all of my interviewers brought up atleast one of mine during my interviews. Can serve as a great way to segue from a traditional interview into a much more conversationalist atmosphere.

Jul 23, 2015

Binge watching Netflix/HBO GO is not an interest.

May 5, 2011
Nouveau Richie:

Person A: "Interests: Reading, Traveling, Music, Volunteering, Movies"

Person B: "Interests: Creative Writing, Beach Volleyball, Martial Arts (Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Taijiquan, & Eskrima), Competitive Sailing, Fly Fishing, Microdredit Lending (Kiva.org)"

I understand your point, but who's to judge someone else's interests? Somebody could be deeply involved in music/movies i.e. performed at Carnegie Hall/youtube star, while person B merely scrapes the surface on creative writing and fly fishing.

I'd rather talk to the guy who is actually genuine about his interests. Again, I'm not saying that the other guy is not genuine. I just think there is more to the story than a single line on a resume can tell you.

"Rage, rage against the dying of the light." - DT

Apr 29, 2013
abacab:

I'd include Road & Mountain Biking, Alpine Skiing, Comedy, Badminton, and maybe Genealogy. I just don't know how comfortable people are talking about the last one. Space/Biotech, etc. are cool stuff, but you can't really share stories with someone else about it (unlike oh hey where did you go skiing last winter). Adding trading as hobby feels like listing Excel Modeling as hobby/interest (which someone suggested to me, wth). As some people already mentioned, its a big conversation starter, and I had more than enough people spend more time there than middle of the page bullet point about some experience 4 years ago.

Sooo, do include trading? And how exactly would you word it? Trading, equity/options/forex trading?

May 1, 2011

Haha, I didn't mean to imply that I don't have any other interests outside of finance or that I'm not involved in other things. I was simply questioning the usefulness of these items on a resume geared towards ib/finance. Why would I want to put down football, basketball, etc., when I could instead list finance club, trading club, etc.? I just feel as if the person reading my resume would see "reading, traveling, music, volunteering, movies" and go "who the fuck cares?" I could see this line potentially being useful if you have unique interests (like Person B above), but not in the case of Person A, which is, let's face it, probably what most people really are.

Dec 14, 2012

incredible importance if you are a man of strategy... you can make others play your game because they will most certainly mention/ask you about your interests

Mar 5, 2013

It really depends but I'd say yes put a line to briefly show that you are not a fuckinger nerd. It doesn't harm. Chances are you might get a conversation out of your interest, you might not get to the point where the interviewer wants to talk about your interests, or the interviwer doesn't care at all. These all happened to me before. Now I'm on the other side of the table, and I personally won't ask the interviewee any questions regarding personal interets unless I like him/her a lot and consider making an offer.

Invest first, investigate later.

Apr 29, 2013

I'd NOT add trading same way I'd not add excel modeling or reading WSJ as my hobby. Opinions may vary.

Feb 7, 2014

Yes.

I have been to over 30+ interviews over the last 2 years and we discussed my interests in 90% of them.

Best Response
Jul 23, 2015

Like @eatmybananas said, you want your interests to be unique if you can (do not say "sports, traveling").

Also, I've noticed people will put IB related "interests" (LBO/DCF modeling, Debt/Equity Financing, PowerPoint, etc.) on their resume as well. Please don't do this. First, this makes you look like a cheesedick because no one believes that you actually enjoy getting off on Friday night, and then going home to grab a beer and build a model. Secondly, if you really do enjoy doing that, then you probably aren't a very fun or interesting person to be around.

Speaking in generalities, of course.

"There's always money in the banana stand" - George Bluth Sr.

    • 3
May 1, 2011

If I see finance club listed on a resume, unless you are the president at a target, I will go, "who the fuck cares?"

If I see almost any sport, any hobby or interest I share, or anything that indicates that there is a real person behind this cv, I'll go "this is someone I might be able to stand being around for 100 hours a week"

I know people who have gotten jobs based primarily on their interests. For instance, I know a girl who was hired simply because the interviewer was impressed by the motorcycle she rode. I don't know a single person who was hired because they were a member of the finance club, but I know plenty of people who have been dinged because no one actually wants to talk about a fucking university finance club

Dec 14, 2012

Let me elaborate. 99% of interests sections look like this:

Piano, hiking, soccer

Who cares if you like playing the piano? Not me. Everyone knows this is largely filler. People who have experience practically never put this section. For students, if you need to fill up space, it's better than white space on the resume. In my experience, I have never hired someone because of this (obviously). Personally, I have never spent more than a minute or two on it. Not everyone who interviews is like me, so take that as you will. The reason I don't care for it is that there is nothing about that which indicates how you might do a better job. If you are struggling whether to put relevant experience there or interests, definitely put the experience.

That being said, if someone put bridge, or poker, that would be cool. If it was something that somehow related to you being able to do the job (calculating probabilities, for instance).

Mar 5, 2013

They take up space, but I have found them to be helpful once I got the interview as the interviews would rather talk about them than have to listen to me spew of a pre-recorded walk-through of a rudimentary DCF.

"They are all former investment bankers that were laid off in the economic collapse that Nancy Pelosi caused. They have no marketable skills, but by God they work hard."

Feb 7, 2014

@goodL1fe - I'm not sure what you are asking. Are you asking whether I've got a problem with GoT itself (answer: no, I quite like it) or do I find something wrong with listing GoT as an interest (answer: yes)?

Those who can, do. Those who can't, post threads about how to do it on WSO.

Jul 23, 2015

Kung Fu Black Belt > 'Sports' > Sitting around watching TV and getting fat

Thank you fall for the feedback.

Feb 7, 2014

to be fair, what's wrong with these applicants being honest?
you admit yourself you like GoT, so why would you be judgemental towards someone saying this?
i get that it shows they might not be thinking too much about social norms, but how does that affect their ability to be a good analyst (ie edit pitch books or updating excel models)?

happy to give advice; no asking for referrals please

May 1, 2011

You have to show that you are well-rounded, so adding things not related to finance will make you stand out. Some people swear by the interest line, and others think it's a waste of space. Ultimately, it's your call. If you have room and good interests, put it on.

Dec 14, 2012

I'd leave it on there. The majority of my interviews brought up the interest section for bullshitting/testing of 'soft skills'. IMO the best possible interview turns into a conversation where you can talk about one of your hobbies/interests. Demonstrating your ability to communicate is more important than one more bullet point for your freshman year pwm internship. My $0.02.

Mar 8, 2013

I don't understand how anybody can recommend to not put interests on your resume.

You need to figure out how to connect w/ ur interviewer and show a dimension outside of work/finance. How else are you going to do it??? Make sure you can talk to them credibly though (esp. if you have results).
One of my talking points is that I was a former poker player and supported an unpaid internship in NYC w/ it. There's a lot of poker process which can be relatable to having a good investment process also.

And for the person who said he always gets asked about at least one interest during an interview... I don't know a single interview that I've done / been part of without interests being asked at least once. There's usually a connection w/ u know... at least one of the many people speaking to u if u make it past r1??

Feb 7, 2014

Whatever you do, please don't put "tennis, cooking, reading, traveling." Everyone has that, and it's bland as anything. Similarly, don't be the try-hard kid who puts "mountain-climbing, cliff-jumping, parachuting, poker."

Feb 7, 2014
m56:

Whatever you do, please don't put "tennis, cooking, reading, traveling." Everyone has that, and it's bland as anything. Similarly, don't be the try-hard kid who puts "mountain-climbing, cliff-jumping, parachuting, poker."

You missed golf and (insert favorite sports team)

May 5, 2011

You have to realize that people are interviewed based on their qualifications AND whether people actually want to work with you. If you don't have any non-finance points on your resume you are going to come off as either as lacking social skills or a giant nerd who spent all their time studying. Either way that isn't someone most people are going to want to spend 50+ hours a week with. Other interests on your resume round you out and give the interviewer something to talk about and connect with outside of pure financial topics.

Dec 14, 2012

I think it can be very useful if you do something weird like parasailing or the truck pull or something ridiculous but if you are like most people (with pretty generic interests) then it probably doesn't really matter either way. Just don't put something on there that you aren't actually that into b/c it will show if they ask about it

Mar 8, 2013

Yes, you need interests. Nothing will set you apart without them at the big shops. Applicants are a dime a dozen and it gives the interviewer a chance to ask a question he'll get a genuine response about. Not some bullshit story or an answer crafted by your career development center.

Feb 7, 2014

As posted above, absolutely. Make it something unique that you are passionate about. I put the Buffalo Bills on mine because I am originally from Buffalo and I have a story going along with it about how it taught me loyalty because they have sucked so much dick for the past decade and a half.

"Those who dare to fail miserably can achieve greatly"

Feb 11, 2012

What about listing "live music" on the resume? What message does this send to you: A. I am normal person doing normal stuff or B. that I like to rage at shows which may come off as unprofessional?

What about "stand-up comedy"? ...Shows that I am too much of a joker to get any work done? Although the work experience should negate this...

Dec 14, 2012

Thanks for all the great comments. Margins will be tight, but I have made some space for it. How many "interests" do you think is appropriate? As many as i can fit? 5, 6?

Mar 8, 2013

I've been asked about my interests in every interview.

Feb 7, 2014

Well, OK. I can see where this is going. From your mixed responses it's obvious that I shouldn't put these things on my resume.
3D is not something many people are familiar with and since it's immediately associated with gaming it's not a good thing. I'm not a gamer and gaming is not what you want to be known for.
"Magic Gathering" (no idea what it is), Game of Thrones( I like the books though...)? - if that's what people start think of when they look at my resume they see a stupid kid who is trying to be original.
However, if the hobbies are listed in the form of some achievements like Ssits said it may not that bad at all.
Thank you for your responses!

    • 1
Feb 13, 2012

It really depends on the type of position(s) you are applying to. If you will be applying to strictly finance positions, then you should not list interests on your resume. As a career adviser and professional resume writer I think of entry level when I see interests listed on a resume. You only have 1 page to make an impression, so I would highly recommend not wasting space by using skills or interests on your resume. I would be more than happy to take a look at your cover letter and resume. You can forward them to my email address at: [email protected]

Sincerely,

Vince

Dec 14, 2012

From the WSJ:
http://blogs.wsj.com/atwork/2012/07/26/jobseeking-...

"Travel. Cooking. Reading."

If the "interests" section of your resume reads something like this, you're wasting valuable real estate, say experts.

With recruiters often reading hundreds of resumes a week, it's true your interests can help you stand out in a group of similarly-credentialed applicants, but only if those interests are exceptional. Run-of-the-mill activities aren't going to win you a second look.

Resume experts advise only including interests that show off transferable traits desirable to employers -- like the motivation and commitment required to run marathons or study piano for 12 years.

Gretchen Johnson, senior vice president of human resources at Travelzoo Inc., recalls one applicant who not only was an avid mountain climber, but also volunteered in those remote locales.

"What usually stands out is when someone has managed to take their interests to a whole different level," she says. It shows drive.

But what if your interests are more commonplace? That's when specificity can make a difference. "Reading" by itself is a snooze. But "reading medical mysteries" is a little quirky and shows some intellectual rigor, says Quentin J. Schultze, author of the recently-published book Resume 101.

Just be careful not to let a quest for quirky cross the line. If the interest suggests "an odd obsession," Schultze says, you've probably gone too far. Case in point: Schultze once interviewed someone whose passion was to persuade American society to eat dog. While certainly memorable, that's one interest better left off a resume.

In the age of Facebook and Twitter, it can be tempting to research the hiring manager and only include interests that overlap with theirs. But that could end up looking contrived. Instead, Schultze suggests researching the company. If it puts emphasis on community involvement, for example, include your volunteer work.

If you don't have any impressive interests, don't try to pick one up overnight. It makes for an awkward interview when a candidate doesn't speak passionately about an alleged interest and "makes [the hiring manager] start to doubt other things," Johnson says.

To be sure, interests can act as a point of connection when the applicant gets further along in the interview process. But interests don't normally come up in the first interview since the hiring manager is focused on determining whether the applicant has the right skill set, says Johnson.

But Beth Brown, co-author of a recent edition of the Damn Good Resume Guide, suggests leaving out interests all together. She says that interests are rarely valuable and there's a risk they may even work against you.

She recalls one client who included "sailing," assuming it would make him more appealing for the middle-management position he wanted. But he later found out he lost a head-to-head matchup with another applicant because the employer was worried he would want to take long weekends for sailing trips.

Brown suggests letting your personality shine in your cover letter and saving the space on your resume for skills and experience most relevant to the job you're seeking.

After all, even the most impressive interest can only get you so far. The mountain-climbing do-gooder didn't end up getting the job at Travelzoo. The skill set just wasn't the right fit, Johnson says.

Mar 8, 2013

95%+ of people have 'Interests' that aren't remotely interesting to talk about.

If your interests look like this:
Violin, soccer, reading, investing

Or this:
World of Warcraft, gardening, movies

Or this:
Tae Kwon Do, rock climbing, ballet

Feel free to leave it off the resume. I honestly don't give a shit. I know many people will disagree with me on this point, but I couldn't tell you the interests of one person out of the hundreds I have interviewed.

Feb 7, 2014

Don't get me wrong - I'd be interested in asking about 3D modelling if someone listed it and that is the interest I'd likely fixate on.

Whether or not someone knows about it, they'll likely ask and you can demonstrate interest in difficult activities.

Only negative would be if it turned out the hobby was making furry characters or 3D models for some other aberrant behaviour.

Even if someone suspected that, they'd likely ask about it rather than just making a broad assumption. 3D modelling is about a lot more than just furries and gaming.

Listing GoT - you have to think what message you are sending. Interviewers aren't trying to get know you as a friend they want to hang out with on the couch in front of TV; they want to get to know you as a potential co-worker. Someone telling me they are interested in GoT is wasting an opportunity, as welling as telling me that they choose to list a bland-sounding interest (ie they like something 90% of the population likes) thinking that it will somehow sell them to me.

What does liking GoT tell me about how you'd operate in the workplace - that you'd be one of those people who turns up at the water cooler say "OMG, did you see GoT last night? Wow..."? That doesn't really demonstrate your achievement drive, you tenacity, your ability to create relationships, your ability to solve problems etc etc - all the criteria I'm looking for in a candidate.

Those who can, do. Those who can't, post threads about how to do it on WSO.

Feb 14, 2012
EmploymentSpecialist:

It really depends on the type of position(s) you are applying to. If you will be applying to strictly finance positions, then you should not list interests on your resume. As a career adviser and professional resume writer I think of entry level when I see interests listed on a resume. You only have 1 page to make an impression, so I would highly recommend not wasting space by using skills or interests on your resume. I would be more than happy to take a look at your cover letter and resume. You can forward them to my email address at: [email protected]

Sincerely,

Vince

Vince, what is your background / specialty?

Get busy living

Mar 9, 2013

"95%+ of people have 'Interests' that aren't remotely interesting to talk about.

If your interests look like this:
Violin, soccer, reading, investing

Or this:
World of Warcraft, gardening, movies

Or this:
Tae Kwon Do, rock climbing, ballet

Feel free to leave it off the resume. I honestly don't give a shit. I know many people will disagree with me on this point, but I couldn't tell you the interests of one person out of the hundreds I have interviewed."

So what interests are worth putting on a resume?

Feb 14, 2012
UFOinsider:
EmploymentSpecialist:

It really depends on the type of position(s) you are applying to. If you will be applying to strictly finance positions, then you should not list interests on your resume. As a career adviser and professional resume writer I think of entry level when I see interests listed on a resume. You only have 1 page to make an impression, so I would highly recommend not wasting space by using skills or interests on your resume. I would be more than happy to take a look at your cover letter and resume. You can forward them to my email address at: [email protected]

Sincerely,

Vince

Vince, what is your background / specialty?

Obviously specialty = employment !

"For I am a sinner in the hands of an angry God. Bloody Mary full of vodka, blessed are you among cocktails. Pray for me now and at the hour of my death, which I hope is soon. Amen."

Feb 14, 2012
duffmt6:
UFOinsider:
EmploymentSpecialist:

It really depends on the type of position(s) you are applying to. If you will be applying to strictly finance positions, then you should not list interests on your resume. As a career adviser and professional resume writer I think of entry level when I see interests listed on a resume. You only have 1 page to make an impression, so I would highly recommend not wasting space by using skills or interests on your resume. I would be more than happy to take a look at your cover letter and resume. You can forward them to my email address at: [email protected]

Sincerely,

Vince

Vince, what is your background / specialty?

Obviously specialty = employment !

ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhh how silly of me

Get busy living

Feb 13, 2012

Vince, I appreciate your willingness to help; however, you are quite mistaken.

Most of us are applying for entry level positions at investment banks and/or consultancies. So please understand the community you are dealing with before promoting your services.

When you say that interests are irrelevant or a "waste of space", this is categorically incorrect. In fact, my interests have come up numerous times in interviews, and I am reasonably confident that one of my interests was highly instrumental in helping me land my full-time job offer. I mean, how else do interviewers differentiate candidates when they all come from similar schools, with the same GPAs and majors, etc? Having strong interests, if nothing else, can set the tone of your interviews from being interrogative to conversational.

I've read some of your other posts and I just have a quick suggestion. Rather than spend your time here to promote your services, why don't you offer your resume/cover letter services for all to see. This way we know 1) how legitimate your advice is and 2) everyone stands to gain something, if you are in fact, a legitimate resource.

I apologize for the skepticism, but a lot of people come here for helpful advice, and it'd be a shame if they left with the wrong ideas.

EDIT: I don't apologize for my skepticism. Please continue trying to "help" people.

"Rage, rage against the dying of the light." - DT

Dec 15, 2012

I don't think it's necessarily important, but it could potentially work to your advantage. I've been asked many times about my interests that were listed on my resume.

Mar 9, 2013

Include the interests line. End of story.

Feb 7, 2014

Drawing a very long bow on this discussion about interests, I'll launch into some very, very broad generalisations, which often may not be factually correct.

The generalisation you often see about Gen Y is that they all think they are special snowflakes and they are waiting for the world to realise how valuable they are. So they should follow an Oprah Winfrey-esque "just be yourself" philosophy, tell people what their real interests are and wait for the world to make the effort to discover their inherent worth.

This is not how the world operates. Other people only care about you in the context of what you can do for them. No one wants to spend their time discovering your inherent worth and taking a gamble on you when there are other options available that look like safer gambles. This article puts it better than I can: http://www.cracked.com/blog/6-harsh-truths-that-will-make-you-better-person/

So when it comes to interests on your resume (or any other part of the interview process), you should be thinking "how can I demonstrate to this person that I am the best person for the job?".

Listing 3D modelling - can tell me you are smart, determined to learn hard stuff even if it doesn't advance your career immediately, think outside the box a little. I want that in a co-worker. Positive.

Listing that you like watching GoT, playing computer games etc - what the hell does that tell me that you can offer me in a work context? You may be able to cook up an argument, but 9 times out of 10 it tells me nothing.

(OP - I keep talking about GoT. I appreciate you didn't raise that. I saw it on a recent resume and was left thinking WTF?! and I'm still ranting about it)

I don't buy the "similar interests/rapport" argument. I've had a few interviews where the candidate has "struck a chord" with me as they have similar interests etc. Unless that has linked to the person indicating they will be better at the job, that has counted for nothing other than increasing the rapport a little in the interview.

Those who can, do. Those who can't, post threads about how to do it on WSO.

Feb 13, 2012
Aragorn:

EDIT: I don't apologize for my skepticism. Please continue trying to "help" people.

Skeptics gonna skept.

Feb 7, 2014

nevermind my last comment
don't entirely agree, but i see you addressed the question

happy to give advice; no asking for referrals please

Feb 14, 2012
Nouveau Richie:
Aragorn:

EDIT: I don't apologize for my skepticism. Please continue trying to "help" people.

Skeptics gonna skept.

Haha, absolutely dude. When this dude claims to be an EMPLOYMENT SPECIALIST (lol), imma be skeptin' for sure.

"Rage, rage against the dying of the light." - DT

Feb 7, 2014

No, I'm certainly not another GoT addict who discusses each film with everyone they know and I really hate when people talk about these things and other celebrity bull$#!t. I just like to read books - that's all. I wasn't going to list it - I was talking about assumptions people make when they see things like 3d software.

You may have a good opinion about it but others - not necessarily. There are as many opinions as there are people in this world. About 3d - I once was very passionate about it and even wanted to double major but it's too late for me now. I didn't think that would make me entitled to something or get me a special recognition.

Yes, 3d is not going to increase company's profits but listing things such as C++, Visual Basic, and Java as your hobbies will simply make you look psycho.

Conclusion: it's better to leave this off resume.

    • 1
Mar 10, 2013

As a resume coach at the Stanford Business School, I strongly follow their Career Management Center's advice to put the interests in a line or two at the end.

But! Make sure they are interesting! If it is like, "world traveling," that's a yawn. Rather, "Couchsurfing in Central Asia" might raise an eyebrow. I worked with one guy at Stanford who put "The Godfather" in his interests and said he got questioned on it every single time. (In a good way). I was impressed.

Show you have some personality, and can laugh at yourself. Another guy had "pretty good salsa dancer" and got rave reactions.

Betsy Massar
Come see me at my Q&A thread
http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-... away!

Jan 16, 2014

I'm bumping this thread with some proposals. Besides financial economics and accounting, my primary interests are the following: biotech, endocrinology, fitness, philosophy, and american history. Should I include any of these on my resume?

"He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man." -- William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

Feb 7, 2014

Yes, put down that you are into running bumfights and you'll be hired on the spot

Get busy living

Mar 11, 2013
Betsy Massar:

As a resume coach at the Stanford Business School, I strongly follow their Career Management Center's advice to put the interests in a line or two at the end.

But! Make sure they are interesting! If it is like, "world traveling," that's a yawn. Rather, "Couchsurfing in Central Asia" might raise an eyebrow. I worked with one guy at Stanford who put "The Godfather" in his interests and said he got questioned on it every single time. (In a good way). I was impressed.

Show you have some personality, and can laugh at yourself. Another guy had "pretty good salsa dancer" and got rave reactions.

Betsy -- what is your opinion on the age limit for an 'Interests' section? I'm middle aged with a pretty succesful career, if that makes a difference.

Jan 16, 2014

Going for a sector specific team?

Mar 11, 2013
SirTradesaLot:
Betsy Massar:

As a resume coach at the Stanford Business School, I strongly follow their Career Management Center's advice to put the interests in a line or two at the end.

But! Make sure they are interesting! If it is like, "world traveling," that's a yawn. Rather, "Couchsurfing in Central Asia" might raise an eyebrow. I worked with one guy at Stanford who put "The Godfather" in his interests and said he got questioned on it every single time. (In a good way). I was impressed.

Show you have some personality, and can laugh at yourself. Another guy had "pretty good salsa dancer" and got rave reactions.

Betsy -- what is your opinion on the age limit for an 'Interests' section? I'm middle aged with a pretty succesful career, if that makes a difference.

interesting question -- you have me thinking. I was targeting my response to most of the people I work with -- pre-MBA candidates, or recent MBA grads. I see you on WSO and know you do have a very successful career.
In this case, I would suggest "Other" which might include some tidbits that are simply not covered on the rest of the resume. It could be something about your community efforts, for example, or something interesting, like you were raised in an unexpected place. But if you are an avid golfer, then why not? Unless it looks really stupid.

Also, and this is true for everyone, if you do add an additional line, it should probably be a few items so whatever you write doesn't stand out too oddly. The eye will catch an unusually short bullet point, especially at the very end of the document, so make sure it is worth reading.

Betsy Massar
Come see me at my Q&A thread
http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-... away!

Jan 16, 2014