Networking in New York City

fcd443's picture
Rank: Senior Chimp | 26

Looking to get in touch with buy side individuals up in New York City. I will buy lunch, drinks, dinner - you name it. Need to expand network up there pronto. Any suggestions on to go about this? Travel there monthly with current sales trading role.

Comments (72)

Jun 28, 2017

What would be the aim of the networking? For a new job?

Jun 28, 2017

It would be to see if I can gain trading relationships for firm at currently. Down the road, I would seek individuals to join my investment firm(s) that I am currently formulating - yes, forming two at moment. The more people I know, the more opportunity I have to connect them with my existing network and hope to use them or their network.

Jun 28, 2017
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Jun 28, 2017

Sounds good - now what is your AUM?

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Jun 28, 2017

About tree-fiddy

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Jun 28, 2017

Same

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Jun 28, 2017

What firm do you work for?

Jun 29, 2017
fcd443:

Looking to get in touch with buy side individuals up in New York City. I will buy lunch, drinks, dinner - you name it. Need to expand network up there pronto. Any suggestions on to go about this? Travel there monthly with current sales trading role.

You offering plenty of perks I'll be greedy I want a house by the beach, a BMW, a yacht, and 50% ownership of the business.

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Jun 28, 2017

I am sorry you couldn't read what I wrote when I said, "I will buy lunch, drinks, dinner." You may most certainly work towards obtaining those goals. Why wouldn't you ask for >51%? I could find you a nice beach house up in Canada for cheap - may be a little chilly all year round though. Also, why settle for a BMW? Are your goals that low?

Jun 29, 2017

Use the meet-up app, and join all the finance groups. They have events around the city

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Best Response
Jun 29, 2017

1.) Send emails to bankers suggesting to "grab coffee for 15 minutes" Add times/dates you are available.
2.) Wait for response
3.) Get a response, say "Thank you very much. I've sent a calendar invitation to confirm. Looking forward to it."
4.) Send calendar invite so they don't forget.
5.) Show up
6.) Kiss ass
7.) ?
8.) Profit

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Jun 29, 2017

thats actually very good points. I never thought of doing that or even thinking that would even work. Thank you Cosimo, I'll try it. Worth a shot

Jun 29, 2017

That calendar invite is key. I wish that I'd have done that when I was a student. If you're on an iPhone, OP, make sure to set a 15 minute reminder.

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Jun 29, 2017

I go to a school in NYC and have done a lot of networking in person. The fact of the matter is that a lot of people feel that they are being a hardship on YOU for making you come to visit them. Therefore, you should say something like "I'm going to be downtown on 10/12 from 10am - 3pm and would love to grab coffee if you have a few minutes." That way they don't feel guilty about making you come down to the city.

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Jun 29, 2017

Remember to wear suit and tie, always. Follow up to emails a week after if no response, and once more but no more after that. Weekdays are fine for coffee chats. Maybe your emails are just written like shit or you have a shit resume; sorry to assume but that's often a reason for lack of reply. But to not discourage you, remember to follow-up and get knowledgeable people to vet your email template.

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Jun 29, 2017
garamond:

Maybe your emails are just written like shit or you have a shit resume; sorry to assume but that's often a reason for lack of reply

Kid's literally 6 weeks into his freshman year of college. He probably doesn't even have a resume at this point. Which could also be a reason he's not getting many responses.

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Jun 29, 2017

Personally, I would advise against the suit and tie comment, at least in the sense of "always". There were a couple times last summer when I was networking in the city when people told me to meet them for coffee, and I showed up in a suit and they came in normal street clothes. I felt that I left certain people with the impression that I was a stiff (specifically because they commented that I was TOO dressed up a few times, and that the meeting's casual nature didn't require a suit). If you are going out to a formal lunch, sure, then maybe wear a dress shirt and a blazer. But if it more of a "meet me here for coffee" I would just go with business casual (button up and dress slacks) or even a polo rather than a full blown suit. If you show up in a suit and your comrade shows up in a tank and shorts, there's gonna be an air of awkwardness. You can play this by ear as well. If it seems like the person is coming straight from work to meet you, go a little more dressy. If you are meeting them in their spare time on the weekend, go a little more casual. It may seem like I am making a big deal out of this, but people judge those who they don't know based on appearance. It's human nature. And the last person someone wants to work with is someone who they think has a stick up their ass.

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Jun 29, 2017

The question of what to wear to a networking inter-view is an age old question that has puzzled bankers and scrubs alike for generations. However, the solution is pretty simple...show up with a suitcase. It should be full of various changes of clothes for various styles (business casual, jeans formal, polo semi-casual, formal-casual, hoodie-entrepenoor cool-casual, casual-casual, etc). Then, sneak a peak at your networking target when he arrives (either through a window, or standing surreptitiously in a lonely corner of the establishment, etc). Once you've determined his dress proclivities, sprint to the nearest bathroom with your suitcase, rapidly change your clothes to match his unique style, and go back out there and crush your networking inter-view so hard...like a champion

    • 6
Jun 29, 2017

Don't forget to drop a deuce in the cafe's restroom to establish the champ mindset.

"This world, it is a tempest sometimes. But remember, the sun always rises again."
-- Brandon Sanderson

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Boost your resume and land a finance job by passing the FINRA SIE. 264 pages & 1981 smart flashcards written by a former 8X top Fidelity instructor. Try it for 0 bananas here.

Jun 29, 2017

When I was in undergrad, I went during July, but that was for FT recruiting. To answer your main question, though, yes, face-to-face meetings will help you. Take a look at my networking overview.

Jun 29, 2017

illuminati

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Jun 29, 2017

yes

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Jun 29, 2017

Freemasons

Jun 29, 2017

A lack of industry connections will not ruin everything, but it definitely won't make the process easier - so don't immediately get off on the wrong start and assume that without a bunch of contacts you are screwed - you're not.

Regarding in person or not, it really depends on your location and what is most convenient. Meeting with someone in person does not necessarily mean the experience will be more beneficial - in fact, in person meetings are often rushed since the analyst/associate may suddenly need to get back to the cube, vs a phone a call in a conference room where convenience is key. Also, with a banker's crazy schedule, I probably wouldn't take a 5-6 hour trip hoping to meet with a few bankers who may or may not have to postpone (also, it kind of comes off a little awkward). Honestly, I think that you are much better off starting with a casual email, and then moving towards a phone conversation to ask additional questions. Then keep the relationship going with an occasional email, especially as recruiting season kicks off, and, if you happen to be in the city at some point, you can ask to grab a coffee if the opportunity presents itself. Don't force the relationship, and be patient with it. Taking a 6 hour trip puts a lot of unnecessary pressure on someone just trying to do you a favor - keep it simple, keep it casual, and keep it flowing.

Regarding who to contact, I would definitely start with analysts and associates as they are often more receptive to aspiring analysts. If a VP or D happens to be in a school database as well, then you are welcome to contact them as well, but I would tread softly and more professionally when contacting more senior bankers. I would start with analysts and associates, and then progress from there.

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Jun 29, 2017

What's the best way to find analysts/associate contact info? From what I've seen, most IB websites only release senior bankers' info.

Jun 29, 2017

Start with a few emails, suck their dick on the phone for a few minutes (take notes so you don't fall asleep), then if you happen to be in the city send them an email a few days before asking if they'd care to meet for coffee or drinks; make it very clear you are not in the city just to see them, and actually have a life. Stay in touch by email regularly, and in the absence of CRM tools, make sure that you have an excel file where you are tracking everything; typing up notes, importing emails, noting when you should call or email again, if they expressed special interest, etc...

Jun 29, 2017

The most important thing (other than establishing rapport and being a normal person) is to get a referral, either to someone else in their group or someone in the division you might be interested in. Use this trip as a launching pad. You'll be surprised at how many people you'll meet if you're good at making the small ask

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Jun 29, 2017

@theSimpleBaller, thanks for the advice and the reply.

I'm going to essentially think out loud, and I want to know what you think. Since I'm only going to be there from Thursday-Sunday (including travel days) I'm pretty limited on time. I'm meeting all three of them Friday. Do you think i would want to take these references (if I can get them) for phone calls/emails/LinkedIn, or try to meet others as well through them (if they're even willing of course.) maybe I should try to meet them at work instead of coffee to get a tour of the building and get a better perspective of what's going on there, and also have a greater opportunity of meeting people.

What do you think about the aforementioned points? I promised myself I wasn't going to overthink this, and I think I just broke my promise.

Cheers,

Mlang

//Signed//
MLang

Jun 29, 2017

You are definitely in a sticky situation. If you get liquor involved. Anything is possible. That might be your best bet. Ask to speak over drinks.

Jun 29, 2017

You need a visitor's pass to get into these buildings. I am not sure if you can get one by showing your resume.

Jun 29, 2017

its sunday, and like alst mentioned you need the visitors pass

Jun 29, 2017

Do what you have to do but your time would be better spent doing this on a weekday. Also email some alumni and ask if you can buy them drinks and ask a few questions. If you can impress these guys they might give your resume to the right person.

Jun 29, 2017

Good luck with the networking man

Jun 29, 2017

First off, congrats and good luck. Would you care to share how you got those meetings?

I've yet to really tap into informational interviews as a source of networking and would really appreciate your process and your insight as it seems you were decently successful with arranging meetings

Jun 29, 2017

I am lucky to have family friends that a) look out for me and b) have friends in NYC. As soon as I started talking to them about my interest they did all the work.

I got another interview coming up thanks to my alumni network.

Not sure if I'm a good example of how to network but in my short experience it has come down to my inner circle of friends or people that will vouch for you. Good luck!

Jun 29, 2017

Interestingly enough, I'm in NYC this coming week as well.

Not sure what my own availability looks like so far, but would be willing to try to get something something together if we can reach a critical mass that makes this worth doing...

Jun 29, 2017

I would like to know this too, surprising how close my situation is to the op lol

Jun 29, 2017

Hit the ground hard. Start reaching back to the places that your BB stints were at and ask for references. Ask someone at the BB to run a CapIQ screen for alumni from your school and the street and start emailing that list.

Best of luck -- it's rough out there but it's possible.

Jun 29, 2017

Nothing is impossible. The fact that you are in New York makes cold calling/resume dropping a piece of cake. If you really want it, do this as much as possible. You'd definitely get a response from this. PM me if you have questions as I've scored both PE and IB with this method.

Jun 29, 2017

Well, there are always the WSO meetups.

There's also the NYC CFA society. Something like NYSSA? (I don't know; I'm not involved).

Jun 29, 2017
willsonchan20000000:

Hi Guys,

I am currently a junior from a west coast school. I am really interested in investment banking and planning on going to new york to network with some professionals during the winter break. Since my school ends around 12.20, I am thinking about flying to new york after that and stay till 1.5. My question will be whether all the bankers will still be around the office when I get there since it will be christmas and new york by then. Please share your perspectives. Thank you so much!

btw, another alternative will be to drop school for a week and fly there in early December. Do you guys think that will be a better option?

Thanks!!

Do you have specific bankers in mind? Those that already agreed to meet you? If not, flying out solely to attempt to schedule meetings will not be a very viable strategy.

Jun 29, 2017

My strategy will be setting up meetings in around November and go in December...i am pretty sure that ppl will respond to my email..it is just that i need to book ticket before its gone too crazy..what is your take on this?

Jun 29, 2017

Get those meetings set up first before you book a ticket.

When that's done, you book the ticket and get ready. Make the most of your time.

Jun 29, 2017