Part-time MBA worth it?

I'm trying to decide if I should pursue a part-time MBA program. Looking for feedback from you guys.

My background: 28 y/o, currently sell-side research associate at BB firm (3 years), previously investment banking analyst at MM firm (2 years), CFA, married with family

Due to marriage/family commitments, I don't think full-time MBA is going to be a realistic option for me.

The reason for pursuing the MBA would be to improve leadership and communication skills and more importantly position myself for a potential buy-side role in the future, or continue towards analyst roll on sell-side.

I live in a city with a well respected #15-#20 ranked MBA program. (think UNC, Texas, Tepper, UCLA, Cornell, Ross, Emory range school).

My question is whether or not you guys think attending the part time MBA program at this school would actually help me achieve my goals or would I be wasting my time and $?

Comments (128)

Mar 6, 2014 - 11:00am

Also interested. @crabb222 How difficult do you think it will be to do PT for 3 years now that you have a family? Would you be considering night classes, weekend-only, or some sort of combination?

Mar 13, 2014 - 10:35am

i think it would be doable with work but definitely put time management at a premium. it would be 2 days of night classes a week plus the occasional long weekend session and they said to expect about 10-15 hours a week of outside the classroom time. firm would be paying a portion but not all of the cost, which is helpful. im really thinking that this would be worth it. the main reason im not strongly considering full time is BC of the lost income aspect of full time. the bulk of my family commitment at this point is bringing home the bacon

Mar 6, 2014 - 11:59am

I feel any education if you can pull it off would be worth it. The only downside to doing a part time mba vs. a full time is that some schools don't do the OCR for part time. I don't know if you're even interested in this since you're currently employed but it can be something to consider. An MBA is also a chance to build a network, so going part time can either be a pro or a con depending on your networking efforts.

Aside from the school aspect, going to school + homework + full time work is very time consuming so you won't really be able to spend a lot of time with your family. I just have a fiance and between me working full time, her working full time, and going to school full time, we don't really see each other and have time to do things together.

If your marriage/family commitments are just putting bread on the table and mostly nothing else, then I could see how that would affect going full time and getting it done with faster, but if your wife's salary is sufficient to live off of, I would recommend going full time so you could still spend time with your family.

make it hard to spot the general by working like a soldier
  • 3
Mar 7, 2014 - 11:13am

td12:

Is your firm paying?

This. And, what are your goals post MBA? Are you looking to stay at your current employer? If you are looking to move, you have to check if the part time program allows for OCRs. And Skinnayyy has a really good point too.

Best Response
Mar 7, 2014 - 11:30am

The decision between part-time and full-time programs is a very personal one. For me, doing a full-time program with a wife and soon-to-be child was actually a much better choice than part-time. With a part-time program, you're balancing family, school and work. As a full-timer, I only contend with two of those. This quarter and next, I have class 2 days/week, which gives me a level of flexibility I would never have if I was working. Even with several significant extracurricular commitments, I have much more time to devote to family. Those extracurriculars are where I've really been able to develop my leadership and communication skills. Part-timers have the same opportunities, but rarely as much time to devote to non-class endeavors.

The obvious sacrifice with full-time attendance is money. Giving up 2 years of salary is big bullet to bite. I am fortunate that my wife makes a decent (but by no means an overwhelming) salary and that we had a little savings. We're still taking on a mountain of debt, though. I figured a loan pay-back of 3-4 years, and a break-even (direct cost, opp. cost, and time-value) of 4-6. Without trying to monetize the learning, networking, social, and other non-pecuniary benefits, those numbers were sufficient for my decision to pencil out.

Good luck with whatever you decide. Feel free to message me if you need.

Mar 13, 2014 - 4:16pm

I think with your background, you can go either way. Do you need the part time MBA to achieve your goals? Do a lot of people in your company have PT or FT MBAs or could you get promoted without one? Most PTers don't switch companies (although most would like to), so it's more realistic to think about your long term potential at your current company.

  • 1
Mar 13, 2014 - 9:21pm

IMHO if I had your experience, (MM IB), creds (CFA and presumably solid undergrad), exp (BB ER) and goals (ER), I'd save my time and money as a 15-20ish PT MBA would likely add marginal value - unless the firm is picking up the bulk of the tab.

  • 1
Mar 24, 2014 - 7:46pm

If your firm is picking up the tab, then in almost all cases the answer is "sure, why not?"

If not, then it depends. With your current background, experience, and CFA, the MBA would merely be a feather in your cap, but it does offer some value down the line. In other words it's nice to have, but in your case I would not say it's necessary. You're perfectly capable of getting the job(s) you seem to be interested in without it.

Be careful trying to balance work, family, and MBA classes. Not saying it's impossible, but the people I've witnessed do it were constantly making tradeoffs that they hated (leaving work early at inconvenient times, giving up weekends, missing assignments when kids get sick). In most cases it worked out, but it depends on how nice your bosses are.

Do you plan on making your career transition within the same company? If so do the higher ups all have MBAs? Then that might give you an edge.

If you're going to be financing the entire thing I'd reconsider. But really, it's a personal decision.

  • 3
Mar 24, 2014 - 10:33pm

Hello crabb222, I am answering the question, is a part-time MBA worth it vs. no MBA. The following answer doesn't consider full-time, since you didn't ask that.

As a former sell-sider who also worked on the buy side (not as an analyst, but in marketing) I can see several reasons to get a part-time MBA
1. Non-financial skills, such as operations, marketing, and strategy, all of which will help you evaluate companies if you choose to continue an analyst career in the mid-term or work in a managerial role if you choose to do that later
2. Leadership skills - particularly leadership communication, which almost every school is now offering
3. Learning from peers -- like the Mastercard commercial, this is priceless . Those who will be in your class are probably in a similar position to you in that they have good jobs and can bring their learning from work to the classroom.
4. Time management -- want to get something done? Ask a busy person (I know a woman who got her MBA from Haas by as she switched jobs, commuted from the Richmond to Berkeley, and somehow had a baby in between it all. I think she may have run a marathon too (kidding).
5. Networking --- related to #3, but not exactly -- you will meet some amazing people and they also are juggling. You may find some new family friends, new ideas about yourself in the world, and new ideas about your future.

Downside: less time with your family? But then.... See #4 above. You'll figure it out.

Make sense?

Betsy Massar
Come see me at my Q&A thread
http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/b-school-qa-w-betsy-massar-of-master-admissions
Ask away!
  • 3
Mar 24, 2014 - 10:34pm

Part Time MBA? (Originally Posted: 02/28/2011)

HI,

I was wondering what the general opinion is of part-time mba programs at schools like Northwestern, UChicago, NYU, etc. Currently I work at a fund of funds that has offered to completely pay for my part time mba if I choose to pursue that path (As we are based out of Chicago it would likely be at UChicago or Northwestern. I spoke with both of these schools and they give their P-T students full access to full time recruiting).

My schedule at my current job would allow me to fully complete my part time MBA within our fund's 3 year program. Since I'm already in an investment oriented role, getting my MBA would not be a career switching type of move. Overall I'm kind of torn with this decision as I've heard people really advocate doing a full time MBA and I think at the end of our fund's program (if I didn't purse the part time) I'd have the resume to apply to a top 10-15 school. So basically I'm asking if people feel that the benefit of a fulltime mba at a top 10 school would outweigh getting a free part time mba at a top level school. Thanks

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:35pm

depends what you want to do i guess...but if the schools allow u to access recruiting then actually it doesnt even matter....because you will have access .U of Chi and Nwestern are pretty much top schools, so you doing a day program would 1) cost you over 100k out of pocket and 2) would cost your salary....i dont even think there is much thought that should go into this... get the mba if u want one.

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:36pm

Good post, all the positive attributes of part time and exec MBA programs are super evident, ESP re cash flow. What's not clear is the massive hate ft guys have inre to the above. More often than not ft ppl downplay part time based on the following: 1) prestige related notions 2) recruiting access 3) making monetizable friends/ contacts/networking 4) depth of content. I think the big issue is 1, and the one which has quantifiable merit as the most qualified candidates are perceived to want nothing but the highest accolades Which usually reside in ft programs. It's circular but is unfort reality. Since the big value add in MBA is the ppl you will meet and class discussions and immersion into projects, the prestige factor is somewhat important. 2) uve got covered 3) That said would I rather have a classroom full of execs who have built businesses and know what a cash flow statement is versus hardcore NGO who needs acctg 101 and I will venture to say that's much more prestigious regardless of what us news tells me. I would be surprised if you can truly monetize half of your ft friends anyways since half will go to quasi entry level jobs at ib, with the focus on stability and repaying debt- they unlikely afforded tuition given the job switch motivation to pursue the degree. 4) content - unclear from this post whether any content or Acccess to profs would be worse

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:39pm

Thanks for the responses. They're very helpful. Durban, to clarify about the P-T content, I know at UChicago the profs and classes are the same as F-T with a slight reduction in office hour availability.

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:40pm

What do want career-wise? It sounds like your intention is to use the MBA program to launch a new job search. If your intention is to look for a new job in a traditional MBA feeder career like investment banking or consulting, then you should target a full-time program. Those firms with traditional, formal on-campus recruiting programs make a big distinction between students in the part-time and full-time programs at Chicago, with many firms unwilling to give a serious look at part-time students. The school will tell you that you have full access to recruiting, and no firm will take an official stance that this is the case, but believe me when I tell you that it is.

There are a couple of major reasons for this:

  • Because the part-time program is less selective, it doesn't serve as effective of a filter as the full-time program does, which is one biggest reasons these firms recruit at the top business schools. People on recruiting teams at these firms often view part-time students as people that were unable to get into a top full-time program. This is unfair, but it is true for a certain population of those part-time students that are pursuing a new career.

  • Part-time students that are actively recruiting are, on average, much less polished than full-time students. This is something I saw as a student and continue to see as somebody that interviews and corresponds with students in both programs. It's also something that many of my friends have commented on as they've gone on campus to recruit. This is probably due in large part to the fact that the full-time program is geared towards preparing students for this process, and having an entire class around you that is preparing for recruiting and interviews is very helpful in developing and polishing your skills in this area.

That said, if you are going to be pursuing a career that will rely on you performing an off-campus search, the distinction between the two programs will be much smaller or non-existant -- and will depend entirely on the outlook of specific people you interview with. If you want to continue to work at a fund of funds then you'd probably be best off going the part-time route. There's no substitute for experience, and you're doing work while in school that is directly relevant to what you want to do in the future then that is likely to set you up for the next step of a career more effectively, than going back full time will.

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:41pm

A clear advantage with PT MBA is definitely the fact you continue to work (and make money) while attending school. This will be really useful if you are in a company or an industry that values an MBA and you don't want to make a career shift. The value of the FT program is that you have complete unparalleled access to recruiters who are using the adcom's selection process as a "filter" for job candidates. Even professional clubs are divided in this regard (FT professional clubs have better access to companies than PT). Stats wise, PT-ers look worse on paper and those programs are probably less competitive to get into. Depending on what you need (like a top 10 MBA on your resume but not a career switch) – then a PT may be for you. If you want to switch careers, FT would be easier (but a more competitive process).

  • 2
Mar 24, 2014 - 10:42pm

Part-time MBA to I-banking - doable ?? (Originally Posted: 06/11/2012)

Does anyone in this forum have had success in switching from a non-finance career to I-banking via the part-time MBA route ... I know there would be a lot of networking involved , but just wanna know if its doable at all or not ... I am sure that BB is out for this route , but is there a chance with boutiques or MM firms ??

Any suggestions would be welcome...

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:43pm

If you have relevant skills/background, access to the right crowd (read NYU Stern) and the stamina to deal with networking/informationals etc. while you're studying and working at the same time- then of course it's doable... my 2 cents- I know someone who has done something similar to that- PM me, I can connect you guys. He was a Part-time Stern.

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:46pm

From talking to part-timers at Booth, it's VERY unlikely. Banking and consulting are the two areas that go through a very structured recruiting process. They hire summer interns (part-timers at booth don't have access to ocr for internships) and then extend offers to a lot of them for full-time conversion. Given the rather rigid nature of this process, there simply is no room for part-timers. I have heard however of part-time students managing to get corporate finance jobs at F500 corporations, wealth management, and some other areas. But banking and consulting will be extremely difficult. Doing a part-time mba with that goal would be foolish.

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:52pm
Brady4MVP:
From talking to part-timers at Booth, it's VERY unlikely. Banking and consulting are the two areas that go through a very structured recruiting process. They hire summer interns (part-timers at booth don't have access to ocr for internships) and then extend offers to a lot of them for full-time conversion. Given the rather rigid nature of this process, there simply is no room for part-timers. I have heard however of part-time students managing to get corporate finance jobs at F500 corporations, wealth management, and some other areas. But banking and consulting will be extremely difficult. Doing a part-time mba with that goal would be foolish.

I assume that this would apply to one year Masters in Finance students as well trying to break in at the associate level, even if they're experienced.
Mar 24, 2014 - 10:51pm
Spalding Get Your Foot Off the Boat:
definitely doable, definitely going to be a battle though. internships are crucial and really more important that the mba itself - maybe do part time on a full time basis and weasel your way into a legit internship

This would probably be the only way. If you were doing a part-time mba but had a very flexible job or a part-time job/project that gave you a lot of free time, you can take classes in the full-time campus, join a lot of the student clubs, go to networking events, career treks, etc. Then by the time you go through OCR, you would have established some decent contacts, and your name will be familiar to those who are doing interviews.

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:48pm

Do-able but not likely. One associate in my start class was a PT MBA. Not sure what the process was like for him, but he's the only one I've ever seen successful (and I've seen many try).

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:49pm
kjl:
Do-able but not likely. One associate in my start class was a PT MBA. Not sure what the process was like for him, but he's the only one I've ever seen successful (and I've seen many try).

How/why did they do it part time?
Get busy living
  • 1
Mar 24, 2014 - 10:53pm

Are part time programs less selective?

Get busy living
Mar 24, 2014 - 10:54pm
UFOinsider:
Are part time programs less selective?

Very much so. Booth part-time accepts around 50% of applicants, and the applicant pool is significantly weaker than full-time. I know some idiots who are doing booth PT while the full-timers for the most part are reasonably smart and know what's going on.

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:55pm

I think it depends on where, geographically, you are applying. I know a few classmates, at a non-target, that were able to get into middle-market boutique IB through a part time MBA. One was an engineering undergrad, the other a collegiate athlete. However, I agree with the others that this probably isnt the best career path.

Mar 24, 2014 - 10:56pm

Thanks for all the replies !!! .. i am based in New Jersey/New York metro area and am targeting NYU PT program...

Well , I did my research on breaking into IB and know that full time is the best option... I applied this year and was interviewed/waitlisted in Ross, Kellogs and Duke - before being rejected from each one of them... I am an international student from one of the most oversubscribed applicant pools... I cannot try again as my 6 year work limit would be very close to my graduation date and even though I would graduate from a FT MBA , i wont get the Visa to work is US... And that would be a complete waste of 100K in education and over 200K in lost salary...

So the best option sounds like to go via PT MBA , network my ass off , and give my best shot. Being based in the New York would certainly help in networking and I can certainly get a 4-6 week break from my current job and can pursue internships ..

Just want to know if its worth all the effort or not before I sink 100K into this ??

Does anyone know if people from NYU PT ever broke into IB ??

Nov 6, 2021 - 11:43am

NYU's PT program does help people land IB roles. Two of the MDs at JP Morgan assigned to NYU recruiting are graduates of the PT program, so BB is still possible. You don't get to participate in FT recruiting events, but they open up events to PT students in their last year. Being in NYC makes it more advantageous to take advantage of networking and off-cycle recruiting. This process let my buddy land a role in MM IB prior to taking any electives. Stern's international community also lends itself to being a target for international IB firms too. 

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:01pm

Part-Time MBA: To do or not to do? Advice is appreciated! (Originally Posted: 01/19/2015)

My fellow monkeys,

I find myself at a crossroads and I am looking to enlist the collective WSO to put in their five cents worth of advice to help me with the next steps.

I graduated from a non-target school with a BA, ECON (3.9 GPA) in 2008. Had some nice interviews in ST, IB (BB & Regional) and had a couple of offers in hand and was expecting a few others. When the shit hit the fan, pretty much all Wall Street Options dried up (except a prop trader gig with no base, and with a shit load of student debt, I needed at least some base for the first year so I wouldn't have to live under a bridge) so I looked elsewhere. I found some great options in finance so I took a role as a finance leadership program associate with a multinational. I loved it and was good at it. Five years went by, and I made my way up the ladder and along the way was offered really good positions and gathered a ton of experience. At the five year mark I was recruited into another finance role with one of the big 4. The pay was better and so is the prestige.

I love the work and I want to continue growing my career down the path I envision. What I enjoy and have experience with is transformation. I enjoy evaluating potentially under-performing businesses processes & strategies and replace them with efficient and high performing alternatives. Right now I do this internally for the the organization on a project basis as a complement to my finance job but I want to take that experience, build on it and consult for clients. To build some more strategy/"big picture" cred as well as to make up for the non-target undergrad I think I need an all-star MBA (M7).

I like my work so I don't want to stop working while getting my MBA. Additionally, continuing to work will give me the opportunity to build my career further and progress up the ladder at least another level thus improving my credibility with potential clients and as well as potential engagement leaders. Technically speaking business strategy & transformation is within the consulting domain, so I think my transition and pursuit of my desired long term goal would be made easier by getting an MBA from say Kellogg or Booth. The issue is that we are talking about one heck of an investment, especially since I still have debt from undergrad.

This is where your sage advice comes into play. Given the circumstances outlined above, is a $120K Part-Time MBA expense (minus financial aid and employer re-reimbursement) a worthy/necessary step to help expedite this career transition from traditional finance to consulting and business transformation? Would you guys do and/or recommend this if on the same boat? I know some people on this board get really pissy when talking about Part-Time vs. Full-Time MBA but I am pretty sure the ship on Full-Time has sailed since my career has matured (and frankly, so have I at 31). Plus while I am technically switching industries, I don't want to wipe my career slate clean, I want to leverage the skills I have in my target job. Thoughts?

(p.s. I am just getting started with all this, so I have yet to deal with the dreaded GMAT. Thank you @"phantombanker" for your study guide, I am sure it will come in handy!!!)

"I'm talking about liquid. Rich enough to have your own jet. Rich enough not to waste time. Fifty, a hundred million dollars, buddy. A player. Or nothing. " -GG
  • 5
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:02pm

1. The FTMBA hasn't sailed due to your age. You don't seem to be interested in it for other reasons, but don't let that be it.

2. You've provided a lot of detail, but this really boils down to whether or not people in PTMBA programs can break into consulting at a new firm. My limited first person experience with this is a no, only based on seeing 3 PTMBA students do first round interviews at Deloitte, and none of them advanced. If you're an optimist, you can view the fact that they got interviews as a positive sign.

3. In addition to listening to people here at WSO, I would talk to the career center at one of your targeted schools, and then a PTMBA who is actually going through recruiting in OCR. The CC should have some stats and examples of people who have done what you want, and the student can hopefully give you a non-BS answer about whether employers put up a wall when they see the PTMBA.

I think it is safe to say that you WILL need an advanced degree to break into consulting, especially if you're interested in an upper level firm. Do you know if your current Big 4 firm would entertain transferring you if you complete the PTMBA? That'd be the best way to avoid wiping the slate clean, as you put it.

Personally, I am risk averse and would take the well traveled FTMBA path here, since so much is on the line. Its only 18 months, and you can snag 20-30k in your summer internship so its not all expense. You'd really be giving up 15 months of income + cost of school. If its a bridge too far, consider T25 as opposed to MBA business schools<br /> ">M7. I can personally attest that you can get into consulting without going MBA business schools<br /> ">M7.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:05pm

John-Doe8:

1. The FTMBA hasn't sailed due to your age. You don't seem to be interested in it for other reasons, but don't let that be it.

2. You've provided a lot of detail, but this really boils down to whether or not people in PTMBA programs can break into consulting at a new firm. My limited first person experience with this is a no, only based on seeing 3 PTMBA students do first round interviews at Deloitte, and none of them advanced. If you're an optimist, you can view the fact that they got interviews as a positive sign.

3. In addition to listening to people here at WSO, I would talk to the career center at one of your targeted schools, and then a PTMBA who is actually going through recruiting in OCR. The CC should have some stats and examples of people who have done what you want, and the student can hopefully give you a non-BS answer about whether employers put up a wall when they see the PTMBA.

I think it is safe to say that you WILL need an advanced degree to break into consulting, especially if you're interested in an upper level firm. Do you know if your current Big 4 firm would entertain transferring you if you complete the PTMBA? That'd be the best way to avoid wiping the slate clean, as you put it.

Personally, I am risk averse and would take the well traveled FTMBA path here, since so much is on the line. Its only 18 months, and you can snag 20-30k in your summer internship so its not all expense. You'd really be giving up 15 months of income + cost of school. If its a bridge too far, consider T25 as opposed to MBA business schools<br /> ">M7. I can personally attest that you can get into consulting without going MBA business schools<br /> ">M7.

you make a lot of good points. regarding the FTMBA, I am being a bit conservative here so that's why the PTMBA. Less opportunity cost which means less debt at the end (plus i like the work i do now and the team I am part of). I just called and scheduled a couple of in-person meetings with career offices for my two target programs so thanks for that idea. As for top 25, the irony is that the only options I have are either MBA business schools<br /> ">M7 or not top 25 where I live so sort of decided for me really (PT that is anyway).

you sir have given me a lot to think about so thank you for that!!

"I'm talking about liquid. Rich enough to have your own jet. Rich enough not to waste time. Fifty, a hundred million dollars, buddy. A player. Or nothing. " -GG
  • 2
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:04pm

Ship has sailed? Lolwut?

You're 31, bro. Average age is 28-30. The ship has definitely not sailed.

If you want to get into consulting, you do NOT have to go to a top 5 school.

Just because I know about the state of Texas... Texas A&M has a Full time mba Program that

1. Ends in 1.5 years
2. Places in all the 2nd tier Consulting Firms
3. is Super Cheap... at MOST you'll spend 30k,
4. has a Tight Knit network.

Right outside of the top 25, but their placement rate is off the charts.. Upwards of 95%, with the other 5% starting their own business... So you know you'll get a gig.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:07pm

handullz:

Ship has sailed? Lolwut?

You're 31, bro. Average age is 28-30. The ship has definitely not sailed.

If you want to get into consulting, you do NOT have to go to a top 5 school.

Just because I know about the state of Texas... Texas A&M has a Full time mba Program that

1. Ends in 1.5 years

2. Places in all the 2nd tier Consulting Firms

3. is Super Cheap... at MOST you'll spend 30k,

4. has a Tight Knit network.

Right outside of the top 25, but their placement rate is off the charts.. Upwards of 95%, with the other 5% starting their own business... So you know you'll get a gig.

it's interesting you mentioned A&M as a friend of mine goes there now (PT) and he told me the same things. Depending if i change my mind to do FT vs. PT (not likely) that might be an option since I can relocate. As for age, what is too old? What if I started next year 32 (need time to prep for FT if I did that)? is that too old?

"I'm talking about liquid. Rich enough to have your own jet. Rich enough not to waste time. Fifty, a hundred million dollars, buddy. A player. Or nothing. " -GG
  • 3
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:12pm

What was your decision here? I'm 31 and in a similar boat.. job is fine but looking to take it to the next level. I'm studying for GMAT right now and looking at p/t programs in SoCal. My appetite for the debt burden is also quite small. Let me know if you want to connect and motivate one another.

CPA/investor/bballer
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:13pm

What was your decision here? I'm 31 and in a similar boat.. job is fine but looking to take it to the next level. I'm studying for GMAT right now and looking at p/t programs in SoCal. My appetite for the debt burden is also quite small. Let me know if you want to connect and motivate one another.

CPA/investor/bballer
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:16pm

There are numerous 2nd tier firms aggressively pursuing PTMBA students since those students have an additional two years of full time work experience (hopefully in a relevant field). I have seen OCR block PTMBA students from pursuing internships, but OCR has actively helps many of the PTMBA students land full time offers at consulting firms.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:17pm

Sier:

There are numerous 2nd tier firms aggressively pursuing PTMBA students since those students have an additional two years of full time work experience (hopefully in a relevant field). I have seen OCR block PTMBA students from pursuing internships, but OCR has actively helps many of the PTMBA students land full time offers at consulting firms.

I always hate hearing the "2 more years of work experience" phrase. First of all, a FTMBA is only 1.5 years long. Second, you aren't unemployed the entire time, you'll have 3-4 month summer internship as well, doing something (hopefully) incredibly relevant to your chosen field, and at a higher level (even pay) than whatever you were doing previously.

In addition, look at the work profile of FTMBA applicants. MOST FTMBA applicants aren't coming in with no experience, the average runs 4-5 years (some start right after undergrad, and some have 10+). A quick glance at a few schools PTMBA program shows average work experience for a beginning PTMBA student is ~6 years. In the end, the work experience gap isn't typically that significant. More importantly, wouldn't you rather start your higher level work experience sooner? A FTMBA student will pick up 1.5 years of post MBA experiences over a PTMBA student who completes in 3 years.

I probably feel more strongly about this than most, since I initially started pursuing a PTMBA and was convinced otherwise. Sorry for the mini-rant.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:18pm

I see your point. I went to a PTMBA program that was 1.5 years, and we overlapped classes with FT students. I personally think work experience is overrated. A few consulting firms recruiting PTMBAs were keen on the "2 more years of experience" phrase. I do think the FTMBA is a better option. I was able to land the job I wanted, but I know quite a few PTMBAs who envied the FT job offers and wished they had gone that route.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:19pm

I think everything that's been said so far is fair. I'm finishing up my part time MBA in May 2015 at USC because of its focus on international business. And for me this degree was a career change. Looking back at it now, I would tell myself to evaluate the MBA programs on the following: costs, program flexibility (important if working full time), recruitment and make up of alumni and current part time students. My school is mostly engineering undergrads looking to move up in heir companies with an MBA under their belt. So this network was what attracted me to the school as well as the above info.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:21pm

A few things:

1) Kellogg offers an accelerated program for students who have taken some standard business classes in undergrad - this shaves a quarter of the classes (and tuition) off your MBA- at a standard pace you'll complete in 7 quarters

2) PT students can partake in OCR so long as they attend some required workshops beforehand. PT students can, and do, land consulting jobs out of OCR, (including MBB)

3) Unreimbursed MBA tuition is tax deductible in its entirety as a business expense for those working full time (the Lori Singleton-Clark MBA IRS ruling essentially opened the full MBA deduction to any working professional). You should study the rules on the IRS website to ensure you qualify, but most PT students do deduct all unreimbursed tuition.

4) Apply for summer intake- easiest to get into

  • 3
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:26pm

Note MBA tuition is only tax deductible for individuals earning less than $75k/year. But the gov't encourages Americans investing in themselves to be more productive to society...........

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:27pm

Part Time MBA Programs: How will an employer know you attended the part time vs full time? (Originally Posted: 01/06/2013)

So maybe a dumb question, but I am starting to look into grad schools now. What is so bad about attending the part time MBA and working over the full time MBA? How will employers know?
How will this hurt your potential network or recruiting?

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:28pm

If you know how to network...it shouldn't hurt your network. You'll be an alum of that school and could leverage the resources. Some people can do this without paying 150k and going back to school. However, if it's required within your company or if they're willing to pay for it...its not a bad investment.

Most top programs (say nyu/booth) have restrictions on recruiting so you will not be able to participate in FT OCR. Sure there is always a chance you could network yourself into an interview but pt mba programs aren't designed for career switchers.

Ask yourself what it is you want to do and where you'd like to live after the program? Should help with the decision, good luck.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:29pm

In my opinion, it all boils down to where you are in your career and what your goals are in obtaining an MBA. I think if you're looking for a career change then a full-time MBA is your best best. Two years and then start a new career or field. There are definite pros and cons to both. With either program you're going to expand your network and broaden your skill-set. One thing to keep in mind is that if you are looking to have a "concentration" then full-time might be your only option. For whatever concentrations are worth. Part-time programs also usually takes a year longer and is for individuals with more work experience. End of the day though it just depends on what you hope to gain in pursuing an MBA considering the opportunity costs, etc. As far as employers knowing for 1) your resume would reflect your employment/full-time student status and 2) some part-time programs contain "executive" etc in the degree. Though a benefit of a part-time program is many employers, at least mine, will help foot the bill. One thing to look into is a lot of full-time programs have opportunities to work on projects (with F100 companies) while in school so you not only pick up the degree but build your work experience and resume. Probably just stated the obvious but just my two cents.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:30pm

Part-time MBA and associated exit opportunities (Originally Posted: 01/22/2016)

Hello all,

I've been a lurker on and off for a while and figured I'd make my first post on a subject that isn't breached very often in depth: part-time MBA programs.

If I went to a great program (M7) but for part-time as opposed to full-time, are there any chances of changing industries or roles? Has anyone had experience with the matter? I realize there is usually a negative connotation with part time enrollment as it is slightly easier to get in and most enrollees are continuing on their current career trek, but I have heard from someone in the program that jumping ships isn't as rare as purported. Also, career centers are becoming much more helpful in affording PT students the same services as FT.

My situation is a unique one as my MBA would be entirely paid for by my current employer and has no stipulations attached to it like the usual work x years post-grad or pay loan in full etc. My current work experience is lack luster (Back office role for a regional bank, credit risk for a certain central bank) but I'm working on becoming more involved. In terms of educational background: 3.50+ GPA from Large public university with a degree in chemistry and a degree in econ. I have a rock solid letter of rec from an ex MS partner who went to the school I'd like to go to and getting another strong rec would only take a year or two in my current role.

I know there is a bias towards full time, but I think it would be crazy to turn down the part-time program while working and having it paid for in full over taking on 120k+ in debt just for the full time experience and summer internship. I'm leaning towards consulting because I love the cross-functionality that is needed to succeed (analytics, communication, different industries etc.)

I'd appreciate any advice.

Thanks,

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:31pm

There's a negative association with PTMBAs for a reason. As anecdotal evidence, my MBB office has yet to even offer an interview to a PTMBA candidate, and we always have 7-10 in every application round.

You're taking a harder path, and no amount of mental gymnastics can erase that fact. Some places simply won't consider you, and others will you the door is open when it's actually shut (because it sounds good).

I wouldn't engage on a PTMBA unless others part-timers from you're program have directly gone to where you want to be. If they haven't demonstrated that the path is open, I'd shy away. Due diligence should make or break this decision.

For what it's worth, I was initially going to do complete a PTMBA. I changed my mind during the school visit after talking to students and career services, and applied FT instead. So maybe I've got some confirmation bias going.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:32pm

OP, take what JohnDoe said with a grain of salt.

Your employer is reimbursing you 100% for the MBA. That is awesome and you'd be crazy to turn that down. It's a no-brainer. 5-10 years down the road, no one gives a damn if you got your MBA full time or part time - you will still have that degree.

That said, if you want to switch careers into management consulting, PT MBA is not the way to go. You will have a much better chance with a FT MBA. Now, its up to you whether you think taking on 120K debt + opportunity cost of leaving your current job for 2 years is worth a career in management consulting. I think there are careers outside of banking/PE/HF/consulting where you can be quite successful if you play your cards right. Corp Finance is one of them. You might not make as much but you're also not mortgaging your life away.

Also remember that even if you get into a top MBA program, it's still very challenging to get a job at a MBB. Your odds are still better than if you were at a PT MBA program. That said, I've heard of people making career switches in a PT program, but they're the exception not the rule.

In nutshell, go PT MBA, unless you really want management consulting at a MBB.

  • 4
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:33pm

Thanks for both of the responses.

I will most likely reach out to try to find some current students both PT and FT and get their thoughts about it to hopefully get a better feel about the current environment. Ideally I would try to see if anyone had luck trying to career switch in part time because although it would be great to work for an MBB leaving a fully paid education is rough. Given my non-traditional background I doubt I would be as competitive as others anyways.

There are a few people I could maybe talk to doing PT in my current department but I have a feeling they wouldn't feel compelled to divulge how exactly they are peacing out.

Would the door also be closed to PT students for something like Deloitte S&O? Or maybe a different T2 type firm?

FT is something I'm not necessarily counting out but I would prefer not if I was relatively afforded similar opportunities in PT

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:34pm

I'm pretty sure that by talking to people in both PT and FT, you'll hear that FT is a better experience and the better route for a career switch to consulting. That was my experience when I went to NYU and talked to both FT & PT students.

Personally, I'm more risk averse so I'd rather take the safe bet of building my current work experience and potentially making a career change v. taking on a lot of FT MBA debt and maybe getting a consulting job (with higher odds than PT). When I went to the NYU prospective student campus tour, I remember someone asked the tour guide, 'what is one thing you wish you had known before enrolling full time" and the response was "I know some students felt that by enrolling in a top 10 MBA program they could get whatever job they wanted... but in my experience there were lots of people that did not end up in the job of their choice." To me that sounds like people probably had to settle for jobs outside consulting/banking. Pre MBA work experience still matters a lot for full time recruiting.

I can't speak for Deloitte S&O but I'd assume its not as competitive as MBB. You'll probably still have to network a lot and spin your story in a way that makes you a good candidate (aka how your project management skills pre-mba prepare you for a career in management consulting, etc.)

  • 4
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:35pm

Have you looked into Chicago PT MBA? I've heard good things about it. They also allow you to recruit with FT students and you have the same access to career resources as them.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:36pm

Yeah, I'm from Chicago so I wouldn't go anywhere part-time but Booth or maybe Kellogg.

Booth does allow PT the same resources as FT nowadays but I know there is a bias during recruiting (other messages on the board saying >90% of the last few years recruiting were FT students)

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:38pm

Part-time MBA to portfolio management, IB or Management Consulting (Originally Posted: 04/07/2011)

need some advice. I currently work on the marketing team for a boutique money management firm in Philadelphia. I would like to transition into Portfolio Management, Investment Banking or management consulting. In undergrad I majored in Finance (GPA 3.5, non target school). And I am now working part-time on my MBA. What do you guys think is the best career move to make and what do you think would improve my chances of making that transition.

HELP!!!!

SP
  • 2
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:40pm

Stop going part-time, go full-time to the best MBA program you can get in

"You stop being an asshole when it sucks to be you." -IlliniProgrammer "Your grammar made me wish I'd been aborted." -happypantsmcgee
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:41pm

Let's try some real advice:

  1. Career-wise you mentioned three completely different fields. Start by picking one and go from there.

  2. Every MBA program has to have an alumni databse with emails/contact info. Start by contacting the younger (5 years or younger) grads from your school in the geography/industry you want. If you have a short and meaningful ask in your email (are you guys hiring/ can we touch base/ how's X company), then you're likely to get some traction. It's my experience that the younger grads that want to be contacted tend to have the better alumni profiles.

  3. See if your current company's competitors are hiring. AM is a great field if you have the right job and/or work for the right group/manager.

Hope this helps.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:42pm

WestCoastChimp30, you're the boss!! Thanks for your advise. I've gotten similar feedback from people in the industry.

Thanks again.

SP

SP
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:43pm

WestCoastChimp, would you not advise him to stop going part-time?

"You stop being an asshole when it sucks to be you." -IlliniProgrammer "Your grammar made me wish I'd been aborted." -happypantsmcgee
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:44pm

If he were just picking an option, it would make more sense to go full time. He's already going part-time so there's a sunk cost factor. When he graduates, interviewers will see the following: MBA/School/GPA. I doubt if any interviewers will give two craps about whether or not it was part-time or not. Plus he gets to pitch his story about working 40/60/80 hours a week AND getting his MBA. That makes for a much better narrative than someone who went to Wharton for two years to network and get drunk at Thursday MBA pub (you know who you are).

Regardless, to the OP: pick ONE field and then approach people. Not the other way around. It reflects poorly on you.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:45pm

Part time MBA in NYC (Originally Posted: 09/07/2013)

Hey guys, I know this question came up for the full time program but I wanted to find out what you guys think about the part time.

I currently work for a large retail bank as a personal financial advisor and I really love what I do. I want to do Asset Management on the institutional side later on since im just starting out. My company can reimburse me for my MBA up to 10k a year. I am looking at CUNY Baruch and NYU as my options. Since both are part time programs I know I will have to network on my own; and thats not a problem. I wanted to know in my situation if it worth paying about 90k for NYU or go to Baruch for free. Also alot of guys that are financial advisors dont event have MBAs, because we are judged on production not on degrees. I dont want to rush into a MBA if it wont be needed and could do a CFP or CFA as well. I would appreciate any advise on how to proceed.

Thank you so much!

A-B-C Always Be Closing
  • 2
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:46pm

What good is a Baruch MBA to you? Just because you can get one doesn't mean you should. I would strike that option immediately because the degree/school combination isn't going to gain anything for you. So then the question becomes if a part-time MBA from NYU is worth paying huge amounts out of pocket. As you said you won't get access to recruiting and networking and you already work in wealth management so I doubt there is anything of academic value for you from the program. You are also aware that an MBA isn't required for advancement in the industry you want to remain in. I guess I'm failing to see any upside for you. If you think you can't network your way into an Asset Management role from your current position then a full-time MBA might help you with that but the part-time just doesn't seem to provide you benefits and has a huge associated cost.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:47pm

You should get a PT MBA if:
You can't afford to go 2 yrs without an income
Your company pays for it and mom and dad wont :)
You like your job and want to advance to the next level

Cons:
Limited access to recruiting
Grueling hours (say goodbye to weekends and prepare to be up until 2AM to get a project done so you can go to work)
Can't participate in many extracurriculars (club meetings during the day or during your night classes)
You get less from the education, no time and constantly exhausted.

You are off on one thing though, there are tons of networking opportunities through PT school. I did a full career switch leveraging a part time MBA (IT to FI Research) but I definitely faced a ton of headwinds doing it. I'd be happy to chat more about this in a PM.

-Recent Stern PT Alum

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:48pm

MilitaryToFinance:

What good is a Baruch MBA to you? Just because you can get one doesn't mean you should. I would strike that option immediately because the degree/school combination isn't going to gain anything for you. So then the question becomes if a part-time MBA from NYU is worth paying huge amounts out of pocket. As you said you won't get access to recruiting and networking and you already work in wealth management so I doubt there is anything of academic value for you from the program. You are also aware that an MBA isn't required for advancement in the industry you want to remain in. I guess I'm failing to see any upside for you. If you think you can't network your way into an Asset Management role from your current position then a full-time MBA might help you with that but the part-time just doesn't seem to provide you benefits and has a huge associated cost.

I did not learn a thing from my undergrad school, and most of the education I got was on my own and by getting securities licensees. I want to have an MBA because I have the time right now and don't know what will happen down the road. I might want to move to the institutional side and a lot of those job require an advance degree.

Thanks

A-B-C Always Be Closing
  • 2
Mar 24, 2014 - 11:49pm

Do Top Tier Part-Time Programs lose their luster? (Originally Posted: 08/25/2006)

By enrolling in a top 10 part-time program (say, NYU), would one be at a disadvantage during the recruiting process?

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:51pm

Many programs segregate P-T recruiting from F-T. They do this because they assume that your company is likely helping you pay tuition and they don't want to slap the hand that rocks the cradle. P-T programs are great for advancement in your current career, but in the end not too good for switchers.

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:52pm

Part-time, monthly MBA programs?? (Originally Posted: 05/10/2014)

Sup y'all.

I'm starting to do a little research on part-time, monthly (or flex) MBA programs and thought I'd start by asking you guys: does anyone know of any programs like that? I saw Darden @ UVA has one similar, but it's an EMBA. Any thoughts?

I can travel wherever domestically and afford it if physical attendance is required monthly. I'm learning that I may need an MBA to move up at my current company (I have a different Master's).

Mar 24, 2014 - 11:55pm

Emory has a "modular" program, which requires week-long sessions, but on a relatively infrequent basis - something like once every other month.

Most of the "once a month" type programs are going to be EMBA programs - but I'm not really sure what difference that ultimately makes vs. a regular part-time program (for most schools).

Mar 25, 2014 - 12:00am

just call the adcom office, they can probably give you some demographic data

happy to give advice; no asking for referrals please
Mar 25, 2014 - 12:04am

If you said that you were Japanese-American, I might actually believe this was legit

"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt." --Abraham Lincoln
Mar 25, 2014 - 12:06am

MBAhousing:

I'm a 34 year old Korean-American and need to get married and socialization.

Congratulations.

GTAA Mistmaker
Mar 25, 2014 - 12:08am

I recommend going through a trafficker who deals in North Korean females. She'll be psyched to be out of NK, she'll be super compliant and obedient (she's been trained to believe anything no matter how far fetched it is so she'll do anything you tell her-you could probably drive an M1 Abrams up her ass and she'd say thank you) and she's not used to eating much so your food costs won't go up much.

Mar 25, 2014 - 12:15am

Rankings compiled by Forbes.com:

  1. New York Univ. (Stern)
  2. UCLA (Anderson)
  3. Norwestern (Kellogg)
  4. Chicago Univ.
  5. Univ. of Michagan (Ross)
  6. Univ. of Minnesota (Carlson)
  7. Univ. of Maryland (Smith)
  8. Carnegie Mellon Univ. (Tepper)
  9. Fordham Univ.
  10. Southern Methodist Univ. (Cox)
  11. Washington Univ.-St. Louis (Olin)
  12. Wake Forest Univ. (Babcock)
  13. USC (Marshall)
  14. Rollins College (Crummer)
  15. Boston College (Carroll)
  16. UC Davis
  17. Georgia State (Robinson)
  18. Michigan State (Broad)
  19. Pepperdine (Graziadio)
  20. Univ. of Denver (Daniels)
  21. Univ. of Iowa (Tippie)
  22. SUNY Buffalo

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/9006844

Mar 25, 2014 - 12:19am

Part-time MBA / Career Advice (Originally Posted: 05/12/2013)

I am currently working in audit at a Big 4 firm and working on breaking into PE. I know a full-time program is better for career changing, but my family situation (3 kids under the age of 5) largely prevents me from quitting my job for school. I will be attending the Rice MBA for Professionals program beginning this fall.

I have a very good connection to several of the partners in the firm, and they have agreed to set me up with some rotations through the Transactions Advisory M&A group so I can get transaction experience. However, these rotations will be more like an internship broken up for a couple weeks at a time over the next couple of years. I know their intent is to set me up to transfer to Transactions Advisory when I finish the MBA. I feel like this would be a good backup plan, but would not be my first choice.

I know transaction experience is very important for getting into PE, so I am considering applying to analyst positions full-time rather than the rotations I currently have set up. However, the time commitment for those roles is significantly higher than my current position. I am also concerned with burning bridges with the partners I am working with now. They have strong connections to the PE field which I feel like I can leverage. One also has significant influence in the Rice community. I don't want to burn bridges with him because that could hurt me with the rest of the alumni base. However, this is business, and they're well aware of the high-turnover nature of the public accounting model.

Do you think an analyst position would provide the time to complete the MBA program? I could be up-front during recruiting and would be willing to take a lower salary for an accommodating schedule (i.e. fewer/more flexible hours).

Do you think it would be worth the reputation risk of potentially upsetting some of the strongest network relationships I have to gain the additional transaction experience?

Mar 25, 2014 - 12:20am

I was at Rice a few weeks ago asking about both the FT and PT programs. What they basically said is that it's pretty hard to switch careers through the PT program although one guy recently moved to IB after working for an oil company as an engineer. If you're looking at PT then I would consider UT's program...from what I have seen in their seminars it seems like a ton of Part timers are trying to switch careers and their career services is very helpful in that regard...

Mar 25, 2014 - 12:21am

Part-Time MBA, Top 20-30, ER (Originally Posted: 09/02/2010)

Is it even feasible to get into ER? I'm enrolled in a program now, planning on doing an MBA/MSF. I want to get into ER very badly, but have had some bad luck in regards to jobs and thought enrolling might help, but now i'm getting coldfeet thinking i might have acted hastily. i'm currently 25

  • Liberal arts undergrad, Econ major w/ Honors, math minor, 3.4 gpa, my Honors Research Thesis on long-term interest rates and the housing market won me some awards and recognition- now regretting not pursuing and publishing

  • 10 months at a tech start up as an analyst

  • 1 year small wealth management, performance analyst, though i did do some side projects doing research in private equity and alternative investments

  • laid off during a merger, 10 months unemployed

  • just hit the 4 month mark at my current job in a mid sized wealth management company, doing performance reporting again (monthly/quarterly reports, calculating returns, benchmarking performance, portfolio attributes etc)

i'm in the DC area, and i know there are a few Ibanks and HFs around, and my thought was once I got my degree and had 4 years as a performance analyst in WM i could migrate to one given that it's bigger school in the area? or is my logic very flawed, i'm only a few weeks into my classes now. other route would be, start studying for my CFA, which i think my work would pay for. i would just love a job in ER, but have no idea what i can do to break in, especially with a 10 month gap in my resume now. would love any suggestions

Mar 25, 2014 - 12:25am

Distinctio sit iure qui consequatur molestiae. Qui reprehenderit eligendi eius animi.

Quis nemo nihil nostrum architecto perferendis vel. Adipisci repudiandae in dignissimos fugiat voluptatibus autem repellat eaque. Et culpa animi in cum mollitia nemo dolore. Aliquam asperiores saepe ducimus soluta. Tempore cum delectus repellendus quo ab illum. Esse fugit voluptate corrupti beatae est inventore.

Mar 25, 2014 - 12:26am

Temporibus qui possimus laudantium voluptatem fuga laudantium. Laudantium quia odit velit omnis nobis eum quis. Quaerat explicabo repudiandae laborum et. Itaque a illo et quisquam et quam. Est sint quam nihil et et.

Eum nobis aut est at sapiente. At nisi id magnam molestiae. Voluptate sunt et corporis sunt sint voluptas autem. Et sit id aut harum culpa deserunt. Aspernatur et amet provident atque assumenda consequatur tenetur. Quia accusantium officiis id perspiciatis neque et veritatis.

Doloribus qui hic quasi velit at tenetur. Rem temporibus earum corrupti vel doloremque ipsa.

Mar 25, 2014 - 12:27am

Dolor animi nulla mollitia quae dolorem rerum totam. Quis corrupti sint quia doloribus. Dolores eos ipsam ducimus laborum esse consectetur. Magni est ut velit illum ut.

Quas a libero totam voluptas. Quis tempora molestiae quia. Soluta alias impedit rerum quod in distinctio. Provident animi commodi illum asperiores repellendus magni. Magnam alias facilis voluptatem dignissimos a. Ad laudantium nesciunt qui quod adipisci. Optio at est voluptas voluptatem accusamus.

Exercitationem debitis cupiditate maiores in voluptatem et quis. Amet quibusdam aut itaque dolorem.

Omnis porro in non deserunt. Necessitatibus aut dolorum voluptatem nesciunt culpa et veniam. Qui asperiores minus dicta tempora incidunt enim qui. Possimus sed quo laborum rerum saepe.

Mar 25, 2014 - 12:28am

Ab excepturi iusto et et quis et. Possimus aspernatur aliquid temporibus cupiditate numquam eum. Facilis voluptate consequatur ex quo autem aliquam eius.

Recusandae dolor explicabo vel velit dolorem occaecati non. Et est libero quisquam eveniet maxime a. Repellendus dolore harum blanditiis ea.

Voluptatem sint ut sapiente hic. Quo nemo qui dolor consequuntur sunt ut. Et facilis praesentium eos maxime dolores temporibus sit voluptatum. Quo provident adipisci esse laboriosam sed repellendus molestiae. Velit eum perspiciatis placeat repellendus excepturi quidem.

Velit suscipit aperiam est voluptatem aut maiores alias dignissimos. Sunt facere dolores cumque consequuntur. Ea labore et qui.

Mar 25, 2014 - 12:29am

Perspiciatis corporis tempore sit ducimus. Culpa consequuntur corporis recusandae amet iure placeat. Beatae voluptatem qui quia perspiciatis qui expedita quis.

Amet laboriosam sunt officia excepturi dolorum. Suscipit sunt et harum temporibus officia. Non numquam porro et sapiente. Ea harum deleniti voluptas asperiores dolorem assumenda.

Possimus pariatur optio sed et ipsa pariatur. Reprehenderit blanditiis voluptatibus necessitatibus nobis non molestiae non. Molestias et aliquam quia ducimus optio earum. Quis voluptates architecto magnam esse nostrum.

Eos rerum autem id dolores tenetur dolores reiciendis. Consequatur aut sit dolor quo. Libero vel autem labore quo nihil delectus.

Start Discussion

Total Avg Compensation

January 2022 Investment Banking

  • Director/MD (5) $604
  • Vice President (20) $379
  • Associates (137) $239
  • 2nd Year Analyst (83) $154
  • 3rd+ Year Analyst (15) $150
  • Intern/Summer Associate (60) $142
  • 1st Year Analyst (283) $138
  • Intern/Summer Analyst (223) $89