4/13/15

I'm interning this summer at MBB as a consultant and have considered applying to the HBS and Stanford deferred admissions programs for a while now. I think I would be a competitive applicant (3.74 cumulative GPA, MBB return ideally, strong on campus leadership and probably strong GMAT) but when I discussed the prospect with a guy in the office I'll be interning in, he said it may be worth waiting. He also said not to worry about it too much because almost everyone gets into HBS, GSB, or Wharton. I'm not dead set on B school because if I return to my firm, I can potentially go straight to associate without b school (saving 2 years). If that doesn't work out, I figure I can apply to B-schools (ideally with sponsorship).

My long term goals may include entrepreneurship and venture capital and possibly public policy (wayyy down the road). Would a Harvard or Stanford business degree add anything to my ability to realize these prospects that a straight to associate program wouldn't?

Comments (5)

4/13/15

The key advantages you'd gain would be a 2 year period to focus solely on entrepreneurship and VC recruiting that you might not get with trying to come directly out of MBB with. Also, it gives you a wider network, more resume padding, and a time to meet with fascinating people and learn in an academic setting again.

It can't hurt to apply right?

Additionally, you might be a bit too optimistic in your approach. Direct to associate is for the absolute top tier performers and the sponsored is for the tier right after that. You might very well get it and i hope you do, but this isn't competing with your classmates in college. These guys are absolutely some of the smartest, motivated, and talented people all competing to be in the top 5-10%

Accepted.com
4/13/15

@ebbitten - your turn.

4/13/15

depends on your school/major and GMAT. if you're a stem major at HYPSM and can get 750+ on the GMAT its worth a shot. will be very tough otherwise but after a few years at MBB you'll be competitive at HSW

4/13/15

Where's the fire? I don't think you have anything to gain by applying now versus waiting two, three, or more years. Those schools aren't going anywhere, so why not just wait until you know (1) if and when you want to go back to school and (2) which schools work best for you. Also, it might be tougher if you get rejected to get in on the second try as a re-applicant.

4/15/15

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