Valuation/Modeling courses (e.g. training the street etc.)

firefighter's picture
Rank: King Kong | 1,051

If I'm reading resumes to interview and I see Training the Street or something similar listed, I will strongly discount the candidate. Why? It shows a lack of priority and judgement - why pay hundreds of dollars for something you'll learn as soon as you start? If you need help for interviews, you can read the Vault/M&I/WSO guide for $30 and be set without the huge cost. It also brands you as a less interesting person - it implies that while others are playing sports or working to pay for college or having fun, you're shelling out hundreds of bucks to learn to do a DCF.

That's just my two cents, what are your thoughts on taking those courses to put on a resume?

Comments (48)

Feb 23, 2011

My school provided it for free (Well like $20 deposit or something stupid). So your entire argument is wrong.

So you don't think I had fun in college because I took a weekend course? Get over yourself, jesus.

Feb 23, 2011

you sound like a massive tool tbh.

do you also ding people for getting a gpa above 1.0?

I mean they could have been getting drunk and playing sports instead of studying right.

Man those kids with 2.0 gpas are such loser already they went to tests instead of taking bong hits.

morans.

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Feb 23, 2011
oneortheother:

If I'm reading resumes to interview and I see training the street or something similar listed, I will strongly discount the candidate. Why? It shows a lack of priority and judgement - why pay hundreds of dollars for something you'll learn as soon as you start? If you need help for interviews, you can read the Vault/M&I/WSO guide for $30 and be set without the huge cost. It also brands you as a less interesting person - it implies that while others are playing sports or working to pay for college or having fun, you're shelling out hundreds of bucks to learn to do a DCF.

That's just my two cents, what are your thoughts on taking those courses to put on a resume?

Why would learning a DCF preclude you from playing sports or having fun in college? Are they mutually exclusive now?

Feb 23, 2011
Banker14:
oneortheother:

If I'm reading resumes to interview and I see training the street or something similar listed, I will strongly discount the candidate. Why? It shows a lack of priority and judgement - why pay hundreds of dollars for something you'll learn as soon as you start? If you need help for interviews, you can read the Vault/M&I/WSO guide for $30 and be set without the huge cost. It also brands you as a less interesting person - it implies that while others are playing sports or working to pay for college or having fun, you're shelling out hundreds of bucks to learn to do a DCF.

That's just my two cents, what are your thoughts on taking those courses to put on a resume?

Why would learning a DCF preclude you from playing sports or having fun in college? Are they mutually exclusive now?

Good point about the two being mutually exclusive.

One of the hardest obstacles to overcome when trying to break into the industry (especially for someone who has been working in another industry) is the lack of knowledge that is typically gained in an analyst position.

I was actually think about doing one of these courses to have basic understanding and familiarity with excel, I am disappointed that you looked down on it.

Would you rather hire someone who was trying to break into the industry that was not putting any effort into learning the basics? Someone who was just chugging along in their current job just hoping that they can break into the industry w/o any effort?

Confused....

Feb 23, 2011

You will actually get brownie points from me for taking the initiative. Sames goes for the CFA.

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Feb 23, 2011

Yes, anything you can do to enhance your understanding and make yourself better is worth it. Even a few thousand dollars (i.e. traveling to NYC to network and other prep/classes) is well worth the investment if it gets you to the right place. Do not put in on your resume, you can speak to it verbally.

Feb 23, 2011

All told I think I spent about 3k on recruiting. 100% worth it.

Feb 23, 2011

I bought TTS a few months ago and I've been able to apply a lot of the stuff from the courses to interviews. Understanding how to go about valuations or how a model is supposed to look like has helped me a lot because its practical experience from a real banker and you know how your expected to answer certain questions.

Some people dont want it on the resume but I put it in the bottom under "additional" in the "technical skills bullet", if you have space why not.

Feb 23, 2011

depends on how much excel and modeling knowledge you have.

Feb 23, 2011

Zero modeling and basic excel knowledge

Feb 23, 2011

I cant really speak for internship interviews as what ive been going for are analyst interviews, but for those, what you learn from these classes was certainly helpful. Its possible for internships they wouldnt require you to know as much, but then again knowing shit can never be a negative. as far as where to put it, pretty sure i threw it under "other skills" as "completed x,y,z TTS courses"

GBS

Feb 23, 2011

IB Training is waste of time. Their Placement services are just a joke. Its just listings from other website. Do not fall into their sales trap, They do not have any relationship with any headhunters. If placement assistance is your goal stay away from IB Training and If you just want to learn models there is a good book on this which you ca buy for $50 and save lots of money.

PM if you need more info.

Feb 23, 2011

I did IBI (ibtraining). For me it was REALLY helpful cus I had no idea how to model/value. he's right they dont have any connects to jobs and their resume review sucks. but all in all if you want to learn how to model you have to do it LIVE, in a class, with someone teaching you. not out of a book.

gluck

--
"Those who say don't know, and those who know don't say."

Feb 23, 2011

The model cases also suck at IBI. You can learn more if you have case books from leading universities

Feb 23, 2011

IMHO any of these courses will have a very minimal impact as far as boosting your chances of getting or converting interviews to offers.

Feb 23, 2011

Puss my "research" consisted of using the search function of this website. I should have made it more clear, these three are the programs I AM INTERESTED IN.

I didn't include Dealmaven because I did take one of their online courses and found it confusing, not to mention as one of the fellows said this is something best learned from someone who shows you step by step.

Feb 23, 2011

AnEx has such a great business model. Pay us to put you to work. Gold mine for boutique banks looking for free/cheap labour.

Feb 23, 2011

No help in getting you a job but I did TTS back in the day. Didn't absorb much since it went by so quickly. Did the 3 day gig, my firm paid for it

Feb 23, 2011

So how important is it to have modeling knowledge going into an interview either with a bulge or with a small shop?

One of my peers who is an associate said he had no knowledge prior to being hired, and my professor has stated it having this on your resume just shows your interest in the field.

How important is it to have this knowledge prior to gaining acceptance into a firm? If one were to read the posts on this site regarding modeling it just seems like you HAVE to know this to get hired.

Feb 23, 2011

Is this material at least somewhat similar to what you'd get in training for SA's?

Feb 23, 2011

Stay away from IBtraining. Just empty promises, no placement or help in placement. Their course also isn't worth much. You can get it anywhere for $ 75 max. Rip off artistes.

Feb 23, 2011

How exactly complex is the training the street public modelling course? Currently in high school and have decent trading/financial knowledge for my age. I think they would add value to my resume when getting my first few internships...

Feb 23, 2011

I have taken in person courses and have also used the BIWS online courses. BIWS courses were more effective for me. Check them out.

As to whether what Macabacus etc teaches is enough, that depends on how much you can take from it- if you have no trouble building a 3 statement model and a dcf after using the course, then it's probably enough. If you still struggle, you probably need more.

Feb 23, 2011

Thanks for the quick reply, I'll check BIWS out too.

Feb 23, 2011

As implied by notthehospital, Macabacus is great for self learners. If you're better taught in a more traditional classroom setting or something of the sort, it is worth it to buy Wall St Prep or BIWS, as the modules are narrated like a lecture.

I spent the $ for WSP and think it was well worth it. Even if you are a good self-learner, it is difficult to know what you are not understand as profoundly as you should be. WSP and BIWS really drill the important things in to you.

"Success means having the courage, the determination, and the will to become the person you believe you were meant to be"

Feb 23, 2011

Thanks for the replies :D.

Feb 23, 2011

It only helps you because you will know how to answer the technical questions during interviews (if you remember anything from the course) but no one will see a modelling course on your resume and go "OoOoOoOhhhhh.. give him an interview!"

Feb 23, 2011
Function:

It only helps you because you will know how to answer the technical questions during interviews (if you remember anything from the course) but no one will see a modelling course on your resume and go "OoOoOoOhhhhh.. give him an interview!"

yea I was just wondering if those guides are enough for technical interview...i have WSP now and seem difficult to finish everything..

Feb 23, 2011

I did the Wall Street Prep class in college. It was a weekend (I think 8am-5pm Sat and Sun). They walked us through a DCF model, and we got to keep it. It was very helpful, and also looked nice on my resume. IB banker asked about it during interview. The paper materials are also nice to create your own/help with input. It was very helpful. Not going to scream at interviewers, though, more practical for actual on the job use.

Feb 23, 2011
GoldenEagle2009:

I did the Wall Street Prep class in college. It was a weekend (I think 8am-5pm Sat and Sun). They walked us through a DCF model, and we got to keep it. It was very helpful, and also looked nice on my resume. IB banker asked about it during interview. The paper materials are also nice to create your own/help with input. It was very helpful. Not going to scream at interviewers, though, more practical for actual on the job use.

What did the IBanker asked you? My topic is not asking how good it looks on resume...but rather how much it helps during interview. Thanks!

Feb 23, 2011

yeah, if it's something with like Training the Street

Feb 23, 2011

All depends on your knowledge going in. If you're already comfortable with financial concepts, it will add almost nothing. Also, it adds almost no value to your resume. It's not an accomplishment, there are no requirements to take it, and you have no proof that you are even good at it.

Feb 23, 2011

I dont think a modeling course will really help you in an interview. Yes, you will have to know how to "walk through a DCF" but I have never heard of anyone having to sit down and actually build one in excel, and definitely not for SA positions. The WSO guides are great prep for interviews and if you know the questions in there, as well as understand the concepts behind them you will be great. Don't stress about knowing how to build a DCF from scratch in interviews. If it's on your resume, they may (and probably will) ask you about it, but if it's not I wouldn't expect to get grilled on it.

Study your guides, be confident and passionate, and you will be fine. Good luck.

Feb 23, 2011

You will be grilled harder during an interview, but on the flip side, it shows interest. At a boutique it may be more important, but BBs give less credence to these types of programs on ur resume since they recruit a bunch of liberal arts kids from targets and train all their analysts anyway.

My point is that it may get you better traction for an interview at a smaller firm than a larger firm.

I'm coming from a BB, target, liberal arts background.

Feb 23, 2011

Basically would encourage you not to do it. You should know all the technical answers and all of the fit questions etc.

Once you land an offer the best thing you can do is honestly learn excel, ppt and word short cuts. Everyone writes "good at MS office" on their resume but this is pretty much a bold faced lie. You should be fast and accurate. So taking an excel short keys, ppt short keys and word short keys course would help you 10000000x over the long-term.

The modelling stuff is already pre built anyway, banks have been around for many many years so the chances of building from scratch are much lower. If that is the case? Then you're just ripping from an old model reformatting and then doing it anyway... There will be a model somewhere thats similar.

Feb 23, 2011

I'll be curious to find out about this as well.I'm also interested into how those compare to the analyst exchange.

The dragon dozes off in the spirit which is its dwelling.

Feb 23, 2011
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Feb 23, 2011