What are you reading?

What books are you guys reading, or have read/plan on reading? Fiction, non-fiction, biographies, do you guys have any great authors or historical figures who have written books or series of books that you absolutely recommend? Any great magazines or websites you guys turn to for quality, stimulating content? I feel like its essential to sanity always be reading something

Comments (165)

Aug 1, 2017

I'm reading Epicurean Dealmaker's blog. Aside from the topics, The weird or ancient vocabulary entertains me as English language is my second language.

Also, Shakespeare was very wise man as well as great writer. He alone invented a few thousand words just to write his plays. Unfortunately, I understand nothing reading him.

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Aug 4, 2017

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My Linkedin

Aug 6, 2017

Good to know. For some people it is a tedious read. Anyway, Is he here? He's quite active on twitter.

Aug 8, 2017

With this comment I found something to replace Leveraged Sell-Out!
Thank you!

"I'm into, uh, well, murders and executions, mostly."

Aug 8, 2017

Oh, if you've found Leveraged Sell-Out and Epicurean Dealmaker interesting, Equity Private's blog also can be interesting for you, if you are not familiar with her yet.

Aug 1, 2017

For books, I've recently finished Straight to Hell and When Genius Failed and I would recommend both of them (The former for laughs the latter for a good story)

As for magazines, Bloomberg Businessweek and Barron's would be my two favorites of the moment.

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Aug 3, 2017

I know I'm in the minority here but I really hated When Genius Failed. It felt like an extended Wiki page about LT.

Hoping for hedge life.

Aug 3, 2017

Yeah definitely agree with this at some points. For me its just another reminder that I'm not as smart an investor as I think I am.

Aug 1, 2017

i sneak into your moms room every night to read her diary

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

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Best Response
Aug 1, 2017

Just finished Albert Einstein's bio by Walter Isaacson. He was only 26 when he published 4 papers that completely changed our understanding of the universe (one of which would win him the Nobel Prize), and here I am almost 26 dicking around making powerpoint slides. Feelsbadman.jpg

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Aug 1, 2017

lol

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Sep 8, 2017

NO offense, but why is that comparison even relevant ?

I'd imagine most people on WSO are business nerds and money-grubbing entrepreneur types and we should be damn proud of ourselves.

I'm a 100% sure Einstein couldn't even value an option using present value and future value logic like I could even though now I doubt it.

Could Einstein tell me about all the risks of scaling a business ? Would he know about the risks of a physical commodity trade ?

Business is as distinguishing and as respectable as a field as is astrophysics or all that other hard science stuff.

Peter Thiel can write 10 pages on what a CEO needs to do to build a proper business with a moat. I doubt he knew anything about the universe. Does that make Thiel an underachiever ?

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Sep 9, 2017

Take a step back here. It's not about who can do which tasks or which field is better. It's about achievements (regardless of domain) that permeate space and time, and Einstein had such achievements by 26.

Aug 1, 2017

Just finished Dune. Solid book that it kept my attention for a whole 800 pages but...overrated. I'd still recommend.

Aug 1, 2017

I enjoy biographies because they offer a glimpse into the minds of the most influential ppl. to ever roam the earth while putting our own struggles in perspective due to the resilience these highly accomplished ppl. often display. In the realm of biographies, i'd recommend Malcolm X autobio by Alex Haley, Benjamin Franklin by Walter Isaacson, and Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson.

Aug 1, 2017

I'm currently reading Simulacra and Simulation by Jean Baudrillard, when I have the mental capacity left in a day to handle it. I'm also finishing up Left of Boom by Douglas Laux and Ralph Pezzullo. I highly recommend The Heart and the Fist by Eric Greitens. Up next will likely be Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman.

I often find myself scanning news.ycombinator.com for interesting content. Depends on your interests.

Aug 1, 2017

"Why Nations Fail" It's a book recommended for summer reading from one of my Econ professors. She used to work for Fed St.Louis and I really like and respect her. It's a 500-page book with some econ jargon in it, since it's written by two highly respected economists. Very insightful and fun to read.

Aug 1, 2017

Thinking Fast and Thinking Slow as well as Good to Great.

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Aug 1, 2017

For fiction Lord of the Rings, call me a nerd but they're great books.

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Aug 2, 2017

I've been reading [edit] mostly fiction lately. A few of my recent favorites:

The Sun Also Rises
One Hundred Years of Solitude
Down and Out in Paris and London

Aug 1, 2017
SFlemming1:

Down and Out in Paris and London

I thought that was non-fiction?

I'm reading Road to Wigan Pier. It's just okay. Going to read Underground Airlines next.

Aug 2, 2017

Yep you're right - good catch

Aug 1, 2017

I'm a bit of a voracious reader, its part compulsion and part enjoyment for me. I'm probably upwards of 50 books in the last year and a half, here's what I'd recommend out of those:

**Sapians/Homo Duex **- Both were fascinating and far-reaching. You may not agree with all the conclusions, but you'll find them thought-provoking nonetheless.

Not Fade Away/When Breath Becomes Air -- Different books, different authors, but similar stories. Both are accounts of dying by men confronting terminal illness in the prime of their lives. Its a a harrowing look at what its like trying to reconcile death with so much life still unlived. Both are a great source for renewed perspective on life and how fickle and unfair it can be.

An Uncomfortable Truth about Relationships -- Great for any guy who thinks he's not built for monogamy.

Filters Against Folly-- Published in 1985, but just as relevant today. The author is famous for having coined the phrase "the tragedy of the commons" The book is a paragon of clear, well articulated thinking. It will certainly provide some valuable mental models for analyzing the world.

The Immortal Irishman -- Fascinating biography very rich in Irish history

We Learn nothing-- A collection of essays worth reading for the prose and humor alone. His writing is unrivaled in my mind.

Recently, I've been reading a lot of Ken Wilbur. I'm on my third book by him but haven't made up my mind. He's another brilliant thinker with an immense ability to synthesize and distill large ideas that span history and different disciplines. However his work tends to venture further into the metaphysical than I can sometimes tolerate.

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Aug 1, 2017

Currently Reading or Just Read:
Good Strategy Bad Strategy - Best book on strategy I've come across. Difficult topic to conceptualize but gives a lot of useful case studies.

The Inner Game of Work - Have become increasingly interested in the mental side of business. Basically takes the mentality of a golfer, boxer, etc. and applies the principles to everyday work.

Principles by Ray Dalio - Really get an appreciation for what a deep thinker this guy is. Probably worth reading twice even if it is a bit extreme.

Blog Roll:
WSO (obviously)
HBR
25iq
Farnam Street
csinvesting
ValueWalk
Value Investors Club
A bunch of other industry related stuff

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Aug 1, 2017

"Prisoner but free" - it's a year or so old and it tells the story of Leopoldo Lopez. It really helps you understand how quickly everything has escalated in Venezuela.

I highly recommend it for anyone who doesn't have a clue of what's going on right now - good background/historical story and an overall captivating read.

Aug 2, 2017

DANGEROUS

Aug 2, 2017
FinBrah:

DANGEROUS

How is it?

Aug 2, 2017

I like it so far - I am about 75% of the way through it. He has his expected comedic persona present in the book, but makes compelling intellectual arguments backed up by facts, which I wasn't expecting as much. Even touches a bit on some historical information to explain how we ended up in the current political climate. Breaks down to book into various groups of the political sphere who "hate" him - and explains why they do. Explains why he behaves how he does and tries to explain why people like him are necessary on the right.

Overall, it's enjoyable. I'm reading it for leisure , as I generally try to read books to make me better in business or life. I don't know if this book will make me "better" per se - but I think it would if I wanted to be a political commentator.

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Aug 2, 2017

Against The Gods by Peter L. Bernstein- Excellent so far, would recommend to any guy that works or wants to work in high finance.

Aug 2, 2017

What is high Finance?

Aug 2, 2017

the STREET

Aug 3, 2017

Read it this summer as well, very good read. Curious if you came across it on the Reformed Broker (Josh Brown)'s summer reading list as well?

If you enjoyed Against the Gods, I'd recommend "How Not to Be Wrong - The Power of Mathematical Thinking". Its partly a historical account of the evolution of math, but also synthesizes a lot of economic, political, and social principles through math and statistics. It doesn't require much heavy lifting in terms of actual math either.

Aug 4, 2017

Thanks for the recommendation, I'll check that one out!

Aug 2, 2017
  1. Barbarians at the Gate 2. No dream is too High - E. Aldrin 3. King of Capital 4. Masters of Private Equity and Private Capital
Aug 2, 2017

The Master Algorithm: How the Quest for the Ultimate Learning Machine Will Remake Our World

By Pedro Domingos

Aug 2, 2017

FIFTY SHADES OF GRAY.

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Aug 7, 2017

+1 .......... ;)

Aug 2, 2017

a book on churchill and orwell and some james rickards.

Aug 2, 2017

Recently read the Spider Network (by David Enrich), which is about the LIBOR fixing scandal. The book offers an interesting perspective on the guy who took the biggest punishment, Tom Hayes.

Aug 3, 2017

Is fan-fiction ok here? lol

Aug 3, 2017

anything goes lol

Aug 3, 2017

"Godel -Escher-Bach" A tiring but eye-opening book. It gives you a glimpse on how consciousness really arises

Just finished "The outliers" and the "Blink" from Gladwell and they are both exploring things that we see everyday but we never notice. Noticing those small things could change how you approach life.

Also Think fast and Slow from kahnemann was nothing less than revolutionary.

Aug 3, 2017

Red Notice by Bill Browder. Shocking book about how business is done in Russia. But if you are from Eastern Europe you may not be that shocked, its jungle everywhere not only in Russia. But I still couldnt believe what I am reading.

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Aug 5, 2017

Just finished this book, it was awesome!

Aug 7, 2017

Red Notice is incredible. Would recommend it to anyone lurking the forms on here. I

ts more relevant than every as its rumoured Donald Trump Jr's secret Russian meeting centred around the key outcomes resulting from what Browder describes in the book.

Aug 3, 2017

Mystery/non-finance: The Secret History. Slow at the beginning, but hands down my favorite book Ive ever read.
Semi-economicsy: Freakonomics
Economics-based: Boomerang by Michael Lewis, so well written, articulated, planned, and flows impressively well for a book written on global economics written in laymans terms

Aug 4, 2017

Looks like we are all reading very boring staff

Aug 4, 2017

Just finished Dangerous by Milo. Quick read. Well done.

Aug 4, 2017

Since I practically have ADHD, I need to have several books started so I don't fall behind on my schedule. Right now there are three. For fiction, I have The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and on the breaks between pages all I can think is how awesome Mark Twain is. For non-fiction, there's Monkey Business, and I am finishing SuperFreakonomics (don't judge).
I recently finished The Big Short and Straight to Hell. Damn It Feels Good to Be a Banker is ok, so if you're looking for a silly banker read, there's always that.

"I'm into, uh, well, murders and executions, mostly."

Aug 4, 2017

You look hawt though!

Aug 4, 2017

Dude that's not me
If it was you'd probably get arrested for pedophilia, I'm in high school.

"I'm into, uh, well, murders and executions, mostly."

Aug 4, 2017

The Man in the High Tower-Couldn't get into the show but the premise makes for an interesting story line...what if the Germans/Japanese won World War II.

Aug 5, 2017

Good Profits - by Koch

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Aug 5, 2017

Always disappointed with the lack of fiction being read by WSO users. There's just as much to be gained by reading something other than nonfiction works covering finance. Currently reading White Noise by Don DeLillo.

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Aug 6, 2017

SBs to you and @Big4please. Currently reading The Lady of the Lake from the witcher series. Sad it's the last one but highly recommend those books!

Aug 6, 2017

Reading some fantasy bullshit because I'm a nerd.

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Aug 6, 2017

Essays by Warren Buffett and the Atlas Shrugged. Thought I had to give it a go. Cheers

Aug 6, 2017

Red Notice (by Bill Browder). This should be a must read given the friction between the US and Russia.

American Kingpin: The Epic Hunt for the Criminal Mastermind Behind the Silk Road. The story itself is good, but it also gives you a lot to think about around the changes that may come with wider adoption of crypto-currency.

I would also second Against the Gods and the Einstein biography which were already mentioned.

Aug 6, 2017

Bill Browder is a legend

Aug 6, 2017

Just finished Hillbilly Elegy, which is an amazing memoir about a guy who grows up in the Rust Belt and despite his terrible home life and poor upbringing, makes it into Yale Law. An awesome read, I couldn't put the thing down and finished it in one weekend.

I'm now reading Tribe by Sebastian Junger on the recommendation of the Military guy from Wharton on here who recently did an AMA.

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Aug 7, 2017

Hillbilly Elegy is a great book. I would definitely recommend to anyone. Especially someone who grew up in a blue collar family.

Aug 6, 2017

Currently (re)reading the art of war

Aug 6, 2017

I walked into a GS partner's office once for an internal mobility interview and I got the job solely because of the books I had been reading. Turns out he belonged to the same country club as William F Buckley.

Read, fellow monkeys, read often, read varied, read well. It will come in handy one day.

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Aug 6, 2017

Was it reading Buckley's books that got you the job?

Aug 6, 2017

Being able to talk about his debates with Gore Vidal with just a casual mention of God & Man at Yale was enough that it was the only question asked on his end

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Aug 7, 2017
Pussy galore:

Read, fellow monkeys, read often, read varied, read well. It will come in handy one day.

Love this with that username

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Aug 7, 2017

I hope you know it's a Bond villain lol. I'm not slamming chicks left and right

Aug 6, 2017

Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

Aug 6, 2017

Some terrific recommendations on here. I've seen a large number of people in finance pick up Red Notice recently.

Here's my contribution to the thread:

  • Madam Secretary by Madeleine Albright. Her writing style is far below expectations, but this is a wonderful primer on 20th century world history, which was unexpected.
  • The Gatekeepers by Chris Whipple. A look at presidential Chiefs of Staff and how they differed in their approaches to the job. I'm looking forward to reading this one.
  • American Fraternity Man by Nathan Holic. Fictional account of a young college graduate's first "real" job as he makes minimum wage, lives in his car, and travels from campus to campus conducting seminars on drinking responsibly (among other things) as a rep for his fraternity's national HQ. It's an engaging story and a good warning of how naive, eager young people are often taken advantage of in their first job.
  • The Evenings by Gerard Reve. Compulsory reading in Dutch schools, this is a short book that was recently translated into English for the first time. It follows the fictional, mundane life of a disgruntled 23-year-old named Frits, the tedious interactions he has with other people, and how he wants to make something more of his life.
  • Metropolitan Life by Fran Leibowitz. A collection of essays on living in NYC with the driest humor ever. It could be a bit tedious at times, but a number of one-liners made it worth it.
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Aug 7, 2017

Reading "King of Capital" and "The Hobbit"

Aug 7, 2017

Moneyball, Dynamic Hedging, every word that comes across my computer screen at all.

"When you stop striving for perfection, you might as well be dead."

Aug 7, 2017

For heavy/frequent readers: How do you guys go about absorbing/retaining the content you read from books that take forever to finish?

Aug 7, 2017

Bump

Aug 7, 2017

Just finished The Strange Death of Europe by Murray. Moving to Taleb's Incerto.

Aug 7, 2017

They have some good recommendations:
https://www.ft.com/summerbooks

Obstacles are the things you see when you take your eyes off your goals.
Aug 7, 2017

The Gatekeepers

About the position of POTUS' Chief of Staff. Especially interesting read considering the drama in Trump's White House and the firing of Priebus and subsequent hiring of John Kelly.

Aug 7, 2017

I am currently readying The Quants: How a New Breed of Math Whizzes Conquered Wall Street and Nearly Destroyed It.

Pretty good book. Very similar to Liars Poker, which i read last summer and I highly recommend as well. Also try straight to hell. These are books that I find teach you a little about the industry, but also give you some laughs and you're not so bogged down in theory.

Aug 7, 2017

Currently reading "How to Win Friends & Influence People" by Dale Carnegie as well as Liar's Poker

Aug 7, 2017

Venture Deals is my current book.

I recently read Zero to One by Peter Thiel. Highly recommend. He thinks in a very different way.

Also read The Age of Cryptocurrency, the Upstarts, and Mastering the VC game.

I'm trying to learn the VC/Start-up industry so been blowing through these books.

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Aug 7, 2017

The Fourth Part of The World was very good to me. It's about maps and might not have the best narrative, weaving through the story of how maps developed along with the explorers using them. But it's offers excellent insight into commerce and how people thought before the world became what we know it as today.

Aug 7, 2017

Just finished "The Tiger: A Story of Vengeance and Survival". Pretty bad ass story esp. if you're into wildlife/tigers and interested by Russia.

About to start "The Gulag Archipelago", which is about the forced labor camp system in the Soviet Union.

Aug 7, 2017

Mixing trading-related books with some fiction.

Last two I finished are:

  • Make Something Up by Chuck Palahniuk - some crazy shit in there. Was slightly annoyed by the Fight Club references.
  • Trend Following by Michael Covel - good read in the sense that I respect the balls all of the people featured in the book have shown in their trading. Offered a different perspective since I am mostly focused on arbitrage and special situations.

Just started reading Manias, Panics and Crashes but it seems kind of meh so far.

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Aug 7, 2017

I try to mix reading/listening to books and professional development/fiction. This is what I've got going on right now.

Audiobook-** Lonesome Dove**- great trilogy about a couple of cowboys in the old west. This book would be brutal to read in paper format. The audiobook alone is 40 hrs. (Next up, 2nd book in trilogy)

Paper Fiction- Where The Rivers Change Direction- book about a kid who grew up on a dude ranch outside of Yellowstone. Talk about a badass way to grow up. It's a dangerous book though as it makes you want to quit everything and move out west. (Next up, The Orchard Keeper by Cormac McCarthy)

Paper Professional Development- The Real Estate Game- I haven't made it too far into it yet but the author explains things in a down to earth and humble tone which is refreshing in a real estate book. (Next up, The One Thing)

I actually hate reading but I realize it necessity both personally and professionally. If you also hate it, my biggest tip would be to get Audible. It is a subscription based audiobook service. You can "read" a book while doing other mundane tasks throughout the day.

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Aug 7, 2017

Currently reading Shoe Dog, maybe my expectations were too high but I find it a tad overrated.

I also try to supplement any book I'm reading with an investment heavy read- currently its Quality of Earnings. A touch dry but finding it very useful and still relevant today.

Aug 7, 2017

Just finished Liar's Poker and now reading Lunar Park by Brett Easton Ellis. I enjoyed all the books he wrote except American Psycho. That is the only book I've ever read that I regret reading, based on how disturbing it is.

Aug 7, 2017

Currently reading 11/22/63 by Stephen King. First book i've read by him and its been pretty entertaining so far.

Aug 8, 2017

"The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit." This guy up and left everything at 20 years old, got out of his car and walked into the woods and lived there with basically no human interaction for almost 30 years. It's fascinating to hear how he did it and what he's like

Aug 8, 2017

I'm not reading, I'm writing ... a manifesto after @Angel Molester" denied me entry into a sex dungeon. The world will rue that day.

Sep 3, 2017

Fiction - The Fountainhead
Finance - King of Capital
Psychology - Influence (Cialdini)
Women - The rational male
Philosophy - The Daily Stoic
Effectiveness - The 7 Habits of highly effective people

Have a long list from each of the above categories if anyone wants more. The above 6 will stand you in good stead for winning at life.

Sep 14, 2017

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson
Lolita by Nabokov
This book so good! My colleagues gave me a present. I was so happy!

Sep 8, 2017

My grandpa was a Freemason. He's been dead for awhile but my grandpa kept a lot of his stuff as is. I was looking through his office this summer when I was over at my grandma's, and I found the Freemason etiquette manual & history that is given to all brothers. Started reading out of sheer curiosity.

It's from the 1950s, so some of it might be out of date, but it's still pretty cool.

"Work ethic, work ethic" - Vince Vaughn
Sep 14, 2017

The Time Keeper by Mitch Albom. This book taught me a lot about patience and the power of now. If you want something to happen for you do it now because time is not guaranteed or the future. I really recommend this book, it is a MUST READ BEFORE YOU DIE.

Sep 8, 2017

Currently reading - Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory

vivid accounts from the daily life of a mortician. nearly 5 star reviews on Amazon. a must read if you're fascinated with the details of humanity post-death.

Sep 14, 2017

Thanks for the recommendations, that trilogy sounds fascinating. The author just died after completing the manuscripts? Just wow.

I usually read historical fiction. It's been a while since I have touched the genre, mainly because I can't find the time. But you should should give James Clavell (author of King Rat, Shogun, Taipan, Noble House, Gai-Jin, Whirlwind) a try.

Sep 14, 2017

completely forgot about clavell. i read shogun and it was awesome.
i began reading very early on and was mostly reading fantasy and sci-fi until i exhausted the good ones (not many good authors in that field, and come to think of it, i haven't really gotten to asimov yet, tho he looks promising).
but sometime late in highschool i began to read the classics like the three musketeers by dumas, tolstoy's war and peace, dostoevski's the idiot, had a small sortie to the complete hitchhiker's guide, and all of them are equally recommended. today i'm reading haruki murakami's norwegian wood - very nice, escapist, semi-pornographic even. but i can hardly find the time with all the coursework and me being a hopeless procrastinator...
oh, and the complete works of lewis caroll - very idealist state of mind. no, i don't think he was a pedophile, i think he admired children and their innocence, but that's for another discussion.

"... then, lobbest thou thy Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch towards thy foe, who, being naughty in My sight, shall snuff it."

Sep 14, 2017

"(The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest)"

Heard they were good a while ago from a friend of mine. Didn't give much thought about them since then. If you could recommend one to start with which one would it be? In other words, which was your favorite out of the three. Sounds interesting now that you shed some light on what's beneath the covers.

Sep 14, 2017

Start with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. You really need to read them in order. You won't be able to put them down.

Here's some really good info on the author and the books:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/sep/1...

Sep 14, 2017

...SEC filings and equity research

I'm making it up as I go along.

Sep 14, 2017
Cornelius:

...SEC filings and equity research

LOL equity research...where 5-2 might equal....2.8, 3.4, or 12.

Myself, have a few favorite authors, Tom Wolfe at the top of the list, also enjoyed Jonathan Safran Foer's first two books, haven't picked up Eating Animals yet (mostly because I like eating animals...)

Sep 14, 2017

I tend to like travel writting - guess there's the obvious escapism thing going on there. It always makes me feel like a looser who's wasting his youth in some shitty office though so maybe I should stop.

In terms of fiction the best book I read recently was The Road by McCarthy - at the time thought it was absolutely amazing but looking back it's good but not the classic in waiting ppl make it out to be.

Sep 14, 2017

The movie is coming out soon, starring Viggo Mortensen and Charlize Theron

Sep 14, 2017

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo got a great review in The Economist, it's been on my list.

I second the recommendation for Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami. Quietly emotional and powerful. The Wind-up Bird Chronicle by the same author is even better, I have never read anything that so completely drew me into the protagonist's world. Great storytelling, a bit on the lighthearted side.

Spring Snow is another great piece of Japanese literature. It's the magnum opus of Yukio Mishima, a celebrate post-war author who is notorious for having committed seppuku (ritual suicide). The incredibly beautiful prose survives the translation, though I can only imagine what it would be like to read it in Japanese. A really subtle psychological tale.

The Remains of the Day is a Japanese-British work, written by Kazuo Ishiguro. The subject matter seems rather uninspiring at first, but it is probably one of the most powerful works on regret and loss ever written. The author manages to perfectly construct the inner world of the main character and share all his feelings and flaws. It is a very good book for bankers to read, because it deals with issues of sacrificing one's self for the sake of his career - highly recommended.

The Picture of Dorian Gray is possibly one of the best books I've ever read. Oscar Wilde's prose and wit can never be replicated and is exhilarating.

Sep 14, 2017

FYI: The first two installments of the Millennium Trilogy have already been made into movies.

Sep 14, 2017
zyphNOR:

FYI: The first two installments of the Millennium Trilogy have already been made into movies.

When I was reading them, I thought they would make good movies. Some books do and others don't, but I think this series lends itself well to film. I just hope they don't fuck it up.

Sep 14, 2017

American Psycho, of course.

Then I like dystopian books. The Ice People by Barjavel was awesome.

Sep 14, 2017

I also enjoy dystopian literature. Makes me wonder if there is an antisocial streak in Wall Street types.

Sep 14, 2017

Bret Easton Ellis actually writes in a very interesting style, although a bit much at times, I find the fascination around money and status quite interesting. I suppose I have been a bit cliche reading his books along with Bonfire of the Vanities, but it is whatever entertains you.

Martin Amis, Time's Arrow was great (pre Benjamin Button)

Anyone read Don Delillo?

Sep 14, 2017

obviously the most recent fiction edmundo has read is palin's latest autobiography

Sep 14, 2017

that's actually an autobiography i'd love to read, assuming, of course, that she wrote it all by her little'ole self. (fat chance)

"... then, lobbest thou thy Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch towards thy foe, who, being naughty in My sight, shall snuff it."

Sep 14, 2017

New Trailer for the movie:

Sep 14, 2017

investment banking pitch books.

Sep 14, 2017

Daniel Craig signs on to play Mikael Blomkvist in the English language version of the movie due next year:

http://apnews.myway.com/article/20100727/D9H7IK0G1...
I can see that working.

Sep 14, 2017
Edmundo Braverman:

Daniel Craig signs on to play Mikael Blomkvist in the English language version of the movie due next year:

http://apnews.myway.com/article/20100727/D9H7IK0G1...
I can see that working.

Too bad he thought his version of Blomkvist having a Swedish accent "would get in the way" of his acting.

Sep 14, 2017

My favorite book of the summer is Ralph Ellison's "Invisible Man." After being booted from a southern Negro college in the mid 1900s, a young black man moves to Harlem and becomes involved with a communist brotherhood. At its most superficial level the book is about various kinds of racism in America. In the all-black college, the man meets a prominent white trustee from Boston who tells him that their destinies are connected, that the students at the school need to become successful for he himself to feel accomplished. In the North, the communist brotherhood is led by mostly unseen white men who manipulate the protagonist (and the rest of the young and confused black soldiers) to gain the support of poor and disgruntled black folks. The men of this brotherhood commonly refer to themselves as "scientists".

The questions this text opens up are far broader than racism. The anonymous protagonist is a young black man being used as a pawn in the grand schemes of more powerful white men. They don't see him, they see a means to an end, they see cheap capital for their own personal and sociopolitical ambitions. In the end, he decides to live off the grid, to be literally invisible--as opposed to the metaphorical when he was unseen through ignorance, delusion, etc.

I think it's ultimately about developing a self-identity while living a life as a cog in someone's machine. I think that this is a perfect metaphor for what most of you guys on here do, and is crucial for a meaningful and satisfying life.

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Sep 14, 2017

I'm almost done with Orhan Pamuk's bestseller, called "Snow." It's about a writer who travels into the Turkish hinterlands from Istanbul to report on some Islamic girls who have committed suicide, but while he's there, a snowstorm blocks all the roads out of town. Interesting things start happening.

Favorite writer, by the way, is Leo Tolstoy. The man was a genius.

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

Sep 14, 2017

Currently I am reading the A Song of Fire and Ice series. One of the best fantasy series I've ever read.

Sep 14, 2017
devvratk:

Currently I am reading the A Song of Fire and Ice series. One of the best fantasy series I've ever read.

I second this. Planning to read the third book once season three starts

Sep 14, 2017

I'll probably get the snoot award for saying this, but I think Jonathan Franzen is the best writer active today. He's not an action packed read, but if you like to get deep with a book that makes you think, and maybe cry a little, nothing better.

if you like it then you shoulda put a banana on it

Sep 14, 2017

Just about the only fiction I enjoy are Tom Clancy. I find non-fiction to be a lot more entertaining. I enjoy military books, and books about baseball players because often times they're just as exciting as fictional books. I'm currently reading "Private Empire: Exxon Mobil and American Power" and so far it's a pretty good read.

-RR

Sep 14, 2017

Zerohedge.

Sep 14, 2017
Macro Arbitrage:

Zerohedge.

There's a little bit of truth in zerohedge articles. Not all of them, but you can find good stuff there.

Sep 14, 2017

Kane and Abel by Jeffrey Archer, hands down!

My formula for success is rise early, work late and strike oil - JP Getty

Sep 14, 2017

All you bookaholics, check out this blog:

http://theliterarystew.blogspot.ca/
I haven't yet read any of the recommended books, but they seem to have good reviews. Hope it helps.

Sep 8, 2017

Wow very few on this site are as hardcore as me.

All i read is books related to the subject of money making and biographies of business titans. If I open a book, it better help me make money. Period.

Annual Reports. Financial TV. Business news. Stock analysis. Stalking activities of billionaires to see their strategies.

My bookshelf:
Red Notice - Bill Browder
King of Oil - Marc Rich
How to become a billionaire - forgot author name
many more + CFA curriculum books.

I have 0 fiction books. Like I said, if it doesn't affect my bank account I don't read it.

Sep 14, 2017

so basically its a Sports Illustrated for kids version of GQ for wanna be ballers?

I hope this is better than the last batch of shit you gave me. Produced more wood than Ron Jeremy. I don't want you to yell, "Reco!" anymore. Know what you should yell? "Timber!" Yeah, Mr. Fuckin' wood.

Sep 14, 2017

Basically, lol

He who is not contented with what he has, would not be contented with what he would like to have.
Socrates

Sep 14, 2017

Checkout these sites:

uncrate.com and coolmaterial.com - for gear and tech stuff

mensjournal.com- for all the above

In pursuit of four monitors...

Sep 14, 2017

I'd call it Dragon-ball-Z. Sounds quite ballsy!

Askmen.com is good for a good laugh from time to time.

Sep 14, 2017

Boatshoesandbeats.com isn't bad for random BS

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Sep 14, 2017

I've checked out uncrate and coolmaterial, which they already knew about. Says the mag would be a cross between British GQ, CoolMaterial, FT's How To Spend It (with a little of the old Trader Daily's lifestyle section thrown in). If anybody's interested, send them a shout over at Alfred(at)alpha mag.co. I'm trying to get them to change the name...

He who is not contented with what he has, would not be contented with what he would like to have.
Socrates

Sep 14, 2017

@adapt or die ,I find this crazy..... I go onto that Boatshoesandbeats.com and on the homepage homeboy is wearing the same EXACT shit im wearing today to work.... eerie stuff... cardigan, collared shirt, khakis, boatshoes, wayfarers... well I guess that website is officially marked on my favs page LOL.

I hope this is better than the last batch of shit you gave me. Produced more wood than Ron Jeremy. I don't want you to yell, "Reco!" anymore. Know what you should yell? "Timber!" Yeah, Mr. Fuckin' wood.

Sep 14, 2017

got some sites from this thread. Thanks

Sep 14, 2017

I am not metro; so I do not read that sort of stuff.

"He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man." -- William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

Sep 9, 2017

I am reading few books on the Dalai Lama, a hero of mine and a great inspiration.

Sep 14, 2017

The Long Hard Road Out of Hell. Marilyn Manson

Sep 14, 2017

Sam Walton's Made In America, still business-oriented but great insight into his life

Sep 14, 2017

"Thinking, Fast and Slow" - Daniel Kahneman

My posts will be fraught with grammatical errors since I post from my phone. I will try my best not to post an incoherent babble.

Sep 14, 2017

"The World as Will and Representation" - Schopenhauer. Enlightening and scary at the same time. It taught me that the universe is apprehensible through introspection.

Sep 14, 2017

I love these threads. There are so many books I need to get to. I only get through like 3 books a month. I'm so bad about putting aside short-term bullshit like Tinder and general debauchery to read for a few hours.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

Sep 14, 2017

Thus Spake Zarathustra
Human Action
The Singularity Is Near
The Fountainhead
Steve Jobs

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Sep 14, 2017
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Sep 14, 2017
Sep 14, 2017
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Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Sep 14, 2017
Sep 14, 2017
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heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/

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Sep 14, 2017
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"When you stop striving for perfection, you might as well be dead."