What is the Average Age to Move Out of your Parent's House?

Just wondering when everybody moved out of their parents' house or when they expect to? Just trying to gauge if I will be called a mamas boy for still living at home..lol. I mean do you think it would look bad if I was in banking and plan on living with the parentals until 26/27. Strategically I think its smart because I will be able to save a lot of money. What do you guys think?

Will Co-Workers Judge Me for Living at Home?

Generally speaking, our users felt that it made sense from a financial perspective and that people will likely not judge you for living at home. Our users shared their thoughts below. Many commentators agreed that 25 - 26 is an appropriate age to move out of the house if you are still living with your parents.

The main reason for this acceptance is that it's a good way to save money but if you're not worried about money you may want to consider moving out sooner. There is a societal belief though that you should move out after graduating so be prepared to hear about from some, but far from all.

CompBanker - Private Equity Vice President:
Basically, use your own judgment and decide what you and your parents are comfortable with.

If you plan to stay at your parents' or another relative's past graduation make sure you are contributing in some way or at least not costing them anything extra. Chances are you won't be around much early in your finance career anyway so there likely won't be much overlap for the most part.

Here are some reasons adult children choose to live with their parents according to The Big Picture.

RKBanker:
No shame in staying with your parents. However, once I start making more money, I get the hell out, so I would say 25/26 is the cutoff point. Not just because your parents would start to get annoying, but because you're an adult and you should have the means to sustain yourself and maybe give something back to your parents in return.

While most don't think living with the parents is anything to be ashamed of, there are certainly opposing views.

Marcus_Halberstram - Industry CEO:
If you enjoy living at home it's something else, if you're simply doing it to save money that is a bit embarrassing. You already make a much higher income than a majority of the population. Not sure why you need to keep mooching off your parents.

Also bear in mind that you're going to be working extremely long days and depending on what your parents are like, you may have to do a lot of explaining why you look so horrible and aren't taking better care of yourself. Overall, assess you and your parents' relationship, how much space you need, and your financial situation to make the best decision for you.

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Comments (20)

 
Jan 6, 2010 - 8:44pm

I don't hold it against people who do it -- it's a great way to save a ton of cash. However, at some point you have to move out. If cash isn't an issue for you, you should definitely move out. If your parents are really wealthy and have a totally separate penthouse that you can stay in, by all means stay til you're 30. Basically, use your own judgement and decide what you and your parents are comfortable with.

Generally -- people think you should move out of your parents house as soon as you graduate college and make a paycheck. There will be a number of people who give you a lot of shit for this -- especially in banking. Goodluck.

CompBanker

 
Jan 6, 2010 - 9:05pm

I don't hold it against anyone. I lived with my aunt and uncle for a while after graduation. They live in the city, I didn't have to pay rent, had my own bedroom and just made sure I didn't cost them anything more by living there (grocery shopping, bought dinner, etc.) Since you are probably rarely home anyways, whats the big deal? Bringing dates home may be tough though.

I say go for it, you will save so much money. I did it for about six months and managed to build up a pretty good amount of cash. Who gives a shit what other people say....

 
Jan 6, 2010 - 9:59pm

Just moved out (22)...but I'd stay until at least 26/27 if I could. Heck, I'd move BACK IN if they were closer to my job. Great way to save cash, plus, I think it sucks living alone, but thats because I've always enjoyed a full house of people (parents, siblings, etc...), which I know not everyone feels the same way about.

 
Jan 6, 2010 - 10:34pm

If you enjoy living at home its something else, if your simply doing it to save money that is a bit embarrassing. You already make a much higher income than a majority of the population. Not sure why you need to keep mooching off your parents.

Also don't know about others but when I come home after a long day, the last thing I want is my parents nagging me why I am not smiling or do not want to have cheese or something. When I did an internship my mother was always asking me why I was upset weeks leading up to and after the Lehman bankruptcy, maybe because my Psycho MD was freaking out that he would be canned if he screwed up one thing.

Don't forget the abuse and tear your body and personality will take during your time on those all-nighters not sure your parents will react good to seeing that day in and day out.

 
Jan 7, 2010 - 2:31am

No shame in staying with your parents. It saves a ton of money, you don't have to clean the whole house, you eat for free, and you live there for free. And especially if you're in NY, I would definitely live at home.

However, once I start making more money, I get the hell out, so I would say 25/26 is the cutoff point. Not just because your parents would start to get annoying, but because you're an adult and you should have the means to sustain yourself and maybe give something back to your parents in return.

 
Jan 7, 2010 - 8:41am

No shame in staying to save some cash, but after you are 25/26ish it's time to do your own thing. You can only be so cheap before you have to get out on your own. People may give you crap about it but you are saving some serious cash.

 
Jan 7, 2010 - 8:54am

26/27? wow is it really that bad? i thought ibanking analysts made 2x more than the college grad and would be able to sustain themselves? what's up? i know several guys from HS who are living on their own right now (they're 22)...one guy got married at 23 and moved out. None of them have high paying jobs. I also have several friends in my Class '09 target school...a girl now lives with 2 roommates in midtown making about 50k in a marketing firm, another moved from NYC to Maryland and lives in a townhouse. Another friend of mine since HS is now 25...she bought her townhouse with a mortgage in Pennsylvania and she's making about 60k/yr.

So it's kind of intriguing that ibankers have to live at home! What's up?

ps. I hope to get out and get my own place right after graduation, unless I go straight to grad school which I'll then take campus apartments. Just more freedom to do your own thing - bring girls over, throw parties, etc...

 
Jan 7, 2010 - 1:17pm

The idea of someone living at home at that age and not contributing something to bills is bothersome to me. I just feel like that person would be taking advantage of they're parents' kindness. I also think that the opposite sex (male or female) would be pretty creeped out in general. I personally think that it is too long, unless there are some serious extenuating circumstances. But hey, what do I know, in Spain it's not that weird at all. I moved out after school, so 21.

 
Jan 7, 2010 - 1:26pm

Are you all in your early 20's? I'm pretty old for this board (early-30s), and in my generation, living with your parents until 26-27 would be incredibly embarrassing/humiliating, unless of course you're "touched" in some way or can't, literally, feed yourself.

I can understand living with mom and dad maybe a year out of undergrad if you can't get a job, need to save a little, or if the alternative is living on the street or in a dangerous situation. However, at the risk of striking up the old generational debate, it strikes me from this post that the stereotype of the Millennial is dead on. That is, you've been materially spoiled, constantly told that you're "the best" and "you deserve it" when you're just as average as the other 7 billion of us having accomplished nothing that the world cares about (yet), and you expect to enter the adult world in the same sheath of comfort that mommy and daddy supplied at home or paid for at college.

None of my friends lived with their parents past college, and personally, I think it would have damaged my sense of independence and robbed me of the growth experience of making it on my own and learning to deal with adversity.

If you can't make rent, get a roommate, live somewhere less desirable, or give up the wholefoods/starbucks habit. You'd be amazed to find that people can live in such a way and not be driven to suicide.

 
Jan 7, 2010 - 2:16pm

nrc_chicago:
Are you all in your early 20's? I'm pretty old for this board (early-30s), and in my generation, living with your parents until 26-27 would be incredibly embarrassing/humiliating, unless of course you're "touched" in some way or can't, literally, feed yourself.

I can understand living with mom and dad maybe a year out of undergrad if you can't get a job, need to save a little, or if the alternative is living on the street or in a dangerous situation. However, at the risk of striking up the old generational debate, it strikes me from this post that the stereotype of the Millennial is dead on. That is, you've been materially spoiled, constantly told that you're "the best" and "you deserve it" when you're just as average as the other 7 billion of us having accomplished nothing that the world cares about (yet), and you expect to enter the adult world in the same sheath of comfort that mommy and daddy supplied at home or paid for at college.

None of my friends lived with their parents past college, and personally, I think it would have damaged my sense of independence and robbed me of the growth experience of making it on my own and learning to deal with adversity.

If you can't make rent, get a roommate, live somewhere less desirable, or give up the wholefoods/starbucks habit. You'd be amazed to find that people can live in such a way and not be driven to suicide.

"Old man yells at cloud"

Although I do agree, the majority of my class moved out right after college. I don't see any harm in staying 1-2 years after graduation (paying off student loans was a big one). In terms of social development... it's a bit of a step back to stay at your parent's place for that long (25+) compared to living on your own.

As for your comments on being the "Millennial" generation stereotype, look who put us there.

 
Jan 7, 2010 - 2:41pm

I wish i had the chance to live with my parents, but the commute would be obscene. I would stay at home for the first year probably and just pay for their groceries or something. Still a lot cheaper than $1000+ in rent and its not like you'll be spending time in your apt doing anything but sleeping for the first few years anyway.

 
Jan 7, 2010 - 2:45pm

I moved out at 18.

If you're gainfully employed and still living with your parents at age 26 then you've got serious maturity issues. Grow the fuck up. Money tight? You're in banking I have absolutely no sympathy for you. And what pray tell will you do with all the money you've saved (aka rents extracted from parents)? Surely you wouldn't just blow it all on bottle service, right? Right? Over 50% of the world eats beans and rice for every meal. Time for you to join the club.

Hey man, I'm just playin. I ain't mad at ya.

 
Jan 8, 2010 - 1:13am

Thanks everyone. It seems like the general consensus is that it is okay to stay with your parents as long as you are not a burden. However one topic that came up was a potential problem with the ladies. Which actually did not cross my mind until now..lol. How are you guys still living at home coping with this issue?

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