Comments (39)

Nov 15, 2008

hmm...i worked at a bulge this summer (think GS/MS/etc.) and one of the coverage groups got super busy, and they brought in a few "valuation analysts" from India who basically did comps/models for two weeks and then went back to india.

Nov 16, 2008

As a valuation analyst, you will be a complete [email protected] to the summer analyst you report to. Career path includes being a direct "report" to a summer associate. The skills you learn from that experience will be transferable to a big 4 audit or HR position, if you are lucky.

Jun 19, 2011

Valuation Analysts can cover a few categories like Business Valuation, Machinery and Equipment, Intellectual Property/intangibles or Portfolio Valuation. I deal with the latter.

So essentially portfolio valuation guys are hired by the buy side to verify what they are marking their assets to. If it was just straight stock or something publicly traded then they could easily obtain a quote but illiquid securities or exotic instruments are where the valuation guys come in; they essentially provide price verification.

I can't really elaborate on the other areas except perhaps machinery and equipment/Intangibles. I would stay away from these personally. IP and intangibles seems very accounting heavy and dealing with tax codes etc etc.

Some might find valuation to be a good backup plan but it's definitely not Wall Street-esq. You would pickup some useful skills and experience should you want to attempt a switch after a few years. Where you would go is beyond me.

Let me know if you find somewhere greener

Jan 17, 2013
Datrde:

Valuation Analysts can cover a few categories like Business Valuation, Machinery and Equipment, Intellectual Property/intangibles or Portfolio Valuation. I deal with the latter.

So essentially portfolio valuation guys are hired by the buy side to verify what they are marking their assets to. If it was just straight stock or something publicly traded then they could easily obtain a quote but illiquid securities or exotic instruments are where the valuation guys come in; they essentially provide price verification.

I can't really elaborate on the other areas except perhaps machinery and equipment/Intangibles. I would stay away from these personally. IP and intangibles seems very accounting heavy and dealing with tax codes etc etc.

Some might find valuation to be a good backup plan but it's definitely not Wall Street-esq. You would pickup some useful skills and experience should you want to attempt a switch after a few years. Where you would go is beyond me.

Let me know if you find somewhere greener

You mind expanding more on what these guys do when it comes to portfolio valuation?

Jun 20, 2011

At our bank, Valuation Analysts are mainly sitting in India (haven't seen one outside of India) and helping Analysts with some of the basic work (e.g. comps, benchmarking, share price graphs, etc.). If they are lucky, they could one day become an Analyst...

    • 1
Jun 20, 2011
Alpine:

At our bank, Valuation Analysts are mainly sitting in India (haven't seen one outside of India) and helping Analysts with some of the basic work (e.g. comps, benchmarking, share price graphs, etc.). If they are lucky, they could one day become an Analyst...

What do analysts do, then? Just pasting the shit that the valuation analysts create into pitchbooks?

Being an analyst with 50% of your work outsourced sounds nice :3

Jun 21, 2011
Cries:
Alpine:

At our bank, Valuation Analysts are mainly sitting in India (haven't seen one outside of India) and helping Analysts with some of the basic work (e.g. comps, benchmarking, share price graphs, etc.). If they are lucky, they could one day become an Analyst...

What do analysts do, then? Just pasting the shit that the valuation analysts create into pitchbooks?

Being an analyst with 50% of your work outsourced sounds nice :3

Well you wouldn't typically get a Valuation Analyst until 2nd or 3rd year when you are expected to step up a bit. There are only a few Valuation Analysts for each sector so you do not have one on every project. Typically they add them to projects where either everyone is under water so you need a bit of extra help or they think you can manage without staffing an Associate and just have a 2nd or 3rd year Analyst with the support of a Valuation Analyst.

    • 1
Jun 20, 2011

I interviewed and passed on a valuation analyst position at a fairly large CPA firm. (Moss Adams)

The type of work they did didn't sound too exciting. Valuing stock in compensation plans for companies, valuing intangibles (patents), machinery, etc.

All in all, they said that none of the shit they valued ever went over 15k in value.

This isn't company valuation for a M&A transaction.

Aug 16, 2011

bump

Jun 10, 2014

anyone?

Jun 10, 2014

?

Jun 10, 2014

A couple of years ago, it was 60k + ~10k bonus. I don't know if that's still the case, but will hopefully ballpark it for you.

Jun 10, 2014

depends where. what kind of company?

Jun 10, 2014

There are valuation firms... which are different from banks.

My money is on that.

Example:
http://www.bvagroup.com/

Jun 10, 2014

Not usually...sounds like a role like FAS. So mainly fairness opinions and such. That is relevant experience however if you wish to move to IB.

Jun 10, 2014

valuation firms --> IB is not a hard jump.

Jun 10, 2014

I was offered an internship there, and considering i dont have much experience I am going to take it...

On its website is says that it isa corporate finance Advisory firm specialising in Mergers and Acquisitions and Capital Raising.

Jun 10, 2014

Good call. It wont hurt you thats for sure.

Jun 10, 2014

bump

Jun 10, 2014

bumpidy bump

Jun 10, 2014

Hello,
Business valuation is not an easy work it requires technical skills. And one should had to hard work to success in this field.

Jun 10, 2014

Interviewing for KKR lol?

Jun 10, 2014
BBnkr10:

Interviewing for KKR lol?

Can't confirm or deny - but for argument's sake, lets say it is.

Jun 10, 2014
Jun 10, 2014

I realize that, still trying to get some insight into the position

Jun 10, 2014

This is essentially an expanded investor relations role. Not FO category.

Jun 10, 2014

This is fund accounting.

Jun 10, 2014

How much do you think you can make as you go up the ladder? I'm sure there is a salary cap for these kind of roles, right?

Jun 10, 2014

I've never been responsible for PE/VC valuation, but I've been able to observe on the sidelines since our CFO is currently undergoing this process for the Fund (so take with a grain of salt..). duffmt6 is right, it's basically fund accounting.

- You won't get to work on deals
- Not a FO role (as you said), so you will not be interacting with management teams. Instead, you will be interacting with accounting firms.
- Every quarter, you'll have to value the Fund's portfolio companies. You'll put together projections and comps, and prepare financial statements for the auditors
- When there is a capital call, you will send out drawdown letters to LPs
- If the Fund sends out monthly or quarterly portfolio company updates, you'll be responsible for keeping track of putting those together

In terms of pros/cons, I can't really say since PE Valuation is the last thing I would personally want to do. However, if you are considering joining a Valuation Group at a Big 4 versus being a PE Valuation analyst, I think you will learn a lot more, and quicker if you went with the Big4, where there is a training program and a team to help you. At the PE firm, you likely be the only person doing this work (maybe under a CFO) so you better be confident in your skills or be a fast learner. If you want to make Valuation a career, I suggest starting out at a Big 4 and then transitioning into a Fund. You'll get to work with a variety of Funds, companies, and investment banks, which is a great way to start off your career.

Jun 10, 2014

I went through the entire interview process with them and thought they had some of the coolest, funniest, most personable VPs and MDs out of all the firms I interviewed with. I ended up accepting another offer before they were ready to give theirs out but I think I would have really enjoyed working there. Overall, making the jump to solid MM IBD is very doable if you put in the effort. Here is a post I had on a recent thread

( //www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/non-big-4-valuation... )

"Using D&P as an example, I think their Valuation Analyst offer this year was pretty standard at 70k base and ~5K (sign on seems to vary more) and according to a few current analysts hours can actually be in the 60-70 hours range and even higher (10-12 hours days plus some weekend hours). Also according to a few current analysts and associates, they have seen a good amount of people exit into MM IBD and a rare jump to PE, as well as a handful of people go to F500 Corp Fin mainly because they realized they didn't enjoy the culture/hours of client services... all occurring around 1.5 - 3 years down the road.

Sure its not IBD or directly transferrable, but being in an client focused environment and working on multiple transactions/deals and gaining exposure to a variety of businesses and industries all while eating and breathing modeling and excel all day errrday are all things that you can highlight that will help you stand out while trying to lateral to IBD."

Feb 28, 2017

Hope that helps.

Jun 30, 2018
Comment