What places do you visit for credible news?

I stopped watching CNN, ABC, CBS, FOX, et al because of the outright misinterpretation of facts (e.g., the fake news controversy). I usually shut off the TV if these channels start talking about subjects other than market info or feel-good stories.

This doesn't mean I choose to remain ignorant of currents, though.

I receive my news through Twitter and Youtube. I always question my sources and do my own research to see if the facts are indeed credible (they usually are). I notice there's much less drama and I enjoy hearing reports from smaller, independent journalists (think Bill Still).

Where do you guys get your news?

Comments (122)

Nov 25, 2016

Reuters and WSJ are good. RT is supposed to be, but careful of the Russian propagandist outfit.

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Nov 25, 2016

I think I've heard on WSO that one of the members knows a reporter who works for RT and states that the Russian government don't influence RT. Take it with a grain of salt but I think it would be better then Western main stream media (CNN, FOX) in terms of government propaganda

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Nov 25, 2016

I get that.. I'm just saying that I've read articles where their journalists praised Russian airstrikes as "something Americans can learn from" because they weren't killing civilians, which is completely false and eats away at American sentiment (i.e. propaganda). And CNN and Fox are the worst when it comes to being apolitical so I wouldn't use those to compare in no measure, except the ends of the spectrum maybe.

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Nov 28, 2016

I think you might be talking about me. I met a guy who works at RT. He said take anything Russian-related with a grain of salt. Other than that, they have intellectual freedom.

Nov 30, 2016

The German outlet of RT is oughtright propagandist - to the point of front-paging articles which cite obviously wrong translations etc. I assume the anglophone division is smarter than that, but I would not assume that their mandate is that much different.

If you think that CNN and FOX are pushing an agenda and don't trust them because of that then I couldn't possibly imagine why you would trust an outlet that is literally sponsored by Putin's administration.

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Nov 25, 2016

RT is great, just realize it is Russian news and will have some slant depending on subject. Al Jazeera is good. ZeroHedge is good, but always negative. I'll occasionally read Bloomberg, but anything political or even market with a political aspect is left leaning. CNBC is fine for reporting general facts.

I love long form articles. National Affairs is really good for this.

Nov 30, 2016

ZeroHedge is good

Based on what? Getting it wrong for the past 5 years in a row?

Nov 25, 2016

A different opinion? If we are going to determine an information sources worthwhileness by the accuracy in predicting the market, then I might as well start reading the farmers almanac or something.

And while the overall theme of the site might be incorrect, the individual articles raise some good questions.

Nov 26, 2016

The Onion. Switched over from the FT, after they raised subscription prices again.

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Nov 28, 2016

southpark

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My Linkedin

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Nov 28, 2016

Member when news networks weren't heavily biased? I member...

    • 4
Nov 28, 2016

member berries are the best

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My Linkedin

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Nov 28, 2016

WSJ is my main source. I balance it out with Bloomberg's website, but they're not too much better than the one's you stated.

Best Response
Nov 28, 2016

Problem: "I stopped watching CNN, ABC, CBS, FOX, et al because of the outright misinterpretation of facts "
Solution???: "I receive my news through Twitter and Youtube."

bro

Nov 28, 2016

I love the outcry over fake news by the MSM when all they do is create fake news.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

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Nov 25, 2016

MSM is yellow journalism and have the greatest blame for the mayhem going on in this country. I saw one of the heads of CNN speak a short while back and was physically ill being in the same room with him. Had to leave.

Nov 28, 2016

For market-related news, I really like Seeking Alpha's Wall Street Breakfast. They publish a new one every weekday morning. I am also a fan of the highlights bar on the front of the WSJ. I usually pick one or two interesting articles and read them.

For world news, I stick to European news channels. American news channels are quite poor.

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Nov 28, 2016

Dude I saw earlier in the year you had mentioned market snacks. I read it every morning on the subway now. Super good, often times humorous, news source. And it's less goofy than Dealbreaker

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Nov 28, 2016

Awesome! Thanks for the feedback.

Nov 28, 2016

lets be honest, the only news we care about is what comes out of Stephen Colbert's mouth

"It is better to have a friendship based on business, than a business based on friendship." - Rockefeller.

"Live fast, die hard. Leave a good looking body." - Navy SEAL

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Nov 28, 2016

Economist, FT, BBC holy trinity. (I'm American)

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Nov 28, 2016

Silver bananed and seconded

Nov 28, 2016

Watching the BBC over something like CNN makes me feel slightly more smug than it should.

"A modest man, with much to be modest about"

Nov 28, 2016

Err, my bb terminal just gets it?, or the rather good anywhere app.

Nov 28, 2016

LOL. Seconded.

BB terminal and sellside emails will pretty much cover any market-relevant news

Nov 28, 2016

BBC, Bloomberg, Drudge, Zero Hedge, Dealbreaker, CNBC, Yahoo Finance (not really news, just market updates). I also check out Mother Jones and The Nation sometimes. It's important to me to get a mix of different views, especially on the same subject if you're interested.

Nov 28, 2016

Washington Post / Bloomberg / BBC / The Economist, I am not even British, but the last two organizations are very good at giving news without too much opinion. And The Economist opinions are based on facts/logic/rational thinking not emotion. Whatever you do, no BREITBART!! ...they make FoxNews look rational.

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Nov 28, 2016

BBC is a good go-to for general world news

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Nov 28, 2016

Huff po....

psyche
WSJ

Nov 28, 2016

The Young Turks

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Nov 28, 2016

WSJ, Economist, MarketAxxess Daily (bond newsletter), Seeking Alpha, local news site. I find many Bloomberg articles to be poorly written / edited.

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Nov 28, 2016

NPR and BBC both do a good job of avoiding hyperbole, sticking to facts and stating clearly if something is a quote or opinion from someone while giving insight to both sides. That being said, it's kind of impossible to completely avoid any spin or bias across the board, so I usually follow a handful at the same time while keeping in mind any inherent bias (NYT, FoxNews, CNN, NPR). If only one is reporting something, might be fake. If they all report it, probably true. If Fox News says trump did something bad, he really f'd up. If CNN says Clinton did something bad, she really f'd up.

Nov 29, 2016
MiserlyGrandpa:

NPR and BBC both do a good job of avoiding hyperbole, sticking to facts and stating clearly if something is a quote or opinion from someone while giving insight to both sides. That being said, it's kind of impossible to completely avoid any spin or bias across the board, so I usually follow a handful at the same time while keeping in mind any inherent bias (NYT, FoxNews, CNN, NPR). If only one is reporting something, might be fake. If they all report it, probably true. If Fox News says trump did something bad, he really f'd up. If CNN says Clinton did something bad, she really f'd up.

I listen to NPR basically every day but my god it is such sob story bleeding heart bullshit sometimes ....

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Nov 28, 2016

Yea I find the website much better in that sense

Nov 28, 2016

Agree with @Synergy_or_Syzygy on Economist, BBC, FT. Problem with FT is that its pretty expensive and I refuse to pay for more than 1 of FT and WSJ (especially since I get all market relevant news spoon-fed to me via work).

WSJ is good if you avoid all politics/ opinion articles, which are Fox new level biased since Murdoch took over. Don't really watch televised news (why?) but if you have to I CNN is least trash (downside = no real analysis either)

Nov 28, 2016

I say this as a fairly well connected Washingtonian--virtually everyone who matters on Capitol Hill reads the WSJ opinion page. It's one of the most influential papers on the face of the Earth.

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Nov 28, 2016

FT, Economist, Spiegal

WSJ, NYTimes, Washington Post, BBC, Bloomberg, Reuters, various blogs (through feedly)

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Nov 28, 2016

Facebook and Reddit - because : echo chamber

Nov 28, 2016

I feel like you need to look at the source that best represents all sides and draw your own conclusions. My go tos are WSJ (good mainstream source with a conservative tilt) NPR for the best liberal news, and National Review for the best conservative opinion.

Full disclosure; I'm a conservative and did a write in at the top of my ballot.

Nov 28, 2016

[deleted for being a little mean]

Dec 2, 2016

Gotta ask, who did you write in?

Nov 28, 2016

I wrote in Evan McMullin.

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Nov 28, 2016

The Economist, Seeking Alpha and WSJ.

I also browse MarketWatch when I'm bored. And I look at Dealbreaker sometimes but mainly for the pictures.

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Nov 28, 2016

Literally everything. I respect the Wall Street Journal more than any other source in the U.S. or abroad; however, I read and watch everything. My favorite podcasts are John Batchelor (center-right, highly erudite guy with focus on foreign policy; has highly intelligent, non-bomb throwing guests); Larry Kudlow (conservative with focus on economics; has highly intelligent, non-bomb throwing guests); Ben Shapiro (right-wing and insightful but one of the few conservatives who still savages Trump for his idiocy). Usually listen to podcasts during gym time.

There are two TV shows I try to catch ever day on Fox News--The Five and Megyn Kelly. I like watching Morning Joe in the morning on MSNBC. If I'm in the car, I may catch 10-20 minutes of Andrew Wilkow on the radio. I can't stand to read Drudge Report anymore since Matt Drudge the last 12-18 months has turned into a pro-Trump propaganda arm and purveyor of "questionable narratives." I can't watch CNN anymore because it's turned into an anti-Trump propaganda arm.

Nov 29, 2016

huffington post, vox, and salon for all financial market related news

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Nov 29, 2016

NYT, WSJ, and occasionally Barron's for newspapers.

TV: Bloomberg & Fox haha.

Nov 29, 2016

I just read WSO forums. @Virginia Tech 4ever" gives a very strong conservative view (although not very far right), while @BobTheBaker does a give an excellent impression of a Hillary-supporting PC center-leftist. So, I get to hear both sides of the conversation.
And, at least, the WSO members do some level of fact checking.

GoldenCinderblock: "I keep spending all my money on exotic fish so my armor sucks. Is it possible to romance multiple females? I got with the blue chick so far but I am also interested in the electronic chick and the face mask chick."

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Nov 29, 2016

Honestly this sounds like you are joking but is pretty much spot on for me too. Thank you WSO posters.

Nov 29, 2016

This is great

Nov 29, 2016

BBC, The Atlantic, Politico, TechCrunch, Pitchbook, The Economist and Wired. There are a few others I'll read occasionally like RBN Energy.

Nov 28, 2016

Hate to burst your bubble but, the economist is a rag of a publication these days.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Nov 29, 2016

If only I had known Heister disapproved sooner....

Nov 29, 2016

Pff... this one is easy, Zero Hedge.

You killed the Greece spread goes up, spread goes down, from Wall Street they all play like a freak, Goldman Sachs 'o beat.

Nov 29, 2016

Liveleak.

Nov 29, 2016

4chan, worldstar, and youtube.

Nov 25, 2016

WSHH keeps me in the loop on who got beat up and who, for some reason, didn't. Important stuff

Nov 29, 2016

i go with politicized sources from both ends of the spectrum and attempt to filter out the facts before said politicization gives me a brain aneurysm. keeps the day interesting. zerohedge, mother jones, breitbart, daily kos, drudge report, heat street, huffpost, among others

Nov 30, 2016

I usually just go on Twitter and see what @RealDonaldTrump is talking about. Usually accurate. Other than that I pretty much only read Drudge, Infowars, and Breitbart. Milo Yiannopolous has some pretty tame views as well. Paul Joseph Watson is highly recommended. Alex Jones is totally sane and accurate most of the time.

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Nov 29, 2016

LOL'ed

GoldenCinderblock: "I keep spending all my money on exotic fish so my armor sucks. Is it possible to romance multiple females? I got with the blue chick so far but I am also interested in the electronic chick and the face mask chick."

Dec 1, 2016

Even Wall Street Journal is starting to get very politically biased. It is annoying.

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Dec 1, 2016

big difference between credible news and unbiased news. one of the best pieces of advice I ever got was to follow news from intelligent sources that you vehemently disagree with. for me, this could be NYT, WSJ, Washington Post, etc., because me reading Fox News and nothing else does nothing to make me more up to date on current events.

some of the best news I get is from my firm and other banks' economics teams. they have their inherent biases, but when you look at things through the lens of investing & economics, it tames some of that bias. the downside is this stuff comes out not by the minute like mainstream media, but weekly, monthly, quarterly, etc.

all news is biased, even a centrist reporter may choose to omit facts in the sake of brevity, but the facts eliminated may be seen as bias.

on an economic issue, a right leaning paper may point to Trump's infrastructure plan as a great idea, because we score poorly on infrastructure, it has approval across party lines, and would be a job creator domestically, potentially adding to GDP. left leaning papers may talk about the same issue, but instead focus on the flaws with dynamic scoring, how it's going to be paid for, the efficacy of infrastructure, and the fact that some house Reps don't see it as a priority. same story, different slant. read both sides, make your own judgments.

on a social issue, paper A may mention that today the Charlotte cop who shot keith scott was acquitted, the family disagrees with the decision, no further charges will be pressed, he had a mental issue which could've lead to him disobeying commands, and there is no credible video evidence that he had a gun. paper B may say the same things, but mention that his gun dealer apologized on facebook for selling him the firearm, the police chief and officer who shot him were both black, and that the police have on scene evidence that he was holding a loaded weapon at his side and ignored police commands repeatedly. again, same story, different slant. read both sides, make your own judgments.

once you realize bias is everywhere and start to read news from parties you disagree with, you'll be able to think and act more intelligently on various matters (social, political, economic, or otherwise). this belief was solidified for me when I read the transcripts of the debates, complete with fact checking. even the fact checking was biased...

tldr: all of this is to say I think there is plenty of credible (meaning factually accurate) news out there, but there is no such thing as unbiased news, so it's up to you, the reader, to have a diverse menu of sources to read, and to form your own opinions once you've heard both sides.

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Dec 1, 2016

Brofessor's advice also applies when reading investment research. Try to read research from someone with a differing thesis from yourself. If you are bullish, read the research from a guy who is bearish. It helps to see the risks to your own thesis, or learn about any opposing catalysts you may have missed.

Though Seeking Alpha gets a lot of slack, it can be a great source to get contrasting viewpoints, especially for those without access to sell-side research.

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Dec 2, 2016
thebrofessor:

big difference between credible news and unbiased news. one of the best pieces of advice I ever got was to follow news from intelligent sources that you vehemently disagree with. f

This, though I have upgraded to having 1-2 for each side of the spectrum.

Guardian/Independent for left leaning, Reuters for the least biased, Telegraph for center right leaning, ZH for libertarian.

WSJ/Financial Times/Economist for the big finance perspective.

I also like Voltaire Network for Middle East geopolitics, Gefira for EU.

Dec 1, 2016

WSJ for plain news (especially market news), hands-down

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Dec 2, 2016

InfoWars, PJW, ZH

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Dec 2, 2016

WSJ, Economist, BBC, Bloomberg, CNBC, and Project Syndicate (commentary).

Dec 2, 2016

CNN... lol!!

Dec 2, 2016

The Economist

Dec 2, 2016

I see a lot of people here who probably bet on a Clinton blowout....

Been fortunate enough to meet several AMs and they all watch Fox News (CNN went down the shitter years ago). It's the most accurate in cable news if you want to know what us going on outside the world of business and markets. CNBC--they're not that smart but they have a lot of smart people come on. Bloomberg news feed is great, I use the app. WSJ greets to my doorstep daily.

And if you disagree with me on Fox and get your news from NYT, Huff post, or WP.. I pitty you and I sure as hell wouldn't give you my money

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Dec 3, 2016

So I'm guessing you wouldn't give Jim Simons your money? Or George Soros?

This is the sort of dumb thinking that makes people terrible at financial decisions.

I think Carl Icahn's political views are awful, but if he offered to manage my money for free I'd snap that offer up.

Dec 2, 2016

Well considering Medallion works off signals intelligence and wavelet transformation.. It really doesn't matter how the news is covered, only how that filters into the market quantitatively... So yes I would give Jim Simons my money.

And if you think that George Soros is really taking what the press says seriously.. Yeah fuckin right.. The guy is a contrarian for chrisssake. And considering his WWII background he understands the power of the press on the public's thought.

I'm going to be laughing to the bank today about this reply--"terrible at financial decisions"--numbers don't lie bud

Nov 28, 2016

I wouldn't give my money to Soro's, the dude is a first rate market manipulator and likely could be criminally charged for some of things he has done in the past to absolutely decimate eastern European economies.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Dec 2, 2016

Who has time to watch cable news anyhow?

WSJ, NYT, Economist, Bloomberg, and CNN.com

Dec 2, 2016

Also, the "fake news controversy" is in no way related to Fox's conservative spin or MSNBC's liberal spin. The fake news controversy is literally fake news from garbage websites that is demonstrably false almost to the point of absurdity that your drunk uncle shares on facebook.

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Nov 28, 2016

Yes and no,the MSM puts out just as much fake news as some of those sites that produce nothing but fake news. Example? Brain Williams is now the poster boy for the fight against fake news. Let that sink in.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Dec 2, 2016

FT, The (London) Times, Bloomberg, BBC for TV and Radio. Sometimes the Guardian and Spectator, also the Term Sheet email for Tech/PE/VC news.

Dec 2, 2016

It's impossible to get unbiased information anywhere. The statistics are so manipulated for political reasons that it's nauseating.

An example:

I heard a claim recently that white Americans are more likely to perform and to carry out terrorist attacks than are Muslim foreigners or Muslim Americans. When I looked into it, I found dozens of 'studies' substantiating the claim and dozens of 'studies' refuting it. One study from the University of Florida said that Muslims are 64 times more likely to engage in terrorism. A study by the "New American Foundation" claimed that white people are 2 times more likely.

This is the age of misinformation, mass distortion and propaganda without consequences.

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Nov 28, 2016

They're probably all correct, but you can manipulate statistics to support almost any narrative. There are 100 million white males in the U.S. and about 3.3 million Muslims. It's hard to imagine that those 100 million white males are individually more likely to commit acts of terrorism than those 3.3 million Muslims.

Dec 2, 2016

Exactly we are bombarded by statistical stuff from a bunch of dumbass "journalists" who probably couldn't even tell what 68/95/99.7 means... The lack of statistical knowledge and understanding in our society is rampant

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Dec 2, 2016

Best to avoid the cable and broadcast networks if you are looking for credible, factual reporting with quality analysis. Twitter and YouTube are platforms, not content creators, so they are no better or worse than the sources that post to them.

Stick with the business press (FT, WSJ, The Economist). Their readership is less ideological, and demands more accurate reporting and analysis. Business leaders need predictability and quality information in order to make good decisions. Making the wrong decision, or making the "right" decision based on bad information, can affect the bottom line. Your average cable news consumer is more interested in validation of his or her worldview than getting facts.

I'm not saying that those publications have no editorial bias/perspective. Just that they are more likely to report "the truth" based on their target market.

Other quality sources are given below, but each has its own pros/cons based on its ownership structure and target audience:
-Foreign Affairs
-PBS
-Reuters
-BBC
-Al Jazeera
-RT

The best daily news aggregator/blog that I follow is The Big Picture, by Barry Ritholtz.

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Dec 2, 2016

***duplicate post

Dec 2, 2016

Despite what everyone says, I think Zero Hedge is a phenomenal source. The technical detail that they go into with respect to the markets is awesome. Have learned so much about market microstructure that I wouldn't have gotten from my actual work.

Geo politically I think their spin is interesting. They're obviously biased (who isn't?) but it's interesting to see a different narrative than the Anti-Russia one which we are pushed on a daily basis.

Not to mention I see them break news before Bloomberg sometimes.

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Dec 2, 2016

Did you see the Bloomberg article on zero hedge a while back?

Dec 2, 2016

I did - ZH put an excellent rebuttal piece out (not sure if you saw that as well).

Dec 7, 2016
zerojb34:

Despite what everyone says, I think Zero Hedge is a phenomenal source.

I'm not familiar with Zero Hedge. Why does it receive a bad rep?

Dec 2, 2016

It's very much an alternative news source. Insofar that you're familiar with the spin that MSM puts on things, ZH is the total opposite. It's a completely anonymous website that is made up (this is me theorizing) predominantly of trade/PM types in the industry.

If I had to summarize, they challenge the narrative. People like to criticize them by saying that a broken clock is right twice a day, but I totally disagree. ZH isn't telling you to go out and short the S&P; they're telling you that the risk reward is all off. Many of their trading recos actually end up being quite profitable (the most recent that comes to mind is the recent move in Bitcoin and TRL).

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Dec 2, 2016

Zerohedge, Breitbart, Bloomberg, MarketWatch (WSJ without paying for it essentially), Russia Today

Dec 3, 2016

Financial Times and Bloomberg are the best, at least for me.
I like also to read The Economist. I know, it's paying. But you pay for quality, in my opinion...

Dec 4, 2016

CNN and Social Media Pages like Facebook. I sometimes subscribe to local news channels.

Sugarybliss

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Dec 7, 2016

WSJ, Harper's

Dec 9, 2016

The Morning Brew is a daily finance newsletter written with college students and young professionals in mind. Execs at Apollo and MS recommend it a learning tool for aspiring professionals and as great source of financial news
www.morningbrewdaily .com/?kid=8BM0Z

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Dec 9, 2016

WSJ, Politico Playbook, Finimize, The Skimm, BBC, occasionally Al Jazeera

Dec 15, 2016

It's been said, but The Economist. They are very upfront about their viewpoint and biases in a way that no other major news outlet is. That makes them extremely reliable, because they practically beg their readers to call them out on their bullshit. They also do a great job of publishing letters from readers calling them out.

Nov 28, 2016

They are upfront about it, but their biases are completely over the top these days.

Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

Dec 15, 2016

R/The_Donald

Dec 21, 2016

I read Drudge Report because Matt Drudge's biased generally align with my biases.

Dec 21, 2016

I used to have this problem. First of all, I go to three websites. WSJ, Dealbook, and FT. WSJ I only click on macro trend news as well as random stuff that catches my eye that doesn't have to do with finance, but I might enjoy reading based on my personal interests. Dealbook is for the deals. If you're into IB Dealbook is where it's at imo. FT I focus on articles that are going to talk about some kind of data. They seem to be the best with numbers. I have purposefully liked lots of articles on bloomberg so now it shows up on my fbook news feed consistently as a backup.

Reading that back it sounds vague, but what I'm trying to get at is bracket your sources by what they're good at. A lot of time is wasted searching for news because of redundancy. Everyone is pretty much reporting the same thing and certain sites are better at doing certain types stories than others.

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Dec 21, 2016

I ask this question before every article.

Is this article going to help me in some way?

Helped me sift through all the crap I read before.

Dec 21, 2016

I highly, highly recommend Feedly. I set up mine to get feeds from DealBook, FT & WSJ (you can select the individual sections that are relevant to you on FT & WSJ), ValueWalk and a bunch of other finance sites. Ensures you never miss out on news, content is presented as headline + first line of the article. Great way to scroll headlines and decide if you want to read the full article or not, and far more efficient than browsing the actual websites.

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Dec 21, 2016
thewaterpiper:

I highly, highly recommend Feedly. I set up mine to get feeds from DealBook, FT & WSJ (you can select the individual sections that are relevant to you on FT & WSJ), ValueWalk and a bunch of other finance sites. Ensures you never miss out on news, content is presented as headline + first line of the article. Great way to scroll headlines and decide if you want to read the full article or not, and far more efficient than browsing the actual websites.

Gonna try this out, SB+1

Dec 21, 2016

Personally, check out the macro trends on WSJ, NYT, and Bloomberg. Also, I like growth/tech, so I subscribe to newsletters from TechCrunch, PEHub, and Crunchbase.

Dec 21, 2016

My $0.02, read as many articles as you can bear and be able to apply the information to what is relevant. Helps with interviews or talking to bankers. Ex. When oil was first dropping, you should have guessed that restructuring firms were getting a lot of work.

Dec 21, 2016

Don't read everything under the sun. I read the relevant articles on Bloomberg, Dealbook and the FT. I also read the Bloomberg Market magazine monthly, along with the Economist. But I only read the things I find interesting. It's more than enough :).

Dec 21, 2016

Thanks for that.

Do you look at Bloomberg online for free? What section? What sections of Dealbook?

I have a hard time deciding what is relevant and end up reading it all.

Dec 21, 2016
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