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Usually they only allow an applicant to apply to two divisions within their firm. Generally a non-target will apply for IB and the Back office role that the company recruits at their campus for.

We all know applying online from a non-target is really pointless. Now, you are stuck with your Back office role as your last option. However, they see you applied to IB and back office - both completely different jobs. They realize you are only using the back office spot as your Plan B. They recognize you aren't really interested in that, so they do not even bother interviewing you. Now you are stuck with nothing.

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Comments (46)

  • blmon00's picture

    well, think about it. Why would a BB bother looking at online apps when they could fill their Analyst class just through the schools they recruit from?

    Chances are slim

  • sloppyj's picture

    I'm from a non-target (and a LAC in the Midwest at that) and my IB offer came from an online app. I think it just depends on the bank (and the resume too, of course).

  • fez's picture

    Cheer up bro. It's not the end of the world. An alternative can be a F500 company where you can get great exposure experience and leadership skills. A lot of people tend to disregard them for completely because IB carries such prestige. If working at a BB is a dream, try again after you complete an MBA. Complaining wont do anything. Accept your situation, network, strive for a decent gig, rock it, butt rape the GMAT and get into a top MBA. Heck, apply to an MSF if you're solely set on IB. Just realize that the sooner you accept your current situation, the more time you'll have to find an alternate route to achieve your goals.

  • Ambition's picture

    Well, honestly man network harder?

    Do you have relevant alumni at your disposal? I know somebody that wanted his shot soooooo badly he got a job in one of the best GYMs in NYC for the summer sophomore year so he could have a shot at "bumping into" a PM/Banker/Stockbroker really any Wall Streeter. He spoke with many many people that summer and 1 offered him a PWM internship at the BB in NYC, and he was a baller salesman so he convinced that MD to speak with the MD in the IBD. Junior year rolls around and he went IBD at the BB. He now is a MD in S&T ( he like the markets more so he made the switch)

    But moral of the story is that its all about desire. Go out there speak with people I went a Finance conference in SF and got hooked up with a VC gig ( I am interested in ER, but VC wont look that bad).

    The WSO Conference also seems like it will be a great opportunity for everybody. You have to pay your dues one way or another the ivy kids worked their asses of in high school, so they dont have to work THAT hard to get an IBD job. Us non-targets fucked off off (atleast I did, didnt even go to class have the days senior year), so we need to work hard in college to get our name out there.

    I respect the difficulty of breaking W.S., because that is what makes it attractive for me.

    I want a lady on the street, but a freak in the bed,

    Go Bucks!!

  • In reply to Ambition
    UFOinsider's picture

    Ambition wrote:
    Well, honestly man network harder?

    Get busy living

  • In reply to Ambition
    bfin's picture

    Ambition wrote:
    I know somebody that wanted his shot soooooo badly he got a job in one of the best GYMs in NYC for the summer sophomore year so he could have a shot at "bumping into" a PM/Banker/Stockbroker really any Wall Streeter. He spoke with many many people that summer and 1 offered him a PWM internship at the BB in NYC, and he was a baller salesman so he convinced that MD to speak with the MD in the IBD. Junior year rolls around and he went IBD at the BB. He now is a MD in S&T ( he like the markets more so he made the switch)

    Lets be serious here. Few people want it as bad as this guy you know. Because if they did they wouldn't come on here and complain about it. They would do whatever it takes.

    By any means.

    The answer to your question is 1) network 2) get involved 3) beef up your resume 4) repeat -happypantsmcgee

    WSO is not your personal search function.

  • In reply to Ambition
    prospie's picture

    Ambition wrote:
    Well, honestly man network harder?

    Do you have relevant alumni at your disposal? I know somebody that wanted his shot soooooo badly he got a job in one of the best GYMs in NYC for the summer sophomore year so he could have a shot at "bumping into" a PM/Banker/Stockbroker really any Wall Streeter. He spoke with many many people that summer and 1 offered him a PWM internship at the BB in NYC, and he was a baller salesman so he convinced that MD to speak with the MD in the IBD. Junior year rolls around and he went IBD at the BB. He now is a MD in S&T ( he like the markets more so he made the switch)

    But moral of the story is that its all about desire. Go out there speak with people I went a Finance conference in SF and got hooked up with a VC gig ( I am interested in ER, but VC wont look that bad).


    awesome story. If more people on here were like this there'd be more success stories and fewer sob stories.

  • Oreos's picture

    It's called breaking in for a reason.

    .

  • Ske7ch's picture

    Moral of Ambition's post: Don't network harder. Network smarter.

    - Bulls make money. Bears make money. Pigs get slaughtered.
    - The harder you work, the luckier you become.
    - I believe in the "Golden Rule": the man with the gold rules.

  • Wasserstag526's picture

    Really depends on your experience and the economy. I come from a complete non-target with a 3.3 and had some decent IB internship experience, and had a ton of interviews last year at MM firms for IB and two BBs. Luck plays a role as well as networking your ass off.

    'We're bigger than U.S. Steel"

  • happypantsmcgee's picture

    What about the term non-target confuses you? It is, by its very definition, not ideal so of course its going to be more difficult.

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    I don't think it's going to be much harder from a non-target though for a qualified candidate.

    Step 1) Save $150K and do in-state STEM.
    Step 2) Get 3.8 GPA and a 2350 SAT.
    Step 3) Apply everywhere.
    Step 4) Make it through computer filters, land on someone's desk.
    Step 5) Only get interviewed by the smart managers.
    Step 6) Get an offer.

    It's honestly not that difficult. Getting a paper published in IEEE- now THAT's difficult.

  • In reply to prospie
    Nouveau Richie's picture

    prospie wrote:
    Ambition wrote:
    Well, honestly man network harder?

    Do you have relevant alumni at your disposal? I know somebody that wanted his shot soooooo badly he got a job in one of the best GYMs in NYC for the summer sophomore year so he could have a shot at "bumping into" a PM/Banker/Stockbroker really any Wall Streeter. He spoke with many many people that summer and 1 offered him a PWM internship at the BB in NYC, and he was a baller salesman so he convinced that MD to speak with the MD in the IBD. Junior year rolls around and he went IBD at the BB. He now is a MD in S&T ( he like the markets more so he made the switch)

    But moral of the story is that its all about desire. Go out there speak with people I went a Finance conference in SF and got hooked up with a VC gig ( I am interested in ER, but VC wont look that bad).


    awesome story. If more people on here were like this there'd be more success stories and fewer sob stories.

    Wait wait wait. So, you're saying that if more people here had success stories, there would be more success stories on this site?

    Explain...

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  • Revolution's picture

    Everyone doesn't get these jobs. They are very highly sought after and the probability of anyone getting a BB/MM FO job would start at probably 5% freshman year and only decreased after that. We are in a very bad hiring environment and there are a lot of extremely qualified Ivy League/Top tire university grads that are still looking, despite having all the neccessary boxes checked. It was hard in the bull markets, and its even harder in a bear market. Not everyone can play for the varsity team, but anyone can make a lot of money, you just have to be innovative, creative, and lucky

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    happypantsmcgee's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    I don't think it's going to be much harder from a non-target though for a qualified candidate.

    Step 1) Save $150K and do in-state STEM.
    Step 2) Get 3.8 GPA and a 2350 SAT.
    Step 3) Apply everywhere.
    Step 4) Make it through computer filters, land on someone's desk.
    Step 5) Only get interviewed by the smart managers.
    Step 6) Get an offer.

    It's honestly not that difficult. Getting a paper published in IEEE- now THAT's difficult.


    Nothing on your list says 'Not that difficult' to me.

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • BepBep12's picture

    This thread is fuckin stupid.. I hate this shit so I am going to try to railroad it with a rant to non targets.

    First, if you can't beat targets at the UG-level (for the 8,000x reasons you come up with to console yourself) do something else and go to a target MBA or MSF program.

    Level the playing field and beat them at their own game (should be easy right? since you think the process was rigged and unfair and you're a stud, but just couldn't get noticed). If you can't 'break-in' from there you just wasted a shitload of money and time b/c you couldn't be critical about yourself and see that it might just be a "you" problem and settle on something other than IB.

    Second, I'm in the same boat as all the other non-targets, I interned on the buyside this summer and thought I was pretty well-connected, but I got blown the fuck up during this recruiting season. MD's that loved to talk in August and September didn't seem to be returning calls or emails in October. I still piss and moan about being a non target b/c my stats rival every target and then some, but no one fucking cares.

    So if you think you're good and you know it's not a "you" issue holding you back, be patient work that "shitty job" till your MBA or go do an MSF. When you "break in" tell everyone to fuck off... but until then non targets, stop posting these gay ass threads. Life's not fair wah wah.

    'Before you enter... be willing to pay the price'

  • MrDouche's picture

    IP: shouldn't step one be to invite Jesus into your heart to gain some righteous perspective?

    Seriously, it is not that difficult. Was talking with a friend and he was lamenting how many mediocre resumes he's seen that have the same pablum. He's looking for a some ambition and intellectual curiosity with a basic level of aptitude and work ethic, for which target schools help provide--but don't determine--screening. If you're interested in poker do you play in WSOP events or just 1/2 games? If you like to run, go run an ultra marathon. Do something interesting and you'll get a look, even if you have to barnstorm MD's at their barbershop.

    But, pray tell me, what would compel anyone to slave away for so little in such a hellish city? Even most MD's in the city have mediocre 2-3 bedroom apartments.

    I rich, smarts, and totally in debt.

  • In reply to MrDouche
    happypantsmcgee's picture

    MrDouche wrote:
    If you like to run, go run an ultra marathon. .

    This doesn't even warrant a response. Thats like saying 'if you like water, go build a ship.'

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • justin88's picture

    So little? A nice 2-3BR in the city is 2-3 bucks.

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Quote:
    IP: shouldn't step one be to invite Jesus into your heart to gain some righteous perspective?

    Dude, this is secular New York. :D Besides, while I'm one of those folks who thinks there's a definite truth to the universe, I'm not foolish enough to think other approaches can't at least make you a more ethical person.

    Quote:
    Seriously, it is not that difficult. Was talking with a friend and he was lamenting how many mediocre resumes he's seen that have the same pablum. He's looking for a some ambition and intellectual curiosity with a basic level of aptitude and work ethic, for which target schools help provide--but don't determine--screening. If you're interested in poker do you play in WSOP events or just 1/2 games? If you like to run, go run an ultra marathon. Do something interesting and you'll get a look, even if you have to barnstorm MD's at their barbershop.

    I agree, but I think a lot of mediocrity is self-imposed. People have to learn to step out of it. It took me a long time and it didn't happen until AFTER I'd landed on the street and read through resume books of interns and analysts I considered fairly ordinary. There is a trap that a lot of people get stuck into of "I'm incredibly competent and hard-working but I don't think that makes me special." These are folks that Googles and Microsofts and IBMs absolutely love and use to create a lot of value. If only there were a way to get those folks producing the same value in finance.

    I don't expect people to have all of that figured out right away. In fact, I really respect that in someone just straight out of school if I can figure out that he's got the intellectual goods to clearly not be mediocre.

    Quote:
    So little? A nice 2-3BR in the city is 2-3 bucks.

    2-3 bucks in most places gets you your own private island with a 5 bedroom mansion. Or at the very least, 2500 square feet and half an acre on Malibu beach. IMHO, 1/2-2/3 of folks in finance work in NYC because they HAVE to, not because they WANT to.

  • Ambition's picture

    ^^^^ good point SB +1

    I want a lady on the street, but a freak in the bed,

    Go Bucks!!

  • In reply to sloppyj
    CiroCorp's picture

    sloppyj wrote:
    I'm from a non-target (and a LAC in the Midwest at that) and my IB offer came from an online app. I think it just depends on the bank (and the resume too, of course).

    Same here. It was for an SA gig in IBD at a BB, fortunate enough to get an offer after the summer. Don't count out the online app. I viewed it as a necessity so my first email to HR could say I already completed the online application.

    I'm sure I'm the exception to the rule, but not filling out the application online can only serve to hurt you.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    noke2012's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    I don't think it's going to be much harder from a non-target though for a qualified candidate.

    Step 1) Save $150K and do in-state STEM.
    Step 2) Get 3.8 GPA and a 2350 SAT.
    Step 3) Apply everywhere.
    Step 4) Make it through computer filters, land on someone's desk.
    Step 5) Only get interviewed by the smart managers.
    Step 6) Get an offer.

    It's honestly not that difficult. Getting a paper published in IEEE- now THAT's difficult.

    This is so much bullshit...

    1. OK I guess
    2. Pulling a 3.8 in a STEM is difficult. The majority of college students could dedicate their sole existence to this pursuit and they would not succeed. Also, a 2350 SAT puts you in the 99.5%. Do you realize that the majority of people probably could not score over 1800 even if they were to study their asses of for it? An 1800 already puts you in the 80%.
    3. OK
    4. You have absolutely no control over this and even with a great resume, grades and sat scores you probably will not make it through the filters, especially in economies such as ours right now where firms filled up their entire class through SA's.
    5. You have no control over this.
    6. Even if you managed to go to this point, you will be interviewed and evaluated by kids who are just as good if not better than you. So again, your chances of moving on past this point are slim and your chances of even getting to this point are near non-existent.

    Moral of the story is this kids, DO EVERYTHING YOU POSSIBLY CAN TO GO TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO A TARGET SCHOOL. It will make your life so much easier. Anyone who tells you that "it's not that difficult" from a non target is straight up lying to you. It's very difficult and you should do everything you possibly can to avoid it.

    "Life all comes down to a few moments. This is one of them." - Bud Fox

  • Wasserstag526's picture

    There are other interesting careers in finance outside of IB.

    'We're bigger than U.S. Steel"

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    Quote:
    Pulling a 3.8 in a STEM is difficult. The majority of college students could dedicate their sole existence to this pursuit and they would not succeed. Also, a 2350 SAT puts you in the 99.5%. Do you realize that the majority of people probably could not score over 1800 even if they were to study their asses of for it? An 1800 already puts you in the 80%.

    A 3.8 in STEM isn't too hard and 2350/1550 is actually a little below average for quants and research folks.

    Quote:
    4. You have absolutely no control over this and even with a great resume, grades and sat scores you probably will not make it through the filters, especially in economies such as ours right now where firms filled up their entire class through SA's.

    Well, yes, which is why most folks- target and nontarget alike- get their offer through their summer work. By apply everywhere, I mean apply for a summer program everywhere.

    Quote:
    Moral of the story is this kids, DO EVERYTHING YOU POSSIBLY CAN TO GO TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO A TARGET SCHOOL. It will make your life so much easier. Anyone who tells you that "it's not that difficult" from a non target is straight up lying to you. It's very difficult and you should do everything you possibly can to avoid it.

    Again, if you have the grades and the test scores, you make it through the computer filters and generally get an interview. Then it all comes down to your competence. If you're the kind of person who can get into H/Y/P/M/CHI/S, why waste the money on undergrad? You'll get in from a state school easy anyways. And it REALLY pisses folks off who think it's all about connections and pedigree, as everyone can see here.

  • In reply to IlliniProgrammer
    Croato87's picture

    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    Quote:
    Pulling a 3.8 in a STEM is difficult. The majority of college students could dedicate their sole existence to this pursuit and they would not succeed. Also, a 2350 SAT puts you in the 99.5%. Do you realize that the majority of people probably could not score over 1800 even if they were to study their asses of for it? An 1800 already puts you in the 80%.

    A 3.8 in STEM isn't too hard and 2350/1550 is actually a little below average for quants and research folks.

    Quote:
    4. You have absolutely no control over this and even with a great resume, grades and sat scores you probably will not make it through the filters, especially in economies such as ours right now where firms filled up their entire class through SA's.

    Well, yes, which is why most folks- target and nontarget alike- get their offer through their summer work. By apply everywhere, I mean apply for a summer program everywhere.

    Quote:
    Moral of the story is this kids, DO EVERYTHING YOU POSSIBLY CAN TO GO TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO A TARGET SCHOOL. It will make your life so much easier. Anyone who tells you that "it's not that difficult" from a non target is straight up lying to you. It's very difficult and you should do everything you possibly can to avoid it.

    Again, if you have the grades and the test scores, you make it through the computer filters and generally get an interview. Then it all comes down to your competence. If you're the kind of person who can get into H/Y/P/M/CHI/S, why waste the money on undergrad? You'll get in from a state school easy anyways. And it REALLY pisses folks off who think it's all about connections and pedigree, as everyone can see here.

    Most recent grads on wall street are Ivy League English/Art History/Arts&Crafts major with mediocre SAT scores who went to prestigious private high schools. If you do not match that description, you will not fit in and will soon be clawing for a way out.

  • In reply to Croato87
    Croato87's picture

    Croato87 wrote:
    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    Quote:
    Pulling a 3.8 in a STEM is difficult. The majority of college students could dedicate their sole existence to this pursuit and they would not succeed. Also, a 2350 SAT puts you in the 99.5%. Do you realize that the majority of people probably could not score over 1800 even if they were to study their asses of for it? An 1800 already puts you in the 80%.

    A 3.8 in STEM isn't too hard and 2350/1550 is actually a little below average for quants and research folks.

    Quote:
    4. You have absolutely no control over this and even with a great resume, grades and sat scores you probably will not make it through the filters, especially in economies such as ours right now where firms filled up their entire class through SA's.

    Well, yes, which is why most folks- target and nontarget alike- get their offer through their summer work. By apply everywhere, I mean apply for a summer program everywhere.

    Quote:
    Moral of the story is this kids, DO EVERYTHING YOU POSSIBLY CAN TO GO TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO A TARGET SCHOOL. It will make your life so much easier. Anyone who tells you that "it's not that difficult" from a non target is straight up lying to you. It's very difficult and you should do everything you possibly can to avoid it.

    Again, if you have the grades and the test scores, you make it through the computer filters and generally get an interview. Then it all comes down to your competence. If you're the kind of person who can get into H/Y/P/M/CHI/S, why waste the money on undergrad? You'll get in from a state school easy anyways. And it REALLY pisses folks off who think it's all about connections and pedigree, as everyone can see here.

    Most recent grads on wall street are Ivy League English/Art History/Arts&Crafts major with mediocre SAT scores who went to prestigious private high schools. If you do not match that description, you will not fit in and will soon be clawing for a way out.

    Forgot to add that almost half the recent grads on Wall Street are female (who, by the way, almost never come on this site, along with most of those actually recruited by the BBs). The females have to be sexually attractive, end of story. The males have to give off a sense of wealth and prestige (blonde hair and light skin helps), hence the desire for Ivy League grads. This is what appeals to clients. There is no meritocracy once you get there, only sycophantism, so if you got there on brains you will have no chance, especially with Wall Street in its current zombie-bank form.

  • IlliniProgrammer's picture

    I don't necessarily disagree with anything you've said. A lot of business that used to go to the banks is moving to the Chicago prop shops and electronic transactions. Still, if you want to spend a few years on Wall Street before the fiscal conservatives in Washington take over and stop the bailouts, I think that's the path of least resistance and least cost for someone who can get into a target anyways.

    There's still a lot of anti-prestige pragmatists left on the street, although they're quietly slipping away to Connecticut, California, and Chicago.

  • Ambition's picture

    mono,

    hardwork can be in many forms..... it doesnt have to mean that they spent more time in the books. speaking with people, going to meetings, paying money and going to conferences can easily wear you down.....networking is also a lot of work

    I want a lady on the street, but a freak in the bed,

    Go Bucks!!

  • asdf12345135's picture

    Croato --

    What are you talking about?

    1) Females don't comprise anywhere near half the incoming analyst class, especially in S&T.

    2) Rich white males are at an advantage in any industry. On Wall Street, however, there's an ever increasing minority presence (e.g., "The Indian Mafia"). These guys will pull for their own. And don't even bother arguing that the minorities don't hold powerful positions in banks.

    3) Most of the ivy grads on Wall Street are economics/finance majors.

  • monty09's picture

    i applied to a bb via monster

  • In reply to Croato87
    JDawg's picture

    Croato87 wrote:
    Forgot to add that almost half the recent grads on Wall Street are female (who, by the way, almost never come on this site, along with most of those actually recruited by the BBs). The females have to be sexually attractive, end of story. The males have to give off a sense of wealth and prestige (blonde hair and light skin helps), hence the desire for Ivy League grads. This is what appeals to clients. There is no meritocracy once you get there, only sycophantism, so if you got there on brains you will have no chance, especially with Wall Street in its current zombie-bank form.

    Can you tell us what your credibility is? Most of the recent grads I know in S&T at BBs are nerdy looking and short. One is Indian, another is Asian, and all are men. My sample size is small, but it doesn't even remotely abide by your description.

  • Ambition's picture

    Haha well Croato,

    The world is getting more global as we speak and this means that, even on Wall Street, they are looking into hiring people of many backgrounds, because clients can be anywhere and anyone. Wall Street is not some USA happy-go-round. I hate using this reference but it seems applicable; in Wall Street 2 when they have those asian clients, shia labeouf uses his knowledge of the traditions they followed to win them over, he was smart and capable, but dont you think it would be handy to have a asian employee at that time?.

    Also the people who make it to MD ARE NOT prestige whores. My family friend was a Department Head at a BB and he went to UPenn both Undergrad and MBA, and he is a complete clown! He is energetic enjoys life, jokes about stupid things (we were talking about how much ass size correlates with beautiful faces).

    Also most clients (in the USA) want guys who ARE NOT cookie cutter Ivy WASPS, they want to speak with someone who can relate to them. Since lots of clients work on main street, do you honestly believe that they want to deal with someone who is a prestige whore/ "cookie cutter" Ivy kid? No. I have met some MD's and lots of them are chill guys who just love simple things like family life, watching basketball, football ( there are some douche bag MD's, but nobody talks to them much they are good at what they do and that is why they are MD's).

    I want a lady on the street, but a freak in the bed,

    Go Bucks!!

  • heister's picture

    You want to hear a really funny story that is just bound to piss this guy off?

    I went to a total non-target. Im talking like not even a top 350 school, well might be top 350 I never looked. I got medicore grades. Had one internship, for like 4 weeks in PWM. Landed a IBD job at a regional bank on their M&A desk. Did that for a year and a half then I jumped to a HF and I am a distressed debt analyst. This industry is not that hard to break into. Its only hard if you make it hard.

    Follow the shit your fellow monkeys say @shitWSOsays

    Life is hard, it's even harder when you're stupid - John Wayne

  • In reply to Croato87
    guyfromct's picture

    Croato87 wrote:
    Croato87 wrote:
    IlliniProgrammer wrote:
    Quote:
    Pulling a 3.8 in a STEM is difficult. The majority of college students could dedicate their sole existence to this pursuit and they would not succeed. Also, a 2350 SAT puts you in the 99.5%. Do you realize that the majority of people probably could not score over 1800 even if they were to study their asses of for it? An 1800 already puts you in the 80%.

    A 3.8 in STEM isn't too hard and 2350/1550 is actually a little below average for quants and research folks.

    Quote:
    4. You have absolutely no control over this and even with a great resume, grades and sat scores you probably will not make it through the filters, especially in economies such as ours right now where firms filled up their entire class through SA's.

    Well, yes, which is why most folks- target and nontarget alike- get their offer through their summer work. By apply everywhere, I mean apply for a summer program everywhere.

    Quote:
    Moral of the story is this kids, DO EVERYTHING YOU POSSIBLY CAN TO GO TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO A TARGET SCHOOL. It will make your life so much easier. Anyone who tells you that "it's not that difficult" from a non target is straight up lying to you. It's very difficult and you should do everything you possibly can to avoid it.

    Again, if you have the grades and the test scores, you make it through the computer filters and generally get an interview. Then it all comes down to your competence. If you're the kind of person who can get into H/Y/P/M/CHI/S, why waste the money on undergrad? You'll get in from a state school easy anyways. And it REALLY pisses folks off who think it's all about connections and pedigree, as everyone can see here.

    Most recent grads on wall street are Ivy League English/Art History/Arts&Crafts major with mediocre SAT scores who went to prestigious private high schools. If you do not match that description, you will not fit in and will soon be clawing for a way out.

    Forgot to add that almost half the recent grads on Wall Street are female (who, by the way, almost never come on this site, along with most of those actually recruited by the BBs). The females have to be sexually attractive, end of story. The males have to give off a sense of wealth and prestige (blonde hair and light skin helps), hence the desire for Ivy League grads. This is what appeals to clients. There is no meritocracy once you get there, only sycophantism, so if you got there on brains you will have no chance, especially with Wall Street in its current zombie-bank form.

    Lloyd Blankfein, Vikram Pandit, Steve Cohen, John Paulson and a host of other guys must have missed the blonde/WASPy look memo. The reality is it isn't a pure meritocracy, nothing is, but being bright (to a certain extent), hard working and good will go far.

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  • nonTargetChimp's picture

    Nobody wants to work for it anymore. There's no honor in taking the after school job at Mickey D's. Honor's in the dollar, kid.

  • sayandarula's picture

    Money Never Sleeps? More like Money Never SUCKS amirite?!?!?!?

  • eriginal's picture

    "One man with courage makes a majority." — Andrew Jackson

  • In reply to Midas Mulligan Magoo
    WalMartShopper's picture

    If the glove don't fit, you must acquit!

  • In reply to chuck
    eriginal's picture

    "One man with courage makes a majority." — Andrew Jackson

  • In reply to chuck
    eriginal's picture

    "One man with courage makes a majority." — Andrew Jackson