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I get a ton of emails and answer a ton of posts asking similar questions so I thought I would answer the most common ones I get here and allow others to post their questions so everyone can see them and the subsequent answers. Hope this helps.

Summer Analyst Eligibility
• The SA position is really structured for undergraduate students. The whole reason undergraduates go for a SA position is because they aren’t ready to work full time. If you are in a one year masters program is really doesn’t make much sense to try for an SA spot when you are eligible for FT analyst recruiting.

Now if you feel that you need internship experience in order to be more competitive then your best bet is to look for an unpaid internship or something off cycle. This will give you FO finance type experience, increase your knowledge and something you can do during the school year thereby not making you ineligible for full time positions.

Does this mean you can’t apply for a SA gig? No.

Smaller banks might be more open to this and through networking you might be able to go over HRs head, but if you can go for full time recruiting I would advise you do so.

Admissions advice

• I get this question at least 10 times a week. MSF programs are very different than MBA programs when it comes to admissions. You need to have the quantitative ability to succeed in the program and you also don’t really get points for having diverse experience like you do in an MBA program. It is a specialized degree after all.

Low GPA (3.0 and below)

• Not a deal breaker. You need a strong GMAT (650 or higher). You need some finance internships and/or work experience. You need to explain when your GPA was low. You need to have a polish application. I’ve helped and know people with sub 3.0 GPA’s get into all the main programs that everyone asks about.

Low GMAT (600-ish)

• Once again, not a complete deal breaker. You need to have a higher GPA, work experience, something to offset you. Lower GMAT will lower your shot at some MSF programs that tend to really focus on GMAT scores, but it isn’t a deal breaker like it would be in the MBA world. You just need to really be able to sell the fact that you can handle the rigor of the program and get a job.

No work experience

• This won’t hurt your application, but it could hurt your recruiting. You really want to have some type of work/internship experience on your resume. There are so many things you pick up from having to show up to work and work with other people that can’t be replicated in school. Get some experience, somehow.

What program should I attend?

• The million dollar question. You need to ask yourself where you want to work, do you need an internship, what type of career you are looking to get into, do you like the campus/surrounding area/program, etc. This isn’t a math equation. Villanova is very different than Ohio State. WUSTL is very different from Claremont McKenna. Dukes MMS program is very different than UT Austin. MSF’s are very regional and place as such.

Different programs also provide different internship opportunities throughout the school year. They are also set up differently. Some have a cohort where everyone takes the same classes together. Some have a hybrid program. Some have students take MBA level finance classes.

And why do I say you need to decide this yourself? Because if you can’t figure out where you are most comfortable and what you want to do once you graduate you are going to have trouble regardless of where you go. Indecision is probably the biggest thing working against MSF students because of the tight timeline everyone is working under.

You need to know what you want to do and how you are going to go about doing it before Day 1 of class. And this includes knowing basic questions about yourself and career which easily narrow down which school you want to attend.

MSF Rankings

• There are none. A lot of stuff is ad hoc and puts MSF programs into tiers or whatever, but the degree and schools offering the degree haven’t reached the level of the MBA degree. Even within the MBA you can’t just look at pure rankings without factoring in career aspirations and local. Best thing you can do is look at placements and program locations and choose accordingly.

MMS vs. MSF

• MMS is a great degree and has some overlap with the MSF so it is often seen as a competitor. The main thing to consider is that the MMS is basically an MBA for students without the required work experience. It is ideal for those students who have liberal arts undergraduate degrees and are looking for a general, business overview. While it can place you into a financial role, I think too many people pursue it simply because of brand value which I feel can be a risky bet.

CFA vs. MSF

CFA is great, but is a poor comparison. Many MSF graduates get their CFA and many students who have L1-L2 completed pursue an MSF. Both are great, have value and should be considered independently.

MSF vs. MBA

• Same advice as above. MSF is more of a mini reset button, allowing students another year in college to pursue their goals. MBA is for experienced individuals looking to rebrand, change careers or advance in their current industry.

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Comments (196)

  • cakepie's picture

    Are companies still confused what exactly a MSF is and why it different from other degrees? I ask because I always used to hear that people had to spend a considerable amount of time in each interview explaining to the recruiters what degree they are actually getting, let alone why it is valuable.

  • KKS's picture

    Anthony, great post. When interviewed for FT, I am sure the question of "Why MSF?" will come up. How can you defend your choice when you pursued an MSF for another shot at FT recruiting?

  • HowardRoark's picture

    Anthony, do you know how easy/difficult it might be to get a summer internship at a bank or boutique? Not necessarily an SA position per se, but just showing up and helping out/learning the environment. Also, to what extent would someone who does this be disadvantaged in comparison to other MSF students who have done SA positions before??

    jacobzhang.net - my thoughts and portfolio.

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  • In reply to cakepie
    TNA's picture

    cakepie:
    Are companies still confused what exactly a MSF is and why it different from other degrees? I ask because I always used to hear that people had to spend a considerable amount of time in each interview explaining to the recruiters what degree they are actually getting, let alone why it is valuable.

    More people are starting to know about the degree, but it is still not as well known as other degrees. Have a 10 second elevator speech to describe it.

    "One year, specialized graduate degree focused entirely on finance." Something along those lines.

  • In reply to KKS
    TNA's picture

    KKS:
    Anthony, great post. When interviewed for FT, I am sure the question of "Why MSF?" will come up. How can you defend your choice when you pursued an MSF for another shot at FT recruiting?

    You wanted to study finance more in depth. You tried your best, but couldn't secure a FT position and wanted to learn more while having another shot at recruiting. You wanted to do banking and tried, but realized that you needed to beef up your resume so you did a masters, interned and XYZ.

  • In reply to HowardRoark
    TNA's picture

    HowardRoark:
    Anthony, do you know how easy/difficult it might be to get a summer internship at a bank or boutique? Not necessarily an SA position per se, but just showing up and helping out/learning the environment. Also, to what extent would someone who does this be disadvantaged in comparison to other MSF students who have done SA positions before??

    Send out emails and call up boutiques in the area. This is why I mention in my original post that you need to know what you want to do and what you need to do to achieve this. If you feel like you need an internship you are better off picking an MSF program located near an urban area with potential internships. If you already have an SA or two you can decide on the program without thinking about the need to intern.

    Are you at a disadvantage? Yeah, I would say so. You can make up for this with a good GPA in your masters, an unpaid internship, superior networking skills, etc.

  • lasampdoria's picture

    Great post ANT, this needs to make the front page.

    "Those who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin

  • twinb's picture

    Thanks for this ANT, I did have a few questions about this, some which you answered in your initial post.

    I live in and was hoping to stay in LA, so looks like I need to target Claremont initially.

    How well does a MSF(or even a MAcc) help in rebranding if you come from a total non-target with a poor GPA(2.8-3.1 area).

    Does the MSF place ok into Consulting at all or mainly banking?

    Top MFin programs(MIT, UCB, CMU etc.), poor GPA but killer GMAT, still a chance?

    Do these programs consider age heavily?

    Again, thanks for doing this.

  • nebben2k10's picture

    ANT,

    At what point (amount of work experience) does the MSF start to lose value? For instance, would it still be valuable for someone with say three years of less than ideal work experience (i.e. brokerage followed by boutique ER)? Less valuable for that person than a person still in undergrad?

    Thanks.

  • happypantsmcgee's picture

    I find it kind of hilarious that TNA has changed his name a few times and everyone still knows his as the loveable curmudgeon that is Anthony.

    If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses - Henry Ford

  • In reply to twinb
    TNA's picture

    twinb:
    Thanks for this ANT, I did have a few questions about this, some which you answered in your initial post.

    I live in and was hoping to stay in LA, so looks like I need to target Claremont initially.

    How well does a MSF(or even a MAcc) help in rebranding if you come from a total non-target with a poor GPA(2.8-3.1 area).

    Does the MSF place ok into Consulting at all or mainly banking?

    Top MFin programs(MIT, UCB, CMU etc.), poor GPA but killer GMAT, still a chance?

    Do these programs consider age heavily?

    Again, thanks for doing this.

    Claremont is the best West Coast MSF and one of the best in the country. They are also very, very selective. You might run into issues with a GPA in the range. You are going to need a very, very good GMAT also (think 720+).

    MSF's can and do place into consulting, but it is usually somehow related to the financial industry. Depending on how you spin it you can go into other areas I suppose.

    Two of the top "MSF" programs you listed are MFE programs. They are also some of the best programs and will probably have high GPA and GMAT requirements. Once again, not saying no possibility, but I would have some other schools as back ups.

    Age is generally not focused on, but if you are more of an MBA candidate you should be prepared to answer the "Why an MSF and not an MBA" question.

  • In reply to nebben2k10
    TNA's picture

    nebben2k10:
    ANT,

    At what point (amount of work experience) does the MSF start to lose value? For instance, would it still be valuable for someone with say three years of less than ideal work experience (i.e. brokerage followed by boutique ER)? Less valuable for that person than a person still in undergrad?

    Thanks.

    This issue is really with recruiters. If you have more than say two years work experience you sort of look like an MBA-ish candidate. What I mean is HR/recruiters start thinking of you as someone not really well suited for a analyst position, which is what you are really qualified for. You are also not suited for an associate role since you don't have the experience or the MBA.

    Now if you have good experience and an MSF you could come in as an associate, but it is the exception, not the rule.

    MSF placements are primarily at the analyst level for FO finance because people with experience in FO finance go the MBA route. As more top schools offer the degree and the MBA value levels off you might see more people with banking/trading/PE experience doing a 1 year masters and going right back to work. As of right now it isn't the norm.

    Outside of FO type finance, you can use the MSF as an MBA alternative. F500 generally doesn't care as I have seen recruiters lump MSF students in with MBA students.

    In general though, once you start having 2-3 years work experience you want to think about the MBA if you are aiming for FO type finance jobs.

  • In reply to happypantsmcgee
    TNA's picture

    happypantsmcgee:
    I find it kind of hilarious that TNA has changed his name a few times and everyone still knows his as the loveable curmudgeon that is Anthony.

    Been around a long time I suppose haha

  • lostchimp's picture

    MsF at non-target and pursueing CFA... just trying to make a name for myself in this jungle!

  • csb5255's picture

    ANT,

    First off, this is my first post on here but I have read a lot of your posts and they are extremely informative and thank you for sharing your knowledge with all of us.

    I am from the Philadelphia area so the Villanova MSF is very attractive, but not exactly sure of my career goals. Would you recommend a master of management (Duke MMS) or Master of Commerce (UVA) or similar programs over an MSF for someone more interested in consulting or simply someone who is not sure they are interested in more 'pure' finance jobs?

  • In reply to csb5255
    TNA's picture

    csb5255:
    ANT,

    First off, this is my first post on here but I have read a lot of your posts and they are extremely informative and thank you for sharing your knowledge with all of us.

    I am from the Philadelphia area so the Villanova MSF is very attractive, but not exactly sure of my career goals. Would you recommend a master of management (Duke MMS) or Master of Commerce (UVA) or similar programs over an MSF for someone more interested in consulting or simply someone who is not sure they are interested in more 'pure' finance jobs?

    Do you have a finance/business UG? If so UVA is going to ding you. With that said, if you are unsure of your direction and want to apply to non finance jobs as well as finance jobs, the less specialized degree might be better. But realize that there are pros and cons to that approach.

    Without knowing more about your background and stuff like that I can't really say one way or another though.

  • The Kid's picture

    +1 great post Ant.

    Hit me up in early summer so I can give you an interview/program review/etc.

  • In reply to TNA
    Ichan's picture

    TNA:
    HowardRoark:
    Anthony, do you know how easy/difficult it might be to get a summer internship at a bank or boutique? Not necessarily an SA position per se, but just showing up and helping out/learning the environment. Also, to what extent would someone who does this be disadvantaged in comparison to other MSF students who have done SA positions before??

    Send out emails and call up boutiques in the area. This is why I mention in my original post that you need to know what you want to do and what you need to do to achieve this. If you feel like you need an internship you are better off picking an MSF program located near an urban area with potential internships. If you already have an SA or two you can decide on the program without thinking about the need to intern.

    Are you at a disadvantage? Yeah, I would say so. You can make up for this with a good GPA in your masters, an unpaid internship, superior networking skills, etc.

    As far as I know, MSF is 10 or 12 months straight program. How do you do internship while your full time at school? Would that even be possible?

    It's not about the money. It's about the game between people.

  • In reply to Ichan
    TNA's picture

    Ichan:
    TNA:
    HowardRoark:
    Anthony, do you know how easy/difficult it might be to get a summer internship at a bank or boutique? Not necessarily an SA position per se, but just showing up and helping out/learning the environment. Also, to what extent would someone who does this be disadvantaged in comparison to other MSF students who have done SA positions before??

    Send out emails and call up boutiques in the area. This is why I mention in my original post that you need to know what you want to do and what you need to do to achieve this. If you feel like you need an internship you are better off picking an MSF program located near an urban area with potential internships. If you already have an SA or two you can decide on the program without thinking about the need to intern.

    Are you at a disadvantage? Yeah, I would say so. You can make up for this with a good GPA in your masters, an unpaid internship, superior networking skills, etc.

    As far as I know, MSF is 10 or 12 months straight program. How do you do internship while your full time at school? Would that even be possible?

    I did two internships in the spring and one more right after. I know people interning throughout, in fall/spring, whatever. All about how you manage time and how you work things out.

  • IB_hopeful's picture

    How do you feel about European MSF's for a US student? Programs like Bocconi, Stockholm School of Economics, HEC Paris, St. Gallen, Oxford/Cambridge/LSE?

    If you only speak English, by attending a Euro school would you be pigeonholing yourself to IB positions in England (a country which, from what I've read, is very stingy on granting workers permits for foreigners)?

  • In reply to IB_hopeful
    TNA's picture

    IB_hopeful:
    How do you feel about European MSF's for a US student? Programs like Bocconi, Stockholm School of Economics, HEC Paris, St. Gallen, Oxford/Cambridge/LSE?

    If you only speak English, by attending a Euro school would you be pigeonholing yourself to IB positions in England (a country which, from what I've read, is very stingy on granting workers permits for foreigners)?

    I think some European programs are worth it, but it is tough getting a job in London as a foreigner right now. I am not super close to these programs, but I have heard about the employment issues. I'd imagine Oxford/Cambridge and LSE would translate fairly well back in the states though.

  • In reply to TNA
    The Kid's picture

    TNA:
    IB_hopeful:
    How do you feel about European MSF's for a US student? Programs like Bocconi, Stockholm School of Economics, HEC Paris, St. Gallen, Oxford/Cambridge/LSE?

    If you only speak English, by attending a Euro school would you be pigeonholing yourself to IB positions in England (a country which, from what I've read, is very stingy on granting workers permits for foreigners)?

    I think some European programs are worth it, but it is tough getting a job in London as a foreigner right now. I am not super close to these programs, but I have heard about the employment issues. I'd imagine Oxford/Cambridge and LSE would translate fairly well back in the states though.

    I think if you are from the States and plan on working in the States after the MSF or you feel your chances of getting a permit in Europe are low (most likely they are) then you are better off pursuing US MSF programs because if you went to Europe you would lose out on two of the most valuable aspects of an MSF: 1) Regional placements/OCR and 2) alumni network that will be able to help to you out in the job search (sure there are TONS of LSE grads working in finance in Europe but if you can't get a permit then it really doesn't mean shit to you).

    Ant - Is this a fair assessment?

  • In reply to The Kid
    TNA's picture

    The Kid:
    TNA:
    IB_hopeful:
    How do you feel about European MSF's for a US student? Programs like Bocconi, Stockholm School of Economics, HEC Paris, St. Gallen, Oxford/Cambridge/LSE?

    If you only speak English, by attending a Euro school would you be pigeonholing yourself to IB positions in England (a country which, from what I've read, is very stingy on granting workers permits for foreigners)?

    I think some European programs are worth it, but it is tough getting a job in London as a foreigner right now. I am not super close to these programs, but I have heard about the employment issues. I'd imagine Oxford/Cambridge and LSE would translate fairly well back in the states though.

    I think if you are from the States and plan on working in the States after the MSF or you feel your chances of getting a permit in Europe are low (most likely they are) then you are better off pursuing US MSF programs because if you went to Europe you would lose out on two of the most valuable aspects of an MSF: 1) Regional placements/OCR and 2) alumni network that will be able to help to you out in the job search (sure there are TONS of LSE grads working in finance in Europe but if you can't get a permit then it really doesn't mean shit to you).

    Ant - Is this a fair assessment?

    Yeah, I mean if you want to work in the US then going to school here is the logical choice. But suppose you have some decent internships in the US, have some good networking done and want to expand your horizons. Oxford would look great on a resume, great education and give you some international exposure. Supposing you could land some type of internship overseas while still networking through phone and email in the states, you could make it work.

    Case by case basis it might be a good idea, but you are correct, in general it makes sense to go to school where you intend on working right out of school.

  • JYFresh's picture

    Does it make sense for a Canadian like me to pursue a top MSF in the States if I'm looking to work in the States? How hard is it for me to get a work permit?

  • In reply to JYFresh
    TNA's picture

    JYFresh:
    Does it make sense for a Canadian like me to pursue a top MSF in the States if I'm looking to work in the States? How hard is it for me to get a work permit?

    I think Canadians have it a little easier, but sponsorship still has a cost. I'd email HR at some banks and take a temperature of the market. If English is your first language it will help for sure.

  • clungeandman's picture

    Hi, I am based in the UK where there are several specialist Master's programmes such as MSc in Finance and Private Equity (LSE), MSc in Investment Management (Cass/City), MSc in Financial Economics (Oxford), MSc in Risk Management (Imperial). If you were coming from a non-finance background, eg. a pure liberal arts grad, would studying for one of these degrees at a target university increase your chance of getting a FT job in the financial services (in a chosen area)? In the US, target universities don't offer these Master's programmes, do they?

    I am just wondering what benefits these specialist Master's degrees bring to your CV. These Master's programmes are expensive, costing $30,000 - 40,000. The HR normally chooses not to see the Master's qualifications in your CV. Instead they insist on GPA3.5 or something like that?

  • In reply to clungeandman
    TNA's picture

    clungeandman:
    Hi, I am based in the UK where there are several specialist Master's programmes such as MSc in Finance and Private Equity (LSE), MSc in Investment Management (Cass/City), MSc in Financial Economics (Oxford), MSc in Risk Management (Imperial). If you were coming from a non-finance background, eg. a pure liberal arts grad, would studying for one of these degrees at a target university increase your chance of getting a FT job in the financial services (in a chosen area)? In the US, target universities don't offer these Master's programmes, do they?

    I am just wondering what benefits these specialist Master's degrees bring to your CV. These Master's programmes are expensive, costing $30,000 - 40,000. The HR normally chooses not to see the Master's qualifications in your CV. Instead they insist on GPA3.5 or something like that?

    I think you need to remember that unlike in the USA, the specialized masters is essentially the defacto terminal degree. So getting an MSc is the equivalent to getting an MBA in the USA.

    And I think you would see a boost in your ability to get into a financial position supposing you went to a lesser known school.

  • In reply to TNA
    clungeandman's picture

    Can you elaborate on the terminal-ness of these European degrees? For some reason, you don't need work experience, not the kind where you manage a club or lead a team in a trading competition, proper work experience to study for these specialised degrees. How can they be terminal? You end up applying for an entry-level position with a specialised Master's, the position you could have obtained without the expensive degree? Do these Master's degrees actually add any value to your CV?

  • BepBep12's picture

    Is a low GMAT score (650-700) a problem during recruiting, will banks ask for my score knowing I am in an MSF/MMS and had to take it to gain acceptance?

    'Before you enter... be willing to pay the price'

  • In reply to clungeandman
    TNA's picture

    clungeandman:
    Can you elaborate on the terminal-ness of these European degrees? For some reason, you don't need work experience, not the kind where you manage a club or lead a team in a trading competition, proper work experience to study for these specialised degrees. How can they be terminal? You end up applying for an entry-level position with a specialised Master's, the position you could have obtained without the expensive degree? Do these Master's degrees actually add any value to your CV?

    Yeah, in the USA the MBA is the main business graduate degree. In Europe the MSc is the main business graduate degree.

    As for value of the degree, if you could land an analyst position without the degree we wouldn't be having this conversation. The value is that it gives you another chance at the position you want.

    And by terminal I mean the final degree you get. In the US people with MSF degrees often go on to receive MBA's.

  • In reply to BepBep12
    TNA's picture

    BepBep12:
    Is a low GMAT score (650-700) a problem during recruiting, will banks ask for my score knowing I am in an MSF/MMS and had to take it to gain acceptance?

    Don't put your GMAT down. I'll never understand why people put it on their resume. It isn't a gauge of intelligence, just your ability to spend time and money to get a score on an otherwise arbitrary test.

    Get a good GPA in your MSF program and that should be all you need to put down.

  • hewenxun376's picture

    Great information. Thanks. I did have some question and wanted to ask for your advice. I graduated 2012 winter with finance degree, a couple months ago. I applied for MSF programs starting at 2013 fall and I am still waiting for the offers. I was thinking I should try gain some related experience or take the CFA level 1 test at June 2013. It is hard to get an intern because most interns are for undergrads like you said. Do you have any suggestions for me on using the half year time wisely before school? Thank you.

  • In reply to hewenxun376
    TNA's picture

    hewenxun376:
    Great information. Thanks. I did have some question and wanted to ask for your advice. I graduated 2012 winter with finance degree, a couple months ago. I applied for MSF programs starting at 2013 fall and I am still waiting for the offers. I was thinking I should try gain some related experience or take the CFA level 1 test at June 2013. It is hard to get an intern because most interns are for undergrads like you said. Do you have any suggestions for me on using the half year time wisely before school? Thank you.

    I'd just start emailing smaller, local firms. That is the thing about unpaid, off cycle internships. Really depends on your location and what you can get.

    As for the CFA, sure, wouldn't hurt. CFA and MSF are complimentary. Having L1 will set you apart some from other students and make your time in the program easier.

  • In reply to TNA
    twinb's picture

    TNA:
    Age is generally not focused on, but if you are more of an MBA candidate you should be prepared to answer the "Why an MSF and not an MBA" question.

    Thanks. I'm actually returning to school late. Left school my first time around, so if I do go MSF it'll be straight out of undergrad. I'll be 31. I'm sure that'll be another set of questions I need to answer.

    I might have to buy some credits to SB you. Really appreciate your help.

  • CKIB91's picture

    would you recommend an MSF for someone like me from a complete non target state school, who is having a hard time breaking into IB/consulting, straight out of undergrad? Or should i work a couple of years with some finance related work and try for an MBA?

  • watdo's picture

    I'm a senior at a non target state school. I have worked nearly 1 year as an unpaid intern in a regional boutique. The firm is essentially a startup, and while we have a couple deals under our belt, I don't see much in terms of career growth. Do you think it would benefit me to pursue an MSF, or would my time be better spent taking a corp fin job and networking?

  • aurelius's picture

    Is the GRE not valued as highly as the GMAT for MSF programs? Can a high GRE help offset a low GPA?

    And what do you think of the MSF program at SMU (in terms of job placement)?

    Thanks for your informative posts.

  • In reply to twinb
    TNA's picture

    twinb:
    TNA:
    Age is generally not focused on, but if you are more of an MBA candidate you should be prepared to answer the "Why an MSF and not an MBA" question.

    Thanks. I'm actually returning to school late. Left school my first time around, so if I do go MSF it'll be straight out of undergrad. I'll be 31. I'm sure that'll be another set of questions I need to answer.

    I might have to buy some credits to SB you. Really appreciate your help.

    No worries. If I were you I would use the MSF as an MBA substitute as time is of the essence right now. You should be fine. At Nova there was an older gentleman who did his MSF as more of something to do than anything else.

  • In reply to CKIB91
    TNA's picture

    CKIB91:
    would you recommend an MSF for someone like me from a complete non target state school, who is having a hard time breaking into IB/consulting, straight out of undergrad? Or should i work a couple of years with some finance related work and try for an MBA?

    If you want to work in FO finance you are going to need a top MBA. Getting into a top MBA is a function of UG reputation, UG GPA, work experience (quality, quantity and responsibility), etc.

    So right off the bat you have a non target school, hopefully a good GPA and now you need the work experience. But since work experience is a function many times of the school you went to, you now have probably two hurdles to overcome in order to get into that top MBA.

    Would I recommend it? If you can't land a job at a reputable company with decent experience, sure, it might be a good idea. But make sure you have some internship/work experience so your resume has some depth to it. And if you do an MSF, try and go to a school with a decent brand/ranking. It will help bolster your MBA app chance and make getting a job upon graduation much easier.

  • In reply to watdo
    TNA's picture

    watdo:
    I'm a senior at a non target state school. I have worked nearly 1 year as an unpaid intern in a regional boutique. The firm is essentially a startup, and while we have a couple deals under our belt, I don't see much in terms of career growth. Do you think it would benefit me to pursue an MSF, or would my time be better spent taking a corp fin job and networking?

    Depends on what you want to do. You could go do an MSF, keep your relationship with this firm and hope something opens up as a fall back, while networking and interviewing at larger banks. Or you could do F500 and be happy. Really depends on your career goals, desires, etc. Only you can answer those.

  • In reply to aurelius
    TNA's picture

    aurelius:
    Is the GRE not valued as highly as the GMAT for MSF programs? Can a high GRE help offset a low GPA?

    And what do you think of the MSF program at SMU (in terms of job placement)?

    Thanks for your informative posts.

    I've heard GRE is a little easier than the GMAT, but have no first hand experience. A high GRE/GMAT can help offset a low GPA.

    SMU will place well in Dallas and the Texas area. It will be second to UT Austin's program and also compete with Tulane. Keep that in mind.

  • calikid3820's picture

    Silver Banana to Anthony for another informative MSF Post...

  • BepBep12's picture

    This might not apply to everyone, but I guess people that are bringing in FT work experience to an MSF and looking for a leg up during IBD recruiting. Is it necessary to have another internship experience related to banking if you are currently working in finance? For example, I'm an FP&A analyst at an F500 firm and I did a PE internship at the UG level. Would you recommend someone with this type of background quit his or her FT job to pursue a more closely related internship?

    'Before you enter... be willing to pay the price'

  • appyz168's picture

    I am in the EC major, and wondering if a business minor will help me to be more competitive for the MSF admission? or the program will not care about the minor at all?
    do you know which programs tend to focus on GMAT scores?
    once again, thanks a lot for the information!

  • neil joseph's picture

    i am applying to MS Finance at Deisunburg school of finance in Netherlands. anyone have some good info on it?

    "A man travels the world over in search of what he needs and returns home to find it." ~George Moore

  • Chai's picture

    Great info and helpful!

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