Should I drop out?

I have, potentially, a very good opportunity. I'm doing really good in college (non-target, first year) right now, have all As but I really don't like it, I've already taken tests in all my classes also. I've been exploring careers and looked into sales. I started networking and I might get an offer to work as an SDR but I would need to move. SDR get around $40-50k a year and after 8-12 months can move up and work as an Account Executive where 6 figures are the norm.

If I am good I can be making 6 figures when my friends are just getting out of college. I want to move away from my family also so it's very tempting to just hammer this offer home and just start with my life. I wanted to get the opinions of some users here who are familiar with the industry.

Oh and an SDR basically takes leads, calls them and see's if they're legit. If they are, then I pass them on to my team leader and he does all the work with closing the deal, etc. It's a pretty easy gig and I think I may do very good in sales.

Thoughts?

Hedge Fund Interview Course

  • 814 questions across 165 hedge funds. Crowdsourced from over 500,000 members.
  • 11 Detailed Sample Pitches and 10+ hours of video.
  • Trusted by over 1,000 aspiring hedge fund professionals just like you.

Comments (95)

Aug 29, 2017

do it

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

    • 4
    • 1
Sep 5, 2017

Hey long time no talk!

Aug 29, 2017

like a week bruv
seriously though college is for chumps

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

    • 5
    • 1
Sep 5, 2017

Heh I really haven't been on in a while. But its really not about college being for chumps. Most college grads get out and after their 4 years of non-sense partying and "bro" life they find it hard to get a job. Most get jobs that will let them max out at 80k also and I don't want to be like that.

This is so fucking exciting, SDR isn't that tough of a role. AE is where the real money happens and when you have to be a killer salesperson but I can only find out myself.

Any tips on how I can get this idea through my thick-skulled parents? They are pressuring me to do engineering or become a doctor they just don't get how good of an opportunity this is to get such great experience early on. They're out dated. The thing is I will be making more than my Dad without even finishing a year of college if I can close this offer, he should be excited not putting me down.

Aug 29, 2017

probably quit being a little bitch and be your own man and live your own life
your nuts drop yet boyyo?
your parents still wipe ya bum?

also please never become a doctor for the good of us all stick to cutco mang

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

    • 9
    • 1
Learn More

Side-by-side comparison of top modeling training courses + exclusive discount through WSO here.

Sep 5, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

probably quit being a little bitch and be your own man and live your own life
your nuts drop yet boyyo?
your parents still wipe ya bum?

also please never become a doctor for the good of us all stick to cutco mang

stfu its not cutco. A small software-sales company.

Sep 5, 2017

It's not a good opportunity. There are literally millions of sales jobs out there right now, and in each one of them, if you can be successful, will make a lot of money. Sales is extremely tough, and like any entrepreneurial endeavor rewards those that can persevere though the risk. Unless you've got a salaried base+commission, you are seriously taking a huge risk for a not so special opportunity (it's not once in a lifetime, I guarantee it).

Many of the companies behind these "Sales Opportunities" churn and burn through so many people you wouldn't believe it. The derogatory term for them is "puppy mills" as they will "hire" 100 eager naive people with the expectation that the 2 or 3 natural born salespeople will rise through.

Research this opportunity in depth and find out their recruiting numbers. Actual good sales positions have paid training and at least 6+ months of guaranteed income to keep you afloat while you get going. The best positions are base+commission, but you typically need a track record to get those.

Regardless, research this opportunity in much more detail than "I can make this much after this time!" or "The 3-5 year guys make xyz 6 figure income!". And to be honest, you can make way more money selling real estate or financial services in the long-run than xyz widget.

Get your real estate or insurance license and begin selling while in school. That way you can make enough to survive (and possibly thrive) while going to school, learn how to sell, get an education, and have a solid skill set and backup career that can help you wherever you go. Dropping out of school for a random sales opportunity, without even knowing if you can sell professionally, seems silly to me. There are a seemingly unlimited number of sales opportunities out there, don't get starstruck because this is the first you are hearing of it.

    • 7
    • 1
Aug 29, 2017

Cutco?

Sep 5, 2017

Software-sales company in a big city.

Best Response
Aug 29, 2017

drop out of WSO? yes

    • 22
    • 2
Aug 29, 2017

Ebolamonkey was better.

    • 5
    • 2
Sep 5, 2017

I'm not tryna open checking accounts for 16 years aka manage their portfolio haha

    • 3
Aug 29, 2017

look bro, I'm pretty sure you're my name is goldstein. you've made 9 threads in 5 weeks essentially asking people how to be successful or if you're doing the right things. at some point you need to stop trying to try to make the "perfect" decision and actually fucking go for something. most big decisions in life are a bit of a leap of faith. stop asking what you should do and do something.

    • 7
Sep 5, 2017

Look you were joking with me and I joked back don't be so serious. This is a big decision but people will label me as a dropout but I'm confident I will make a lot of money which is all I care about in the end.

    • 2
Aug 29, 2017

you will never make a lot of money if you are this indecisive. if you really want help, listen to the advice you've already been given time and time again and just go do something. yes, it's a big decision, but nothing worthwhile is without risk. weigh your options, and do something. but do not come back and ask us how to be successful, please.

Aug 30, 2017

Your profile picture looks like a professor of mine...he claims that Edward Thorpe is his good friend ... and students didn't really believe him

Aug 29, 2017

What are you studying?

Sep 5, 2017
Esuric:

What are you studying?

After my 2 years of CC (basic gen-eds) I'm gonna aim to transfer to a higher ranked school and do Finance or Economics. But my chances of getting into a high end school are slim to none.

Aug 29, 2017

Totally worth dropping out if you can realistically make $100,000+ within 4 years.

Aug 29, 2017

Sounds like the plot to boiler room

    • 2
Sep 5, 2017
geology rocks:

Sounds like the plot to boiler room

Any advice man?

Aug 29, 2017

tell me what your favorite show on netflix is right now

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

    • 1
Sep 5, 2017

Snowfall

Aug 29, 2017

do you identify with all the snowflakes?

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Sep 5, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

do you identify with all the snowflakes?

Nah snowflakes are losers

Aug 29, 2017

like college dropouts who are scared of mommy and daddy?

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

    • 4
Sep 5, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

like college dropouts who are scared of mommy and daddy?

Just wanna make the right decision bro.

    • 1
Aug 29, 2017

do rite like the donut but do or do not there is no try

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Sep 5, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

do rite like the donut but do or do not there is no try

I don't get the donut part but nice Star Wars quote.

Aug 29, 2017

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Sep 5, 2017
GoldenCinderblock:

https://www.yelp.com/biz/do-rite-donuts-and-coffee...

Chicago is wack man

Aug 29, 2017

your mom likes to visit

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Aug 30, 2017

His mom also goes to college.

    • 1
Sep 5, 2017

.

    • 2
Learn More

Side-by-side comparison of top modeling training courses + exclusive discount through WSO here.

Aug 29, 2017

You've said that it's "difficult" to find a job out of college.

While this may be somewhat true, most "horror stories" are from people who majored in feminist dance theory, with a 3.0 GPA and no relevant experience.

Hell. Even my uncle with an English degree makes a couple hundred thousand a year at state farm, and he did nothing throughout college except drink.

If you study something relevant (cough finance cough), you do well in school, get internships, and join student orgs, then you can be extremely successful. You can make more than 100k per year.

What if this SDP position falls through like most cold calling positions do?

Are you gonna re-enroll at 20 and be difficult to hire, since you already dropped out and are 24?

You're taking on a lot of risk, while trying to be risk-averse.

Just go to school, and make it how you want it to be.

    • 2
Aug 29, 2017
Pump And Dump:

I have, potentially, a very good opportunity... I've been exploring careers and looked into sales. I started networking and I might get an offer

Let us know when you get an offer.

    • 2
Aug 29, 2017

This is an instant gratification move. Gotta learn to play the long game if you want to maximize your chances to be successful.

    • 3
Sep 5, 2017
Cov:

This is an instant gratification move. Gotta learn to play the long game if you want to maximize your chances to be successful.

But I could possibly become an AE at 21. My peers will be out of college and I can be making at least 100k. But I see your point, thanks for the advice

Sep 5, 2017
Pump And Dump:
Cov:

This is an instant gratification move. Gotta learn to play the long game if you want to maximize your chances to be successful.

But I could possibly become an AE at 21. My peers will be out of college and I can be making at least 100k. But I see your point, thanks for the advice

What % of inside sales people (SDRs as you call it) get promoted to AE and on what timeline?

Aug 29, 2017

is this company called herbalife?

    • 5
Sep 5, 2017
guggroth93:

is this company called herbalife?

nope, small software-sales comapany

Aug 30, 2017

I had a friend that worked for a software sales company in a similar capacity. He was miserable and it was virtually impossible for him to make a sale. It was B2B, however, the leads he got were shit and companies were never interested.

Sep 5, 2017

So far I've been discouraged from
1) Investment Banking 2) Trading 3) Sales

What is next? Also I do agree it can be shitty but most B2B do a good job of marketing and such. I'm surprised that happened to ur friend but shit happens I guess.

Aug 30, 2017

IB is fine. Trading is a bit risky in terms of the things 'going to the computer.' Sales is nothing to be discouraged from, just the type of opportunity (without knowing the specifics) that is too good to be true.

Aug 30, 2017

Look, if it doesn't work out the rest of us need ditch diggers and servers at restaurants. So you'll always have a place. Go for it.

    • 3
Sep 5, 2017

You're a loser

    • 1
    • 1
Aug 30, 2017

Man, don't listen to those finance losers, most of them only dream of 100k, chase the dream. Drop out, and did you know that girls love AEs in top NYC lounges thats hotter than being a GS MD, trust me. Don't let your parents and some shit-education stop you

    • 2
Aug 30, 2017

I choked on my coffee at this

Sep 5, 2017

The Swington guy probably is still in college and thinks since he's special and adds people on LinkedIn he wil get into IB and make 6 figs

Aug 30, 2017

Sacrifice the short term to enjoy the long term. Do not drop out. Stay focused on your education and how you are going to strategically start your career post-undergrad. You can do it.

    • 2
Sep 5, 2017

Thanks bro

Aug 30, 2017

You can have one marshmallow now or you can wait five minutes and I will give you two marshmallows. Which do you want?

    • 3
Sep 5, 2017

Ah the delay of gratification. +1

Sep 5, 2017

This must be one of those time value of marshmallow calculations.

    • 3
Aug 29, 2017

Just run an Edward jones boiler room

No degree necessary

Aug 30, 2017

Wasn't initially going to comment on this but fuck it, maybe it'll benefit you or someone else unsure of the justification behind college. I used to think college was some chore to get through, and that it really didn't matter too much because everyone had a degree, and its not like MOST people walk out, diploma in hand, with a unique skill set. However, not long after this idiotic "epiphany" I realized I wanted to always have options in life. Not necessarily MF PE vs MM HF, but job security in the sense that if my firm closed down, I could work in the same industry or one that is relatively similar. I knew if something awful happened and I couldn't pursue IB/PE, I could always pivot to a different position within finance. Yes, it may have less pay, worse culture, but the hours will likely be better, and I won't go hungry. This is my survival mentality.

Lets go with the best and worst case scenario for you here.

Best: You accept the job, make solid money, save and invest, and have accrued roughly 150k+ by the time your friends are finishing up college. This is very, very unlikely, and without a lawyer looking over your contract you will most likely get played into being dealt a shitty hand. Sorry, but you're not even 21 and most likely have minimal work experience, and don't know the first thing about what a contract entails. Now, fast forward 5 years. All your friends are starting to make similar salaries, and you find you have no where to pivot to other than similar companies, and zero upward mobility because you focused on the short term gains. Your friends all pass you up, and now, at 25ish, you contemplate going BACK to UNDERGRAD or accepting that you have maxed your potential in life, and have zero cards to play. Does doing sales for 30 -
60 years sound enticing? Do you know of a single guy promoted to a managing position without a degree at any firm that isn't a fast food restaurant or comparable?

Worst: Do I even need to describe it? Broke, no education, working jobs that don't require an undergraduate degree (they aren't pretty). Even my friend in sales has an undergrad degree and will be making roughly 100k after 4 years, so why the fuck would they want someone with zero previous experience and no degree when it comes time to promote? Just for context, my friend also had 4-5 internships and worked numerous other positions at school, do you see what I'm getting at here?

The choice is yours, but for Gods sake, don't think you're smarter than everyone else. There is a reason people don't actively seek out jobs when they have the opportunity to attend college. Stop worrying about money, you're fucking 18. Go to class, work some shitty part time job, and use the motivation from wanting it to get straight As. Join clubs, whatever really, but stop with these absurd threads. PLEASE

    • 13
Sep 5, 2017

This was amazing advice, +1

Aug 30, 2017

Everyone will tell you that you won't make it until you do. My friends all laughed at my plan to work in IB/PE, right up until the point where I got the first offer. Some still laugh, tell me I won't make it to a FT role. I just ignore them, they don't understand my drive, work ethic, etc. The people who don't really know me are always the ones doubting me, and the friends who I speak to often always show support. Plenty of people on this site are toxic. You have to ignore everyone, trust in yourself, and just tell yourself that you are capable of making it. Good luck

    • 2
Aug 30, 2017

Always perplexed that why people answer to this dumb shit and make the meaningless thread 30+ comments.

    • 3
    • 1
Aug 30, 2017

Slow day at work and idk what else to do. Plus, I hope that someone else can benefit from my 2 cents. Definitely see your point though.

Aug 30, 2017

Wait, this story makes no sense. How could you possibly have been in college long enough to know if you like it? It's August 30th. Are you just doing summer classes. You know that's different than college, right?

Aug 30, 2017

First of all their numbers are lies. Only the top will make 6 figures in a year or two. SDR/BDR is not an easy job. From personal experience probably 85% will either quit or get fired within 3-6 months. While you can make decent money ($35 base plus $30 commission first year) it's a grind man. 150+ cold calls everyday (minimum)just for 1 appointment at best. You will be paid hourly and then $20-40 per appointment with bonuses at certain numbers. Lastly, if you kill it for 2-3 years you might have a chance at working at companies like Salesforce but you'll need a bachelors degree. Work there while still in school, then when you graduate you'll have four years of b2b sales experience which will be a huge leg up against your peers.

Harvey Specter doesn't get cotton mouth.

    • 1
Sep 5, 2017

Dude idc how hard it is. I am absolutely fucking sick of people telling me I shouldn't do something because it is hard, this is such a loser mentality. I am not directing this towards you though. Also Account Executives are very known for making at least six figures, I mean that's established.

NOW, that is a great idea. I could take my CC classes online (which transfer as regular, in-the-seat, classes) while working. I'm still thinking about this thought.

Aug 30, 2017

Never said you shouldn't do it. I'm just explaining its not as easy as you think. Get hired, stay in school and crush your quota. The only person holding you back is yourself. Instead of asking people about different careers try it out while in school and see if you're good at it, you'll never know unless you actually work in the position. I'm actually surprised that you don't need a degree for your sdr position at a software company.

Harvey Specter doesn't get cotton mouth.

    • 1
Aug 31, 2017

You are the one with the sour attitude. If you want to work in IB/PE/S&T go do it and stop complaining about the hand you were dealt.

Sincerely,
A non target monkey

    • 2
    • 1
Sep 5, 2017

ok non-target "monkey"

    • 1
Aug 31, 2017

Giving me MS for being honest?? Nice! I broke into the industry and you can too if you are truly determined.

    • 1
Sep 5, 2017

I didn't MS you, ill even SB you now to prove it.

Sep 5, 2017

Told u!

Sep 5, 2017

He just sold you into giving him a banana.

Sep 5, 2017

pretty accurate statement tbh

Aug 30, 2017

Lol @ people taking this thread seriously.

    • 3
    • 3
Sep 5, 2017
BobTheBaker:

Lol @ people taking this thread seriously.

Lmao Dems always trying to derail threads smh

    • 3
Sep 5, 2017

Think long terms! I could've been the president of this country but I thought long term and let my boy Donald run show. He thinks he calls the shot, never seen such a naive orange

    • 1
    • 1
Aug 29, 2017

did op drop out yet

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

    • 1
Sep 5, 2017

Nope, hanging in there.

Sep 6, 2017

I don't know if OP is a troll or not, but I want to leave this comment for anyone who might be in the same boat, thinking of dropping out of college for a sales job.

Other users left some fantastic advice about why it's not worth it to go for the short term gains over the long term gains. I agree with them 100%, but my advice takes a different route.

I had two sales jobs during college: One was cutco, the other was an electronics salesman at a national chain. Both were 100% commission based. Cutco sucks, its not a legit job and their whole business model is built on getting that noob salesman to make big "pity sales" to their parents, grand parents, and rich uncle at 10% commission before realizing that cold calling to sell knives simply doesn't work. Then they quit two weeks later, thinking it's their fault and they weren't motivated enough.

My electronics sales job was a "real" job- benefits, PTO, etc. The interviewer sells you a dream and makes it seem like you can be making boat loads of money and that there is no limit to your income. But for some reason, everyone still averages only $40k a year.

Here is my point: In sales, if you are one of the guys making it rain, you are treated like a king. You win competitions, win vacations, get to go to training conferences, etc. If you are one of the average guys, life sucks. The company typically doesn't help you with anything- often you have to get your own supplies, use your own car, pay for your own gas, buy your own uniform, etc. You have a hard time climbing up because the attention is given to the guys who are already performing well.

In commission sales you are 100% expendable. They don't give you a substantial base, so therefore they are taking no risk on you. They don't need to fire you if you don't perform: you simply don't get paid and you quit. If you do well, they don't mind trying to keep you happy because you bring in far more than they pay you. It's a vicious game: Your relationship with your co-workers is nothing but jealousy and backstabbing, and management doesn't care about you.

The last thing is that the mental state you're thrown into is awful. You can never stop thinking about selling. At vacations, family gatherings, weddings. In the back of your mind there is always a nagging voice saying "ooooh, does this person I just met at this wedding maybe want to buy from me?" It's toxic, you stop being a real person.

There is a reason these companies take people with no degree: It's because they want quantity, not quality. If you throw enough shit at a wall, some will eventually stick. My sales jobs lit a fire under my ass because I was so scared that if I couldn't find a job after school, I would end up back in sales. I can't imagine how depressed I would be to be in one of those jobs and feel like there is no way out since I have no degree.

Sales will be around forever. Get your degree, try out sales, and thank me 3 months later when you want to quit and actually have the ability to get another job.

    • 9
Sep 5, 2017

Thanks for the advice, really appreciate it. But SDR < AE is a real path and this isn't B2C which is what you described above. I'm just going to keep killing it in CC and line up a B2B SDR internship next Summer.

Sep 6, 2017

Think about it this way- if this sales job were a viable route to riches, wouldn't it be a lot more competitive? Think of IB- its been proven as a pretty sure way to put you on the path to wealth. As such, it is incredibly competitive. Same thing with medicine: Med schools only take the very top applicants, and charge insane money because they are able to be exclusive and expensive since they have so many people interested. But those who make it though are guaranteed a good salary.

If this sales job is willing to take someone who doesn't have a college degree and/or amazing work experience, could it really be that sure of a path to 6 figures in a few years? Because if it were that sure of a path, then why aren't a ton of people all over it? How are there not so many applicants that the company is able to raise the requirements to a degree from an Ivy league school and an internship at an elite company? How is there not a "B2BOasis" for people desperately trying to break into this guaranteed, $100k at 21 years old job?

If it were a sure path, a ton of people would be all over it. Because a ton of people are not all over it, you can be assured that this job is not a sure path to wealth. Those figures you talked about (8-12 mos til you make 6 figs) are the top 2% of employees.

SO, if we take it as a given that you are a "top 2%" kinda guy, wouldn't it be better to be a "top 2% guy" in a more lucrative pool? If you can achieve those heights, then might as well be a top 2% college graduate and make hundreds of thousands.

You have the right idea. Get the internship, and get an insider look into how the average employee does. What % make it from SDR to AE? What is the average income of an AE? I can guarantee you that the answers will be disappointing. And if they aren't, and this job is an easy and sure path to riches, let me know and I'll jump ship too before everyone learns about this best kept secret.

    • 4
Sep 5, 2017

also you and other users are just throwing around "find another path" isn't very right.

This is the next best thing for me since investment banking is near impossible to get into. Just my .02. Investment banking isn't just "cold call, network, cold call" like this forums claims it is. It's your school OCR and connections (real connections not LinkedIn messaging).

Aug 30, 2017

There are infinitely more jobs out there in the world beyond investment banking and SDR sales. Stop looking for instant gratification. Take the time in college you desperately need to grow up, and learn to listen to people who have been through it before.

Sep 5, 2017

Yeah I'm just going to grind through college and line up a summer internship. Kind of funny the CC loser here may get a paid internship as an SDR my first year heh.

Yeah they're infinitely more jobs but they pay terribly, I just wanna make money.

Aug 30, 2017

There are infinitely more well-paying jobs out there in the finance sector than investment banking and SDR sales. Maybe you'll learn about a few of them in college.

Sep 6, 2017

I can throw in a few different data points from what's been mentioned above. I have zero experience in sales, but two close relatives went into B2B software sales at the height of the dot-com era. One dropped out of college after 1 semester, the other didn't go at all.

They worked their way up from smaller software companies and are both now wildly successful. Both are making high six figures at major F500 tech companies, work mostly from home, play golf 3-4 times a week, etc.

One still wishes that he had gone to college (and mentions this frequently). He wants to move to a unicorn/later stage startup--something that his colleagues have done, but he is having a lot of difficulty making that move despite his track record. Incredible salesman, great track record, insane technical knowledge of his software area (literally guest lectured to Yale graduate CS class last year)--but he has a lot of trouble explaining why he never went to college. And he has absolutely no way of moving to non-sales roles.

This is one data point--I have no idea if this is the norm. But I really recommend talking to an experienced sales guy (at a different company ideally) who doesn't have a degree and hearing their thoughts.

Sep 5, 2017

Haha that's fucking awesome. Working in B2B during the tech bubble must've been amazing honestly. Thanks for the advice.

Sep 6, 2017

Same actually, a close relative of mine went into sales for Oracle out of college in the 80's. He worked for 10 years, got really rich, and retired on his yacht. Got bored sailing the pacific for 2 years, then went into sales for SAP during a really great period in their history. I don't know exactly how rich he is, but I'd imagine its in the 8 figures area, judging by what he has and the jobs he held after SAP.

B2B can be lucrative if you are in the right place at the right time, but no one really knows exactly what's about to explode next.

    • 2
Sep 7, 2017

The only reason I would go to school is to get a job and if you can get that job and make 6 figures and you are not happy right now, there is no reason for you to stay. People now a days have this preconceived notion that you have to go to a 4 year college to make good money and that is false you have to network, be smart, and work hard. You seem to have that don't waste your time or money do whats best for you and don't take your parents or fiends opinion in consideration, just consider money, time, and happiness.

Sep 7, 2017

Is the company Meltwater/media monitoring company? PM me.

Sep 7, 2017

Stay in school. Work hard. Transfer to the best school you can Junior year. Work harder. The second you get into that school, apply for internships the next summer.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Sep 5, 2017

I don't have the money to pay $50k a year for an OOS semi-target. These are private loans also not from the school. Thanks for the advice though!

Sep 7, 2017

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Aug 29, 2017
Sep 7, 2017

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Sep 5, 2017
Sep 5, 2017