Where is the best place to live?

And why is it Texas?!
But really, I'd be interested to hear where some of you live and the pros and cons that come along with each area.

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Comments (106)

Apr 19, 2018

Chicago.

Pros: Great city overall. Not too big and not too small. Plenty of businesses. Great food. People are easygoing (most of the time).

Cons: Weather is absolute shit 7 months out of the year. Property taxes in Illinois are abysmal.

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Apr 19, 2018

Cons (cont'd): homicide rate

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Apr 19, 2018

Yeah, that's always a bummer. lol

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Apr 19, 2018

All the shootings happen in tiny isolated areas mostly between young black gang kids. People talk like there are just bullets flying in the streets here. Just don't go to the fucking hood. Like anywhere else. And even being in the hood isn't that dangerous. I drive through North Lawndale all the time. You just need to be aware of your surroundings and if, for example, some black kids are blocking off a street, find another way; don't honk. That's only in the deep hood though where no typical person with a job and shit would go for any reason.

Chicago is great. It's a global city on a lake. We have some awesome neighborhoods. Nothing really takes more than 30-40 min to get to from anywhere to anywhere. NYC is gonna sink. Florida is gonna sink. Hurricanes and floods in Texas. You get the plethora of benefits of living in the U.S. I LOVE the Chicago real estate inventory and market; it's unique and ripe with opportunity. COL is great.

If I had to live anywhere else, it'd be somewhere in New Zealand or Germany. Although Germany is getting annoyingly Lefty. Maybe Ukraine. Maybe Puerto Rico or Belize if I had enough passive income.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

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Apr 19, 2018

Chicago is the best place to live (during the summer)

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Apr 19, 2018

The cold weather most of the year has made me appreciate the summer weather a lot more. It's so random though. Yesterday it was snowing and today I'm wearing shorts.

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Apr 19, 2018

NYC

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Apr 19, 2018

Frisco, Texas - no poor crackheads or dumb libs

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Apr 19, 2018

PMed a fellow Texan.

Apr 19, 2018

Nothing compares to NYC.

Right now I'm in DC, and the benefits are that there's a really large population of other Yuppies who enjoy live sports and beer and that there's a lot of very exciting developments coming along nicely in the city.

The downside is that the neighborhoods are not very well gentrified. Some of the nicest, newest parts of DC are just a few blocks away from projects. It's a real bummer to not feel safe walking home from your favorite bar to your apartment at 2am (also sucks that the bars are only open until 2am). The thing I loved about NY is that you could pretty much walk from Central Park to Wall Street at any time of night and feel secure. You'd probably also meet at least 10 new people on the way also.

Food in DC is also trash. Way too many bullshit hipster, yuppie restaurants with petite serving sizes and wacky purees on every damn plate that charge $15 for basic dishes. I miss NY because some of the most delicious food I've ever tried was below $10 and served to me out of a truck or unlabeled hole-in-the-wall.

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Apr 20, 2018

I couldn't agree more about DC. The food scene is overpriced yuppie hipster bullshit. I swear to god you can't find normal bar food in the city unless you crave roasted beat fries (?) and smoked venison tacos while watching a game.

Spring saturdays at Wet Dog is sundress city though.

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Apr 24, 2018

The DC restaurant scene isn't that bad if you venture out into VA or MD for more cheap ethnic options. The higher end scene, while nothing like NYC, is still somewhat decently solid. Bar food is definitely lacking though.

Best Response
Apr 19, 2018

I won't argue that for most people, their proximity to other people, excitement, nightlife, art, culture, music, lends them to draw toward large world cities.

But my value system is a little different. I like quiet, pretty places where I can think clearly and work. I'm not a hermit, but I value peaceful living and free-flowing traffic more than I value Broadway plays or Ukrainian restaurants.

To that end, I love living in the Southeast. Here, I can afford a clean, bright, new house with enough room to have guests and an office. The weather is hard to beat and I can get around town without a struggle. The people here are well-educated and there's a surprising amount of new money and opportunity for people pouring out of local schools. My only fear is that it will grow too much, and at some point I'll have to find a quieter place.

And I don't mean Atlanta -- Austin / Nashville / Birmingham / Charleston / Charlotte / Raleigh / Richmond have some under-the-radar opportunities for those willing to get off the beaten path. Certainly not for everyone, but it's hard for me to imagine a better cost-adjusted quality of life in the country.

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Apr 20, 2018

Austin has to be one of the least "under the radar" places, with Nashville close behind.

Good places to live, yes. Under the radar and low COL, certainly not

twitter: @CorpFin_Guy

Apr 24, 2018

Richmond is great but there are way too many hipsters there, sort of ironic (see what I did there) for the former capital of the Confederacy. Great food options though that aren't super expensive and lots of history which is nice too.

Apr 28, 2018

Lol at Charlotte

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May 5, 2018

+SB Exactly this, I rather make $150K in the cities you mentioned than $400K in NYC/SF/LA. I have a target city to eventually move back to that fits exactly into what you are looking at. In many of the cities you listed, someone making 80K has a better standard of living than many people in NYC making 150K.

Apr 19, 2018

100% Texas. Don't know why frisco (burbs?) but move to dallas immediately. You will not be disappointed.

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Apr 19, 2018

SBd. I just moved to Dallas this week and can confirm how awesome it is.

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Apr 19, 2018

Im from there and Ive yet to find such good trim anywhere else.

Apr 19, 2018

Hey Im from Dallas.
What area do you live in?

Apr 20, 2018

Also in Dallas and I love it here. Uptown area if anyone wants go grab a drink

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Apr 20, 2018

Dallas representin'

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Apr 19, 2018

Im always down for a drink. PMed

Apr 20, 2018

A few of Dallas Monkeys have connected and are looking to grab drinks. If you're local, PM and we'll getcha an invite.

Cheers!

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Apr 19, 2018

the French Riviera. Antibes/Cannes in particular.

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Apr 19, 2018
MonacoMonkey:

the French Riviera. Antibes/Cannes in particular.

lol, but not Monaco?

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Apr 20, 2018

Michigan! You can date your sister there! Don't believe me, ask @michigan10483!

'I'm jacked... JACKED TO THE TITS!!'

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Apr 20, 2018

Switzerland. Skiing in the winter, magnificent nature, close to coastlines, surrounded by some of Europe's biggest cities, incredible living standard.

Oh and traveling outside of Switzerland is the equivalent of an American/European going to Thailand.

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Apr 20, 2018

Agree with most parts, but I wouldn't say it's close to any coastlines. The closest would be in Italy, which is an 5 hour drive from Zurich. Having said that, it has some amazing lakes.

Furthermore, you need to like the Swiss people's 'attitude'. They can be a bit boring as they are not really open and very conservative.

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Apr 20, 2018

True. I'm more familiar with the Italian speaking part of Switzerland.

Apr 20, 2018
Insomnia_Banker:

Agree with most parts, but I wouldn't say it's close to any coastlines. The closest would be in Italy, which is an 5 hour drive from Zurich. Having said that, it has some amazing lakes.

To someone in the U.S., a five hour drive sounds like an easy weekend trip. That's close in my book.

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Apr 27, 2018

Sounds good if you're 60 or older

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Apr 20, 2018

Southern California.

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Apr 19, 2018
Matoma:

Southern California.

Yeah, SoCal is legit. I lived in Encinitas (North County San Diego) for a year. Good times.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Apr 20, 2018

Hong Kong. At least prior to having kids and needing more space. Shanghai and Tokyo also excellent as is Boston.

Apr 20, 2018

I firmly believe London is the best European city I've worked in, having also had the fortune of working in Geneva and Copenhagen.

Of the three, Geneva was the worst. The city was far smaller than I was expecting and felt distinctly provincial. For all the hype about quality of life, I wasn't especially impressed. I'm also sad to say that I found the Swiss rather arrogant. This was hugely disappointing, having always enjoyed holidaying in the Swiss Alps previously and been good friends with Swiss kids at school. On the whole, a sleepy and fairly boring place.

Copenhagen comes second. Gorgeous city with immensely friendly people and fantastic public transport systems. If you're making decent money, you can live like a king. Compared to Geneva, the nightlife is also significantly better at a fraction of the cost. Downside for me was taxation and knowing none of the language!

London, however, tops it. Granted, I am British, so there's undoubtedly bias in my assessment. That said, it was the largest city I'd worked in and had the amenities to match. The amount of professional opportunity is huge, and the city benefits greatly from its proximity to some of the world's very best universities. Interestingly, I found the city's diversity to also appeal. Copenhagen and Geneva quickly adopted a "character" in my mind, informed by the largely homogenous traits of its residents. This can make it difficult if you clash with certain characteristics. That London is so global means there are always pockets of people with whom you will naturally gel, making it a very "easy" city to live in regardless of where you're from.

"Work is the curse of the drinking classes" - Oscar Wilde

May 6, 2018

I agree with most, having lived in both London and Copenhagen. However, I would say that the language issue is smaller than you make it out to be in Copenhagen. Danes are generally really good at English, and are, for most parts, happy to speak it.

With that said, I agree that London offers more and better professional opportunities. For the long-term though, and family-wise, I think I would prefer Copenhagen.

Apr 20, 2018

Texas.
Pros: cheap COL, plenty of job opportunities, decent weather, and you can find just about anything you're looking for in terms of culture or things to do.
Cons: Property taxes, humidity

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Apr 19, 2018

Pros: Conservative

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Apr 20, 2018

Texas is very diverse though. You can't just lump everything into one category. Dallas, Houston, Austin, and San Antonio are all totally distinct areas with distinct economies, geographies, cultures, vibes, etc...

Even within DFW, Dallas and Fort Worth are quite different places despite being in the same metroplex (I'm from here). same with San Francisco/Oakland/SanJose...

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Apr 20, 2018

Within walking distance to work. It will change your life.

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Apr 20, 2018

I grew up in IL (not Chicago), started my career in NYC and moved to Denver 11 years ago.

Pros: Access to the mountains and scenery is easily number one. I love the weather. Sure, you get some snow, but it melts off in a day or two. Most of the Winter is in the 50s and sunny with some cold/snowy days and 70 degree weather in between. Summer is ideal because of no humidity. The restaurant scene is great and the bar scene is improving. We have more craft breweries than anywhere and a lot of great distilleries. Almost everyone is active and work/life balance is good. We have the lowest unemployment in the country. Around downtown there are a lot of cool Victorian neighborhoods so you can still live in the city with a family. Weed is legal, if that's your thing. Taxes are reasonable, and we have a constitutionally mandated balanced budget.

Cons: When traveling everyone asks you about weed. I don't even use it. It hasn't really changed anything. John Denver sang Rocky Mountain High like 40 years ago, nothing new so move on. Locals constantly complain about the cost of living, which while rising is similar to Chicago. It could definitely use more diversity...too many white people. It's a small job market for finance people. Before starting my own company I was considering a move to SF for more job opportunities (was going to transfer with my old job and then start searching).

Apr 20, 2018

The diversity part is so true... I was in Denver a few weeks ago. I'd often look around whatever bar, restaurant, or coffee shop we were in and comment to my gf (who's white so she never noticed until I mentioned it) how I was literally the only guy who wasn't white in the entire place. I was never uncomfortable, it was just really odd and weird.

Because of this, the city seemed to lack ethnic restaurants (Middle Eastern, Indian, Chinese) and the places they did have were bad or mediocre at best. I enjoyed every other aspect of Denver, but love good ethnic cuisines too much to live there.

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Apr 20, 2018
thexfactor336:

The diversity part is so true... I was in Denver a few weeks ago. I'd often look around whatever bar, restaurant, or coffee shop we were in and comment to my gf (who's white so she never noticed until I mentioned it) how I was literally the only guy who wasn't white in the entire place. I was never uncomfortable, it was just really odd and weird.

Because of this, the city seemed to lack ethnic restaurants (Middle Eastern, Indian, Chinese) and the places they did have were bad or mediocre at best. I enjoyed every other aspect of Denver, but love good ethnic cuisines too much to live there.

The crazy part is that diversity has actually gotten better with all of the recent college grads moving here, who are more diverse than the older population...still a long way to go though.

There are some good ethnic restaurants but mostly in Aurora or on Federal Blvd...you are spot on for the ethnic options downtown. There is obviously a large Hispanic population, and interestingly, several decent sized East African populations.

Apr 21, 2018
TechBanking:

I grew up in IL (not Chicago), started my career in NYC and moved to Denver 11 years ago.

Pros: Access to the mountains and scenery is easily number one. I love the weather. Sure, you get some snow, but it melts off in a day or two. Most of the Winter is in the 50s and sunny with some cold/snowy days and 70 degree weather in between. Summer is ideal because of no humidity. The restaurant scene is great and the bar scene is improving. We have more craft breweries than anywhere and a lot of great distilleries. Almost everyone is active and work/life balance is good. We have the lowest unemployment in the country. Around downtown there are a lot of cool Victorian neighborhoods so you can still live in the city with a family. Weed is legal, if that's your thing. Taxes are reasonable, and we have a constitutionally mandated balanced budget.

Cons: When traveling everyone asks you about weed. I don't even use it. It hasn't really changed anything. John Denver sang Rocky Mountain High like 40 years ago, nothing new so move on. Locals constantly complain about the cost of living, which while rising is similar to Chicago. It could definitely use more diversity...too many white people. It's a small job market for finance people. Before starting my own company I was considering a move to SF for more job opportunities (was going to transfer with my old job and then start searching).

Denver is barely 50% white...

it seems whole swathes of the city are fully non white

what % of white people would make you happy?

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Apr 20, 2018

DC (Grew up): Pros: Really good people in general. DC has great culture and nightlife while not being too hectic, decent food if you know where to go. Really diverse place. Constantly expanding areas (H Street, Wharf, Columbia heights always bopping)
Cons: traffic sucks, all the suburbs feel the same, kinda pricey. People tend to cash out early and buy homes and have families (not my thing atm). Surrounded by politics and boring monuments. Job opps kinda suck. Govt advisory everywhere, worked in that field for a couple years, people are incompetent and make s*** money, hence the cashing out early and buying a house. You see govt inefficiency first hand.

NYC (Currently working/living) Pros: Best food city in america (dont @ me, its just the truth). Train runs well and will get you anywhere for cheap. Diversity everywhere you go, great place to discover yourself, one of the best cities for finance opps and career growth. For guys, great male/female ratio, not too hard to date around
Cons: People literally will eat each other alive to get what they want. Classism, sexism, racism on full display. Dirty as hell, you will feel claustrophobic. You will work a ton if you want to get ahead

Apr 20, 2018

A certain place in Texas. Please do not move here.

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Apr 20, 2018

From Dallas went to school in Austin and in Boston now.

Prefer the south TBH, but wouldn't mind a stint in NY.
Think I would retire in Texas at some point.

I view Boston as a less-fun and colder version of Austin.

I think the rise of Deep Ellum has made Dallas a cooler place. Before it was just Uptown and I didn't think much of it.

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Apr 26, 2018

Boston is absolutely beautiful during the summer but dog shit in most other aspects. Im from OK and have lived in Dallas, Boston, Arizona, OKC, and Denver. Fuck Boston.

Met some great Oklahoma fans there but everything is really overpriced and old. No thanks. I'll take my 3-4 dollar beer in OK over that any day. Can't wait to move back to the LCOL area with a 3x salary than I made straight out of school. :)

Apr 20, 2018

San Diego, cons: not many jobs, pros: everything else

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Apr 20, 2018

another one of these, jesus.

I live in a major southeast city, and don't ask, I'm not telling you where. I consider the southeast VA, NC, SC, GA, FL. if you're not touching the atlantic, you're not southeast. also Maryland, while below the mason dixon, is not a southern state. I love Maryland, but it's not a SE state. while we're on the subject, DC isn't really a SE city the same way Charlotte is, it pretty much starts at Fredericksburg, but that's a different argument altogether. back to the question.

all cities have value. what do you value? do you value CoL over amenities? space over convenience? proximity to square footage? job opps to weather?

people will say SD has it all, but they lose on traffic and CoL relative to most places outside NYC/SF. people will say NYC has it all, but they lose on CoL, square footage, and commute time to anything outside your little bubble. people will say places out West like Denver or Seattle have it all, but they lose on weather and job opps. people will say the southeast has it all, but they lose on diversity, culture, and job opps (broad based, not just one industry like CRE/PWM). give it a fucking rest.

I love the southeast because of weather, work, CoL, and proximity to cool shit. yes, NYC has mountains and the beach, but don't tell me that Lincoln St is as nice as Kiawah, Crystal Coast, or the Delmarva peninsula. it has its value, but it's not the same. that being said, metro areas in the southeast are 70-90% smaller than the NYC metro area, so less amenities, less job opps, and less culture by comparison. for me, that doesn't matter, but to others, it does.

yeah, I love Charleston (maybe I live there, maybe I don't), but is that a good place to launch a buyside career? fuck no. yeah, I love Atlanta (maybe I live there, maybe I don't), but is there as much culture as there is in NYC/SF/DC? fuck no. yeah, I love Charlotte (maybe I live there..you get it by now, I'm not telling you where I live), but is it the wannabe big city like NYC it tries to be? fuck no.

live wherever the hell you want, and get out and see the rest of the country. it's a great big world out there.

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Apr 19, 2018
thebrofessor:

I live in a major southeast city, and don't ask, I'm not telling you where.

ok but what if not only did we work in the same city, but in the SAME BUILDING, AND ON THE SAME FLOOR??? We could be best friends and head down to the bar on the ground floor and tell WSO stories that are grand inside jokes.

I'm going to assume that you're one of the guys who works in the office across the floor from mine.

Apr 20, 2018
thebrofessor:

another one of these, jesus.

I live in a major southeast city, and don't ask, I'm not telling you where. I consider the southeast VA, NC, SC, GA, FL. if you're not touching the atlantic, you're not southeast. also Maryland, while below the mason dixon, is not a southern state. I love Maryland, but it's not a SE state. while we're on the subject, DC isn't really a SE city the same way Charlotte is, it pretty much starts at Fredericksburg, but that's a different argument altogether. back to the question.

all cities have value. what do you value? do you value CoL over amenities? space over convenience? proximity to square footage? job opps to weather?

people will say SD has it all, but they lose on traffic and CoL relative to most places outside NYC/SF. people will say NYC has it all, but they lose on CoL, square footage, and commute time to anything outside your little bubble. people will say places out West like Denver or Seattle have it all, but they lose on weather and job opps. people will say the southeast has it all, but they lose on diversity, culture, and job opps (broad based, not just one industry like CRE/PWM). give it a fucking rest.

I love the southeast because of weather, work, CoL, and proximity to cool shit. yes, NYC has mountains and the beach, but don't tell me that Lincoln St is as nice as Kiawah, Crystal Coast, or the Delmarva peninsula. it has its value, but it's not the same. that being said, metro areas in the southeast are 70-90% smaller than the NYC metro area, so less amenities, less job opps, and less culture by comparison. for me, that doesn't matter, but to others, it does.

yeah, I love Charleston (maybe I live there, maybe I don't), but is that a good place to launch a buyside career? fuck no. yeah, I love Atlanta (maybe I live there, maybe I don't), but is there as much culture as there is in NYC/SF/DC? fuck no. yeah, I love Charlotte (maybe I live there..you get it by now, I'm not telling you where I live), but is it the wannabe big city like NYC it tries to be? fuck no.

live wherever the hell you want, and get out and see the rest of the country. it's a great big world out there.

I totally disagree on the weather comment for Denver relative to the SE. I hate humidity with a passion. I couldn't ever live comfortably in the South because of the summers.

People also have a false belief that Denver is cold in the winter. Outside of a few days per winter, it isn't cold.

Average high temp in Denver / Charlotte:

Jan - 49 / 51
Feb - 49 / 55
Mar - 58 / 64
Apr - 65 / 73
May - 73 / 79
Jun - 86 / 86
Jul - 92 / 89
Aug - 90 / 88
Sept - 82 / 82
Oct - 68 / 72
Nov - 57 / 63
Dec - 47 / 54

It's barely colder in Denver than Charlotte during the winter, but we have 300 days of sun/year and no humidity.

Apr 20, 2018

fair point, I've visited half a dozen times and have caught it frigid a couple of times so admittedly my opinion was just that

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Apr 28, 2018

I lived in Charlotte 6 years. Wouldn't recommend. People move there and get lazy as the city is too slow paced and comfortable. Nightlife is slow. About 5 good restaurants in the whole city.

Lol at people who think it is a city there are 4 blocks of buildings downtown. That's always hilarious to me.

Singles life is terrible there as well (for men).

Is it comfortable? Sure. But leaving was best decision I ever made. Maybe if you have a family on lake Norman it's worth it... but otherwise go to an actual city if you're in IB.

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Apr 20, 2018

Montreal is where it's at

Pros: low COL compared to other major cities, nightlife is unreal, best strip clubs in the world, gorgeous women and the Canadian classics - moose and sugar shack

Cons: winter is darn cold, pot holes

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Apr 20, 2018

Miami, in my opinion, is the best for business and pleasure. I work in the mortgage industry down here and can say it provides lucrative pay with a more relaxed work schedule relative to the NE. Miami has the BEST nightlife, hands down.

Pro's: Latin culture (women, food, night life), beach > 10 minutes away, capital from foreign investors, weather is impeccable almost all year (though summer months are blistering), Brickell is the Manhattan of the south

Con's: traffic, terrible drivers, people can be hard to deal with, language barrier (if you don't know Spanish), it can feel like you live in a different country

All in, starting a career in Miami was the best move I could have made. Once you get past all the tourist BS, you really get an incredible experience and get to know some fantastic people.

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Apr 20, 2018

Why would anyone in finance not live in NY? It's like living in Montana to pursue deep sea fishing...

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Apr 20, 2018
Shaun-Mullins:

Why would anyone in finance not live in NY? It's like living in Montana to pursue deep sea fishing...

I would never consider moving to a mega-city-shit-hole like NYC, LA, SF, etc. even if I was paid three times my salary. Liberal-infested wastelands where exhorbitantly high taxes are imposed upon you so your unemployed next-door neighbor can pay for his/her eighth out-of-wedlock child are pure cancer.

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Apr 19, 2018
Tom Bwady:
Shaun-Mullins:

Why would anyone in finance not live in NY? It's like living in Montana to pursue deep sea fishing...

I would never consider moving to a mega-city-shit-hole like NYC, LA, SF, etc. even if I was paid three times my salary. Liberal-infested wastelands where exhorbitantly high taxes are imposed upon you so your unemployed next-door neighbor can pay for his/her eighth out-of-wedlock child are pure cancer.

Ah yes, tell us how you really feel...

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Apr 20, 2018
Tom Bwady:
Shaun-Mullins:

Why would anyone in finance not live in NY? It's like living in Montana to pursue deep sea fishing...

I would never consider moving to a mega-city-shit-hole like NYC, LA, SF, etc. even if I was paid three times my salary. Liberal-infested wastelands where exhorbitantly high taxes are imposed upon you so your unemployed next-door neighbor can pay for his/her eighth out-of-wedlock child are pure cancer.

I trust you're ballin out of control in some backwoods town in Kentucky drinking Bud, shooting guns, and sleeping with your sister. Cuz hey, Murrica right!

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Apr 20, 2018
Tom Bwady:
Shaun-Mullins:

Why would anyone in finance not live in NY? It's like living in Montana to pursue deep sea fishing...

I would never consider moving to a mega-city-shit-hole like NYC, LA, SF, etc. even if I was paid three times my salary. Liberal-infested wastelands where exhorbitantly high taxes are imposed upon you so your unemployed next-door neighbor can pay for his/her eighth out-of-wedlock child are pure cancer.

You should probably visit one of these places before forming an opinion. You realize all of these places are paying the Federal taxes that carry the rural states (because of the higher incomes), right?

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Apr 20, 2018
Keepondreaming69:

And why is it Texas?!

You knew the answer, so why ask the question?

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Apr 19, 2018

It was a joke.

Apr 20, 2018

Agree with most of the comments on here. Definitely Texas - Dallas is probably the best city, although I do prefer the Texan burbs

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Apr 20, 2018

How about somewhere in southern California? LA yeah, but thinking smaller. Newport Beach comes to mind. If you have the money, the lifestyle doesn't get much better. OC people though.. can be a little much at times.

Apr 20, 2018

SJWs and liberals, meshed with the strong influence of pop culture, make the LA area one of the most unattractive places in the world.

We have people who never graduated high school run YouTube channels about "hype-beast" apparel. We have idiotic "celebrities" who are worse at math than my third-grade cousin. We have millenials wasting their lives away on social media and video games. We have a massive surge of individuals going into debt while striving for useless passions. We have community college proponents advocating for silly rallies that accomplish nothing. The list goes on.

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Apr 20, 2018

That's like your opinion.

Serious note though, talking more about places like Newport Beach than LA. I have never lived in LA so don't have a strong/justified opinion.

Apr 20, 2018

are you really that triggered that you needed to write a 6 line paragraph about it? Just ignore it and make dat money. LA is great. Bomb weather 99% of the year, tons of new places to scout out and many many surrounding areas. Not to mention the cityscape is vastly changing. Looking out my office at 4 new high rises as I speak.

Who wouldn't want to be, IMHO, the next biggest upcoming city?

Apr 19, 2018
Texas Tea:

How about somewhere in southern California? LA yeah, but thinking smaller. Newport Beach comes to mind. If you have the money, the lifestyle doesn't get much better. OC people though.. can be a little much at times.

I like LA and I had a few interviews there last year. I was thinking of moving to Manhattan Beach for a position in El Segundo. Having waves and Big Bear mountain there for snowboarding were big pluses for me. Also, poker is big there as well. The traffic really really sucks.

As far as OC goes, I think it is a great area as well. I visited there twice last year as my sister and her husband live in San Clemente. Its a cool little town in the OC and real estate prices aren't that expensive and you really don't run into crazy LA type traffic as they are small towns. Waves are good there too. Trestles is a famous spot. Down side is there are less job opportunities there than LA, but if you can find a job up north near the train, it is in walking distance (to get on the train) from a lot of places in the OC.

My brother-in-law rides his bike to the train in OC and rides it north and then rides his bicycle to work after that. He's like 55 years old but says he feels like a little kid and loves his routine.

My sister works down south (I think north of Oceanside), so its like an hour daily drive for her, which isn't bad.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Apr 21, 2018

Best place to live is completely subjective and much of it is based on an individuals' point in life, place in life, responsibilities, available FCF, desired extra-curricular activities, etc.

I'm 50 and have lived in the Midwest for the last 20 years. I moved from NC after living there ~ 15 years and was born and raised in Charleston, SC. As the old saying goes: "You can never really go home." Which is true in many ways, but my bride and I have all of our family in the Carolinas, the quality of life is FAR superior to where we've lived the last 20 years, and as soon as my last child is out of college, we shall re-locate back to the Carolinas.

As I was saying, it's all about priorities and desires. One of the beautiful aspects of living in the Carolinas is the fact that you can be at the top of the mountains, say in Asheville, NC at 8 AM. By 4 PM the same day, you can be standing on a beach with sand between your toes. There is incredibly rich history in the Carolinas (racial issues aside). Downtown Charleston, SC still, to this day, have cobblestone streets and historical houses that harken back to 150 years ago.

Quality of life far exceeds where we currently live, but I am dealing with "golden handcuffs" at my job and I have two boys in college (one entering this fall, actually). Many, I'm really babbling now, but I've been absent from WSO for a couple weeks and this issue has been on my mind relentlessly for a couple of years.

I will say, my job has provided me the opportunity to travel the entire country. I've worked on facilities from southern Florida to Massachussetts, to MN, TX, AZ, CA, HI, KC, MO .... point is, I've been all over the country and seen how people live in most areas. There are many things in CA that I love, but I literally could not get paid enough to live there. The Midwest has its good qualities, but people hibernate in the winters, and our experience has been that if you don't grow up in the area, regardless of how long you live here, you do not have the lifelong friendships that others have. Also, people are much less willing to open up personally. My bride has experienced that.

I envision a move within the next 6 - 8 years back to NC probably, or SC. I've made my nut out here in the Midwest, once I go back, my bride and I will be able to choose where we want to live, how we want to live, how much/little property we want, what size home we want, etc. etc. I could go into myriad details as to why the Carolinas would be my ideal place to live, but it boils down to more than anything I could convey in a post. We have been practicing delayed gratification for nearly 30 years. Another 5- 6 will give us complete and total freedom. We will find our dream home, in our dream town somewhere in the Carolinas. Truly God's country.

Apr 21, 2018

SPAIN, think about whatever you would like to have (nice food, nice weather, nice people) and Spain is the answer. Madrid, Barcelona...

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Apr 19, 2018

Spain is absolutely gorgeous.
Seville FTW

Apr 19, 2018
Keepondreaming69:

Spain is absolutely gorgeous.
Seville FTW

guys guys guys

Valencia is where its at...

VCFFFFFFFF

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/c/ce/Valenciacf.svg/1200px-Valenciacf.svg.png

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Apr 22, 2018

Lol why do people even bother asking Americans questions on international perspective. Most of the blokes on here probably don't even have a passport.

"If you could live anywhere in the whole world where would it be?"
"Buttf*k Texas seems right"

Lmao give me a break. If you're rich and connected I'd pick either Singapore or Dubai depending on tax rate preferences but both are unbelievable cities.

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Apr 19, 2018

I've actually backpacked through Europe, and South America. I recently had to get a new passport because mine was full.
But yeah, I guess me being "redneck" means I have no perspective.
Give me a break.

Apr 20, 2018
CanadianEnergyBanker:

Lol why do people even bother asking Americans questions on international perspective. Most of the blokes on here probably don't even have a passport.

"If you could live anywhere in the whole world where would it be?"
"Buttf*k Texas seems right"

Lmao give me a break. If you're rich and connected I'd pick either Singapore or Dubai depending on tax rate preferences but both are unbelievable cities.

You'd have to pay me a lot of money to get me to live in either place, and, yes, as a non-passport holding American I've been to both multiple times. Both are disgustingly hot. Screw that.

Internationally, there are a ton of great options. My picks would be Switzerland, specifically the German and Italian parts (my family is Swiss German though so the culture is good with me), Barcelona, Argentina and rural Northern Italy. Once we sell my company, my plan is to spend a few years abroad in the above countries/places so our kids can have a fun experience.

Apr 19, 2018

You sound like a cool Dad.
Interlaken, Switzerland is my recommendation.
Its literally God's country.

May 6, 2018

Better than Hong Kong?

May 6, 2018

Better than Hong Kong?

Apr 24, 2018

Well, the german area surely got a nice combination of high living standards, next to no real poverty, which is a social plus, being far away from all major, well-known sources of natural disasters and well-used taxes securing safety....if you are wealthy enough yourself and are looking for more exclusive benefits, i generally recommend tiny, rich states. ;)

Apr 26, 2018

Oslo, Norway

Pros: the weather as winters are still proper, with snow and everything + the proximity of the mountains;
Cons: It is still a small city compared to other capitals of Europe so there is not so much to do as in London, for example.

Apr 27, 2018

If work opportunities were slightly better (even if they are pretty good as of right now) I would say Milan, Italy.

  • Life isn't too expensive compared to what you make (at the top; MBBs and BBs) when out up against other European finance cities (Paris, London or Frankfurt).
  • The food/bar/club scene is pretty good and diverse
  • There is more diversity compared to other Italian cities (Rome, Florence and Naples) plus the women...
  • Linate and Malpensa are very international airports so getting around the world is very easy with many direct flights to Asia, the US and LATAM.
  • Close to the mountains to ski, close to the lakes to chill and close to some great beach places in the north (Cinque Terre and Forte dei Marmi) plus good train/plane connections for domestic beach places in the south.
May 5, 2018

Wakanda

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May 6, 2018

What do you think of London and Los Angeles guys ? (especially if you work in Finance)?

Apr 19, 2018

moving to Biarritz for the rest of May. will report back to you guys shortly.
heard great things about Basque country.

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Apr 19, 2018
MonacoMonkey:

moving to Biarritz for the rest of May. will report back to you guys shortly.
heard great things about Basque country.

I've surfed there and at Hossegor. The waves are really fun there.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee