8/28/14

Mod Note (Andy): #TBT, Originally posted on April, 2012

The New York City area is home to nearly 20 million people and 20 trillion cockroaches living together in blissful harmony. Well over 1 million people alone are packed into the 23 square miles that make up the island of Manhattan. New York is known for high rents, high couture, and of course - high finance. Every summer, waves of newly-minted investment bankers descend upon the city, snapping up apartments left and right in several of the many neighborhoods and areas in proximity to Wall Street.

Let's take a walk down NYC's East Side and survey the typical mistmaker lifestyle in a few of the City's most banker-heavy nabes:


The sweet nectar of Bud Light

    1. The Murray Hill Bro-Shak

    Four banker bros just graduated together from the same frat and all landed jobs in finance in NYC. At first, they considered trying to find an apartment on the Upper East Side, because that's where the smokeshows on Gossip Girl lived. Then they realized that 90th and York is actually pretty quiet, and man, there are like, so many families up in that area.

    Inevitably, like a ten-ton magnet, the wafts of Victoria's Secret perfume, the blaring tunes of The Boss, and the familiar stank of sweat-n-booze-stained wooden floors attracts these strapping young fist pumpers to the Hill. Armed with fray-brim Duke Lacrosse douchetops, you'll find the typical inhabitants of a Murray Hill Bro-Shak throwing "totally sick pregames" every Saturday night somewhere around East 34th.


    2. The Stuy-Town Single

    The fifth bro of the group got in the rental market a little late - as the one guy with a long-term girlfriend in another city, he was the obvious odd man out, and fell behind in the apartment hunting game.


    The world's biggest post-college dorm

    While he still wanted to be close to his college bros and Bar XII, there weren't any studios or 1-beds available in Bro Shak Country. So he caved in and called the number on the banner ad on the 6 train, and ended up in a small convert in Stuy Town. What he didn't realize at the time is that he'd stumbled upon a goldmine. Packed with similarly-clueless college grads, this banker bro's go-to mass text quickly became "Stuy Town then Still Bar!"

    Needless to say, the long-term relationship didn't work out - trolling the elevator banks in Stuy Town was just too easy.


    3. The East Villager

    Below 14th Street, you find young bankers in an identity crisis. Too inexperienced to navigate the trendy yet hit-or-miss LES apartment market, yet savvy enough to avoid the neverending jello-shot parade that dominates life north of 20th, the East Villager decides to settle into an overpriced renovated walkup on lower 2nd Ave.


    So, so awful... yet so good.

    In stark contrast to his roommate - an old friend who took a decidedly different path in life and works at Generation Records - this young banker suits up every day, slogs past the piss-stained KFC on East 14th, and takes the train from Union Square to his midtown office feeling like a sellout. He chose the East Village because hey - he's not really a frattastic banker bro. He snags Mudd Coffee and hits the Greenmarket on the weekends. In the evenings, he takes pleasure in trading his pressed shirt and tie for a rumpled flannel. He voted for Obama and might even do it again. But once in awhile, he'll dig deep into his dresser, throw on a polo, and hit 13th Step. Secretly, he thinks Carly Rae Jepsen is insanely catchy, but don't tell that to anyone at Knitting Factory.


    4. The SoHo Sophisticate

    In every first-year investment banking class, there is always a son of great privilege. Raised on the Upper East Side and educated at Trinity, upon graduating from Penn, this young man had the sophistication and parental means to secure a 2,000 square foot loft on Mercer Street. On the weekends, the Yankees game buzzes on the 55-inch wallmount flatscreen as the young banker sips top-shelf liquor with his cadre of cokehead college friends before heading out to cocktails at Pegu Club.


    Comes with basketball hoop and NBA player.

    An avid sailor and scratch golfer, this young banker may have an incredibly refined social skillset - but even with the comforts of a multimillion dollar apartment, life in the city presents challenges. When walking, he gets lost within blocks of his own home - non-numbered streets are confusing. He has no idea where the nearest subway station is, nor does he possess a Metrocard. He's a "Giants fan" but he can name more green jacket winners than football players. Despite these and several other glaring real-world deficiencies, within the cocoon that is New York City, he is a king.


    5. But... I have a balcony! (FiDi)

Don't jump.

    Ah, the Financial District. The allure of towering skyscrapers, new units, rock-bottom pricing, and some good-ol'-fashioned broker bullshit ("this is where the action is!") sucked the unassuming young banker into a 1-year lease down in no-man's-land.

    Thinking he had come to New York to experience the vibrancy and excitement of the City That Never Sleeps, young FiDi banker failed to recognize that below Canal Street, that moniker is only true because everyone is always working. True, he's saving tons of money on rent, but the often-lonely lifestyle that comes with 80-hour workweeks isn't helped by the fact that nobody ever wants to come hang out at his 58th floor 2-bed. Plus, his next-door neighbor is the group's staffer, who's married with an infant child. Soon enough, he'll "trade up" to an apartment twice as expensive and half as spacious in the West Village.


So, what neighborhood do you live in, and what do you think about the lifestyle?

If you don't live in New York, what are the equivalent yuppie-heavy neighborhoods where you live?

Next up, West Side edition.



Aaron Burr is a retired investment banking analyst and currently works as an associate at a private equity fund. Email him at [email protected]

Comments (109)

10/4/12

It sounds like I'm gonna have to wait for the West Side edition...

I live in Greenwich/West Village (depends on who you talk to, because my street is right on the line) in a 1BR with seperate LR and Kitchen. Fourth floor walk up. The lifestyle is awesome, bars and nice restaurants everywhere, my gym 10 blocks away, laundry pickup and drop off. Also, similar distance to all other parts of Manhattan so its pretty centralized.

And I don't fall under the category of the kid who lives in SoHo, after all I only work in middle office :)

Hopefully I can relate to the "West Side Edition" coming soon!

Frank Sinatra - "Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy."

10/4/12

Idk why, but I always thought of Stuy-town as a Co-op City on Manhattan. No, actually I do know why- because it looks just like it. I first figured I was wrong when I looked up what rents were in there, lol. "The world's biggest post-college dorm". Sounds good to me.

GBS

10/4/12

noted

10/4/12

Midtown East ... about a 5 minute walk to work. Def a double edge sword. Nothing beats the short commute to work, but I never really feel like I leave because spend 95% of my life in the same 5 block radius.

10/4/12
vtech243:

Midtown East ... about a 5 minute walk to work. Def a double edge sword. Nothing beats the short commute to work, but I never really feel like I leave because spend 95% of my life in the same 5 block radius.

You try Tudor City. Feels like little separation there. I like Midtown East a lot.

10/4/12

Might trade down my Gramercy apt and move to Stuy Town (picture looks like the projects, seriously.) if what you say is true. I think I'll break even after 3 months based on the incremental savings + lease-break fee. But first, I need to get over my fears of being stabbed at night... for those late office nights (read: every night).

10/4/12
akim89sp:

Might trade down my Gramercy apt and move to Stuy Town (picture looks like the projects, seriously.) if what you say is true. I think I'll break even after 3 months based on the incremental savings + lease-break fee. But first, I need to get over my fears of being stabbed at night... for those late office nights (read: every night).

I laugh any time anyone mentions fear of being stabbed/mugged/murdered/whatever ANYWHERE in Manhattan...

I used to live in a city with over twice NYC's (the WHOLE city) murder/violent crime rate and I was fine... And I'm a scrawny 5 foot 8 white kid. Get a fucking grip.

5/27/13

akim89sp:

Might trade down my Gramercy apt and move to Stuy Town (picture looks like the projects, seriously.) if what you say is true. I think I'll break even after 3 months based on the incremental savings + lease-break fee. But first, I need to get over my fears of being stabbed at night... for those late office nights (read: every night).

Stuy town is filled with octogenarians. They aren't too aggressive

Fear is the greatest motivator. Motivation is what it takes to find profit.

10/4/12

Unless you're making $200K+, NYC is a miserable city to live in.

10/4/12
TheLastCall:

Unless you're making $200K+, NYC is a miserable city to live in.

Well I think many will disagree with this statement. Yes maybe you cant club every night or eat $100 steak dinners and sushi, but you can clearly still have fun and enjoy it.

10/4/12
TheLastCall:

Unless you're making $200K+, NYC is a miserable city to live in.

I suppose in Manhattan and the places listed, but as a native New Yorker I'll have to disagree. It's most certainly true for some people, but unless you know them personally you'll most likely just see the people whom stand out the most such as the panhandlers on the subway if you take the subway, which might certainly lead you to think the way you do.

One place people can check out is prospect park and its outlying neighborhood. That is if they don't mind an extra 15-25 minute commute. That said, there are a lot more non-New Yorkers/non-immigrants in Brooklyn as of late, particularly in that area. Hell, I've noticed that a lot of those same non-NY/non-immigrants are preferring to live right at the border of neighborhoods with immigrant Asian communities in Brooklyn and Queens (NOT Manhattan unless you're from NYU or something) simply b/c of the relatively low crime rate despite the low rent.

EDIT: Though this is irrelevant to the banker discussion. Nice place if you want to be different and hipster I guess, heh.

73 good sir!

8/28/14

Or you could lever up. That's what banker are best at, right?

10/4/12

Love this post!

No contract means I have all the power. They want me, but they can't have me. - Don Draper

10/4/12

I go running through Stuy Town sometimes. Don't knock it. Place is really well maintained and has an outdoorsy feel with all the open space and grass. The basketball and roller hockey courts all have nets on the hoops and goals. The grounds are well maintained with farmer's markets on the weekends. They have coffee shops and restaurants. I havent been in any units but I hear they're huge.

The only problem is that after it was taken over the rents skyrocketed to market value and of course you're a 10-15 minute walk to the closest train, unless you take the westbound L from 14th and 1st which is very close.

10/4/12
NYU:

The only problem is that after it was taken over the rents skyrocketed to market value

Problem? Nothing wrong with a little gentrification, lol. Besides, if I'm not mistaken- the fact that that DIDN'T happen is what caused the project (no pun intended) to go ass up.

GBS

10/5/12

Stuytown? This was always seen as the last haven for middle class and fixed imncome folks who could never live in Manhattan without the rent control.
Now it is a 20 something hot spot. Goo figure.

10/4/12

I lived in Turtle Bay/Sutton Place when I first moved here.That whole bar scene over there is tad too broish for me. Nice area with the consulates and such.

WSO Vice President, Data
@JustinDDuBois

10/4/12

Damn Burr.

10/4/12

Has anyone ever attempted living at the office? Great way to save 20-30k/year.

You've got your bathrooms, high ceilings, lounge area, home office, maid + house guest (2-in-one), unsurpassed security, seamless for food, and free internet/tv.

8/28/14

BTbanker:

Has anyone ever attempted living at the office? Great way to save 20-30k/year.

You've got your bathrooms, high ceilings, lounge area, home office, maid + house guest (2-in-one), unsurpassed security, seamless for food, and free internet/tv.

are u serious?

8/28/14

LeverageMill:

BTbanker:

Has anyone ever attempted living at the office? Great way to save 20-30k/year.

You've got your bathrooms, high ceilings, lounge area, home office, maid + house guest (2-in-one), unsurpassed security, seamless for food, and free internet/tv.

are u serious?

.....are you?

8/29/14

Cookies With Milken:

LeverageMill:
BTbanker:

Has anyone ever attempted living at the office? Great way to save 20-30k/year.

You've got your bathrooms, high ceilings, lounge area, home office, maid + house guest (2-in-one), unsurpassed security, seamless for food, and free internet/tv.

are u serious?

.....are you?

gotta weight my options.. you know..

8/29/14

Don't know how quick you'll end up in a disciplinary meeting...or as a real homeless..lol

DC

10/4/12

Wait, what about midtown as a neighborhood for analysts? I thought most junior bankers lived there b/c, according to other threads on WSO, you absolutely have to live within walking distance of the office as an IB analyst.

10/4/12

I'm in the UWS and would never, absolutely never, move to the giant dorms you mentioned. UWS is somewhat affordable, with grocery stores and quiet!

10/4/12
nonos:

I'm in the UWS and would never, absolutely never, move to the giant dorms you mentioned. UWS is somewhat affordable, with grocery stores and quiet!

I don't live in NYC, but have visited a lot and want to echo these sentiments: UWS is awesome. Really great atmosphere, nice people, all the goods are within walking distance of most (cheaper) apartments. Far from work for a lot of people, but definitely a sweet place...I would hands down live on the UWS if I moved to NYC.

"An intellectual is a man who takes more words than necessary to tell more than he knows."
- Dwight D. Eisenhower

Check out my blog!

10/4/12
DonVon:
nonos:

I'm in the UWS and would never, absolutely never, move to the giant dorms you mentioned. UWS is somewhat affordable, with grocery stores and quiet!

I don't live in NYC, but have visited a lot and want to echo these sentiments: UWS is awesome. Really great atmosphere, nice people, all the goods are within walking distance of most (cheaper) apartments. Far from work for a lot of people, but definitely a sweet place...I would hands down live on the UWS if I moved to NYC.

The UWS is a pretty awesome neighborhood if you're a 75-year-old Jewish grandmother.

Anyway, here are the best neighborhoods for a young-but-not-brand-new (i.e. post-analyst yet pre-family) banker (in no particular order except for the fact that the West Village is the best place to live in all of NYC):

-- West Village
-- Nolita
-- Soho
-- Noho
-- Greenwich Village (might as well rename the neighborhood NYU)
-- Certain parts of the EV/LES

EDIT: I've always thought that Tribeca is horribly overrated.

10/4/12
holla_back:
DonVon:
nonos:

I'm in the UWS and would never, absolutely never, move to the giant dorms you mentioned. UWS is somewhat affordable, with grocery stores and quiet!

I don't live in NYC, but have visited a lot and want to echo these sentiments: UWS is awesome. Really great atmosphere, nice people, all the goods are within walking distance of most (cheaper) apartments. Far from work for a lot of people, but definitely a sweet place...I would hands down live on the UWS if I moved to NYC.

The UWS is a pretty awesome neighborhood if you're a 75-year-old Jewish grandmother.

Anyway, here are the best neighborhoods for a young-but-not-brand-new (i.e. post-analyst yet pre-family) banker (in no particular order except for the fact that the West Village is the best place to live in all of NYC):

-- West Village
-- Nolita
-- Soho
-- Noho
-- Greenwich Village (might as well rename the neighborhood NYU)
-- Certain parts of the EV/LES

EDIT: I've always thought that Tribeca is horribly overrated.

:) right off bleecker

Frank Sinatra - "Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy."

10/4/12
holla_back:

Anyway, here are the best neighborhoods for a young-but-not-brand-new (i.e. post-analyst yet pre-family) banker (in no particular order except for the fact that the West Village is the best place to live in all of NYC):

-- West Village
-- Nolita
-- Soho
-- Noho
-- Greenwich Village (might as well rename the neighborhood NYU)
-- Certain parts of the EV/LES

EDIT: I've always thought that Tribeca is horribly overrated.

Nolita, god I love it here. I'm still young too, it was a stretch on rent but I'm just the guy who puts a premium on home so it was worth it.

Most people do things to add days to their life. I do things to add life to my days.

Browse my blog as a WSO contributing author

10/4/12

love the post Burr...curious to hear your thoughts on the West side. I've lived at 50th and 8th, 55th and 8th, 46th and Lex and 38th and Park. (from 2002 - 2008)

All midtown, because I always wanted to be able to walk to work.

10/4/12

golden post

10/4/12

I live on the Upper East Side, and the OP nailed it. I live with two friends in an awesome apartment, but it's quiet and there are tons of families up by me. Bars are good though.

10/4/12

SoHo is not really on the east side. Neither is the financial district for that matter. The island of Manhattan gets narrower as you go further south and the whole east side vs west side distinction becomes increasingly less pronounced until it almost converges together at battery park where my building is located.

From a subway standpoint, in the financial district (I hate the neologism FiDi with a passion) the 2 and 3 line stations are actually to the east of the 456.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

10/4/12

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

10/4/12
brandon st randy:

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

So you hate the neologism FiDi, but you're fine with SoHo and TriBeca? That doesn't really make any sense...

10/4/12
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

So you hate the neologism FiDi, but you're fine with SoHo and TriBeca? That doesn't really make any sense...

The etymology of SoHo and Tribeca date back to the early 70s while FiDi is a much more recent invention.
Also the areas comprising what is nowadays SoHo and Tribeca used to consist only of abandoned industrial lofts until artists started moving into the areas in the 70s . These neighborhoods did not exist before so they are justified to give them new names. The Financial District has been around forever.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

10/4/12
brandon st randy:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

So you hate the neologism FiDi, but you're fine with SoHo and TriBeca? That doesn't really make any sense...

The etymology of SoHo and Tribeca date back to the early 70s while FiDi is a much more recent invention.
Also the areas comprising what is nowadays SoHo and Tribeca used to consist only of abandoned industrial lofts until artists started moving into the areas in the 70s . These neighborhoods did not exist before so they are justified to give them new names. The Financial District has been around forever.

The point is that they are shortened forms of the names they were given. South of Houston and Triangle Below Canal. FiDi as a shortened from of Financial District is every bit as valid.

10/4/12
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

So you hate the neologism FiDi, but you're fine with SoHo and TriBeca? That doesn't really make any sense...

The etymology of SoHo and Tribeca date back to the early 70s while FiDi is a much more recent invention.
Also the areas comprising what is nowadays SoHo and Tribeca used to consist only of abandoned industrial lofts until artists started moving into the areas in the 70s . These neighborhoods did not exist before so they are justified to give them new names. The Financial District has been around forever.

The point is that they are shortened forms of the names they were given. South of Houston and Triangle Below Canal. FiDi as a shortened from of Financial District is every bit as valid.

Yeah, except the only people who say "FiDi" are douchey real estate brokers and all of the poor people who were snookered by said brokers.

10/5/12
holla_back:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

So you hate the neologism FiDi, but you're fine with SoHo and TriBeca? That doesn't really make any sense...

The etymology of SoHo and Tribeca date back to the early 70s while FiDi is a much more recent invention.
Also the areas comprising what is nowadays SoHo and Tribeca used to consist only of abandoned industrial lofts until artists started moving into the areas in the 70s . These neighborhoods did not exist before so they are justified to give them new names. The Financial District has been around forever.

The point is that they are shortened forms of the names they were given. South of Houston and Triangle Below Canal. FiDi as a shortened from of Financial District is every bit as valid.

Yeah, except the only people who say "FiDi" are douchey real estate brokers and all of the poor people who were snookered by said brokers.

I don't really think that's true... for instance virtually everyone on my floor likes to refer to it as a unit of distance, as if to indicate a Siberia-like remoteness, i.e. "Nah dude, we can't go all the way down to the FiDi tonight."

You just don't like the term because you live there. It's no douchier than Tribeca, SoHo, NoHo, Nolita, or Dumbo. You just want to add an additional level of class by saying Financial District because you think FiDi cheapens it, but that's your own deal. Hate to break it to you but FiDi isn't going anywhere as an identifying neighborhood moniker so you'll have to get used to it.

10/5/12
rufiolove:
holla_back:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

So you hate the neologism FiDi, but you're fine with SoHo and TriBeca? That doesn't really make any sense...

The etymology of SoHo and Tribeca date back to the early 70s while FiDi is a much more recent invention.
Also the areas comprising what is nowadays SoHo and Tribeca used to consist only of abandoned industrial lofts until artists started moving into the areas in the 70s . These neighborhoods did not exist before so they are justified to give them new names. The Financial District has been around forever.

The point is that they are shortened forms of the names they were given. South of Houston and Triangle Below Canal. FiDi as a shortened from of Financial District is every bit as valid.

Yeah, except the only people who say "FiDi" are douchey real estate brokers and all of the poor people who were snookered by said brokers.

I don't really think that's true... for instance virtually everyone on my floor likes to refer to it as a unit of distance, as if to indicate a Siberia-like remoteness, i.e. "Nah dude, we can't go all the way down to the FiDi tonight."

You just don't like the term because you live there. It's no douchier than Tribeca, SoHo, NoHo, Nolita, or Dumbo. You just want to add an additional level of class by saying Financial District because you think FiDi cheapens it, but that's your own deal. Hate to break it to you but FiDi isn't going anywhere as an identifying neighborhood moniker so you'll have to get used to it.

Except people simply don't say "FiDi." It has always existed and been called the "Financial District." You and your friends are in the minority. That's what I'm saying.

WHat does it cheapen? Do you think that I live there?

10/5/12
holla_back:
rufiolove:
holla_back:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

So you hate the neologism FiDi, but you're fine with SoHo and TriBeca? That doesn't really make any sense...

The etymology of SoHo and Tribeca date back to the early 70s while FiDi is a much more recent invention.
Also the areas comprising what is nowadays SoHo and Tribeca used to consist only of abandoned industrial lofts until artists started moving into the areas in the 70s . These neighborhoods did not exist before so they are justified to give them new names. The Financial District has been around forever.

The point is that they are shortened forms of the names they were given. South of Houston and Triangle Below Canal. FiDi as a shortened from of Financial District is every bit as valid.

Yeah, except the only people who say "FiDi" are douchey real estate brokers and all of the poor people who were snookered by said brokers.

I don't really think that's true... for instance virtually everyone on my floor likes to refer to it as a unit of distance, as if to indicate a Siberia-like remoteness, i.e. "Nah dude, we can't go all the way down to the FiDi tonight."

You just don't like the term because you live there. It's no douchier than Tribeca, SoHo, NoHo, Nolita, or Dumbo. You just want to add an additional level of class by saying Financial District because you think FiDi cheapens it, but that's your own deal. Hate to break it to you but FiDi isn't going anywhere as an identifying neighborhood moniker so you'll have to get used to it.

Except people simply don't say "FiDi." It has always existed and been called the "Financial District." You and your friends are in the minority. That's what I'm saying.

WHat does it cheapen? Do you think that I live there?

Dude everyone says FiDi... I don't know what you're talking about

10/5/12
rufiolove:
holla_back:
rufiolove:
holla_back:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

So you hate the neologism FiDi, but you're fine with SoHo and TriBeca? That doesn't really make any sense...

The etymology of SoHo and Tribeca date back to the early 70s while FiDi is a much more recent invention.
Also the areas comprising what is nowadays SoHo and Tribeca used to consist only of abandoned industrial lofts until artists started moving into the areas in the 70s . These neighborhoods did not exist before so they are justified to give them new names. The Financial District has been around forever.

The point is that they are shortened forms of the names they were given. South of Houston and Triangle Below Canal. FiDi as a shortened from of Financial District is every bit as valid.

Yeah, except the only people who say "FiDi" are douchey real estate brokers and all of the poor people who were snookered by said brokers.

I don't really think that's true... for instance virtually everyone on my floor likes to refer to it as a unit of distance, as if to indicate a Siberia-like remoteness, i.e. "Nah dude, we can't go all the way down to the FiDi tonight."

You just don't like the term because you live there. It's no douchier than Tribeca, SoHo, NoHo, Nolita, or Dumbo. You just want to add an additional level of class by saying Financial District because you think FiDi cheapens it, but that's your own deal. Hate to break it to you but FiDi isn't going anywhere as an identifying neighborhood moniker so you'll have to get used to it.

Except people simply don't say "FiDi." It has always existed and been called the "Financial District." You and your friends are in the minority. That's what I'm saying.

WHat does it cheapen? Do you think that I live there?

Dude everyone says FiDi... I don't know what you're talking about

Well, that's the strangest thing I've heard today.

Serious question: how old are you? How long have you lived here?

10/5/12
holla_back:
rufiolove:
holla_back:
rufiolove:
holla_back:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

So you hate the neologism FiDi, but you're fine with SoHo and TriBeca? That doesn't really make any sense...

The etymology of SoHo and Tribeca date back to the early 70s while FiDi is a much more recent invention.
Also the areas comprising what is nowadays SoHo and Tribeca used to consist only of abandoned industrial lofts until artists started moving into the areas in the 70s . These neighborhoods did not exist before so they are justified to give them new names. The Financial District has been around forever.

The point is that they are shortened forms of the names they were given. South of Houston and Triangle Below Canal. FiDi as a shortened from of Financial District is every bit as valid.

Yeah, except the only people who say "FiDi" are douchey real estate brokers and all of the poor people who were snookered by said brokers.

I don't really think that's true... for instance virtually everyone on my floor likes to refer to it as a unit of distance, as if to indicate a Siberia-like remoteness, i.e. "Nah dude, we can't go all the way down to the FiDi tonight."

You just don't like the term because you live there. It's no douchier than Tribeca, SoHo, NoHo, Nolita, or Dumbo. You just want to add an additional level of class by saying Financial District because you think FiDi cheapens it, but that's your own deal. Hate to break it to you but FiDi isn't going anywhere as an identifying neighborhood moniker so you'll have to get used to it.

Except people simply don't say "FiDi." It has always existed and been called the "Financial District." You and your friends are in the minority. That's what I'm saying.

WHat does it cheapen? Do you think that I live there?

Dude everyone says FiDi... I don't know what you're talking about

Well, that's the strangest thing I've heard today.

Serious question: how old are you? How long have you lived here?

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/fiditribecca...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/living-in-fidi

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/where-do-cit...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/where-should...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/blog/best-area-to-l...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/july-august-...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/nyc-summer-r...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/ft-nyc-summe...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/nyc-apartment-0

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/first-year-a...

Not really sure that age has much to do with it but I've spent 2-3 years living in New York so I have a pretty decent grasp

10/5/12
rufiolove:

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/fiditribecca...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/living-in-fidi

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/where-do-cit...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/where-should...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/blog/best-area-to-l...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/july-august-...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/nyc-summer-r...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/ft-nyc-summe...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/nyc-apartment-0

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/first-year-a...

Not really sure that age has much to do with it but I've spent 2-3 years living in New York so I have a pretty decent grasp

I didn't have a real problem with you using it online. My point was that nobody says it out in the real world (meaning says it aloud). Would you call the South Bronx "SoBro?" Would you call Crown Heights "ProCro?" What about "NoMad?"

If you answered yes to any of these, you're in the minority, and doing so will possibly make you sound like an idiot, sort of like saying you live on the Avenue of the Americas or pronouncing it "HYOO-ston" Street. It's just something that'd be jarring to most ears, and would advertise to the world that you really don't know any better.

I think age has a lot to do with things, as young transplants generally usually aren't the savviest of people. Also, I'm in a grumpy old dickhead mood, so take this whole internet argument with a grain of salt.

10/5/12
holla_back:
rufiolove:

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/fiditribecca...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/living-in-fidi

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/where-do-cit...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/where-should...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/blog/best-area-to-l...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/july-august-...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/nyc-summer-r...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/ft-nyc-summe...

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/nyc-apartment-0

http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/first-year-a...

Not really sure that age has much to do with it but I've spent 2-3 years living in New York so I have a pretty decent grasp

I didn't have a real problem with you using it online. My point was that nobody says it out in the real world (meaning says it aloud). Would you call the South Bronx "SoBro?" Would you call Crown Heights "ProCro?" What about "NoMad?"

If you answered yes to any of these, you're in the minority, and doing so will possibly make you sound like an idiot, sort of like saying you live on the Avenue of the Americas or pronouncing it "HYOO-ston" Street. It's just something that'd be jarring to most ears, and would advertise to the world that you really don't know any better.

I think age has a lot to do with things, as young transplants generally usually aren't the savviest of people. Also, I'm in a grumpy old dickhead mood, so take this whole internet argument with a grain of salt.

Thats because you can't make up a colloquialism for a neighborhood that's never talked about.

10/6/12
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:
rufiolove:
brandon st randy:

I think it makes sense to do 3 editions: east side, west side and lower Manhattan/downtown, the last one would comprise of neighborhoods below Houston st where the streets are not numbered, such as SoHo, TriBeca, Financial district, BPC, the LES etc.

So you hate the neologism FiDi, but you're fine with SoHo and TriBeca? That doesn't really make any sense...

The etymology of SoHo and Tribeca date back to the early 70s while FiDi is a much more recent invention.
Also the areas comprising what is nowadays SoHo and Tribeca used to consist only of abandoned industrial lofts until artists started moving into the areas in the 70s . These neighborhoods did not exist before so they are justified to give them new names. The Financial District has been around forever.

The point is that they are shortened forms of the names they were given. South of Houston and Triangle Below Canal. FiDi as a shortened from of Financial District is every bit as valid.

I would disagree. Not only does FiDi sound stupid - but the neighborhood is actually known as the Financial District. "South of Houston" and "Triangle Below Canal" were never predominantly known by those names.

10/4/12

Hoboken

10/4/12

I'm trying to move to east village.. more specifically avenue C & 13th. can't wait.

10/4/12
SamuelClemens:

I'm trying to move to east village.. more specifically avenue C & 13th. can't wait.

Are you sure about this? 13th and C is really just East River Station (Con Ed) and projects.

10/4/12
holla_back:
SamuelClemens:

I'm trying to move to east village.. more specifically avenue C & 13th. can't wait.

Are you sure about this? 13th and C is really just East River Station (Con Ed) and projects.

I know it's not the greatest part of the east village but it's certainly affordable. I've been around the area quite a bit and it's perfectly fine. Avenues A - D have a bad reputation in general but that area has been quite gentrified in my opinion. I'm not worried at all, especially since the studio I'm wanting is in pristine condition.

edit: also it's a bit south of the east river station so it's barely visable from the building. I don't want to give out the exact location :P

10/4/12
SamuelClemens:
holla_back:
SamuelClemens:

I'm trying to move to east village.. more specifically avenue C & 13th. can't wait.

Are you sure about this? 13th and C is really just East River Station (Con Ed) and projects.

I know it's not the greatest part of the east village but it's certainly affordable. I've been around the area quite a bit and it's perfectly fine. Avenues A - D have a bad reputation in general but that area has been quite gentrified in my opinion. I'm not worried at all, especially since the studio I'm wanting is in pristine condition.

edit: also it's a bit south of the east river station so it's barely visable from the building. I don't want to give out the exact location :P

Fair enough. My brother lives around 10th and C and loves it -- there's a lot to do on Ave C (awesome bars and restaurants) these days.

Be aware, though, there's a pretty weird invisible border that exists between Ave C and Ave D, especially at night. The neighborhood east of C is one of the few shitty places that still exists in Manhattan (like pit bulls running around free, obvious dealers and neer-do-wells hanging out everywhere, etc.). I'm a pretty physically imposing guy who grew up here, and even I completely avoid Ave D at night.

10/4/12
SamuelClemens:

I'm trying to move to east village.. more specifically avenue C & 13th. can't wait.

That is in alphabet city. Do you work in Midtown? If you take the subway to Midtown you would first have to walk like 15 minutes just to get to the station.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

10/4/12

Someone should write a London version of this...

10/4/12

This is so right it's scary

Made the FiDi mistake in 2009. Never again.

Jesus Christ I miss NYC.

Best Response
10/4/12

Writers, artists, families and working/middle class are now replaced by the "Bro" and the "Like Yah" millennium transplant Frat crowd. And the saddest thing about this is that you all think you're cool. Even Bud Fox would hate your guts.

10/4/12

What about Harlem?

Talent is hitting a target no one can hit.
Genius is hitting a target no one can see.

10/5/12
Determined:

What about Harlem?

That's the sweetspot.

"I like money (as do most females) but love is...great :)"-student
Is the Bull Chasing a Bear

10/5/12

This post is awesome. Burr, you sure have a way of bringing back the past (NYC, IBD analyst days...) nice work man

"Jesus, he's like a gremlin; comes with instructions and shit"

10/4/12

I just live on the High Line now. Bitties are outta controllll

10/4/12

do any of you find the idea of being surrounded by bankers and finance folks after work in your neighbourhood... well... a bit too much?

Wouldn't you want to live somewhere with a different social scene?

10/4/12

^Come to High Line dawg, it's meatpackers and models, don't need no bottles. Just bring styles and smiles

10/4/12

Meatpackers? lol

GBS

10/4/12

I still think brooklyn heights > everywhere

My drinkin' problem left today, she packed up all her bags and walked away.

10/4/12

A shot at the Chicago version of these neighborhoods...

  1. The Murray Hill Bro-Shak = Wrigleyville
  2. The Stuy-Town Single = Lincoln Park
  3. The East Villager = Wicker Park
  4. The SoHo Sophisticate = Gold Coast
  5. But I have a balcony! (FiDi) = Loop
10/4/12
livingthedream86:

A shot at the Chicago version of these neighborhoods...

  1. The Murray Hill Bro-Shak = Wrigleyville
  2. The Stuy-Town Single = Lincoln Park
  3. The East Villager = Wicker Park
  4. The SoHo Sophisticate = Gold Coast
  5. But I have a balcony! (FiDi) = Loop

Wicker Park is definitely the Williamsburg/Bushwick of Chicago. I would consider Lincoln Park and Lakeview the Chi-Town equivalent of Murray Hill/UES. The Gold Coast is more like UES west of Madison Avenue, where the old money of Chicago historically resides.
Agreed with the Loop being like the Financial District.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

10/4/12

brandon st randy:
I would consider Lincoln Park

i would consider them effing bro-tastic too bro!!! FUQ YEAAAAHHH!!!!
10/7/12
Ron Paul:
brandon st randy:

I would consider Lincoln Park

i would consider them effing bro-tastic too bro!!! FUQ YEAAAAHHH!!!!

Made me laugh.

-RR

10/5/12
brandon st randy:
livingthedream86:

A shot at the Chicago version of these neighborhoods...

  1. The Murray Hill Bro-Shak = Wrigleyville
  2. The Stuy-Town Single = Lincoln Park
  3. The East Villager = Wicker Park
  4. The SoHo Sophisticate = Gold Coast
  5. But I have a balcony! (FiDi) = Loop

Wicker Park is definitely the Williamsburg/Bushwick of Chicago. I would consider Lincoln Park and Lakeview the Chi-Town equivalent of Murray Hill/UES. The Gold Coast is more like UES west of Madison Avenue, where the old money of Chicago historically resides.
Agreed with the Loop being like the Financial District.

IDK man, Logan Square battles hard for the Williamsburg/Bushwick of the Chi. Humboldt Park too.

"An intellectual is a man who takes more words than necessary to tell more than he knows."
- Dwight D. Eisenhower

Check out my blog!

10/5/12

Humboldt park is more like bushwick in the sense that both used to be very humble neighborhoods and are now magnets for hipsters and the alternative crowd.

Also when I typed that the gold coast is like the ues west of Madison, I really meant park avenue obviously. Don't know how to edit my post on mobile.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

10/6/12

Wow, very accurate

10/5/12

I've been living in New York for more than ten years and have never heard anyone say FiDi. I wouldn't even know how to pronounce it: Fih-dee? Fye-dye?

10/6/12

Once you bank a couple bonus checks and get tired of living in a frat house (I did spend a year of my life in the infamous Windsor Court for all you NYC'rs) the West Village is where it's at. If you can afford to live there you can afford to take cabs if you want to have a divey night in Murray Hill, LES, etc. but walking distance to meat packing, tons of restaurants, tons of good bars, and it actually feels like a neighborhood more than anywhere else in the city. Shit I have bushes and trees in front of my apt and walk out my door and have a view of the Hudson. Gym is across the street, running on the water, wouldn't want to really live anywhere else.

5/28/13

Billy Ray Valentine:

Once you bank a couple bonus checks and get tired of living in a frat house (I did spend a year of my life in the infamous Windsor Court for all you NYC'rs) the West Village is where it's at. If you can afford to live there you can afford to take cabs if you want to have a divey night in Murray Hill, LES, etc. but walking distance to meat packing, tons of restaurants, tons of good bars, and it actually feels like a neighborhood more than anywhere else in the city. Shit I have bushes and trees in front of my apt and walk out my door and have a view of the Hudson. Gym is across the street, running on the water, wouldn't want to really live anywhere else.

Unfortunately the west village is becoming like murray hill for 27 year olds instead of 22 year olds as evidenced by the above. I have lived there for about 5 years now and even in that short-time it has become way more douche-tastic. It still is a great neighborhood but its not what it used to be or even close.

5/28/13

Bondarb:

Billy Ray Valentine:

Once you bank a couple bonus checks and get tired of living in a frat house (I did spend a year of my life in the infamous Windsor Court for all you NYC'rs) the West Village is where it's at. If you can afford to live there you can afford to take cabs if you want to have a divey night in Murray Hill, LES, etc. but walking distance to meat packing, tons of restaurants, tons of good bars, and it actually feels like a neighborhood more than anywhere else in the city. Shit I have bushes and trees in front of my apt and walk out my door and have a view of the Hudson. Gym is across the street, running on the water, wouldn't want to really live anywhere else.

Unfortunately the west village is becoming like murray hill for 27 year olds instead of 22 year olds as evidenced by the above. I have lived there for about 5 years now and even in that short-time it has become way more douche-tastic. It still is a great neighborhood but its not what it used to be or even close.

New York will never really be what it once was.

That said, there really isn't a nicer neighborhood in Manhattan these days. (And I'd say it's more a Murray Hill for 30-something-year-olds, as few 27-year-olds can afford a grown-up place in the West Village.)

10/6/12

I generally like to live within 10-15 minutes of where i work. Preferably 10 minutes. As a single guy, all other criteria are secondary to this imo.

10/6/12

This post was great. I am one of those dudes who lives in the East Village and "feels like I sell out" as I walk to the subway in the morning.

That being said, it's a great place if you can get near a subway line. Weekend pregames are easy and you can walk to and from any number of bars, including those in the LES.

Personally think West Village is a little too posh/hollywood. Sure it's beautiful and quiet, but it's super expensive and near impossible to have a real pad living there.

10/8/12

Murray Hill is unquestionably the stereotypical 'young banker' neighborhood in NYC. Very untrendy, and popular with the frat-bro, still pretend I am in college, i cant believe how much rent costs kids. It is a fine, clean neighborhood but women will not be impressed. Big plus is easy commutes on the 456 line up to work in midtown.

Tribeca is where you go when you are 40, married to a model, and have $25 million to spend on a place. You order take out from Nobu and have an interior designer on call. You enjoy the wide, clear sidewalks and the nanny dresses your kid in $400 outfits for his Mandarin lessons.

Soho is so hip, you signed the lease sight-unseen before moving to the US. You have never seen as many tourists in your entire life and the sidewalks are five deep, shoulder to shoulder with morons holding maps and walking so slow you never want to leave your apartment. You feel like you are in the middle of everything, but your next apartment will be somewhere else, for sure.

The Upper East Side is for rich guys, right? Maybe that was true 30 years ago, or maybe you live in the very crappy, dead at night, everyone thinks you are a loser side of the neighborhood? Because even if you could afford to live near the park, no single guy in his right mind under 75 would want to live here. You are saving lots of loot vs living downtown. But you spend half your life in a cab heading downtown to meet friends.

Fidi is where you go when you want to get a little more for your money. And you say things like 'it is getting SO much better than in years past.' You say things like this all the time and no one believes you. And they won't visit. You order Fresh Direct because restaurants are not great and the bodega closes on the weekend.

Chicks love the West Village. Small streets every restaurant is overflowing with beautiful people. You go running along the West Side path and enjoy saying you live in the west village despite spending $6k each month for a shit hole walkup.

I could go on.

10/9/12

As long as it's 15 minutes from Katz

10/22/12

I'm goind to be moving to NYC this summer. What's wrong with FiDi?

Because when you're in a room full of smart people, smart suddenly doesn't matter--interesting is what matters.

10/22/12
ricky212:

I'm goind to be moving to NYC this summer. What's wrong with FiDi?

It's a barren, desolate wasteland during non-work hours.

10/22/12

I prefer the Greenwich Village area, but hey, that's just me.

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

10/22/12

I'm just curious, where would a summer analyst stay for the summer?

10/22/12

YOU'RE ALL FUCKING FALSE BROOLYN HEIGHTS OR GTFO. Seriously though.

My drinkin' problem left today, she packed up all her bags and walked away.

10/24/12

Noob to WSO, but native New Yorker, who lives abroad and hasn't lived in NYC for a decade or so. I can assure you that nobody ever said "FiDi" in the 20th century. (How do you pronounce it? "Fiddy"?)

Making abbreviations by using the first syllable in each word makes me think of communism and fascism: Comintern = Communist International; Gestapo = Geheime Staats Polizei. We're capitalists, people! We don't do it that way. What ever happened toinitialisms and acronyms? UES, UWS, that kind of thing.

(That said, the ludicrous acronym DUMBO is one of the silliest things I've ever heard and I'd refuse to live there as long as people were calling it that. If Brooklyn Heights ever gets called BroHi, I shall live in exile from my former home until its proper name comes back.)

10/24/12
Joralemon:

Noob to WSO, but native New Yorker, who lives abroad and hasn't lived in NYC for a decade or so. I can assure you that nobody ever said "FiDi" in the 20th century. (How do you pronounce it? "Fiddy"?)

Making abbreviations by using the first syllable in each word makes me think of communism and fascism: Comintern = Communist International; Gestapo = Geheime Staats Polizei. We're capitalists, people! We don't do it that way. What ever happened toinitialisms and acronyms? UES, UWS, that kind of thing.

(That said, the ludicrous acronym DUMBO is one of the silliest things I've ever heard and I'd refuse to live there as long as people were calling it that. If Brooklyn Heights ever gets called BroHi, I shall live in exile from my former home until its proper name comes back.)

There was even a movement to rename the Financial District "SoMa" as in South Manhattan.
Thankfully that attempt quickly fizzled, presumably after San Francisco threatened them with copyright infringement lawsuit.
There have been other instances of backlashes against hideous neo-acronyms, e.g. SpaHa, SoBro, LoHo etc.

The name Dumbo was actually dreamed up by the local hippies back in the 70s in an attempt to make the neighborhood look less appealing to developers. That attempt didn't work however as Dumbo is now among the most expensive neighborhoods in all of NYC, in terms of both residential and commercial rental costs. In hindsight perhaps they should have saved the O in the end and called it "Dumb" instead.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

10/25/12

I'm going to go ahead and second brandon, FiDi is the dumbest and most unnecessary acronym I've ever heard in my life and I refuse to ever say that out loud. Sure I can tolerate it in a real estate broker ad, but if I was ever having a face-to-face conversation with someone and they told me they lived in "fye-dye", I'd smack the living shit out of them.

holla_back:

The UWS is a pretty awesome neighborhood if you're a 75-year-old Jewish grandmother.

this made me lol. so true, don't know why the hell a single dude in his early 20s would want to live in the UWS or UES. going downtown is a pain in the ass

Great post.

5/27/13

I'm moving to UES in July (80th), just wondering what people's thoughts are about that area? Thanks!

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."

5/27/13

streetwannabe:

I'm moving to UES in July (80th), just wondering what people's thoughts are about that area? Thanks!

Expensive but you can tell people you live in the same neighborhood as Don Draper

funny how I said I was going to be moving to 13th st in this thread like 9 months ago. I ended up getting a place in Kips Bay, basically in between east village and murray hill. It's a pretty nice area and there are lots of bars and stuff.

5/27/13

SamuelClemens:

streetwannabe:

I'm moving to UES in July (80th), just wondering what people's thoughts are about that area? Thanks!

Expensive but you can tell people you live in the same neighborhood as Don Draper

funny how I said I was going to be moving to 13th st in this thread like 9 months ago. I ended up getting a place in Kips Bay, basically in between east village and murray hill. It's a pretty nice area and there are lots of bars and stuff.

He's very likely talking about Yorkville, which is one of the most inexpensive white neighborhoods in Manhattan.

5/27/13

holla_back:

SamuelClemens:

streetwannabe:
I'm moving to UES in July (80th), just wondering what people's thoughts are about that area? Thanks!

Expensive but you can tell people you live in the same neighborhood as Don Draper
funny how I said I was going to be moving to 13th st in this thread like 9 months ago. I ended up getting a place in Kips Bay, basically in between east village and murray hill. It's a pretty nice area and there are lots of bars and stuff.

He's very likely talking about Yorkville, which is one of the most inexpensive white neighborhoods in Manhattan.

Yeah, I guess it is in Yorkville (very bottom corner), but it will be inexpensive just because of the way we arranged it. Regardless, how is that general area?

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."

5/27/13

streetwannabe:

holla_back:

SamuelClemens:

streetwannabe:
I'm moving to UES in July (80th), just wondering what people's thoughts are about that area? Thanks!
Expensive but you can tell people you live in the same neighborhood as Don Draper
funny how I said I was going to be moving to 13th st in this thread like 9 months ago. I ended up getting a place in Kips Bay, basically in between east village and murray hill. It's a pretty nice area and there are lots of bars and stuff.

He's very likely talking about Yorkville, which is one of the most inexpensive white neighborhoods in Manhattan.

Yeah, I guess it is in Yorkville (very bottom corner), but it will be inexpensive just because of the way we arranged it. Regardless, how is that general area?

It's not too bad. It's obviously not the most happening place in the world, but there are enough bars and restaurants in the neighborhood to prevent you from killing yourself. You'll find your places.

How far are you from Lex? If you're far, you might end up taking the bus more often than you might have thought.

5/27/13

holla_back:

streetwannabe:

holla_back:

SamuelClemens:
streetwannabe:
I'm moving to UES in July (80th), just wondering what people's thoughts are about that area? Thanks!
Expensive but you can tell people you live in the same neighborhood as Don Draper
funny how I said I was going to be moving to 13th st in this thread like 9 months ago. I ended up getting a place in Kips Bay, basically in between east village and murray hill. It's a pretty nice area and there are lots of bars and stuff.
He's very likely talking about Yorkville, which is one of the most inexpensive white neighborhoods in Manhattan.

Yeah, I guess it is in Yorkville (very bottom corner), but it will be inexpensive just because of the way we arranged it. Regardless, how is that general area?

It's not too bad. It's obviously not the most happening place in the world, but there are enough bars and restaurants in the neighborhood to prevent you from killing yourself. You'll find your places.

How far are you from Lex? If you're far, you might end up taking the bus more often than you might have thought.

2nd ave and 80th so it's not too far from the subway (the 77th and 3rd or whatever). And yeah, not the most agreeable neighborhood, but its cheap and I'm sure it'll be fine.

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."

5/27/13

streetwannabe:

I'm moving to UES in July (80th), just wondering what people's thoughts are about that area? Thanks!

Two of my favorite joints are in that area. Brandy's Piano Bar is on 83rd between 2nd and 3rd. And Dorian's is a few blocks away at 84th and 2nd. Dorian has a bad reputation among some but I have always had good time there plus the staff there are always been nice to me.

There may still be disruptions due to constructions of the 2nd Avenue Subway line but other than that the area is nice, with many amenities including a Fairway on the 86th and proximity to both Central and Carl Schurz parks.

Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

5/27/13

Why would anyone live in Stuy Town when they could go one stop further and have a 2x bigger place in a 4x nicer building for the same price in Williamsburg?

"For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

5/27/13

@samuelclemens: Yeah, I know it is generally nice but just seems a bit quite from when I've been there. And I'm getting a place with my friends so it'll be around >1k per month which will be nice.

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."

5/28/13

Bankers miss out on Brooklyn. There's some serious arbitrage over there right now. Don't live there myself, but I kick myself every time I visit my friends' places in Williamsburg / DUMBO. One stop further than a ton of very popular areas, but with much newer buildings.

"For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

5/28/13

NorthSider:

Bankers miss out on Brooklyn. There's some serious arbitrage over there right now. Don't live there myself, but I kick myself every time I visit my friends' places in Williamsburg / DUMBO. One stop further than a ton of very popular areas, but with much newer buildings.

The commute. Great when you get the comped ride home, obnoxious in the mornings. Endured it once coming back from a girl's place. Did not enjoy.

Most people do things to add days to their life. I do things to add life to my days.

Browse my blog as a WSO contributing author

5/28/13

APAE:

NorthSider:

Bankers miss out on Brooklyn. There's some serious arbitrage over there right now. Don't live there myself, but I kick myself every time I visit my friends' places in Williamsburg / DUMBO. One stop further than a ton of very popular areas, but with much newer buildings.

The commute. Great when you get the comped ride home, obnoxious in the mornings. Endured it once coming back from a girl's place. Did not enjoy.

See, that's what everyone says. But boat loads of bankers make the commute from Stuy Town on the L from 1st Ave. If you lived on the Bedford stop on Williamsburg, you'd be one stop further than Stuy Town. Am I missing something?

"For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

5/28/13

NorthSider:

Bankers miss out on Brooklyn. There's some serious arbitrage over there right now. Don't live there myself, but I kick myself every time I visit my friends' places in Williamsburg / DUMBO. One stop further than a ton of very popular areas, but with much newer buildings.

Williamsburg and DUMBO are just as expensive as Manhattan's nicest neighborhood's these days, though.

5/28/13

holla_back:

NorthSider:

Bankers miss out on Brooklyn. There's some serious arbitrage over there right now. Don't live there myself, but I kick myself every time I visit my friends' places in Williamsburg / DUMBO. One stop further than a ton of very popular areas, but with much newer buildings.

Williamsburg and DUMBO are just as expensive as Manhattan's nicest neighborhood's these days, though.

I wouldn't go that far. You get much more for your money out in W / D (nicer, bigger place). But they are definitely way more expensive than the rest of Brooklyn.

"For all the tribulations in our lives, for all the troubles that remain in the world, the decline of violence is an accomplishment we can savor, and an impetus to cherish the forces of civilization and enlightenment that made it possible."

8/29/13

Never Brooklyn.

Bourbon all day.

5/29/13

Gimme East Village, for Generation Records alone....

Metal. Music. Life. www.headofmetal.com

6/26/13

holla_back:

NorthSider:

Bankers miss out on Brooklyn. There's some serious arbitrage over there right now. Don't live there myself, but I kick myself every time I visit my friends' places in Williamsburg / DUMBO. One stop further than a ton of very popular areas, but with much newer buildings.

Williamsburg and DUMBO are just as expensive as Manhattan's nicest neighborhood's these days, though.

If that were true who would want to live in Brooklyn? I think the P/R ratios of Lower & Midtown Manhattan show the difference in perceived value.

"It's very easy to have too many goals and be overwhelmed by them... The trick is to find the one thing you can focus on that represents every other single thing you want in life." -- @"Edmundo Braverman"

6/27/13

My drinkin' problem left today, she packed up all her bags and walked away.

8/8/13
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8/29/14
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