Choosing between McKinsey, Bain, and BCG?

In deciding between MBB, would you guys offer any insights about differences between the three firms or things to think about while making a decision? All three offers are from the same city.

McKinsey vs Bain vs BCG

If you've worked hard enough to secure an offer at all three firms then congratulations. These firms are the most prestigious in consulting. All of these firms offer great exit opportunities and pay. However these firms still have their individual strengths and weaknesses.
Lets take a look at each firm in terms of pay at the first year associate level. The following figures are being pulled from the 2017 Wall Street Oasis Consulting Industry Report. Compensation figures are calculated by adding average salary to average bonus.

McKinsey Salary

  • Average base: 126.4k
  • Average bonus: 25.5k
  • All in compensation: 151.9k

Boston Consulting Group (BCG) Salary

  • Average base: 81.4k
  • Average bonus: 15k
  • All in compensation: 96.4k

Bain Salary

  • Average base: 74.4k
  • Average bonus: 16.5k
  • All in compensation: 90.9k

On the whole, Mckinsey and Company pays its first year associates the best by a large degree.

MBB: Management Consulting Lifestyle

Next, lets see how these firms compare in terms of lifestyle. Each firm will is given a percentage based on time off, hours worked and overall work life balance. Each metric is designed to answer each of the the following questions.

  • Time off: Management support for needed time off?
  • Work life balance: Employer support in balancing between work life and personal life?
  • Average hours worked: How many hours do you work an average?

Working at Mckinsey

  • Time Off: 94.4%
  • Work life balance: 86.7%
  • Average hours worked: 69.1

Working at Bain

  • Time Off: 89.9%
  • Work life balance: 91.1%
  • Average hours worked: 64.9

Working at Boston Consulting Group (BCG)

  • Time Off: 87.8%
  • Work life balance: 81.1%
  • Average hours worked: 63.7

In terms of pay and time off Mckinsey & Co. leads the group. Bain comes in first for best work life balance and second in pay. Finally, BCG comes in first place with the least amount of average hours worked.

In summary, all of these are fantastic places to begin a career in management consulting. All three firms are top tier for almost every metric used in the consulting industry report. After all, they have their own acronym for a reason.

Curious about how your firm stacks up against MBB and other elite firms? Check out the 2017 Consulting Industry Report for more compensation data and the most up to date information. Click the link below to get started.

Consulting Industry Report

 

well, it might be too late for that now, but during the interview, when they ask you "do you have any questions for me?..." - that would have been a good time to ask them what THEY think makes their firm/office special, what kind of engagements are maybe more typical at that office, or whatever interests you and helps you decide. also you could have tried to get a feel as to the people at the office, the feel of the place...

or... i could give you the cliches, which you could have googled yourself... Mck: most prestigious, biggest, greatest network, "let's do our work, and do it right" attitude BCG: creative, out-of-the-box, almost nerdy Bain: college'y, "fun"(?)

just repeating what keeps getting said, but i think they all have much of the same and differ mostly on an individual basis v-a-v people and offices.

go with whichever office felt better.

"... then, lobbest thou thy Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch towards thy foe, who, being naughty in My sight, shall snuff it."
 
dagro:

Mck: most prestigious, biggest, greatest network, "let's do our work, and do it right" attitude
r.

Implying that BCG and Bain don't have the attitude of producing quality work? Ridiculous. If anything, compared to Bain and BCG, McKinsey is far more concerned with who sees the work than what was actually accomplished at the client.

"'In summary, people are morons and who cares. Make a shit ton of money. I've never seen a Ferrari paid for by what people think.' - ANT" -rufiolove
 
acronym:
dagro:

Mck: most prestigious, biggest, greatest network, "let's do our work, and do it right" attitude
r.

Implying that BCG and Bain don't have the attitude of producing quality work? Ridiculous. If anything, compared to Bain and BCG, McKinsey is far more concerned with *who* sees the work than *what* was actually accomplished at the client.

please don't quote me out of context again.

"... then, lobbest thou thy Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch towards thy foe, who, being naughty in My sight, shall snuff it."
 

First, congratulations!

By and large, it's tough to make an objective case for one MBB over another. Here are some things to think about: 1. Travel - Some industries in some offices provide lots of local work. Beyond that, some firms typically travel 3 days/wk. Other are 4 days/wk. 2. Work style - Do teams always co-locate? Do you leave the team room when you're done or when everyone is done for the night? 3. Fridays - Do most people work from home? Work full days in the office? Do lots of networking and practice-area events? 4. Progression - What %age make the jump to EM/PL? Of those, how many leave before promo time vs. how many are coached out? What about the next level? What resources are there for those who exit for either reason? 5. Leave, sabbatical, secondement, ambassador programs - What options are there? How many people utilize them? How are these viewed in terms of career progression? 6. Sustainability - What measures are in place to ensure it's not always crunch time? What checks are there to prevent burn-out? Do all teams abide by these? 7. Salary progression - Base offers and progression are pretty similar, but at least get the data for your future reference. 8. Staffing - Self-driven networking, highly centralized, or somewhere in-between. Which model suits you?

Beyond making the decision, there are some tactical considerations you might want to think about: 9. Case types - What industries and functions do you want to work on first? As a triple-offeree, you'll never have more leverage than now to get soft commitments from the firms about your early assignments. Same for meeting senior staff who work on those types of cases. Be tactful.

Hopefully you'll have a few SELLebration events to ask these types of questions. Good luck.

 

I think brj did an excellent job summarizing the differences among the three firms. The only things I'd add are:

1) The people - Where do you feel like you fit best? Consulting travel and hours is really tough if you don't like who you're working with. Assuming you are either an undergrad or an MBA, you can also look at your classmates going to different firms and think about where you'd fit in the best. 2) The staffing model - Bain is office-centric, BCG is regional with some national/global optionality, and McK is the most global. There are inherent pros and cons to each of the models. Which suits you best? 3) Org structure/shape - Bain is pyramid-shaped (more undergrads) whereas BCG and McK are diamonds (more MBAs / advanced degree holders). Which environment would you rather be in?

Assuming you find that multiple firms satisfy your hygiene factors (salary, type of work, travel), I'd advise choosing based on people. Good luck!

 
Best Response

What city are you in? Relative strengths/attractiveness of clients differ a lot by city (and country). [Actually, don't tell us but consider the question].

Corollary to the previous question: are you interested in a particular vertical? Strengths within particular verticals differ by firm and by firm by city.

Do you want to wake at at 4:30am every Monday and live out of a hotel 3 nights a week? Go to McKinsey or BCG.

Do you want to be friends with your colleagues? Go to Bain.

Do you want to impress random people with only a minimal familiarity with the industry? Go to McKinsey.

What do you want to do later in your career? If you want to go to the buy side, go to Bain or McKinsey.

Are you nerdy, awkward, and/or German? Go to BCG.

Seriously though, go to the offeree weekends and see where you fit in. In my experience, the work isn't all that different but the people are.

"'In summary, people are morons and who cares. Make a shit ton of money. I've never seen a Ferrari paid for by what people think.' - ANT" -rufiolove
 

This is a blanket answer. However, there are some valid points. I found myself in a similar situation as OP recently having all three offers and the biggest differences are the culture and people. Unforutnately this varies from office-to-office, so take any statement on here with a grain of salt.

BCG and McKinsey's models are more similar than different. I would say McKinsey is slightly more global when it comes to staffing. Bain however is very different. You will always work with people form your office or the next closest office on projects. The pro is obviously making stronger relationships, however the con is that you limit your network and could end up doing repeat work with colleagues you may not like that much. In general Bain is less travel than the other two.

In the end, it is all about people and fit. You need to get face-time with people from each office before you pull the trigger.

 
OpsDude:

Based on the general consensus at my MBA program, McKinsey has the strongest prestige and Bain is the most fun/coolest people. BCG seems to be lagging a bit behind those two in where people want to work (and surprisingly, quite a few people took bain over McKinsey). That said, the Chicago BCG office is pretty great and only 50% travel.

It's still strange to me that Kellogg and Booth are completely opposite with regards to Bain and BCG. At K, Bain kills it and is head-to-head with McK. At B, the battle for #1 has been between BCG and McK for the last few years, with Bain a distant 3rd. Several discussions with MBBers from both schools over the summer and we still can't figure it out.

Generally though, crosses between McK and either B often boil down to prestige v. sustainability and are easier to resolve (though not in one direction or the other) than crosses between the Bs, where the intangibles loom largest.

 
brj:
OpsDude:

Based on the general consensus at my MBA program, McKinsey has the strongest prestige and Bain is the most fun/coolest people. BCG seems to be lagging a bit behind those two in where people want to work (and surprisingly, quite a few people took bain over McKinsey). That said, the Chicago BCG office is pretty great and only 50% travel.

It's still strange to me that Kellogg and Booth are completely opposite with regards to Bain and BCG. At K, Bain kills it and is head-to-head with McK. At B, the battle for #1 has been between BCG and McK for the last few years, with Bain a distant 3rd. Several discussions with MBBers from both schools over the summer and we still can't figure it out.

Generally though, crosses between McK and either B often boil down to prestige v. sustainability and are easier to resolve (though not in one direction or the other) than crosses between the Bs, where the intangibles loom largest.

I went to a few high potential dinners that MBB had, and one of them was mixed between Kellogg and Booth students. From that I've realized the stereotypes about the differences between Booth and Kellogg are very accurate. I can definitely see why the more quanty/nerdy BCG would appeal to Booth students (I don't mean that in a bad way).

 
brj:
OpsDude:

Based on the general consensus at my MBA program, McKinsey has the strongest prestige and Bain is the most fun/coolest people. BCG seems to be lagging a bit behind those two in where people want to work (and surprisingly, quite a few people took bain over McKinsey). That said, the Chicago BCG office is pretty great and only 50% travel.

Generally though, crosses between McK and either B often boil down to prestige v. sustainability and are easier to resolve (though not in one direction or the other) than crosses between the Bs, where the intangibles loom largest.

please elaborate
"... then, lobbest thou thy Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch towards thy foe, who, being naughty in My sight, shall snuff it."
 

Bain. No question. They do (far) more PE work, place guys regularly at Blackstone/BainCap (~3/yr and ~9 / yr, respectively), usually 2-3 at TPG, and then maybe 1 at KKR (Carlyle just started interviewing consultants this year).

For HFs, Bain has more on retainer than McK, and does more work in that area. So if you're at McK doing finance cases, you're working for big banks or corporations, while at Bain you're doing far more advising to PE firms and Hedge funds relative to big banks/firms. This only really applies to the SF/NY/Bos offices--others do way less PE/HF work, so there's a good argument for taking McK there. Top-5 PE don't list Associates on their websites, but you can assume that Bain has huge adv @ bain cap, and is marginally better at the other 5 than McK. Look at websites for Berkshire, Gold Gate, Hellman Friedman, Providence, CVC, Cinven, and you'll see that Bain dominates. At executive level, maybe more McKs than Bainies at many of these firms, but that's really cause Bain is younger and really came into its own in PE space during the last boom, so it kills McK in associate hiring now.

Or think of it this way (if it's more helpful): • ~25% of Bain 2nd year ACs in a given year leave to do buy-side (others do non-prof/bus school/stay at Bain/industry. Buy side is HF/VC/PE). That means ~35-40 applicants (140-160*.25). Let's assume high and go 40. • most of this 25% do PE. It's the most well-travelled route, given that ACs do a lot of time in PE. Say 15% of the 25% do VC and 15% of the 25% do HF (that's 6 VC and 6 HF). Leaves 28 going to PE. •Now take a look at acceptances in a given year: 2 BS 2 TPG 1 KKR + Carlyle (this is conservative, given that both firms are moving towards hiring more consultants) 7 Bain Cap 3 Golden Gate 1 Providence/Hellman Friedman 1 CVC 2 Berkshire (also conservative--see their website) 2 Apax 2 3i 2 Cinven 1 AEA 1 Cerberus/TH Lee/Warburg Pincus/Madison Dearborne, Silver Lake/Other firms I'm missing that are very legit (1 is for all these combined--conservative, I think) 3 HIG (less legit, but I'll incl here) 1 GS PIA (I think--not sure tho)

TOTAL > 28 (and w/ conservative numbers--Bain Cap goes above 7 usually from Bain. it's greater b/c of some hiring out of Bain London.
Compare that with McK numbers from these companies' websites McK guys are working at worse firms--look at Audax, for e.g., which was founded by a Bain Cap guy and ex Bainie, but has way more McK associates. That's cause, though Audax is legit, bainies are getting better jobs than that. Look at other solid mid mkt firms' sites that hire consultants--more McKs, and these firms tend to be worse

For hedge, Bain and McK are closer, but Bain still edges out all but McK corp fi. The truth is, if you go into McK w/o any finance bckgrnd (internships) and aren't corp fi, you won't even get interviews from most of the top 5 (except Bain Cap). Guys in the NY office went to SAC and Och Ziff last year. Guys in SF had offers from D.E. Shaw and Farallon.

Keep in mind that out of Bain's ~150 ACs, only ~75 are in SF/NY/Bos, which are the places that do more HF/PE-applicable work, so those guys are really set or HF/PE, given that the numbers above apply to all of Bain.

That's not to say Bain is better--McK is better at a lot of non-profit, industry, public sector, and impressing random people you meet. But Bain is very clearly better comparatively than McK, and on an absolute level, very very good, when it comes to PE/HF

 

Check out the MM firms' websites that report associates' stuff, so that means that only BS and TPG are way out of line...and I'm sure that BS and Bain have a very good relationship, so assuming 2 isn't crazy at all (out of 20 associates hired). Bain will say that 1/2 of Bain Cap's class is Bain ACs...and Bain Cap's class is mid-high teens.

McK places well, of course, but, again, check out those firms' websites. The ##s suggest that Bain is stronger...even at firms other than gold gate and Bain Cap (except Audax, which is a cut below the others I mention, I think).

I'm a senior at target not doing consulting next year, though I got Bain and McK. It was clear to me that McK is very confident that they are "the best," and in may respects they are, but that confidence spreads to their beliefs about how good they are at recruiting to buy-side, when the evidence points very strongly in Bain's direction. If you're making a choice between the two, make sure to ask the tough questions...

I'm wondering which of my ##s is wrong, specifically...

 

Check out the MM firms' websites that report associates' stuff, so that means that only BS and TPG are potentially way out of line (even assuming only one hire for each in a given year, that doesn't really change my overall conclusion that Bainies do very well in PE--i.e. way more spots than people who want to go to PE and work in top-tier offices, so PE must be hiring from "2nd tier" bain offices a lot...and I'm sure that BS and Bain have a very good relationship, so assuming 2 isn't crazy at all (out of 20 associates hired). Bain will say that 1/2 of Bain Cap's class is Bain ACs...and Bain Cap's class is mid-high teens.

McK places well, of course, but, again, check out those firms' websites. The ##s suggest that Bain is stronger...even at firms other than gold gate and Bain Cap (except Audax, which is a cut below the others I mention, I think).

I'm a senior at target not doing consulting next year, though I got Bain and McK. It was clear to me that McK is very confident that they are "the best," and in may respects they are, but that confidence spreads to their beliefs about how good they are at recruiting to buy-side, when the evidence points very strongly in Bain's direction. If you're making a choice between the two, make sure to ask the tough questions...

I'm wondering which of my ##s is wrong, specifically...

 

Think about the 8-10 number more: -Bain Cap's website says that they have 270 investment pros across all investment vehicles, 170 in PE -Bain Cap has several positions: Associate pre MBA, Associate Post MBA, Principal, VP, MD. -Their website lists all investment pros principal and higher. There are 133. -So 133/270 investment professionals are associates pre and post b-school. -Assuming the ratio in PE is same as their hedge funds (a very conservative assumption--PE has more due diligence than hedge so more associates / senior pro), then we get 84 associates. -The associate contract for pre MBA is 2 years. Those invited back (not a huge ##) must go to b-school 1st (few exceptions--none that I know of and am reasonably familiar with the firm). Max time as post MBA associate is 3 years (again, very few exceptions). -So that means 84 associates / 5 years = 18-19 associates / year. -which means more than 8-10 hires...just from the simple process of "filling in the blanks" on Bain Cap's own website -which makes sense--Bain Cap is known for lotsa due diligence, so they will have 3 associates, a principal, VP, and MD on one team (more associates than most funds). -Either way you look at it, smuguy, I think my number is likely to be more accurate than yours.

 

questions - as robust as your website-based SWAG appears to be, there is a key difference between my figure and your estimate. The 8-10 figure was articulated to me by Josh Bekenstein (feel free to look him up) while eating lunch in the Bain Capital dining area / cafeteria during a September '05 third-round interview for a summer '06 start. I can confirm that for '07 the starting class was of similar size, as a close friend and fellow MBB alum just started in September '07.

If you really want to know why your estimate is off, it is because you have no familiarity with Sankaty Advisors, one of Bain Cap's non-PE units. Sankaty is a fixed-income fund that is staffed heavily with both associates AND analysts. Sankaty is the only Bain Capital unit that hires direct from undergrad; within the group, analysts outnumber associates by roughly 2-1.

 

personally i'd go with BCG or McKinsey.

BCG pays a bit more and has been growing more recently, which is good.

bain is smaller and might not be recognized in some geographies. also, due to smaller size, future is a bit less certain.

McKinsey still has a slight edge for name.

i'd index heavily on what the office you were offered at does. I mean, what industries do they primarily serve where you got your offer, and how does that compare to your interests? BCG, McKinsey and Bain might have very different industry concentrations for the same office / region, and even if your offers are at the same city, this could lead to very different long-term careers based on what type of work they do there.

can't go wrong however you choose.

 

Spoilt.

Still not sure if I want to spend the next 30+ years grinding away in corporate finance and the WSO dream chase or look to have enough passive income to live simply and work minimally.
 

I'm curious why you think that? I changed my language a bit in the post but I think this is a great opportunity to learn even if I don't want to spend my life working towards a position at a PE firm or a blue chip not that there's anything wrong with that I just don't think it is for me...is that not an acceptable approach to the situation?

 

ignore missingno. it's pretty standard for people to only do management consulting for a couple of years then exit, but i think it's just one of those things you're not supposed to say out loud. for some reason, exiting to private equity is more ok than going to law school. go figure.

i would say your best bet is bain. they'll all work you hard, but from what i hear bain places a very strong emphasis on training and also the people who work there seem to genuinely like it, which is something you don't see at the other two. it also has the largest proportion of young people.

that being said, if you think your future lies in other areas, why aren't you going after them straight out of college to get a head start and do something you actually find meaning in? just curious.

 

First off, congrats on the three offers.

I think a lot depends on what you mean by "work/life balance." Certainly any of those places will have better lifestyles than most I banking jobs (not sure if that was your internship), but also worse than most other elite jobs. And FWIW, BigLaw (i.e. what 95% of law school grads do, including the vast majority of those who are sure that they want to do civil rights etc. going in) has an awful work/life balance. I also think that your early 20's aren't the time to be obsessing over work/life balance--the next few years are about learning a ton and putting yourself in a position for future success. My suspicion is that if you are smart & driven enough to get all three offers, you will enjoy working hard at consulting, just because of the intellectual challenge. Work/life balance will become a lot more important a decade down the line when you're married and have kids.

I'm also a little confused how you can eliminate BCG on fit but are torn between the other two. Bain has a much more fratty, friendly culture (i.e. captain of the lacrosse team), McKinsey a stiffer culture (chemistry major), with BCG somewhere in the middle. Bain also has a better lifestyle than McKinsey (less hours, less travel).

Anyway, all three firms are great. McKinsey will probably give you somewhat more senior-level exposure, and definitely more long-term prestige. You say you don't care about "prestige" now, but trust me in ten years you will. It's great that you're cock of the walk right now and probably don't feel that you need the brand-name on your resume, but things can change. McKinsey will also work you a little bit harder, you will travel more (pros and cons), and the office will have less of a party atmosphere.

But for now, luxuriate in the options and go to the three sell days, then make up your mind.

 

So I work at an MBB firm and I can tell you that the biggest difference are the cultures. McKinsey does have more prestige, so if that's all you're looking for, then go for it. Otherwise, if you want a fun place to work, go for Bain. The place has a reputation of being a bit of a frat, and, based on the folks there I know, not undeservedly. So if that's what you want, then go for it. People with offers from both often seperate based on these criteria, with many at Bain saying they didn't really want to work at McKinsey because a fun loving culture (as opposed to a very intense one) is what they wanted. Others will work at McKinsey because, as you mentioned, it can maybe give you better exposure and they want the intensity McK brings. So whichever you value more.

Hope that helps.

 

You will perform better while working with people you like, and your perceived work/life balance will be greater when you truly enjoy spending time with your co-workers.

The differences in prestige, exit ops, travel, etc are so minute compared to cultural differences that they are almost not even worth comparing. Go where you feel most comfortable.

 

I like Enrico's post - except I think the "Chem Major" is more the BCG stereotype (bookish, lots of engineering types). I'd say that the McKinsey stereotype would be the president of the student body, who probably didn't do that much studying (but still got good grades).

 

I really appreciate the feedback. I'm really interested in peacerenity's comment. Do others also get the feeling that the training program is much better at Bain? Oh and to answer your question, just because I think there are experiences that I could have and things I could learn that I couldn't in some of the other work I may want to eventually do.

And, of course, I'll go to all the sell days and hopefully it'll give me a much better idea of what everyday life looks at these places but I've heard a lot of people say it breaks down into basically into Bain may be a better environment/lifestyle but McKinsey may provide you both more opportunity to do interesting work and carries a better brand. I can definitely believe that it has the slight prestige advantage but are people right that being the larger firm the work opportunities are much more interesting at McKinsey than Bain (i.e. people/govts/firms only come to McK with the biggest problems whereas Bain may get less "cutting-edge" cases) or is that just unwarranted hype?

Thanks again to everyone for their advice. I really appreciate hearing from you guys, especially those who've worked at these sorts of places.

 

@ califly

going off of the 2010 vault consulting survey, bain is ranked number 1 in "formal training" with an average employee rating of 9.698. BCG is also ranked 7th with a rating of 8.431. McKinsey is not in the top 20.

It doesn't give a detailed description of training at Bain, but here's what it says about BCG:

"To get ready for all that client contact, training at BCG involves “a mix of on-the-job training, formal cohort training in the office, regionally and worldwide, and in-person or online topic-specific training.” We’re told that entry-level orientation “lasts two weeks at the start of the associate position, and is followed by other sessions that focus on specific tools, as well as communication skills and leadership development.

"The quality of formal training with outside experts is phenomenal,” a source claims, and a junior colleague agrees: “I owe most of my development to apprenticeship during the case process.” Another newbie concurs, saying that “there is fantastic apprenticeship given. A strong component of our superiors’ performance evaluation is upward feedback, which is based on their mentoring capabilities.” All this training really pays off come promotion time. BCG consultants “are given time to develop,” and those who perform well can “advance very quickly, with meaningful level changes every two years.” Eventually, however, “it is up-or-out.” The built-in timeframe for advancement is “24 to 30 months from consultant to project leader,” and those who wish to continue their career with the firm have to “prove they can make it.”"

 

I think the fact you're compared 3 NY offices is really going to minimize the differences between the firms. IMO, a lot of office culture is based on what the target schools are...an office in the south/Texas will probably be frattier than an SF office, for example.

To be 100% honest, you're making way more of marginal differences than you need to. For example, the training is going to be what you make it...I was way more interested in having cocktails with my new friends and colleagues than learning Power Point macros my first week of training.

Frankly, I've heard BCG NY is a bit more "work hard play hard" than the other offices, and McK is more of a sweatshop than average, but that's off a limited sample size.

Your "McK gets bigger cases than Bain" is pure BS, by the way. If you were comparing McK and Accenture, sure. But the reason it's MBB is because they're head and shoulders above everyone else on pretty much every dimension, and the marginal differences can be made up by driving your personal experience.

Life, liberty and the pursuit of Starwood Points
 
paknightpa:
So what's funny is that Bain SF is actually much frattier than Bain Dallas. Most Bain offices (with Dallas the notable exception) are similar in terms of their culture, at least within the US I've heard, so NY would definitely be that way too.

Well, I stand corrected. SB for you.

Life, liberty and the pursuit of Starwood Points
 

Sorry to bring this thread back, but I seem unable to post a new one and I need advice on what to do.. badly. I got offers from Bain and McKinsey to work at Mexico City (I am from Mexico btw). Bain does pay a little more, but that’s not nearly as important as getting a sponsorship for an MBA for me.

People at McKinsey said that approximately 90% of the analysts that reach their second year are offered full sponsored MBA program at a top school (don’t know the % of analyst that last more than a year though) I also don’t know the Bain numbers, but they told me that if stay on track I will get sponsorship after my third year.

It seems to be McKinsey is just a bit higher in terms of prestige above BCG and Bain, but it also seems the lifestyle at Bain is the best out of the three. Sincerely, I felt more identified with Bain and the people I got to meet in the interviews. McKinsey had some cool guys, but some we’re too serious or nerdy.

Any other differences I can be missing (generalist/specialist approach, exit opportunities, training, future compensation, luxurious travel, etc.)?