Comments (96)

Funniest
8d 
Pizz, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Women suddenly like you if they find out you have money. 

  • 31
  • 5
8d 
WolfgangFuckface, what's your opinion? Comment below:

How many years did you spend in the can? I know you don't like to talk about it

  • 1
Learn More

300+ video lessons across 6 modeling courses taught by elite practitioners at the top investment banks and private equity funds -- Excel Modeling -- Financial Statement Modeling -- M&A Modeling -- LBO Modeling -- DCF and Valuation Modeling -- ALL INCLUDED + 2 Huge Bonuses.

Learn more
Most Helpful
8d 
jackstraw001, what's your opinion? Comment below:

In no particular order:

  • Once you have kids, your time is no longer your own, particularly weekends.  Between birthday parties, practices, games, giving wife a few free hours, etc., there's not a lot of time left to do your own stuff.  Time intensive pursuits like golf are tough to fit in.
  • My metabolism slowed to a crawl in mid-30s so exercise and diet took on a greater importance.  However, hard to find time to workout unless your commit to getting started at 5am or workout during lunchtime.  No more workouts after leaving the office.  
  • The decade of my 30s flew by way faster than I thought it would.  Same with 40s.  Time just flies by so you need to be disciplined with goals and plans as its really easy to get caught up in just living and have a few years go by without really realizing it.
  • No matter how much money you make, your lifestyle will find a way to cost slightly more than your free cash flow can cover.  I always thought that "once I get this raise/bonus/promotion" that I'll be good but somehow private schools, vacations, 2nd homes, summer camps, etc. tend to suck up any available cash.  Your lifestyle grows in proportion to your income.  Something you need to be disciplined about as well.
  • What surprised me most is how much I enjoy getting older.  Seriously.  Each stage of life has its own unique sets of pros and cons.  I'm pretty content with where I am and have no desire to revisit any earlier periods of my life.  Enjoy where you are because it goes by quickly.

EDIT: There have been some great comments added since my stream of consciousness post the other night that I'd like to respond or add to.

  • Parents - it's different for everybody but at some point in your adult life, you'll probably have to start taking care of your parents instead of the other way around.  It becomes particularly difficult if you have kids of your own at home and you're trying to allocate time and resources to everyone who needs you.  I have elderly parents, both living thankfully, but one has some health issues including dementia which started sooner than should be expected so my physical and financial support of them started when I was in my mid-40s.  The transition from receiving support and encouragement from your folks to instead offering the same back to them has been sobering.
  • Friends - I agree with everyone who mentioned that your circle of friends shrinks as you get older but I think that's a good thing. In my younger years, I had my golf buddies, my concert/shows buddies and my drinking buddies, with some overlap between, and none of whom I was particularly close to when I really think about it. I now have 3 really solid friends, all of whom I met post-college, who I connect with regularly and have become more or less extended family members.  We counsel each other, keep each other accountable and have agreed to help our spouses and kids in the event one of us unexpectedly passes or is incapacitated.  Find true friends you can rely on like that.
  • Marriage - Your relationship with your spouse changes as the years progress and you're both busy working and raising kids; it's trite and you've all heard it before, but you have to work at having a good, solid marriage.  While many of you are in the wedding-every-weekend phase of life, I'm on the other side where too many couples than I can count are splitting up after the last kid is out of the house because they realize that they don't know each other anymore and really don't have much, other than their kids, in common.  The kids become the buffer or excuse for not spending time together or being attentive to each other's needs and years of that can kill whatever brought the two of you together in the first place.  This is all Marriage 101 stuff but I know for a fact it works - be intentional about regular, scheduled date nights, weekend trips without kids, shared hobbies/interests, having coffee/wine just to catch up, etc. At some point before you know it, it will be just the two of you again and you want to really LIKE, as well as love, the person you're with.
8d 
Smoke Frog, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Lifestyle creep is so real, easier said than done to just not care and keep savings rate steady as you get older.

8d 
WolfofWSO, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I saved more when I made less than 1/3 of what I do now. I also lived cheap at $500/month rent with a 10 year old car that cost $6k.

My monthly mortgage is more than 5x what it was. My income didn't go up 5x. I also bought a new car more than 10x what my old car cost (and it has more problems with all the blasted buttons).

I envy the simpler days…

Beware young monkeys, that "rich" future you're dreaming about may actually be a nightmare in disguise.

Array

  • 1
9h 
Link_REDev, what's your opinion? Comment below:
jackstraw001

In no particular order:

  • Once you have kids, your time is no longer your own, particularly weekends.  Between birthday parties, practices, games, giving wife a few free hours, etc., there's not a lot of time left to do your own stuff.  Time intensive pursuits like golf are tough to fit in.
  • My metabolism slowed to a crawl in mid-30s so exercise and diet took on a greater importance.  However, hard to find time to workout unless your commit to getting started at 5am or workout during lunchtime.  No more workouts after leaving the office.  
  • The decade of my 30s flew by way faster than I thought it would.  Same with 40s.  Time just flies by so you need to be disciplined with goals and plans as its really easy to get caught up in just living and have a few years go by without really realizing it.
  • No matter how much money you make, your lifestyle will find a way to cost slightly more than your free cash flow can cover.  I always thought that "once I get this raise/bonus/promotion" that I'll be good but somehow private schools, vacations, 2nd homes, summer camps, etc. tend to suck up any available cash.  Your lifestyle grows in proportion to your income.  Something you need to be disciplined about as well.
  • What surprised me most is how much I enjoy getting older.  Seriously.  Each stage of life has its own unique sets of pros and cons.  I'm pretty content with where I am and have no desire to revisit any earlier periods of my life.  Enjoy where you are because it goes by quickly.

EDIT: There have been some great comments added since my stream of consciousness post the other night that I'd like to respond or add to.

  • Parents - it's different for everybody but at some point in your adult life, you'll probably have to start taking care of your parents instead of the other way around.  It becomes particularly difficult if you have kids of your own at home and you're trying to allocate time and resources to everyone who needs you.  I have elderly parents, both living thankfully, but one has some health issues including dementia which started sooner than should be expected so my physical and financial support of them started when I was in my mid-40s.  The transition from receiving support and encouragement from your folks to instead offering the same back to them has been sobering.
  • Friends - I agree with everyone who mentioned that your circle of friends shrinks as you get older but I think that's a good thing. In my younger years, I had my golf buddies, my concert/shows buddies and my drinking buddies, with some overlap between, and none of whom I was particularly close to when I really think about it. I now have 3 really solid friends, all of whom I met post-college, who I connect with regularly and have become more or less extended family members.  We counsel each other, keep each other accountable and have agreed to help our spouses and kids in the event one of us unexpectedly passes or is incapacitated.  Find true friends you can rely on like that.
  • Marriage - Your relationship with your spouse changes as the years progress and you're both busy working and raising kids; it's trite and you've all heard it before, but you have to work at having a good, solid marriage.  While many of you are in the wedding-every-weekend phase of life, I'm on the other side where too many couples than I can count are splitting up after the last kid is out of the house because they realize that they don't know each other anymore and really don't have much, other than their kids, in common.  The kids become the buffer or excuse for not spending time together or being attentive to each other's needs and years of that can kill whatever brought the two of you together in the first place.  This is all Marriage 101 stuff but I know for a fact it works - be intentional about regular, scheduled date nights, weekend trips without kids, shared hobbies/interests, having coffee/wine just to catch up, etc. At some point before you know it, it will be just the two of you again and you want to really LIKE, as well as love, the person you're with.

isn't this the truth, I'm making around $500-$600k per year and I'm still thinking where the fuck is all the money going lol.

8d 
Nuwanda, what's your opinion? Comment below:

1) Losing people as you get older has to be the hardest part of growing up. No one tells you or prepares you for it. It just happens and you have to manage.

2) The wide variety of ways that life can fall apart only to come back together in strange and possibly better ways.

8d 
thebrofessor, what's your opinion? Comment below:

not yet 40, married, no kids (yet), what I didn't expect and how I'd advise the younger me

  1. to still be in this good of shape with this kind of metabolism. consistency in the gym is key kiddies, don't try to be a hero with hitting new maxes in big lifts, aim for 5 training sessions a week, don't be afraid of cardio
    1. more on this, I didn't expect to ever enjoy cardio, but I've come to love rounds on the bag, a long run/swim, etc., it's very meditative
  2. to have my friend circle shrink this much and not give a fuck. plenty of people I saw near daily in college have just faded by the wayside, not because of any incident, but because I no longer have the room for 10 really close friends, I've got room for 2, and I keep those guys very close. no advice I'd really give myself, just try your best. everybody's busy, but if you make even a tiny bit of effort, it can go a long way
  3. how quickly old friends' lives can fall apart. drugs, alcohol, bad relationships, obesity, crime. if someone needs help, offer but don't insist (hippocrates: Before you heal someone, ask him if he's willing to give up the things that make him sick), but be very careful of who you surround yourself with. your old college buddy who's spending every thursday-sunday doing blow and chasing dumb 22-24 year olds while you're trying to build relationships? don't alienate yourself entirely, but don't waste your time there.
  4. health scares. I heard "you almost died" when I was in my mid 20's. long story short a medical issue that I'd had my entire life presented itself in such a way that a seemingly benign injury nearly turned fatal. don't hesitate to call 911 if you feel off. you won't miss the money, you could miss an opp to save your life. countless other things with friends who both neglected their health and who did triathlons. you have control over what you do in the gym and in the grocery store, but not the genetic cards you're dealt. treasure every moment, you never know when your last one will be
  5. how quickly time flies. it's still hard to believe I'm 3X years old and have been out of college 1X years, your mind is definitely rooted in the glory days for a very long time. I'd just tell myself the same cliche stuff I heard in my teens and 20's, don't worry about shit. I don't remember any arguments I've gotten into from years' past, stupid purchases I've made (unless they were large dollar), things that pissed me off on social media or in politics, just let it be like water off a duck's back, whatever it is, you won't care about it in the future, so why give it attention now. that said, you will remember all of the trips you take, the guys weekends you did, the visit with family you do, and since you won't remember the cost of the plane ticket, the lost sleep you won't ever get back, and so on, just go out and try to DO as much as possible with the people you care about.
  6. how my political views have evolved and dissolved. I was a borderline anarcho-libertarian in college, and while I still lean that way, I don't really give a fuck. you'll come to learn that your day to day is much more impacted by things like the speed limit in your neighborhood, the quality of the nearest high school, zoning rules, and your local economy than what's happening in washington. I've since shifted my attention to be mostly apolitical. I still vote in every election, but I don't allow victory or defeat of the people for whom I voted dictate my mood. I will also say that in general, as I've aged, my views have gotten softer. things I used to be hardline on, not anymore. there's a lot of grey area out there, and while I believe there are some absolute truths, very little in politics is actually black and white
  7. how I view money. when I didn't make or have money, it was all I thought about. and while I'd consider myself a henry (google it), I don't think about it much. it's a means to an end - to provide for the people I care about, pay my bills, and provide me with the means to experience the things I want to experience. and yes, while I do have a thoughtful approach to money management (it is what I do for a living), I rarely think about it which has led me to be way less stressed about it. I've noticed the ones who always think about money seem to be the most stressed, even if they have it together
  8. how much benefit I'd get from hardship. I've had a relatively easy life. sure, growing up lower middle class as a biracial minority wasn't silver spoon but I grew up in a safe suburb (crime mostly happened in the downtown of where I lived), had loving parents, had no health issues as a kid, and was in the USA, that's pretty fucking lucky. for years, all the way through my mid 20s, I never really pushed myself, but once I tried to build a business, I found out real quickly what grit was. I intentionally had to push myself beyond what I was comfortable doing, and have since determined that all personal growth comes not from victory, but from struggle. I encourage everyone to put themselves through hardship because life will give you plenty of it eventually, if you're not prepared for it, you will suffer more. also, through hardship comes growth. I look back on every hard thing I've ever done with fondness because I got something out of that experience, so try hard things, get out of your comfort zone. instead of being the guy that asks why, be the guy that asks why not

EDIT: since so many others have mentioned lifestyle creep, I feel compelled to comment. I've not experienced lifestyle creep robbing me of savings, my lifestyle has not grown in proportion to my income, and it's definitely avoidable. I take nicer vacations now and do so more frequently, go out to eat more, but right now my mortgage is about the same as the rent on my last apartment. a big part of this is in who you choose to marry. if your partner wants to upgrade their lifestyle with things that have high fixed costs, lifestyle creep is unavoidable. if you're happy with the simpler things and so is your spouse, it's not that difficult once you're aware it exists. I could be eating my words once I enter my 50's with kids, but for now this is what I believe and practice

7d 
mo2cii, what's your opinion? Comment below:
it's still hard to believe I'm 3X years old and have been out of college 1X years

Great and insightful right-up as always @El-Proffesori 

I don't understand the quoted text. So lets say you left college at 20, so its been 1x out of college (another 20).

But 3x years old? what does this mean, since you're not 60 (3x20)

  • 3
Controversial
8d 
Hölder, what's your opinion? Comment below:

As a teen I had that phase in which I thought the world was a horrible place and everything sucked.

Mid-20's now and I never expected that the world was actually even worse that teen-me could have even imagined and everything sucks way more than I even thought was possible (but, obviously, for totally different reasons).

Ignorance truly is bliss. I am currently sitting in my comfy office job just typing numbers into an Excel file even though I know our governments very likely just threw us on a recession on purpose, are actively escalating a war that did not even need to happen to see if they can push Putin to start WW3 by nuking someone, and in the next 3-5 years it is likely that many governments that push against the current world order (i.e. China, Russia, some middle east, some africa, etc.) will collapse leaving literally billions of innocent people to starve to death. But the media will tell us how all of this is actually a good thing and 80% of people will believe it blocking any kind of change coming through democratic means so a civil war that kills even us is probably also coming.

6d 
rf949, what's your opinion? Comment below:

You got problems dude

6d 
Alt-Ctr-Left, what's your opinion? Comment below:
Hölde actively escalating a war that did not even need to happen to see if they can push Putin to start WW3 by nuking someone,

Weapons level gas lighting. The only one initiating and escalating a war is Putin. Full stop. 

"I don't know how to explain to you that you should care about other people."

  • 3
  • 2
6d 
Hölder, what's your opinion? Comment below:

As the saying goes, it takes two to tango. Putin is no saint but I do not see many peace-makers on the west either. The simplest explanation is that both sides are gaining some benefit from prolonging this war. The reality is that you have two countries that both have historical and political claims to a piece of land. If in our day we had statesmen like Otto Von Bismarck this petty conflict would have been ended via a UN resolution. This is literally the stupidest war that has been fought in a long while and anyone who supports it is evil or misinformed. And if you think that the real world is like a kids show where there is one clear good guy and one clear bad guy then you probably fall on the misinformed camp. I'll say it again: Putin is no saint - but Ukraine pre-war or even pre-crisis was not some kind of innocent progressive utopia. 

6d 
Phil Leotardo, what's your opinion? Comment below:

our governments very likely just threw us on a recession on purpose, are actively escalating a war that did not even need to happen to see if they can push Putin to start WW3 by nuking someone, 

So if Putin murders you with a nuclear bomb, you will still blame the West?  Boot lickers are so sad 😂 I really hope Putin is paying you

  • 1
5d 
bands_bands_bands, what's your opinion? Comment below:

this is gonna sound cliche but you should try "getting a life". You'd be surprised how much hobbies and relationships will take your mind away from whatever your problems are (sounds like you just don't have anything going on outside of work)

8d 
Isaiah_53_5 💎🙌💎🙌💎, what's your opinion? Comment below:

In my 20s, I never thought I would be that close to my parents. But, that all changed in my 30s when they started having health issues and I jumped in to help and now our relationship is very strong. 

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

  • 1
7d 
Nuwanda, what's your opinion? Comment below:

My relationship got pretty rocky with my parents from my early 20s to my late mid 20s. We all turned a corner and now our relationship is very strong and functional. Its one of my proudest accomplishments.

7d 
Isaiah_53_5 💎🙌💎🙌💎, what's your opinion? Comment below:
Nuwanda

My relationship got pretty rocky with my parents from my early 20s to my late mid 20s. We all turned a corner and now our relationship is very strong and functional. Its one of my proudest accomplishments.

That's awesome. Yeah I value family much more now. 

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

8d 
Stonks1990, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I'm only in my low 30s, so I may not have as much experiential tenure as some here. I can confidently say, however, that where I am now is nowhere on the spectrum of where I thought I'd be in my late 20s. Early 20s. Late teens, early teens. Life will always continually grow and evolve in a series of nonlinear experiences that you come to love and hate. If you're 22 years old and reading this, know that you genuinely just don't have an idea of where you'll be when you're 32. You can think I'm wrong, laugh me off, or anything of the sort - but trust me, I've had enough personal experience and anecdotal evidence from observing people around me to know that it's true. It's not necessarily a bad thing either.

As mentioned above, the way you interact with your friends and family will change. The quantity will go down, but the quality will continue to rise. In college, I had hundreds of acquaintances - people I'd run into at the bar or in between classes, say what up, ask how their summer was, and keep going. That was the extent of our friendships. Nowadays, I can think of 5-6 people with who I still have meaningful relationships. And can I tell ya something? Man, it's SO much better. 

I know everything about those people. They know everything about me. I've been in three of their weddings, all six of 'em have been in mine. I've watched them go through promotions, cross-country moves, divorces, childbirth, winning the lottery (yes, true story), and so much more. I've seen these things because we've just been around so long and have so many experiences together. Life is beautiful in that notion. But if you asked me in college if I'd be content with having six total friends, I probably would have been a little upset. Not anymore. 

My twenties both went by in a month and a hundred years. I struggled a lot mentally and financially in the earlier years, think 23 to 25 or so. I've spoken about this before - I was severely addicted to Adderall & cocaine, didn't work out or take care of myself, all that stuff. I'm at heightened risk for a cardiac event when I reach my 50s, even with all the work I've done to reverse the toll on my body. Those moments seemed like they lasted forever and not at all, as pretty much everything I owe to my current life (both good and bad) happened from age 20-29. While the later years were much better and I found success with my mental state, fitness levels, and career promotion, still seems like it went by in the blink of an eye. It's just wild how FAST it moves sometimes, as noted by both thebrofessor and jackstraw001's great comments. Enjoy what you can, while you can. Can sure as shit tell you I've taken so many things and people for granted, not understanding the positive impact they had until they were gone. 

One thing that I saw that may have been slightly touched upon that I want to expand on is how your priorities will change. I'm actually laughing while writing this now, recollecting my definitions of 'success' and 'making it' that I had early on. There was a thread a couple of days ago asking something like "How many of you all made it?" and I was reading the replies - all I could think of was my former self. WolfofWSO, as usual, provided the one comment that resonated with me more than anything, moving the question completely away from a financial marker and onto what matters more. When you get older, money doesn't interact with you the same way it does when you're younger. Your priorities shift almost completely away from it, and more to what you care about and love - I love my wife. I love my family. I love my friends, my dog, and my old coworkers who I can catch up with. I love my personal trainer, my old MMA coach, and my sweet old neighbor who takes care of our dog. I would give up every penny I've ever made if it meant that I could help them out in a way, and for anyone who has a family and people they hold near and dear, you know what I'm talking about.

As privileged of a remark as this may seem, I'll just come out and say it: I genuinely do not give a shit about money anymore. The salary doesn't matter to me, the bonus doesn't matter, nor does the carry. I recognize how fortunate I am to be able to say this, and can also see how it'd be construed as narcissistic. I'm lucky in the notion that I've worked hard in my career to obtain the financial cushion I have. It doesn't even come close to the number that I've seen others have on this forum and doesn't even tickle the ankles of some HNWIs that I've met on the job. But it's enough for me. If more comes, I'll take it. I'll take the promotion, I'll take the bonus, I'll take the invitation to the equity pool. But it's just no longer my priority anymore. As you grow older, it very well may no longer be yours.

Growing up is a beautiful thing. It's sad in a lot of ways, but I try not to think about it that way. It's just different - life continually evolves, and there's nothing you can do to slow it down. Ending here, my only REAL recommendation is simple: enjoy the ride. 

8d 
WolfofWSO, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I had to reread what I wrote in the 'Made it' thread because I honestly didn't think it would take off like it did.  We're saying the same thing, money, prestige, job, and promotion are secondary to the real values of life.  I had it twisted going through my 20s and early 30s and realized what a fool I was.  Headcount is nearly a depreciating asset these days and companies won't hesitate to sack you to save a few bucks and please the faceless shareholders (or activist shareholders looking to flip the stock).  It's sad in a sense.  Money really has less meaning as we get older.  Back when I was a pup doing some intern budget work, I'll never forget what a VP said to the individual I supported.  We were walking them through their year end bonus, showing how we calculated and accrued for it, and showing when it will be paid.  This was nearly a 7 figure incentive and the man said, "Pay it whenever you can, I really don't care about money." and that was that.  He was fortunate to join a team he loved, work with people whom were as driven as he was, and he was compensated many times over what he could have ever dreamed.  Therefore, he just didn't care.  I later learned, "Well, he DOES, cause his wife likes to donate it just as fast as it comes in to get invited to lavish galas!"  He wasn't living high on the hog driving a 6 figure car despite the ability to buy a new one each year.  Just a simple guy who'd grab burgers and fries to go for lunch like I would.

I have had a few coworkers (VP level) die at a prior company.  There was a day of mourning, then back to it and who gets the chair.  It really was remarkable how quick some of these dedicated employees were forgotten as nothing more than a cog in the wheel.  

I appreciate your vulnerability Stonks.  Many people battle demons and many are ashamed to admit it leading to the silent suffering.  I'm glad you're in a good place now.  Talking health, I'm also trying to repair the damage done in my 20s and early 30s with a high stress line of work, 3 meals a day in the office, energy drinks, pills (vague on purpose), and the inevitable binge drinking after a good or rough week.  Hiring a trainer was a blessing and it's working wonders.  I honest feel better in the second half of my 30s than the second half of my 20s.  

I'm rambling again about who knows what.  But I'll end it with you work to live, not live to work.  

Array

  • 11
7d 
Arroz con Pollo, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Absolute banger of a comment - I wish every young adult could read and truly understand what you wrote, but I think it's one of those things where "you'll understand when you're older" truly comes into play.

I would scoff at your comment even just two years ago. My view of money changed once I ran into some. Money is seemingly everything until you get some, then it becomes much less important.

8d 
ConfusedGuru, what's your opinion? Comment below:

You're still the same person, just in a bigger more "adult" body and it makes you realize adults aren't really that smart, they just act like they know what they're doing. 
 

I also didn't expect to slowly become a carbon copy of both of my parents which isn't a bad thing because they're both very responsible people, but wow have I just become a boring human being lol. 
 

Grass really is always greener. I thought my life would be amazing once I got X job and made Y money, but humans are extremely adaptable creatures and now I'm once again bored with my current position, yearning for more. 
 

The fact that no one tells you what to do or holds you accountable for anything anymore. In school, you've got a strict schedule, and parents + numerous adults who'll reprimand you if you go even an inch out of line. When you're an adult, you could technically do cocaine and heroine and no one would really care. 
 

You could miss a week of work, get fired, and that's completely on you. You could stop going to the gym and get fat, and no one would say a thing. It's all up to you what kind of man you want to be in this world. And that fact still scares me. 
 

The utter boredom. You need to find hobbies and things to do with your time outside of work. You need to constantly stimulate yourself. Maybe in school it was possible to grind 14 hours a day and be OK, but as an adult, this will nearly kill you. You need some semblance of a healthy work-life-balance. 
 

That's all I can think of at the moment 

  • 5
7d 
JoeCamel, what's your opinion? Comment below:

1. Life is a marathon, not a sprint. There's someone who hated his job, worked 80 hours a week only to retire at 55. There's someone who retired at 70 but enjoyed every day at work and found fulfillment in what he/she did. 

2. No point in comparing yourself to others. You can only compete against yourself and work towards becoming the best person you can be. Everybody has different circumstances. 

3. Spirituality and simplicity become more important. 

4. Women come and go. However, they are less likely to walk away at an older age. 

5. Health is wealth. 

6. You try to make the most of everyday as you realize there's limited time on this earth. 

Array

  • 2
7d 
odog808, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I agree with most of the observations.  I'll try to think of some different ones:

  • Your world gets smaller as you get older (saw what happened to my dad - and you know what me him and my sister - that was enough)
  • You learn a lot happens between the zones of the Law of the Jungle and the legal system
  • For many, getting older means prioritizing shorter term thinking - usually revolving around money, place in life - which leads to divorces, business breakups, litigation and other negative events 
  • The reputation of someone over age 40 is generally true
  • Your co-workers and most everyone do not give a shit about you.  Life will go on without you.
  • Most of your lasting most influential  memories happen prior to 25 years old
  • Macro politics and economics are fun to read but usually doesn't impact you as an individual 
  • You have to reinvent yourself several times to survive over a career; bar is constantly changing; this isn't a world of life time employment and stability (generally speaking)
  • The word Legacy means something different to different people 
  • I want to make money mainly to give it away; don't need a lot of stuff
  • Lighting strikes, maybe once, maybe twice (Gypsy - Fleetwood Mac) - that could be interpreted in different ways (love, business, family) and Young man thinks there's always tomorrow (Justin Bieber "Ghost") - I'm at that crossroads of "young and old;" I'm in 40's yet I still have that long term thinking yet know that I only have finite shots left (energy, time being the constraints). 
  • personality is a pretty good predictor of the future - study psychology beyond a college.  
  • keep your face moisturized 
  • insurance can be your best friend
  • you will wish you spent more time with your parents once they are gone.  The crazy stat that you spend 90% of your time with you parents Pre-adulthood and then less than 10% once you leave the nest.  Get someone to record their stories (including your grandparents), MemoryVideo.com for example, it's worth it.
  • in your family dynamic, you are generally separated generationally by 30 years.  Grandparents 90 years old.  Parents 65 years old.  You 30 years old.  By the time your become mature enough to care about the older generations (usually after 35), they are dead, have dementia, or if you're lucky one of them are alive (or both). We live like ships sailing in the night.  Maybe physically we are there, but mentally we might just pass each other by. 
  • people sometimes brashly say that they would rather die when they get infirm (old, incapable of taking care of themselves), and I usually don't believe them because people generally find reasons to live when the time comes.
  • prestige is worth less and less 
  • Age discrimination and agism will become an issue for you (right now I look young for my age) but I've heard it many times.  Examples of Agism: underestimating older people, taking down to them, making them feel worth less, defining people by their condition vs their selves 
  • Your desires, if you're a guy, parallel your dad in a way when he was your age.
  • work out more muscle in 30-40's; plenty of time for cardio later when you can't build muscle no more (at least that's what I heard).
  • listen to your body.  If something feels wrong or different, self-advocate and get it checked out.  The "C" word is scary (cancer).  Who cares about the money.
  • don't miss weddings.  Maybe you're unemployed or too busy and you can't travel to your hometown for the wedding, so you don't do.  There will be a time when all your friends are married and there are no more weddings to attend and you'll think about would that $1,000 I saved by not going to my good friend's wedding, will I miss that?  And the answer is no.
Have compassion as well as ambition and you’ll go far in life
  • 11
7d 
ConfusedGuru, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Some really good stuff in here! I especially feel that "prestige is worth less and less" is super relevant for this website. 
 

Prestige is always nice the first week or 2, but then you realize it's just another job, and you'd rather do interesting work in a company with a non-toxic culture and have a decent work-life-balance than work at some place that would make people say "wow". 
 

Eventually the "wow"'s aren't worth that much to you, and your personal happiness is worth way more. This goes for more than just a job of course. 

  • 1
7d 
Devils Advocate, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I'm in my Mid-30s now and I first posted on here I believe during my sophomore year in college 
 

1. Coming to terms my own mortality as well as those of my friends and family. Getting older comes with losing the people dearest to you - sometime in the most traumatizing fashion. I can remember from high school to my early 20s feeling invincible. Now you try to cherish every moment because as cliche as it is time really isn't guaranteed. Learning to live with loss and trauma and leaning on a support system is essential the older you get

2. Your friend group shrinks tremendously and you have to make a concerted effort to maintain the relationships you care about. Gone is the time of seeing them daily and having a relatively similar routine. You quickly learn which are friendships that are reliable in times of needs and "friendships" that were purely social with superficial depth. Forming genuine friendships in your late 20s / 30s is substantially harder as you have less time to invest and everyone is at different stages of their lives.

3. It's crazy how much your priorities change from the immediate post-college period to the 30s. I can remember running through walls and sacrificing opportunities to invest in relationships just for a chance to make an extra buck. Now, while I still enjoy the prospects of making money, there is definitely an inflection point where I'm not willing to sacrifice "me-time"

4. Things like "prestige" matter so much less. It's why I find the IB forum amusing and nauseating at times. "Where you work, where you went to school, etc." all of that shit starts to become irrelevant especially when you see how miserable your 30+ / 40+ peers and colleagues are (despite checking all these superficial boxes I admittedly cared a lot about at one point in time). Seeing some of my old posts on here from my college days provides a certain level of amusement and cringe.

7d 
WolfofWSO, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I'm anticipating a load of MS for this one, so long anon posting in other forums, but...

I believe there are more posters on WSO earning $300k+/year than there are people earning $300k/year.  I'm not plugged into HR or company payscales, but I did do budgeting at one point and saw the payroll of EVERYONE in a corporate division.  I could likely count on my hands how many people earned more than $300k/year.  My friend just got a VP spot in a market group of a BB in NYC.  Total comp including bonus; barely $200k.  The person who left the spot and went to another BB did so to earn $240k or something all in.  Shy of IB comp, most comp in finance isn't that alluring.  And when you break IB comp down to an hourly rate, that isn't that great either.  There's a reason they say you get 5 years of experience in 2 years.

Array

  • 4
  • 2
7d 
Mikhail_Khodorkovsky, what's your opinion? Comment below:

So hardly anyone in a corporate gig (think f1000) is making over 300k? Are the highest paid people in corporate really the CEOs and CFOs?

7d 
Arroz con Pollo, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Did you mean to say more earning less than $300k compared to over $300k? I'm on mobile but seems you're missing the less than sign.

I would agree with this. Having had salary data at several companies (all less than $3B annualized revenues), CEO's are compensated much higher than anyone else (often is multiples of lower tier C-suite).

CFO and COO are usually compensated similarly, and I've seen COO higher at a few firms. Note these aren't consulting / law firms or banks. All private companies.

7d 
WolfofWSO, what's your opinion? Comment below:

It's a play on words. I see more people on WSO who claim they make $300k+ a year than the actual number of people making $300k a year.I've seen people claim you won't make it in NYC on anything less than $300k a year. This is just false. My friends and I had a blast making less than $100k a year in our late 20s. We quickly learned there is a big disparity between restaurants that are tasty and expensive. It's not a clear correlation. Don't believe me? Look at the line for Lombardi's at any point. Cheap coal oven pizza that blows most other restaurants away! I've eaten at Michelin star places that were meh. I've had authentic Cuban food made by a family of immigrants that had a taste I still crave a decade later.In any case, I believe comp embellishment on WSO is pretty heavy.

Array

  • 4
3d 
dan_yo23, what's your opinion? Comment below:

This seems unlikely to me- I'm a manager at a F500 company in a low/mid COL state making 160-170k all in. The directors have to be making in the 200s, VPs in the 300-400s at least.

At a prior company (F100s, mostly Low/Mid COL locations) I was able to manipulate our cost data to strip down to exact salaries. All director base salaries had a 2-handle, VPs had a 4-handle. No idea about bonus targets but I'd guess 30-50%.

7h 
BobMerkin, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I do think the pool on WSO is going to be a bit skewed toward those high paying roles though, just because of the nature of the forum. The discussion here when we talk about career goals and comp ladders excludes the very long tail of ~$200k people who make up the majority of the broader "high finance" industry. And it excludes all of the roles outside of the industry that pay even less.

It's an echo chamber of rich kids and wannabe rich kids, but then again, that's why we have it. You couldn't have these conversations with a straight face in a generalized career forum with normal wage levels. 

7d 
earthwalker7, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I'll answer differently - which is what would I alter if I could do it again.

I'd say stick with each opportunity and phase in life until you really get all there is to it, rather than jump. Stay in university longer if you need to, stay in the jobs that are teaching you, and don't be in such a hurry to jump to the new new thing. Really get everything out of every experience that you can before you move on. And keep an eye on the big picture. When I was an associate I should have spent less time focused on the 'suck' of the job and devote more of my mindshare to enjoying time with my associate classmates and having friendly drinks with the seniors at the firm, rather than focusing on the sucky parts of the job. In hindsight I was depriving myself of the fun parts of being at the platform, and I made my own experience worse for it.

7d 
CarsnWatches, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Despite my username, as I get older I'm starting to realize material possessions aren't as important as I thought. I used to daydream about things I could buy and then when you buy the actual thing it loses it's importance or the gratification dissipates quickly. It's a pretty empty pursuit.  

I also used to always wonder how well off people I knew would drive beaters or not upgrade to the best item they could. It didn't make sense to me, but as I get older I started to realize that stuff doesn't matter and it hardly will improve your life purposefully. Also some people just don't put any value on stuff like that. 

I see the appeal to be a minimalist at times. Overall I'd say I'm pretty minimalistic except for certain things like (liquor, clothes, eating out), but part of me almost wants to forgo it all as I age. 

7d 
ironman32, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Basically what everyone said above, what I would add:

1. You see how other people live their lives, and how other people develop. For example, I went to a small catholic school growing up until 8th grade, less than 60 students, so you kind of know where everyone stands/ended up. Hate to say it, but if you had to bet on kids in 8th grade on how "successful" (job, relationships, life) they'd be, you'd probably get a high percentage correct. 

2. You understand a little more why people make the decisions they make. Meaning, you see different theories on life. Some people would rather do what they want and die at 65 (drinking, smoking, bad eating), than live to 90 doing things they don't want to do. I can see it both ways, not saying one is right and one is wrong. 

3. You realize that most people create their own problems and not doing well at things they can control. Similar to as mentioned by others above, most people know what they need to do, just fail to do them, in terms of managing their money correctly, or not eating poorly. For example, if someone complains about how their job sucks, they rarely try to change jobs, or most likely aren't doing a good job to begin with; they could change that but don't. 

4. I'd also add, it kind of wild how many people as they get older don't get better at things. For example, I know plenty of friends and relatives who have no idea about their money. If they learned one thing a day for ~2 minutes about money, they'd be set. However, they don't. 

5. You realize that age is truly just a number. I know people who are 80 and still young, I know people who are 35 and old. 

7d 
ConfusedGuru, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Curious…when does the "separation" begin when you start to see how people from your high school "end up" as you said? 25? 30? 60?? 

6d 
ironman32, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Short answer: probably at birth

Longer explanation: I look at it as every person is formed by a percentage of nature and nurture. Some people grow up with virtually no nurture, so their live progress is extremely nature. Think of someone like Jay-Z, the environment he grew up in he probably really needed to push himself, hence, nature. Then there's other who have more nurture in their life. Something more of a trust fund kid. Not saying that Jay-Z couldn't handle being a trust fund kid, but he might not have been "as" successful. I always says its funny, I went to private school my whole life, I know people who went to public school and are doing better than people who also went to private school their whole life. (I know kids from the same family, one is a CPA/MBA, the other is a drug addict.)  School is really just an artificial way to suppress and keep everyone together, in the sense, some people can do minimal work and get by, where as in the real world that doesn't cut it.  

6d 
Hayek, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Surprised about your first point -- at least in my case (15 years out of a public high school), I'd say there's a correlation between the "smart kids" / kid students and success in life, but the results are pretty noisy. The kids who were in the gifted and talented program for example all have a huge dispersion of outcomes now. Somewhat surprisingly I've found that many of the "B" students who went to a state school and majored in accounting or who pursued a blue collar track are the ones who are really outperforming now, at least relative to where they were in high school.

  • 2
4d 
ironman32, what's your opinion? Comment below:

We're basically the same age, so I get what you're saying. My main point in saying "You see how other people live their lives, and how other people develop." is probably more, people are who they are, generally. Meaning, there were people I went to school with who weren't in the top of the class who are what you would call "success" today that I'm not surprised about, because looking back they had other skills that make them success (personable, can get things done, can figure things out.) I know people in school who probably weren't great test takers who do well now, and others who were great test takers, but didn't know how to prepare, work hard, or study  who have issues now. So I see some people who were hard workers, had good parents who are more successful that people who didn't really work hard, no had not great parents. 

Also, I didn't mean to say it was bifurcated, as in, if you didn't get an "A" in math in sixth grade your homeless now. My main point is, we were at the 8th grade level, so people were somewhat formed into who they are. For example, we had a kid from that 60 who went to an Ivy League school and is now a teacher mainly because the kid is/was just very smart, but didn't have the skill set for jobs outside of school. We also had a kid who was more a "B" student who does great now for a major corporation doing really well. I remember this kid in particularly, his father would come to school just to have lunch with him on occasion. 

Again, we had less than 60 kids, so I knew everyone fairly well and probably ~60% of everyone's parents. Social media helps now keeping track of everyone. There were definitely kids who were labeled gifted and talented who are now mediocre, and some people who were "B" students doing better in life. We lived in a somewhat blue collar/white collar area, so it wasn't like parents were on Wall Street but they weren't day laborers ether. To me its always one of those things of, did my reality at the time reflect other schools, or were we more of a sampling error. 

7d 
Dr. Rahma Dikhinmahas, what's your opinion? Comment below:

At some point (I don't know, maybe age 30 or so) people who've been ambitious to that point start splitting into the ambitious-for-life crowd and the settling-down crowd.  I'm not referring to marriage or kids.  Whether family or not, it's like some people keep looking at life as a challenge to be conquered, and others see it as a finite thing to be enjoyed while it lasts.

What's been surprising:

1. How quickly it changes people.  10th college reunion, everyone is the same.  Some w kids, some not, but all feeling like the same rough chapter of life.  15th reunion, everyone is different.  One group of guys wants to talk about what Elon is doing at Twitter, or (after a few drinks) what their next big move is.  Other group of guys wants to talk about golf shoes.  Both groups equally inclined to talk about family, but very different interests outside of that.

2. How much it changes their view of society and world.  Ambitious group gets really curious about where the world is going.  Economics, technology, etc.  Less ambitious group is more into local politics, "can you believe what Trump said" that sort of thing.

3. How much it changes goals.  One group sets personal goals and the other sets "bucket list" type goals especially travel, and is really good at getting through Netflix seasons fast.

Between this, and the ability to meet new people easier than ever, its caused me to change my friend group in a way I never thought would happen.  It's like late 30's is a re-shuffle.

  • 8
6d 
ADTIBE, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Growing up, I thought money was important and resulted in happiness...

Now I know its true. People may not like hearing that, but that's been my experience. Healthcare? Covered. Kids' education? Covered. Laid off or fired? No problem. 

Over the years, I've done my own informal social experiments, and let's just say tailored suits, exotic cars and expensive watches always seem to win people over, whether for business, romance, socializing, etc.

6d 
falconeagle, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Fantastic thread - absolutely amazing comments on here, 100% agree with all of them (as a guy in his early 30s). Would just echo what others have said about money and prestige becoming much less meaningful as you get older. Particularly prestige - like others said, it's amusing for me now to look at posts on here by college kids asking about the most prestigious BBs, PE firms etc. Whilst of course you want to go to a good firm - trust me, in 5-10 years' time your friends and family will not give a sh*t if you make $150k or $300k at Wells Fargo, or at Goldman, or through running your own chain of Subway franchises lol. When I meet my friends now we barely talk about work - there are so much more important things to discuss, i.e. relationships, kids (I don't have any but some of my friends do), upcoming vacations etc.

Equally with money - whilst obviously you need a decent amount of money to give yourself and your family/future family a good lifestyle, the extra value you get from it over time really does fade. As a personal example, I work in MM PE making $300k - if I got an offer from a MF (not that they would want me) for $600k but I'd have to work the majority of weekends for the next year, would I do it? Myself ten years ago would have immediately said "hell yes!" without a second thought. Me now though - I have to say I wouldn't.

I realize that's a fortunate/privileged position to be in. But here's something else you realize as you get older - the value of material things/stuff really starts to fade. When I was 23 I thought owning a Ferrari and a Rolex would mean a life of eternal bliss. I still don't own a Ferrari or a Rolex, but having a Porsche Boxster (not the same I know) and a Tag watch - they're nice for a bit, but really your life doesn't meaningfully change. The novelty really wears off fast - your friends and family might be interested briefly, but they'll quickly refocus their attention back to their own lives. So whilst I could probably afford to lease a Ferrari comfortably now (and certainly could buy a Rolex if I could stomach the wait times), it just doesn't appeal to me anymore. Creating memories for yourself and with other people is much more important (so I do still enjoy splashing out on luxury vacations).

6d 
cap182375, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I think when we're young, we have a pretty basic idea of what success looks like. Brand names. Money. Nice things. Whatever TV and our parents/elders say (not explicitly necessarily, but the comments about cousin so-and-so having a Lexus), for the most part.

But as we mature, we figure it out a little more. there's more to life than a fancy car or a trip to the Bahamas. Life shouldn't be a one dimensional grind for those trappings. you realize it's more about relationships and experiences, with some nice things along the way.

I bought my first nice car the other day after driving the same car since high school. It drives better, it's got heated seats, and I don't know what half the buttons do. It's great. But I can't say it really made me much happier or felt like a milestone. It's just a new car that's kind of fun to drive around.

4d 
ironman32, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Agreed with these. Was thinking about these myself. 

Probably the big advice here is when you're young you think people will care about everything you do, but as you get old you realize they don't. For example, meaning, everyone on this site talks about prestige, and that seems real important right when you graduate college, but say you're able to buy a beach house, no one cares how you made your money to do it. 

Another thing is when you're young you think about trading money for time, but as you get older you start to think about time for money. Meaning, if you're making ~$50k, making $600k would seem awesome. But once you get to $300k, having to work that much more to make $600k might not seem that appealing to you (time vs money trade off). 

6d 
earthwalker7, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I did not expect to be less employable as I got older. I thought with hard work and dedication to my profession I would get more employable. Nope. I get told "we can hire a 30 y.o. to do this and it would be cheaper and their capabilities and network would be similar". It's beyond depressing. Whenever I had trouble getting jobs when I was younger it was stressful. Not being able to get a job due to ageism is terrifying.I now am responsible for a stay at home wife, two kids and her in laws who are staying with us. Wife refuses to get a job over past 14 years of marriage which stresses and infuriates me.It's quite terrifying and frustrating. I often get suicidal ideation but of course would never act on it because I have responsibilities to these kids. But without a proper career it's beyond bad.

5d 
WolfofWSO, what's your opinion? Comment below:

To ease your mind. I worked for a VC backed company for a short while (very short). Worked with some brilliant individuals who were absolute assholes. I got told over and over, "There is a line of people out the door begging for your seat. You better keep earning your keep. Someone out there can do your job better and faster for cheaper. Bla bla bla."

Finally I had enough of it and got a new job rather quickly after I began looking. There was a bit of panic in my boss when he saw my 2 week notice and he asked if I would consider 4 for a seamless transition. I said no.

Three months into my new job, I get a call from a green recruiter. "You have the perfect background for a job I'm trying to fill." I find out it's my old one! I dig a little and find she's been working on it for 1.5 months with few qualified folks and even less folks who the VC entity is interested in. If I'm not mistaken, it was almost 6 months before my seat was filled. The company was bought out everyone lost their job quickly thereafter.

I write this to say despite what your organization says, everyone knows that the labor market is slim as it is. Filter for qualified interested available labor and you're really not going to find a large sample to pick from.

Array

  • 5
1d 
LeveragedBuoy, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I think this emphasizes how important choice of partner is. It was fine when fucking around, but when I got married I knew I wanted someone educated and who wanted to build a career - this saves me stress from needing to be a provider and having a wife who's a dependent.

Sorry to hear about your situation and hope things get better. Why does she refuse to get a job when she sees the stress / burden you're under?

5d 
oil_quant, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Did not expect that one's body could no longer handle work for mental or physical reasons.  And how so much basic knowledge to address this is skipped over in formal education.  How to to handle stress and worry.  How to prioritize and find discipline.  How to eat healthy and feel better.  Have gotten a lot more value from podcasts and self help books than many years of school combined (some dumb ones, but those like Atomic Habits or the Stoic philosophy ones are awesome).

Did not expect to find more meaning in doing small things well than being a big shot with a huge title.  So many jobs in a capitalist economy could actually be useless or held by incompetent people.  If a company makes money, often no one notices about pointless cost centers and high ups often pursue personal empire building without tangible merit.

Did not expect how much it takes to raise kids.  Still early on and between the first few months where they wake up every 2 hours to the weekends where you must entertain an impatient toddler for 2 days without a nanny or daycare to help, expect to spend about half a job's worth of effort on small kids.  Still wouldn't trade it for anything though.

4d 
theATL, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I have absolutely loved it and didn't expect to enjoy my 30's (and almost 40 now) more than my 20's. 

Things that have been surprising:

1)  I've been able to stay in shape (arguably best shape of my life) even in my late 30's

2) how rewarding having a kid has been. Being able to spend time with them has been great. While it's a lot of work, it is easier than I expected (granted have a nanny etc)

3) the people who I've stayed close with. Still being best friends with childhood friends and going on trips every year. I always thought these relationships would just go away over time

4) how you still feel young and occasionally do stupid things even though you are suppose to be "mature"

5) that all the annoying stuff at work still sticks around. Office politics, not feeling fully appreciated, etc doesn't go away as you are more senior. The MDs fight with each other just as much as the junior folks 

l'm personally loving it. While I miss the amount of free time I had when I was younger, the freedom now (especially after a successful career so far) is amazing. Traveling a lot, spending time with friends and family, having lots of cool experiences. I didn't realize it would be this fun. 

Array
  • 5
4d 
Swag King, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I never thought my hairline would still be on point as fuck. This is something I took for granted growing up, having male relatives in my family, all of whom sport thick, luscious heads of hair well into their 50s and 60s. 

Now, I see the bullets whizzing by daily. Every late night the Associates & Analysts sitting next to me leave behind a pile of shed hair on their desk. Phew. Bullet missed me by an inch and hit the dude next to me evidently, because he's got noticeably less hair this week than he did last week. Fuck, even the women are noticing more and more split ends and a bigger vertex on their heads. 

But not me. I stand strong, and walk this lonely road of luscious hair, by myself. I know there are MDs who resent me for it. At Goldman they wouldn't let me through the door with hair like this. Even the girls I entertain get jealous sometimes. But that's life. You can't just be better than everyone around you without consequences. Classic cause & effect. 

  • 3
3d 
tackytech, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Existential crisis that hit me when I turned 35. 

When you're 35, you're at the halfway point between 20 and 50 - but the thing is that you remember 15 years ago like it was yesterday. Then it hits you that time goes by even faster as you get older, and before you know it, you'll be a 50 year old dude. 

And I guess if you ask a 50 year old, they'll say the same. They feel young, and that 50 isn't really old - 70 is old. 

  • 1
3d 
philbegas, what's your opinion? Comment below:

By my early 20s my metabolism had sharply slowed down and now I'm struggling to balance a healthy diet with a stressful job that often makes it hard to make good homemade meals. 

By my mid 20s my lower back started to hurt more and I have to spend extra time stretching and going to chiro to manage it

In my late 20s I'm now having an existential crisis. I used to think that finance was at the intersection of what kind of work I could semi-enjoy while not hating my life. However, after a line of several unfulfilling finance jobs I'm not sure that's still true. 

2d 
TheBuellerBanker, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Tons of good points above. Guess I'd sum my thoughts into this: a comfortable apathy towards most things people have generally gotten worked up towards. What I include in this:

- Politics: whether you care or don't give a shit about politics, you learn to just live and let live as it relates to your political views. I have developed a real meaty intolerance towards overly staunch political folks who were drawing relationships and fencing friendships based on political views

- Prestige: having worked at non-prestigious and prestigious firms, I promptly realized early on that none of that matters in the grand scheme. The loser running a meme account who is trashing certain banks at random behind the veil of anonymity should certainly not be the gauge of how you measure the success of your firm and certainly not prop your self-worth up behind it

- Socializing: I know I read this above and it was articulated really well, but I gotta reemphasize - you just will cut down on the size of your social circle to only accommodate those who are real friends whose company you genuinely enjoy. If you're like me, you started cutting people out early on who you didn't like spending time with but I've found it becomes much more defined as you grow older

- Money: this one I have a hard time with. It's easy for many to find a good gig and say they wouldn't take a substantially higher salary now if it meant sacrificing some freedom they've found in their current, but I think it's difficult to make this claim unless you're really faced with it. Was faced with this once and took the opportunity and frankly it was the wrong decision as it decimated my mental and physical health but I can't say it would be easy to make the other choice given how little money I had grown up on and how much the opportunity was paying (always kept that far too in perspective, which was the wrong thing to do)

  • 6
2d 
m_1, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Vitae eos provident dolore exercitationem aspernatur magnam. Sint vitae voluptates incidunt quae voluptatem quis. Doloribus ut qui voluptas consequatur rem.

1d 
thesmartadvisory, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Eaque qui facilis eveniet perferendis illo cupiditate et. Qui qui accusantium rerum facilis fugiat quod sit. Doloribus ipsam et ratione quibusdam eveniet minima molestiae. Rem eos dolor nisi dolores.

Earum illum accusamus in ut esse. Eligendi praesentium deserunt maxime nostrum enim. Est nobis cupiditate numquam temporibus. Qui dicta aut velit ut quas expedita. Magni fuga et rerum perferendis exercitationem dolores.

Nam illo explicabo enim aspernatur. Aut est ratione qui ducimus iste in distinctio nihil. Assumenda autem est saepe molestiae rerum repellat. Ex voluptate quis rerum consectetur quidem aperiam deleniti.

[Comment removed by mod team]
7h 
InfoDominatrix, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Non est est temporibus et. Est et quis voluptatibus consequatur.

Animi quia fugiat illum aliquid. Quaerat dicta aliquid placeat iusto. Qui dolores veniam maiores aut esse quo et. Tenetur deserunt ducimus rerum impedit non autem. Qui sunt reprehenderit laboriosam quia amet. Et eveniet temporibus voluptatem similique impedit voluptatem. Aliquid est vel dicta adipisci.

Start Discussion

Career Advancement Opportunities

January 2023 Investment Banking

  • Lazard Freres (+ +) 99.5%
  • Jefferies & Company (▽01) 99.1%
  • Lincoln International (▽01) 98.6%
  • Financial Technology Partners (▽01) 98.1%
  • William Blair (▲08) 97.7%

Overall Employee Satisfaction

January 2023 Investment Banking

  • Canaccord Genuity (▲04) 99.5%
  • William Blair (▲04) 99.0%
  • Lincoln International (▲09) 98.6%
  • Jefferies & Company (▲06) 98.1%
  • Financial Technology Partners (▲09) 97.6%

Professional Growth Opportunities

January 2023 Investment Banking

  • Lazard Freres (▲15) 99.5%
  • Financial Technology Partners (▲09) 99.1%
  • Lincoln International (= =) 98.6%
  • Jefferies & Company (▽03) 98.1%
  • William Blair (▲01) 97.7%

Total Avg Compensation

January 2023 Investment Banking

  • Director/MD (6) $592
  • Vice President (23) $401
  • Associates (134) $264
  • 3rd+ Year Analyst (9) $194
  • 2nd Year Analyst (80) $172
  • 1st Year Analyst (257) $171
  • Intern/Summer Associate (41) $167
  • Intern/Summer Analyst (185) $91