Would you ever consider being a public school teacher? What are your thoughts on Public Schools?

Noticed a lot of people I went to school with are quitting their jobs as teachers.

Do you think this is due to how ridiculous some curriculums have gotten and how batshit crazy superiors are pushing inappropriate content to kids?

For people that went to public school, how was your experience and what did you have problems of your school?

Seems like all the news is about critical race theory, in school mask mandates, dropping standardized tests, etc.

Idk feel free to give your honest opinion on how public schools are now.

Comments (65)

9mo
OmahaOmaha115, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I don't know a lot about the evolution of the curriculum / dealing with administrators, but I figured it mostly was due to COVID (mask mandates, younger children largely not being vaxxed, dealing with parents, etc.)

Also all things considered we're seeing massive wage inflation and the great resignation so most teachers are probably seeing opportunities to increase their compensation that they have never seen before.

9mo
PrivateTechquity 🚀GME+BBBY🚀, what's your opinion? Comment below:

They literally could not pay me enough. Also kids are extra shit these days because social media and lazy parents. Think about how much different school would've been if growing up you could just pull up the answers to anything and everything on your phone and immediately call out a teacher if they're full of shit/wrong about something? 

I think the public school model is patently inferior, outdated, and in major need of change. So in its current form, hell to the no. Now if it was a school where some of the teachers are also younger baddies and I were taking a year or two of sabbatical maybe. 

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20d
GeorgSorosFinanceMaster, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Think about how much different school would've been if growing up you could just pull up the answers to anything and everything on your phone and immediately call out a teacher if they're full of shit/wrong about something? 

Is this supposed to be a bad thing?

Most Helpful
9mo
rickle, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Wife has been an educator for many yrs (retiring this yr). It's become a pretty thankless job. She teaches the younger kids. Parents typically expect everything and aren't willing to "partner" in their child's education. Also expect teacher to be available to discuss things at all hours. Typical day for her is at school from 7:30 - 5:30 (always stays after preparing things) and then works on lesson plans, researching fun material for science projects, etc for another 2 hours at home. Essentially a 12 hour day for 40k salary. Yes summers off is nice but she gets very little support from admin, parents, etc. Covid has made it even worse but it was pretty bad before. Most of her friends are teachers and they're all counting down the days to retirement. Has become a thankless job. She has told me many times she would never encourage someone to go into teaching today. That's pretty sad!

9mo
apollotime, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Teachers are getting paid 40k in the US? Thats tough. 

Here near Toronto, they're making 90k or more a year, and of course we get way more benefits to bump that up too. 

Damn. 

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9mo
Anonymous Monkey, what's your opinion? Comment below:

The American right thinks that teachers get paid too much in this country.  They are nuts!

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2011/11/01/141915912/conservative-think-tank-study-finds-teachers-are-overpaid

9mo
qwertykeys, what's your opinion? Comment below:

There are some 'elite' programs where humanities kids from 'top' schools will teach underprivileged kids. I am not sure how hard they are to get into, or how intense it is when you're actually teaching. 

Can spend a couple years basically hanging out and deciding what you want to do next. 

9mo
IncomingIBDreject, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I believe it is called Teach for America

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9mo
eloquence, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Don't think this is that elite anymore. They send mostly wealthy white kids into inner cities with very little training to teach kids who are often well behind their grade levels... certainly not just like being a public school teacher at your local school. I've seen people do it as a gap year before law school or if they really don't know what to do, but it's pretty tough being a privileged 23 year old in a chronically underfunded school / random dying city so don't see many people pursuing it these days

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9mo
financeabc, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I went to public schools and my kids went to public schools and would not have it any other way.  If I am going to pay taxes to support the school system, my kids are going to the schools.  The public schools in my area are very good with lots of resources.  I can't say the same thing about most of the private schools in my area.  Unless your private school is funded by Warren Buffett or located in a city like Princeton, NJ, it is likely not going to have the same resources as a public school. 

Public school teachers in my area are highly compensated with lots of time off.  They are not making millions of dollars but they work in a profession focused on educating young people, which is pretty noble in my view. Not sure about this critical race theory stuff but this is not much of a thing in my area.  From what I can tell, kids are mostly learning about math, English, science, history, etc.  

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9mo
CaymanIslandsResident, what's your opinion? Comment below:

The program as you are describing it is called Teach for America and it's a tough gig. Know a few people who have been in it. Looks great on a resume, but you get paid the same as any other teacher there, think $30-40k, and are in an incredibly challenging teaching situation. Most people leave Teach of America after their two year contract expires to either do something in the education space: consulting, educational software sales, public policy, or change fields entirely.

All said, I think education is a pretty selfless career but I imagine it's hard to find it fulfilling unless you can see your contribution is making a difference.

9mo
MarthaStewartsAFelon, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I wanted to be a high school teacher and even student taught for a while and wanted to do Teach for America, and I'm glad I didn't do it. It's a hard thankless job and you get paid crap for it. Students are difficult, administration is difficult, you have kids' futures in your hand and in the state I'm from you get a masters degree to make $38K.

Also I'll say a lot of people go into the field eyes wide open (as much as you can be before doing it) and thinking that getting to make a difference will make up for the shortcomings of the job, but a lot of times its very hard to make a difference or see the difference you're making. I tutored students too for years and it can get really tiring emotionally / mentally pouring a lot of yourself into students and (I don't say this in a blaming way because I understand there are a lot of exogenous factors at play) they don't care or your effort turns out to be for naught (e.g., the student still fails despite your best efforts). 

It's not like doing investment banking was easy or stress free, but at least kids futures weren't in my hands, there's not much of an emotional connection and I wasn't getting paid the same as a Circle K cashier for my efforts.

9mo
IncomingIBDreject, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Went to a public school inside the city (unlike financeabc who lives in the suburbs), and I can tell you it is quite the experience from a student, much less from a teacher point of view. Drugs were passed around and sold all the time with many getting busted. Teen mothers wasn't uncommon at all. Kids flunking out of school with no real direction ahead in life. Verbal fights were the norm, physical violent fights were daily. We had a few cops on site who would break up fights and even use tasers if necessary. Drug searches via dogs were not  uncommon. Compare that with the private schools with rich affluent kids who come from UMC+ backgrounds with 2 parent households and a stay at home mom, and you can see why teachers would rather go to well funded private schools than public schools.

Bureaucracy and administration is also a pain for the teachers. I've had teachers tell me how they aren't allowed to discipline anymore. Typically teachers get punished if too many students fail, so they have to pass the kids whether they are ready for the next grade level or not. Curriculum is typically set by higher-ups, so teachers are probably ordered to teach the CRT stuff.  I graduated well before COVID, but can only imagine that those things have made it worse. I knew many kids when I studied who didn't have internet at home. I have little idea how their younger siblings would have made in a virtual environment.

Apart from this the soaring COL, coupled with rising crime has made it financially ludicrous for teachers to stay in the city. While pay varies from state to state, the pay in the same state between city and rural is typically not enough to cover the material COL. I wouldn't doubt many are looking for jobs in more rural locations. 

To answer the title of this question, no I have never considered being a public school teacher. Pay is extremely low relative to qualifications, it is a difficult environment, and typically your students are not that bright. I have thought about being a lecturer at a university before, but that is obviously a much different dynamic than public school teacher. 

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9mo
financeabc, what's your opinion? Comment below:
IncomingIBDreject

Went to a public school inside the city (unlike financeabc who lives in the suburbs), and I can tell you it is quite the experience from a student, much less from a teacher point of view. Drugs were passed around and sold all the time with many getting busted.

By the way, I grew up in a city and went to public schools and drugs were not passed out routinely.  What you are probably describing is the difference between living in an affluent area and living in poor area.  Of course, there are going to be issues in the public schools in a poor area but not every public school is in a poor area.  Yeah, compensation is low compared to other professions but you still need teachers, so may be there should be extra monetary incentives for them to go into teaching.   

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9mo
Isaiah_53_5 💎🙌💎🙌💎, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I would consider teaching at a public university, never a public HS or anything like that. Kids are crazy. 

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

9mo
FlyingDachshund, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Personally no. I would also not want to send my kids to public schools. Private boarding schools are the way to go for me. But not US schools. Preferably Switzerland, UK or Salem (went there myself). 

9mo
PyyrhusSolos, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I went to a global Tier Mount Olympus private/boarding/public school (Eton, Winchester, Westminster, Rosey, Andover, Exeter) and the resources there exceed many US "top colleges". I plan for my kids to attend Eton as well.

9mo
Hölder, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Would I enjoy teaching? Yes. Would I force myself to be poor? No. Would I force myself to be exposed to immature and potentially disrespectful children? No.

But I do enjoy teaching. I think a possible future in education could have the possible two trends leading it:

1) Less and less people willing to be full time teachers

2) Students and teachers preferring remote models more and more

If those two trends hold then a new educational model could thrive: Imagine having remote classes taught by real professionals in industry. A Google Engineer could volunteer to teach ICT. A NASA engineer could volunteer to teach physics. Etc.

Of course when I say volunteer I mean make the hourly wage of a teacher which would be way less than their comp but I'm sure many would not mind dedicating one hour every few days to teach a class in a field they love. Maybe to sweeten the deal the state could pass some tax incentives to teach in this model. I would definitely volunteer to teach math. It would be a nice way to forget about the bullshit of the real world for a couple of hours and because it is remote it would not matter if a student is a little shithead. Whoever wants to pay attention pays attention. Whoever wants to browse instagram instead is free to do so. Would be kinda fun. If someone actually managed to get real google engineers, nasa engineers, hedge fund managers, etc. to be teachers, I'd send my kid there. Learn from the actual successful people.

9mo
IncomingIBDreject, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Remote is great for the UMC+ 2 parent household with the stay at home mom. It's horrible for those coming from poor often single parent households. The single parent (or both if both are there) are working throughout the day to make ends meet and have no time to supervise the child. More likely than not, the house doesn't have internet or won't have internet of meaningful quality to stream live lectures. Apart from this, with no parents at home these kids will feel isolated and have no one to talk to and no sense of community. 

 Whoever wants to pay attention pays attention. Whoever wants to browse instagram instead is free to do so. Would be kinda fun. If someone actually managed to get real google engineers, nasa engineers, hedge fund managers, etc. to be teachers, I'd send my kid there. Learn from the actual successful people.

https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/public-and-social-sector/our-insights/covid-19-and-learning-loss-disparities-grow-and-students-need-help

One of dozens of articles that highlight the increasing gap in learning between the wealthy UMC+ and the poor. You're basically saying that only the driven will be pushed to learn (driven by stay-at-home mom in the next room), and those who don't have the opportunities and support network should learn nothing.   

Given that education has been shown time and time again to be the most important variable in lifting people out of poverty, we should prioritize giving poor kids a quality  education and the support network through in-person teachers to succeed. Not your laissez-faire setup that completely ignores the poor. 

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9mo
Hölder, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Okay Debbie. This model can still help poor people. My idea is just to have the teachers have no interaction with the students other than answering questions. I am not a babysitter. However I still imagine that schools will have dedicated teachers that would perhaps act more like 'Teaching Administrators'. They would be the full-time teachers in charge of building curriculums and disciplining the students.

My model would still work if it was just me teaching remotely but the kids are all in the same classroom watching me on a projector. A teaching administrator could also be sitting in the class to discipline the shit students while I just teach. These teaching administrators could also have more attractive comp while potentially working less than current teachers.

9mo
theAudiophile, what's your opinion? Comment below:

While your model is admirable and could have a lot of potential, this is reality filled with people and thus malice and ignorance and as such there's two words that'll shut down your idea before it can take it's first breath: Teacher's Unions.

As an add-on to your idea, instead of outright pay, make the hours taught a tax deduction for both the person teaching and their employer since it'd be during normal business hours. No one has to actually have money change hands, you can offer higher pre-tax rates to draw in teaching talent, and employers get to write those hours as charitable contributions instead of actually doling out cash so everyone benefits. Hell, even offer a match benefit so employers want their people donating time.

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9mo
Hölder, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Would I enjoy teaching? Yes. Would I force myself to be poor? No. Would I force myself to be exposed to immature and potentially disrespectful children? No.

But I do enjoy teaching. I think a possible future in education could have the possible two trends leading it:

1) Less and less people willing to be full time teachers

2) Students and teachers preferring remote models more and more

If those two trends hold then a new educational model could thrive: Imagine having remote classes taught by real professionals in industry. A Google Engineer could volunteer to teach ICT. A NASA engineer could volunteer to teach physics. Etc.

Of course when I say volunteer I mean make the hourly wage of a teacher which would be way less than their comp but I'm sure many would not mind dedicating one hour every few days to teach a class in a field they love. Maybe to sweeten the deal the state could pass some tax incentives to teach in this model. I would definitely volunteer to teach math. It would be a nice way to forget about the bullshit of the real world for a couple of hours and because it is remote it would not matter if a student is a little shithead. Whoever wants to pay attention pays attention. Whoever wants to browse instagram instead is free to do so. Would be kinda fun. If someone actually managed to get real google engineers, nasa engineers, hedge fund managers, etc. to be teachers, I'd send my kid there. Learn from the actual successful people.

9mo
Kevin25, what's your opinion? Comment below:
Shrek2OnDVD

critical race theory, in school mask mandates, dropping standardized tests, etc.

pretty sure it has nothing to do with this. public school teaching just doesn't pay shit and involves a lot of effort and stress. so obviously people are quitting and moving to some better positions.

9mo
Isaiah_53_5 💎🙌💎🙌💎, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Why is everybody talking about HS? I read the OP again and it says nothing about HS, just public school in general.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

9mo
neink, what's your opinion? Comment below:

After seeing that teachers spend their time on tiktok bragging about humiliating kids with CRT or grooming them with gender fluidity and other woke nonsense, no, never. Public education should be terminated altogether. It's child abuse and grooming at this point.

Never discuss with idiots, first they drag you at their level, then they beat you with experience.

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9mo
GoingToBeAnMD, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I come from a family of teachers so I have considered it. I could definitely not do it full time. I considered putting myself into the substitute teacher pool and the rates they pay are laughable. Like, yes I have other sources of income and I could do it as my own form of "mental exercise" or whatever. But the rates would literally barely cover my gas - it was something stupid like $45 for the day or something like that. I have no idea how anyone can decide that they want to work at that rate. 

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9mo
IncomingIBDreject, what's your opinion? Comment below:

The substitute teachers I've had are either retired and just want to pass the day or have jobs with unusual schedules (youth pastor) and are doing it as a side gig.

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9mo
GoingToBeAnMD, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Yeah, I get that. And I considered doing it when I was doing consulting under my own flag (time in between clients, project goes on hiatus, etc). But $45/day??? At some point you're - literally - just covering costs. It's just not enough money. 

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9mo
dollar.billy, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Mom taught in inner city public schools in large city. She retired right after 2020 school year but still has friends that teach. 1) Teachers becoming competent in technology. If taught and never had to incorporate a lot of technology in your classroom for 30+ years and all of a sudden you have to run an entire class via zoom that is a difficult adjustment and the main thing my mom wasn't willing to do so she retired. Other common reasons:

Beaucracy in public schools is insane and many of the issues with unions coming to an agreement with districts about what is safe for teachers. Regardless of your beliefs about covid it is a reality people have different ones. So the unions coming to an accommodation for teachers who are immunocompromised has made restrictions for other teachers. 

There is also a lot of politics in their curriculum. Especially in meetings discussing curriculum you cannot hypothetically disagree with a principal who is a PoC about anything regarding CRT. Or if you have a LBTQ+ teacher who wants to incorporate trans/gay discussions into cirriculum it is difficult to disagree. My mom had said that's happened before and the 'are you attacking me because I am a XYZ minority" card gets pulled immediately, even if counterargument is valid.

Now not to mention in a WFH in public schools not only do teachers have to walk a fine line between what they say/how they say it. But then will get complaints from parents who don't agree. Often times teachers don't politically agree with some stuff but have to teach it. Then will get complaints from parents and have to get called into principal office for teaching something they might not even want to teach. 

These are main frustrations and there's many more especially in lower income school districts. But a lot of what my mom had said her teacher friends are dealing with currently. 

9mo
ironman32, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Random thoughts on this:

1. I forget where, but they did a study at one point where they asked high school kids if money didnt matter would they would consider being a high school teacher and a high majority said they would. 

2. I hate to say it, because I know teachers and have them in my family, but I feel that the "best and brightest" in our society never become teachers. It's basically become a profession thats for people who don't know what they want to do with their life, or their fall back job. Couple that with most likely a high percentage of kids who don't want to be there, and its a cat and mouse game between students and teachers. Little history, and it is what is it I'm not saying its correct, being a teacher used to be a highly respected job, but when public school became mandated the government had to increase the number of classes to fit all the students, but didn't get an equal increase in funds to pay teachers; to solve this they tried to pitch the idea to women to become teachers because they felt they could pay them less, basically stretching the dollar. 

3. Think about how school was in the 1970s versus how it is now, then compare that to how the world/technology has changed over that time. School is getting worse because its not evolving. 

4. I think parents put way too much on school these days. Decades ago school use to be basically a supplement to things parents taught their kids, now school is almost the sole learning experience. 

5. In some ways, school in America is like voting, the best part is everyone gets to do it, the worse part is that everyone gets to do it. In some ways, school is just public babysitting. I hate to say it, but when kids are 8,9,10, most people could probably fairly predict what they will do in life. Meaning, I look back on my days at school, if you would have picked which 8 year old would have a corporate job and which ones would do other things you probably wouldn't be far off. Not hating on anyone or profession, but it would be the same thing if instead of learning we made every kid in their country play basketball. Some would hate it and only be there because its mandated, and you could probably easier tell the athletic ones from the not. (I also know there are anecdotes about kids who messed up in school and still came out ahead, but those are more anecdotes than the norm.)

6. There's always a debate about public school choice, and good vs bad public schools. I know Joel Greenblatt wrote a lot about it in his last book. At the end of the day, I think raising a kid (if you take out for their individual skills/drive) is 80% parenting 20% schools. Meaning, I feel kids I grew up with in school who had better parents ending up doing better than kids with what we'll call "lower" tier parents. 

So, to answer the question, I think I would want to be a teacher, but I also think about doing it on a part time basis after I retire, one where I would go back to a high school and just teach a class about business, so I wouldn't be full time. Probably would have to be with some type of private school, don't know if I could swing it public. 

9mo
Al's, what's your opinion? Comment below:

First, I really like Hölder's idea of teaching from professionals. Back in high school I was on the engineering track, and both my teachers were former engineers (one with 40 years of experience!). Easily my favorite classes, because there really is a difference when it comes to more technical classes.

I grew up in public school, mainly suburban, and honestly I think it depends on your local school options and how much public and private is emphasized. I have friends from NYC and other NE areas who say public is crap and private is the only good choice for education. In my southern state, public schools are pretty good (huge public school system from elementary to university) and generally have the resources for clubs, sports, and good teachers.

I would not be a teacher right now because of money, but if I hit my number I would consider it. My best teachers, at least in my eyes, were men (almost always veterans) whom I felt better understood me and who I could look up to. I'd be happy to be that person for someone else.

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9mo
Anonymous Monkey, what's your opinion? Comment below:

The problem is America just doesn't pay his teachers enough, especially in math and science.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5Cc_t5QeSw

Quant hedge fund manager Jim Simons is taking matters into his own hands.  He is paying exceptionally qualified math teachers 100k in addition to their teaching salary, as well as paying for their Masters Degrees to make it a more attractive profession than say, engineering.

9mo
sexhaver420, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I normally do not contribute to these types of threads because they inevitably end up in unrelated idealogical arguments, but I can't resist.

Ater an internship in banking, I did the math and discovered that as a public employee with a pension plan living in upstate NY, I would have more spending cash per hour worked. 45k per year isn't as bad when you work 1500 hours, don't have to make 401k contributions, and live in an area where houses cost 150k. Undoubtedly, it is an attractive proposition for anyone who values a relaxing life.

But I already find it hard to get through to kids who are even 4 years younger than me due to the infiltration of technology. Layer in other teachers tending not to be the type of people I enjoy spending time with, and the job starts looking pretty dull. In addition, it's a job anyone can trade down to, but teaching calculus to teenagers doesn't qualify me for any of the other fields that interest me more.

So regardless of the politics of education, I am not interested in it as a job. And if I am interested in it as a way to make an impact, there are plenty of better ways to contribute my time (mentorship, clubs, etc.)

9mo
rickle, what's your opinion? Comment below:

The actual total compensation is not bad at all. I have many teacher friends, several of whom are clients, and their benefits are outstanding. Similar to police and fire, the pension is great. The added major perk for teachers is tenure. Varies by state but in FL, a teacher receives tenure after a few yrs (used to be 3, may still be, but certainly still while a newly minted teacher is in their 20s if starting right out of school). So, at a very young age you get lifetime job security (really have to commit a felony to lose your job), lots of vacation time, really good healthcare, and a pension that will likely pay you more than you made over your lifetime (at normal life expectancy). Know many teachers that retire with full pensions (30 yrs of service, but still in their 50s and will likely live 30+ yrs in retirement). add in social security and they've cobbled together a GUARANTEED income of about 75% of what they were making prior to retirement with healthcare covered at employee rate until medicare. If they've done any investing along the way, they have a nice additional nest egg to supplement the guarantees.  Think about it. If a pension pays out 40k a yr and the teacher lives to 85 (retires at 55), they've taken out 1.2M guaranteed. Didn't have to contribute the 401k money (they do contribute a little to their pension but not much). 

The problem, or challenge, is dealing with the kids, admin, school district crap, constant change of curriculum, teaching to the test, and most of all, parents who expect you to raise their kids for 30 yrs.  My wife would tell you she loves dealing with the kids but hates everything else, especially the parent who tells her "we're going on a family trip the week after spring break - can you put all of Susie's work together for me? I'll pick it up tomorrow. Oh and if we have questions, when can you zoom?" No embellishment. This crap happens all the time. Wife has finally started saying "NO I can't. Guess Susie will have to miss all the work and fall behind, but at least she gets to go skiing. Hope it's worth it."

9mo
da_beast, what's your opinion? Comment below:

can't really speak for everyone but my school is pretty useless. im a senior and take pretty much all ap classes and do nothing in 90% of them. we don't learn anything meaningful and are usually expected to self learn the information. also calc is the only class i actually learn something but don't find it interesting enough to actually pay attention.

9mo
Deo et Patriae, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I would personally not want to teach in a public school. You can argue that you would have the biggest impact, but there are simply too many kids that are there who don't want to be. Not to mention the lack of flexibility in the curriculum/what you can teach.

A good private school, on the other hand, I would be open to teaching at in semi-retirement. Would also have perks like allowing my future kids to preferentially attend.

9mo
j_1972, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I spent the last 10 years working my way up to the trade desk in mortgage, completely untraditional path. I felt like teaching would be a good exit strategy with less stress than finance, and more time off to spend with my toddlers. I started teaching middle school about a year ago. The trade off is to spend more time with my kids but I definitely miss the bigger paychecks. I teach mostly the advanced students but there are definitely some little shits on my campus. I'm not sure if I see myself here long term but I'm at least getting to spend more time with my kids and am looking forward to summer break, I might need to look for some part time remote work. Sucks that work from home is not an option. As far as CRT it isn't something I have to worry about as it's only something that has ever been taught in law school courses. Not something we cover in our US History curriculum.

20d
Nickdpoker, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I was born in the USA and I've lived there all my life, so I went to a regular public school and I didn't see anything wrong with working there after graduation.

20d
ibdropout, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Both of my parents are Public School teachers and have been for 20+ years and they said in the last 5-7 years they've had relentlessly bad classes.

As a preface, both of my parents still have students from 20 years ago in contact with them, so it's not an issue on their end. If you're in education though, and not working at a Spence or Dalton, public school has the best pay/job security and also part of the one of the most established unions.

But you could pay me double AN1 salary and I'd still skip it.

20d
w99, what's your opinion? Comment below:

As someone who works in public school education wouldn't recommend. I say this because public schools have no recourse nowadays. Kids can say and do whatever they want and they won't get punished. And while I do enjoy the process of teaching and learning, I would much more enjoy if I were doing it in the latter part of my life when I am established maybe in my late 40s or onwards, and can teach at a university or high school. I feel like I'd like the age group much much more. From my own experience it doesn't matter what grade I go to - kids are going to be cussing at each other and even directly at me. What can I do about it? Nothing. Disrespectful and idiot kids that don't want to learn don't make teaching enjoyable. Teaching K-8 at least, and at times 9-12, feels more like babysitting than actual pedagogy

17d
w99, what's your opinion? Comment below:

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19d
WolfofWSO, what's your opinion? Comment below:

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Nickdpoker, what's your opinion? Comment below:

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Career Advancement Opportunities

December 2022 Investment Banking

  • Jefferies & Company (▲08) 99.6%
  • Lincoln International (= =) 99.3%
  • Financial Technology Partners (+ +) 98.9%
  • Evercore (▽01) 98.5%
  • Bank of America Merrill Lynch (▲01) 98.2%

Overall Employee Satisfaction

December 2022 Investment Banking

  • PJT Partners (= =) 99.6%
  • Evercore (▲02) 99.3%
  • Greenhill (▲05) 98.9%
  • Canaccord Genuity (▲15) 98.5%
  • William Blair (= =) 98.1%

Professional Growth Opportunities

December 2022 Investment Banking

  • PwC Corporate Finance (▲14) 99.6%
  • Jefferies & Company (▲05) 99.3%
  • Lincoln International (▲02) 98.9%
  • William Blair (▽02) 98.5%
  • Evercore (▽01) 98.2%

Total Avg Compensation

December 2022 Investment Banking

  • Director/MD (10) $613
  • Vice President (38) $392
  • Associates (220) $255
  • 2nd Year Analyst (139) $163
  • 3rd+ Year Analyst (19) $160
  • 1st Year Analyst (466) $153
  • Intern/Summer Associate (88) $151
  • Intern/Summer Analyst (337) $92