Books that genuinely helped your career

IBguy2020's picture
Rank: Senior Baboon | 247

Does anyone care to share some books they feel have impacted their career/life in a positive way? I'm starting to read a lot more than I used to and would love some good reads recommended by people with similar career interests.

These books, of course, do not have to be limited to career-advice / finance books, although if you have some very influential books in those categories, please feel free to share as well.

Comments (98)

Funniest
  • Analyst 2 in IB-M&A
Jun 12, 2020

The bible, some of ya'll need Jesus

    • 71
    • 5
Controversial
Jun 12, 2020

To counter, The God Delusion and Waking Up

    • 17
    • 8
  • Intern in IB - Gen
Jun 12, 2020

Still in undergrad but this book was an interesting read that I highly recommend:

The Outsiders : Eight Unconventional CEOs and Their Radically Rational Blueprint for Success

    • 7
Jun 14, 2020

Antifragile

    • 1
Jun 20, 2020

I second this. Currently reading and finding it interesting and educational.

Most Helpful
Jun 12, 2020

How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie.

There is a reason Buffet always praises his certificate from Carnegie's course that this book is based on. Finance is very much a relationship business and I found this book instrumental on teaching me how to effectively communicate while at work. Well worth the read.

    • 18
    • 1
Jun 12, 2020

Definitely have to read this one, thanks

    • 1
Jun 17, 2020

Has anyone read the updated version "How to Win Friends and Influence People in the Digital Age"?

Jun 20, 2020

Yes, have read it and didn't enjoy it. It's definitely updated a lot as all the stories reference material that happened after the original version was published. The lessons stay the same however. Found a bit dull/basic but I'm just one opinion.

Jul 2, 2020

The best book I've read so far!

Jun 12, 2020

Millionaire Mind, by Thomas Stanley

Most accurate, non-BS representation of the careers/businesses of the wealthy in the US. Great advice as well (don't bother with Millionaire Next Door, no where near as useful)

    • 3
  • Intern in IB-M&A
Jun 12, 2020

Startup of You by Reid Hoffman (co-founder of LinkedIn and PayPal)

    • 1
Jun 12, 2020

"Extreme Ownership" - Jocko Willink

"Meditations" - Marcus Aurelius

"The Power of Now" - Eckhart Tolle

    • 10
Jun 13, 2020

I think meditations is pretty overrated as life skill/self help book. It's basically just the guy's diary entries without context, a series of blurbs in which Marcus references stuff from his day and reassures himself by reciting his thoughts on stoicism. It's definitely interesting to read, especially for people who like Roman history, but I don't think it deserves its current reputation.

    • 2
Jun 16, 2020

I looked into "Extreme Ownership" and it seems great, but it has a big problem. Like a swingers party, it only works if everyone involved agrees and is committed. I can easily see bad work environments in which people simply point the finger and go "yeah, he fucked up and admitted it" when you take that extreme ownership. Granted, not all environments are toxic, but even normal workplaces can have people or bosses out to save their ass. Whilst I think that the extrapolation from military life to civilian life can be applied, it is a bit of a stretch. Fucking up a mission in the military can result in lives being lost so people want to own up and take responsibility. At work, if throwing you under the bus means you get a lower bonus and someone else gets a higher one greedy people will do that. Bottom line is, be very careful when applying extreme ownership in daily life and who you apply it with.

    • 6
Jun 16, 2020

Pharma Guy, thanks for the thoughtful discussion! What a breath of fresh air. Agree with what you say and would like to advance the conversation.

I wholeheartedly agree that Extreme Ownership works best in one of two environments: (1) A flat team organization of relative equals (a marriage, a partnership, a very flat startup, your own personal discipline, etc.), or (2) When adopted by the top leadership on down.

"Extreme Ownership" by an Analyst which is not shared by the MD is not a culture of ownership. It will, as you said, lead to getting thrown under the bus, and the senior people not realizing or appreciating the ownership aspect. That is definitely counterproductive. I think as a result, the book is really targeted first at people leading their organizations or teams. Accountability is an attribute that you can't really train for, but you can hire people that are accountable, and while you can't always demand others to be accountable, you are always in control of being accountable yourself.

Beyond taking ownership being a nice thing to do, like someone virtuously taking the fall for a mistake, it is a necessary thing to do. Problems cannot get fixed without diagnosing the root issues (that's why we continue to have so many problems as a society that are left unsolved). As you mentioned, our base human nature may well be antithetical to this instinct -- we have some that will fight, some that will flight, in the face of danger. But for this very reason, when historical examples of great leaders come up, they are those that are able to rise above our base fear instincts and boldly put themselves in harm's way, in risk's way, and own up to the result. That's across politics, military, investing, and many other spheres.

So, do you need extreme ownership to be "good" or "safe?" No, and you may in fact be jeopardizing a safe place by starting to adopt this. But, do you need ownership to be great? I believe that's beyond debate.

    • 6
Jun 12, 2020

Disgraced by Ayad Akhtar and Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

    • 1
Jun 18, 2020

As someone that is at pivotal point of career progression, "Death of a Salesman", hits me right in the feels....

I come here when I'm bored....
Jun 12, 2020

As mentioned above, Extreme Ownership is fantastic

    • 2
Jun 13, 2020

"So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love"
-Calvin Newport.
The author makes a strong case for skill-talent NOT passion. This book helped me reposition mid-career and transition smoothly to a less stressful job.

Paradigm1

    • 3
Jun 13, 2020

Also Cal Newport's book: Deep Work.
I've read deep wprk 3-4 times. Very helpful.

    • 3
Jun 13, 2020

Rich Dad/Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki. A lot of what his books say is nonsense and the guy's background is questionable but his simple approach to explaining why the poor and middle class never build any wealth (they spend money on liabilities like cars and gadgets) was a real eye opener to someone who grew up in family where education and getting a god job was preached from day 1.

Jun 13, 2020

Came to comment this.

I come from a hardworking self-employed family so we have assets that the upper middle class would have but we have a "working class" lifestyle.

Rich Dad, Poor Dad was eye-opening because my father was teaching me about assets and liabilities from a very early age. He would joke and say "what's rent?" and I'd say "passive income" etc. I probably read the book when I was 14 and even though I don't remember any of it now, it was the first book that I've read and it just opened an entire new world for me. I also read Trump's "Art of the Deal" a week after that and together they showed me that there is a very interesting world outside of my country.

Now I'm an expat that studied Finance. And contrary to your findings, in my WM job I saw how people with good education and good jobs can retire with a good net worth of like $2-3m. There is actually nothing wrong with getting a good job. It's about what you do with the money.

If I didn't read any of these books I would probably be running a kebab shop in Eastern Europe.

Jun 13, 2020

It's never too late to start up your kebab shop in Eastern Europe. Follow your dreams!

    • 10
Jun 29, 2020

Wait $2-3 million is a good net worth?
I'm trying to get $200 million and I don't know if that will even be enough.

    • 4
Jun 15, 2020

I place Kiyosaki in the same boat as Dave Ramsey, but less applicable. Rich Dad/Poor Dad was the book that sparked my interest in finance, so i owe it that. That said, a lot of the shit said in teh book leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

Don't @ me

    • 1
Jun 13, 2020

Antifragile by Nassim Taleb is a great read

    • 1
Jun 13, 2020

People/thinking-focused:
* Mindset - Carol Dweck
* Influence - Robert Cialdini
* How to Win Friends and Influence People - Dale Carnegie
* Atomic Habits - James Clear
* Antifragile - Nassim Taleb

Investing/finance-focused:
* Buffett letters (it's free too!)
* Margin of Safety - Seth Klarman
* The Most Important - Howard Marks
* Competition Demystified - Bruce Greenwald
* Innovator's Dilemma - Clayton Christensen

Instagram: @dickthesellsider

    • 2
  • Analyst 1 in IB - Gen
Jun 13, 2020

Mostly personal development books:

How to Win Friends and Influence People - Dale Carnegie
High Performance Habits - Brandon Bruchard
Influence - R.Cialdini
The Power of Now - Ekhart Tolle
The Game - Neil Strauss
Atomic Habits - J. Clear
The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
Factfulness - Hans Rosling

    • 1
Jun 13, 2020

I actually do not recommend the 7 habits books. Cal Newport's deep work is, imho, 20x better than that one.
I promise you I do not take any $$ from Cal Newport...or his publisher...

    • 1
  • Analyst 1 in IB - Gen
Jun 13, 2020

Haven't read this, but 7 Habits has some great lessons: begin with the end in mind, focus only on what you can change, think win-win... all great advice.

    • 1
Jun 13, 2020

Hannibal and Me: What History's Greatest Military Strategist Can Teach Us About Success and Failure

    • 2
Jun 14, 2020

+1 for books about military leaders. Last year I read Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World which was a great read.

    • 1
Jun 15, 2020

Second this. Well written and just an unbelievable story.

Jun 13, 2020

ALL TIME

How to Win Friends and Influence People (most memorable quote to me: "Hello, Mr. Nicodemis Papadoulos")

Think and Grow Rich (a lot is good for career/life; I'm fascinated by the chapter on "The Mystery of Sex Transmutation")

Vandals Crown (foreign exchange market and how hardliners are no match to the free market over time; read it for fun in college)

Land and Power in Hawaii (relevant if you want to do business in Hawaii)

On China (Henry Kissinger; back around 2010 was fascinated about geopolitics and strategy; near threats and far threats, differences between China's perception of national safety vs the US)

Influence - R.Cialdini (recommended above and to me before; I read it but don't remember much)

RECENT

Tools of Titans (Tim Ferriss, love him or hate him; I like him, good read of interviews of successful people; read about 70% of it)

Being Mortal (written by a doctor; most memorable: with chronic disease we survive, survive and then die rather quickly when the sum of the body's breakdowns reach a tipping point; read about 50% of it)

Am I being to Subtle (Sam Zell; real estate; read it cover to cover)

    • 4
  • Analyst 1 in IB - Gen
Jun 14, 2020

I really didn't like Think and Grow Rich. Basically, the guy wrote a full book about the fact that the law of attraction works. More, he uses it like some mystic force that will make everything alright whereas in reality it works as follows: you think strongly about something, you create an identity about it, which activates your Reticular Activating System for you to see more opportunities about what you're thinking about, which reinforces your identity around it once again, which in turn makes you change your behavior in the face of new evidence, etc.

Jun 14, 2020

How did you like On China? Have it on my shelf and let my roommate borrow it, but he hasn't started it yet. I wonder how it compares to the current US-China environment.

Jun 15, 2020
Pierogi Equities:

How did you like On China? Have it on my shelf and let my roommate borrow it, but he hasn't started it yet. I wonder how it compares to the current US-China environment.

I think it was great. After reading that I then doubled down on reading about The Party (it was called that).

Anyways back to On China, helpful to gain a perspective on a generation, which I dub a 30 year or so knowledge gap between generations (people who lived 1945 - 1980 and are still alive today; and my generation starting 1980). Understanding history. Mao but also Zhou Enlai, someone one more analytical could relate to.

I can't remember everything about the book but how it relates today. Chinese leaders play the long game. They also see the West as always trying to box them in. They also see domestic threats as the biggest; also invasion from Russia (the near threats). China was great but humiliated for over 150 years. The emphasis on strategy similar to the game of Go. The need to cling to power or else feel the purge in your camp within the party (power struggle leading to Xi's rise and reign; forgot if I read that in On China).

That makes me think. They don't care about the fate of a generation (Hong Kong) because the people of the City will eventually change. It saddens me but we are just here for a limited time. The Go strategy reminds me of the US-Japan-SK-Taiwan, add in Philippines and so forth boxing in, containment strategy. For the US, we have a hegemony the Western Hemisphere and have the luxury of projection.

The older generation is still in power. They are split into camps of admiring the US (bc China was going through bad things like the Cultural Revolution - funny there's the word Cult in Cultural, just noticed) and those who see the US as an enemy. The power struggle of that seems to be hardening in both the US and China. The younger people are also split in the get educated in the US camp and those who think China is so great. Anyways I'm over generalizing and only basing my info on limited sources. I find it dumb to punish the let's get educated in US camp; but, we are heading into a Cold War. So yes On China seems to be relevant.

    • 6
Jun 16, 2020

Influence was required reading for one of my marketing classes, great book

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My Linkedin

    • 1
Jun 18, 2020

Land and Power in Hawaii - do you think this could be applicable to understanding the dynamics of doing deals in captive markets e.g. Hawaii?

I come here when I'm bored....
Jun 18, 2020
RacoonFood:

Land and Power in Hawaii - do you think this could be applicable to understanding the dynamics of doing deals in captive markets e.g. Hawaii?

I think part of the joy of the book was reading about names you might of heard about growing up (business people, politicians) and knowing the places/locations that these people built. So I might derive more enjoyment because Hawaii is my hometown.

The historical confluence between socio-economic dominance Pre-Statehood 1959 by the minority white landowners combined with the returning Asian American GI's (predominantly Japanese American) from WWII gaining influence in the new Democratic Party, that is an interesting history that maybe in captive markets you can see repeated (not sure but maybe post-colonial Africa?). 1959 - 1985 saw rapid change and prosperity. A doubling of the population during the Jet Age of 1960's (impacts on in-migration and tourism to military to trans-continental travel logistics). The power to tax and control the use of land, giving rise to multi-ethnic (White-Asian) participation in business.

A book written in 1985, I wonder what's next in 2020 and beyond. Demographics changing. Tourism is shook up due to COVID. High cost of living for the working class.

It's pretty Hawaii specific and it helps to have some context going in. That said Hawaii people tend to think of themselves as coming from a homeland, so book's on local business not sure how many good ones there are. This book would be like the book on Robert Moses for New York City, great if you know the landmarks, people and places.

    • 2
Jun 13, 2020

Talent is Overrated - Colvin
AI SuperPowers - Kaifu Lee
Financial Shenanigans by Howard Schilit
Ray Dalio - Principles for Life and Work

    • 2
Jun 15, 2020

Have not read first two, Financial Shenanigans should be top five in this thread. Principles was great... ableit a bit overhyped.

Don't @ me

    • 1
Jun 29, 2020

When you have billions of dollars and are trying to share a message your marketing budget is pretty huge.

Jun 16, 2020

AI Superpowers is a great read. Can definitely also recommend that. I still have to get around to read Principles at some point though.

A title that I didn't see mentioned so far:
Outliers: The Story of Success - Malcolm Gladwell

Jun 16, 2020
earthwalker7:

AI SuperPowers - Kaifu Lee

What were your thoughts on this? I just read it a couple of weeks ago and unfortunately the field is moving so fast I felt it was a bit out of date. I also wish he'd gone into more depth on the topic he discusses. Overall I thought The Second Machine Age was a better AI book.

Jun 20, 2020

Thanks for the tip. I'll check it out. Yes the field is moving so quickly that much of what is written in a book is already outdated. There's some good podcasts though. I have another WSO post on that.

Jun 13, 2020
    • 2
    • 1
Jun 13, 2020

The Great CEO Within is the absolutely best book ever written. I make all my managers read it, founders we do growth equity in, etc... ZERO fluff. Look the book up @ the writer. Far more legit than these cuck management consultants writing books.

Jun 14, 2020

Taleb's books earned me more than a job offer. Everyone has read them but many struggle to apply concepts to real world events, which is exactly the point of them. I'll never thank the guy enough.

    • 1
    • 1
  • Intern in IB - Restr
Jun 14, 2020

Can you elaborate on how you've applied them thus far?

    • 1
Jun 15, 2020

bump

Jun 15, 2020

For my very first prop trading job, I interviewed with the MD, he had the entire series on his desk, I brought up tinkering, which Taleb discusses and we had a nice 10 mins discussion about it.

Another firm asked about political polarization and where I thought it was going, I brought up the ''dictatorship of the intolerant minority'' explaining we were going down that path.

Another one asked why markets went up after Trump won in 2016 and why many people got it wrong, Taleb makes good arguments about biases and limitations of economic forecasting.

    • 1
    • 1
Jun 15, 2020

Robert Greene. All of them.

If I had to recommend just 3 books for your career, all 3 of my recommendations would be from him. 48 Laws of Power, Mastery and 33 Strategies of War will be a lifesaver many times in your career and following his rules (knowingly because you have read the books or unknowingly) are in my view the reason why some people make it and other equally intelligent people dont.

Some other books that make for a nice read (many have already been mentioned):
Jamie Dimon: Last Man Standing (found it better than Schwarzman's bio)
Dale Carnegie: How to win friends and influence people
The 7 habits of highly effective people
The McKinsey Mind
Ray Dalio: Principles
Everything from Kissinger
Nassim Taleb

    • 2
Jun 15, 2020

Antifragile by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
Skin in the Game by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management by Roger Lowenstein
On the Shortness of Life by Seneca
Never Split the Difference: Negotiating as if Your Life Depended on It by Chris Voss
The DAO of Capital: Austrian Investing in a Distorted World by Mark Spitznagel

    • 3
Jun 15, 2020

E-Myth

Jun 15, 2020

Actually, Economics: The User's Guide by Ha-Joon Chang is something that got me genuinely interested in economics and finance, and brought me to work for a stock exchange, and later for MM IB doing ER. So, I'd say it really did change my life.

Jun 15, 2020

Lots of good stuff up here. I would also include "Market Wizards: Interviews with Top Traders" by Jack D. Schwager.

https://www.amazon.com/Market-Wizards-Interviews-T...
Basically, it's a collection of interviews of successful hedge fund guys from the 80s.

Jun 15, 2020

My favorite books are not the typical business books. They are books that helped me grow as a person, the business side came later.

The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas Stanley
Eron: The Smartest Guys in the Room by Bethany McLean
Too Big to Fail by Andrew Ross Sorkin
It Worked for Me by Colin Powell
The Bonfire of the Vanities by Tom Wolfe

    • 1
Jun 15, 2020

I can't recommend anything from Taleb enough but specifically Antfragile. It really does open up an entirely different way to think about things and with that framework in mind you can adapt it to anything that you do. I have been reading it over and over again in parts for over a year now.

Also, as Seneca said in Letter II in "Letters From a Stoic":

The primary indication, to my thinking, of a well-ordered mind is a man's ability to remain in one place and linger in his own company. Be careful, however, lest this reading of many authors and books of every sort may tend to make you discursive and unsteady. You must linger among a limited number of master thinkers, and digest their works, if you would derive ideas which shall win firm hold in your mind. Everywhere means nowhere. When a person spends all his time in foreign travel, he ends by having many acquaintances, but no friends.

The whole letter, and book for that matter, is well worth the read. I included that quote because to me it is more important to really understand a book and an author - and be able to use your own mind to expand on their thoughts - than it is to just read as many people and books as possible. It takes time and critical thinking for ideas to really sit inside you and fester enough for you to then go on and really apply them to your life.

    • 2
Jun 16, 2020

Did you read his whole Incerto series? Based on all the praise in this thread, I was planning on picking that up and reading those four over the summer.

Jun 16, 2020

I have them all but haven't made it through them. I've finished Antifragile and The Black Swan. He also has a technical book called Dynamic Hedging that I use as a reference often in my work.

I haven't finished any of his other books because for me they are the perfect jumping off point for other ideas. Multiple times now I have come across an idea or historical reference in his writings that sends me down a rabbit hole of another book(s) for a couple months. Then I slowly find my way back to him and read a bit more before the cycle starts again. Exhibit A is the quote from Letters from a Stoic. I ended up reading that because of his chapter on Seneca in Antifragile.

Jun 15, 2020

bump

    • 1
Jun 15, 2020
  • One Up On Wallstreet got me interested in finance
  • Factfulness is a really eye opening book about misconceptions in the world and thought process
  • Lean In and Own It were both really great, I'm a male so they provided a whole different perspective for me.
  • Quiet, really great book on what it's like to be an introvert in a world where people are always trying to get you to "come out of your shell"
    • 1
Jun 16, 2020

Zero to One by Peter Thiel was a great book. You kind of get the gist of what he's getting at in the first 50 pages, but the book does a good job at depicting the type of businesses you should be investing in, which is contrary to what you learn in academic econ classes.

    • 1
Jun 20, 2020

Reading this book currently. Really opened my eyes since it never clicked in my head to think in the terms given in the book.

Jun 16, 2020

Give and Take by Adam Grant

Jun 16, 2020

So many provide their own little piece of knowledge, I dove into the following this year and learned a ton:
Where are the customers yatchs
When genius failed
Liars poker
Barbarians at the gate
The new new thing
Thinking fast and slow
Common stocks and uncommon profits
A random walk down wallstreet
The intelligent Investor
Flash Boys
The Money Culture
How to Win Friends and influence people
Rich Dad Poor Dad
Snowball
7 habits of highly effective people
The big short
Billion dollar whale
Wiley Finance - Investment Banking (Rosenbaum)

    • 3
Jun 16, 2020

Human Behavior / Development
- Thinking Fast and Slow - Daniel Kahneman
- Mindset - Carol Dweck
- How Not to be Wrong, the Power of Mathematical Thinking - Jordan Ellenberg
- the Hour Between Dog & Wolf - John Coates

Business
- Reminiscences of a Stock Operator - Edwin Lefevre
- Essays of Warren Buffett - Lawrence Cunningham (skip the author's intro!)

History/Geography:
- Sapiens - Yuval Harari
- Fractured Continent - William Drozniak
- Prisoners of Geography - Tim Marshall

Other favorites
- Moment of Lift - Melinda Gates
- The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind - William Kamkwamba & Bryan Mealer

    • 1
Jun 17, 2020

mark

  • Intern in IB-M&A
Jun 17, 2020

Political Philosophy:

  • De re publica ('The Republic'), Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • Two Treatises of Government, John Locke
  • Just Freedom, Phillip Pettit

Economics:

  • Basic Economics, Thomas Sowell
  • Why Nations Fail, Daron Acemoglu
  • Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy, Joseph Schumpeter

Finance:

  • Distressed Debt Analysis, Stephen Moyer
  • Mastering the Market Cycle, Howard Marks
  • A Random Walk Down Wall Street, Burton Malkiel
  • Finance and the Good Society, Robert Shiller
    • 1
Jun 17, 2020

Sapiens

Jun 18, 2020

The Goal (Goldratt) - absolute must read, manufacturing sector by the beauty of the book is that it needs to be applicable everywhere, Who Moved My Cheese (Johnson), Capital in the 21st Century (Piketty), Financial Accounting ha (McGraw Hill), and Mob Rules: What the Mafia Can Teach the Legitimate Businessman (Ferrante)

Jun 18, 2020

Thanks for the recs. I've added The Goal and Who Moved My Cheese to my reading list. I'm going through Piketty's new book now, Capital and Ideology...not sure on my thoughts on it yet.

I come here when I'm bored....
Jun 19, 2020

Do you speak french? or did the translation come out?

Jun 18, 2020

Life: "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" by Robert Pirsig
Finance: Natenberg's "Option Volatility & Pricing"

That is all.

Oh and...Mark Filippell's book, "Mergers and Acquisitions Playbook: Lessons from the Middle Market Trenches"...just for MAF

I come here when I'm bored....
Jun 20, 2020

Who Moved My Cheese is pretty depressing if what you plan to do is work in a corporation. It may make you run for the exits.

    • 1
Jun 20, 2020

Totally aside, but did you guys pick up a Kindle for the reading, or mostly iPads/laptops?

Jun 20, 2020

I had a Kindle and never used it until recently . I really like it. It does inspire you to buy more books, must admit, but that's not the end of the world.

So much easier to maneuver the little thing rather than a laptop

How you doin'? Feeling 100%?

Jun 21, 2020

Thank you very much for checking on me. You mean the COVID thing? Yeah, I was better after 2 days. But then that mistake of turning myself in to the hospital... yikes. 5 week in a cell. Not well thought out plan. At least I'd have brought more stuff along with me if I was going to be locked away.

    • 1
Jun 20, 2020

I think it's important for people to read as a way to expand their understanding of the world and how they fit into it. A lot of philosophers have great work, and I have been reading a lot into existentialism.

i.e. Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground

path less traveled

Jun 20, 2020

Atomic Habits
Principles
Relentless
Rich Dad, Poor Dad
The Art of War

in no particular order

Jun 20, 2020

For the Love of Money
The Power of Habit
Grit

Jun 22, 2020

Never split the difference by Chris Voss - great book with highly applicable concepts

    • 1
Jun 22, 2020
Comment
Jul 4, 2020
Comment

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

Jul 12, 2020
Comment

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

https://arthuxtable.com/