Exchange to UPenn or NYU for IB/PE/HF recruitment?

Hi guys,

I'm one of those long time readers, first time posters of WSO.

Currently in my final year ugrad at an Australian University, I have the option of going to either University of Pennsylvania or NYU for exchange. Reason I'm going is that Australia, though a large landmass, is quite small in the financial ocean. There is no recruiting for PE/HFs here and the numbers are extremely small as well for large multinational PE due to the tax system.

Having done a few searches for the above on WSO, it seems as though UPenn>NYU. Can someone explain why this is the case? I would've thought that NYU's location would mean that is a hotspot for recruitment.

NB: I'm really only interested in PE/HF since we do have IB recruitment down here.
I do realise the above are notoriously difficult to break into anyway.

So which is better for PE/HF recruitment?

Another question I have is whether attending UPenn would give me a greater chance at being accepted into Wharton down the track?

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Comments (8)

Jan 3, 2012 - 6:20am

If you can find a way to intern in NYC while at NYU, then obviously NYU. You won't be considered for OCR at either. And you certainly won't be considered an alumnus of Penn when it comes to graduate admission to the Wharton School.

Jan 3, 2012 - 6:28am
seedy underbelly:
If you can find a way to intern in NYC while at NYU, then obviously NYU. You won't be considered for OCR at either. And you certainly won't be considered an alumnus of Penn when it comes to graduate admission to the Wharton School.

OCR being 'On-Campus-Recruitment' right? Does that mean internationals can't apply for internships?

Jan 3, 2012 - 6:44am

You cannot use a school's career services office if you are not an enrolled student of that university. As an exchange student, you are simply visiting for a semester. That means you will not have access to the online job database that students at those schools do. You cannot apply for internships through the career office. You can try to find internships on your own, however. Nothing is stopping you from doing that.

You are correct in that Penn > NYU (and for their respective business schools, Wharton > Stern). If you were to try to find an internship yourself by cold-calling or applying blind through a company's website, I'd say NYU would beat out Penn. The location factor of NYC exceeds whatever benefit you'd get from having an Ivy school on your resume as only an exchange student.

I am permanently behind on PMs, it's not personal.

Jan 3, 2012 - 7:05am
A Posse Ad Esse:
You cannot use a school's career services office if you are not an enrolled student of that university. As an exchange student, you are simply visiting for a semester. That means you will not have access to the online job database that students at those schools do. You cannot apply for internships through the career office. You can try to find internships on your own, however. Nothing is stopping you from doing that.

You are correct in that Penn > NYU (and for their respective business schools, Wharton > Stern). If you were to try to find an internship yourself by cold-calling or applying blind through a company's website, I'd say NYU would beat out Penn. The location factor of NYC exceeds whatever benefit you'd get from having an Ivy school on your resume as only an exchange student.

Thanks for the reply.

I was under the assumption that in the US, companies recruit through resume/CV dropoffs at a booth on campus.

Also, do you apply through the jobs database using your own student unique code or is it simply a mechanism for finding which jobs are available? In the latter case, surely I could just borrow someone else's login to get the right details.

If someone can help, I need some specifics of what I can apply for and can't seeing as I could waste a fair amount of time by not getting this right in advance.

Jan 3, 2012 - 7:22am

There are career fairs like what you described, but generally only once or twice a semester. Firms there will be willing to speak with you on an individual basis and they will take a paper copy of your resume, but they almost always want you to apply online through their website and also through your school's career page as well.

You must use your university ID, typically it's tied to your university email address, so yes, it's a unique identifier. You cannot make an application if you don't have the unique identifier. In your case, as an exchange student, you might get the @nyu.edu or @penn.edu email address, but you won't get a login code for the career page. You wouldn't be able to apply for internships posted there. You would be able to use your email to contact recruiters though, so it might provide some legitimacy even if you were explaining that you were just a visiting student. Beyond that, however, there's little value add. You'd be doing the same thing you could do from Australia (cold contact HR at various firms), albeit with a different email address.

I am permanently behind on PMs, it's not personal.

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Jan 3, 2012 - 12:30pm

The above posters are correct in that as an exchange student all you have access to is the # of courses you take at the school, not any external services (alum access, career services access, etc). Thus your play is purely a resume one to the extent that you want to add brand prestige on your resume when you go into recruiting for pe/hf positions. NYU does not compare to Upenn. Firstly, Penn is an ivy league school with much tougher admission standards, and thus the students you will be meeting are likely to be smarter than those at NYU. Secondly, Wharton is the best business school in the world, and the Wharton undergrad business prestige is highly regarded on the Street, moreso than most other MBA programs. I would recommend you goto penn and preferably Wharton for your exchange, as that will allow you to network with other students, take classes with top professors and add brand to your resume. While you will not be getting a degree from Wharton, and the Street acknowledges that, that you took classes at the School and are able to withstand the rigorous Wharton undergrad curve (10% As) will speak highly of your abilities, far more than any opportunities NYU can offer.

I may be a bit biased as I'm a wharton undergrad alum, but I don't think I'm incorrect in my post above.

Jan 3, 2012 - 12:38pm

Actually, I have a friend from Germany currently on exchange at NYU and he told me that he used the OCR services at NYU. All exchange students are treated as regular students with student IDs, email addresses, etc. This gives them access to career services and other benefits. As per a previous comment, there is no access to alumni services since you typically have to graduate in order to get those.

Overall though, I don't think my friend was very successful in the OCR process given the hiring market being very difficult coupled with his international status, but it is possible to leverage the resources nonetheless. However, no matter where you go you will probably run into visa issues. Yes, NYU is a hotspot for recruitment, but Penn also carries a higher distinction.

Bottom Line: I wouldn't base this solely on OCR opportunities. Given the tough market and lack of U.S. citizenship, it would be unwise in my opinion to base a decision solely on this. Consider the differences in academics, social scene, etc.

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