How to network effectively - Tired of applying for positions online

Hi,

Could somebody give me some suggestions on how to network effectively?

I'm tired of applying for positions online and hear nothing.
50% don't respond, 35% reject and only about 15% invite for an interview.
People always tell me to network but I just don't know how to make it effectively and make sure the talk is not a one time talk but something more continuous.
What topics do you bring up when you network with professionals?
How do you follow up?
I'm sure that they probably can guess that I'm looking for an internship, how to make it less obvious?

How about cold-emailing? (I don't think cold-calling would be appropriate, right?)

Any suggestion would be appreciated.

Thanks

Comments (125)

Mar 22, 2012

Interested.

Mar 22, 2012

15% invite for interviews is pretty good, actually.

Mar 22, 2012
Downeasta:

15% invite for interviews is pretty good, actually.

Yea, I think I exaggerated, haha
Let's say something closer to 1%-2% of total applications I sent out.

Mar 22, 2012

Search for it.

But simply put:
-Find people with whom you have a connection (e.g. uni, interests, product, industry) and use it as the reason you contacted them in particular;
-Tailor each email;
-Email should go: how you found them, why you found them (e.g. i've recently become very interested in Stat Arb due to bla bla bla), who you are (uni, current status, job or recent internships), request meet up; and
-Follow up, people are busy and travel, you need to follow up.

Mar 22, 2012
Oreos:

Search for it.

But simply put:
-Find people with whom you have a connection (e.g. uni, interests, product, industry) and use it as the reason you contacted them in particular;
-Tailor each email;
-Email should go: how you found them, why you found them (e.g. i've recently become very interested in Stat Arb due to bla bla bla), who you are (uni, current status, job or recent internships), request meet up; and
-Follow up, people are busy and travel, you need to follow up.

^^^ do this or buy the guide

Mar 22, 2012

Use the search function. This topic was just covered extensively about a month ago.

Mar 22, 2012

Thank you guys for the help... will be going through past discussions and will look into the guide WSO is selling.

Last question, who do you think I should network more with, VPs & MDs or Analysts & Associates?

Mar 22, 2012
WallStreetStandard:

Thank you guys for the help... will be going through past discussions and will look into the guide WSO is selling.

Last question, who do you think I should network more with, VPs & MDs or Analysts & Associates?

Anyone who'll meet with you. (but lower ranks will have less time / weight)

Mar 22, 2012
Oreos:
WallStreetStandard:

Thank you guys for the help... will be going through past discussions and will look into the guide WSO is selling.

Last question, who do you think I should network more with, VPs & MDs or Analysts & Associates?

Anyone who'll meet with you. (but lower ranks will have less time / weight)

I see.

Thanks for your inputs, appreciate it.

Mar 22, 2012

1-2% sounds a little low, but that could be due to being at a non- or semi-target school, low GPA, little work experience, your emails are too long, etc.

Oreos is right about the time/wait thing. The converse side of this is that you can better relate to analysts/associates and they will most likely give you a clearer view of whats going on. Being able to better relate to them gives you a greater opportunity to get in the door.

Lastly, if your formatting is anything like on this post, you need to work on it. I know people are a lot more casual on forums, but sometimes there is spillover.

Mar 22, 2012
D M:

1-2% sounds a little low, but that could be due to being at a non- or semi-target school, low GPA, little work experience, your emails are too long, etc.

Oreos is right about the time/wait thing. The converse side of this is that you can better relate to analysts/associates and they will most likely give you a clearer view of whats going on. Being able to better relate to them gives you a greater opportunity to get in the door.

Lastly, if your formatting is anything like on this post, you need to work on it. I know people are a lot more casual on forums, but sometimes there is spillover.

It could be a few reasons all together. I'm a master's student at a target school applying for analyst positions (due to lack of experience in banking)... I think being a master's student and applying for analyst positions is the main drawback... many companies don't like this

My emails are very short (2-3 sentences) but I haven't been networking at all, I've been sending out emails to HR people and filling out online applications... clearly not a good idea.
I'm not even sure about the 1-2%...
Let's say so far I have distributed my resume to ~60 companies/contacts and received 6 interview invitations.

I know it's too late to get anything out of networking for the summer, but I hope it will help me in the near future when I graduate (Dec 2012).

Thanks.

Mar 22, 2012

FYI: I'm a student, so please take what I say with a grain of salt. To be fair, most of it is common sense observations/questions that will hopefully help lead you to the answers you need.

Definitely keep networking. Offer to work for free this summer if you can afford to. It's a last ditch effort, but if you can get something going this summer you might be able to convert it to full time. Even if you don't, you've got something to put on your resume.

One thing a lot of people do that I think is a big mistake (keep in mind, once again, I'm not in industry) is they treat the informational interviews too formally. Being formal is fine to an extent, but when you're trying to get a guy to go to bat for you, it's not going to work. You have to shoot the shit a little, make sure he gets to boast about his accomplishments, build a rapport with him. You want to go from being a name to being the guy who did a baller internship, or studied something really cool, or even better, partied with Victoria's Secret models in Paris during fashion week haha.

Give them a reason to like you and to want to call you up and hang out. Be respectful. Be GENUINELY interested (best way to do this: find out how to be interested in a janitor's job, then you'll be able to find interest in anything. That's not really fair since janitors actually get to see a lot of cool shit.). And, last but not least...

BE FUCKING HAPPY

If nothing else, I can tell you this: a sunny disposition and 100 IQ will get you way further than a douchey attitude and a 110 IQ.

Mar 23, 2012

Thank you for your suggestions, D M.
Every piece of information on this website is golden... I wish I'd known this website a few years back.

Mar 23, 2012

Use your alumni network to find people in the industry. E-mail them, explain why you are interested in 1 sentence, and ask to setup a phone call to find out more about their experience working in the industry. Setup a call and come prepared with questions and a solid understanding of why you want to do investment banking. Finish up by asking for advice on how best to position yourself for an interview. Even if it takes a while for you to gain traction don't stop. Always be professional. Start with analysts and then start contacting others at the same firm. HR will notice and then will be more likely to interview you based on your display of interest. Make sure HR is aware.

Mar 23, 2012

I, too, am interested about this

I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

Mar 23, 2012

how do you "make sure HR is aware"?

Mar 23, 2012
okay24:

how do you "make sure HR is aware"?

Figure out who is in charge of HR. For most banks, simply call and ask for the director or recruiting, head of human resources, etc. Once you get their name, ask them for their email address to submit a resume (HR is much more open to this type of thing, probably happens 25 times a day). In the body of your message, type something like "I was notified of this position by John Smith and blah blah blah." That's one way.

Similarly, if you can make good relationships and manage to meet the analyst/associate/vp for coffee, give them a copy of your resume and tell them to hand it to HR.

These tactics work best for boutique banks.

Mar 23, 2012

What do you recommend for BB?

Mar 23, 2012

I usually use a Cisco router

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Mar 23, 2012

.

Mar 23, 2012

I don't think networking with Analysts is worth your time, unless its a small shop and they can definitely get your resume in front of the right people or if they are a good friend of yours.

I usually try to email VPs since they are not as busy as MDs, but they are senior enough where their opinion counts (more so than an associate).

If a VP doesnt respond, i'll email an associate. If that doesnt work, i'll email an MD.

Most people (if you have a good alumni network) are more than willing to chat if they are not busy. Just be courteous, polite, and genuine about yourself and your goals.

Mar 23, 2012

This is an open ended, but good question. Many of my clients are women (medical industry), some of which are CEO's, CFO's, MBA's, etc. They are hard as nails professionally, but are also good schmoozers when running into them informally. What do you currently do? Is there a specific area you feel you are hitting a wall?

Mar 23, 2012

I ask the myself how to network with guys as well
Many times I'm afraid of appearing to be flirting or just find it hard to connect with guys' interest (think in terms of conversation topics, activities, etc.)

Mar 23, 2012

I think of it as all of those things you mentioned, but to an extent. Like you said, it really helps when an employee is willing to go out of the way for an applicant - which they obviously need a reason for. But like you also said, it's hard to pull that type of networking off.

So I think the best thing that anyone on the outside looking can do is cast a wide net, at the least. And since luck does play a factor, make sure you are perfect in everything you can control - gpa, leadership, internships. Your interests are your personality and your personality combined with your passion for IB will be the key to networking well.

But honestly, I have been on both sides of the fence. I have had many "meaningful" connections with employees that have completely fell flat, meaning they don't even respond to my contacting. And I have had some very brief and cold connections do more things for me than I had even asked out of them. All it takes is just one!

Mar 23, 2012

I see, yeah I plan on using cold calling to network myself into a boutique hopefully.

On a side note, if you've graduated college and have a few years working experience in a client facing role, think financial advisor, and you get your CFA, would it be impossible to secure an analyst position at a boutique IB?

Mar 23, 2012

PM me.

Matrick:

[in reply to Tony Snark"]

Why aren't you blogging for WSO and become the date doctor for WSO? There seems to be demand.

BatMasterson:

[in reply to Tony Snark's dating tip]

Sensible advice.

Mar 23, 2012

ask them to tell you fratty stories from their college days. guys usually love bullshitting about that stuff

Mar 23, 2012

Can anyone offer any networking advice?

Mar 23, 2012

Topic's been covered a few times on this forum. Run a search

Use common sense. How well do you know these contacts? Have they been helpful and reached out to others on your behalf already? If so, ask to be in touch with hiring managers/other individuals involved in the process for more information. Helps to ask if you can be put in the loop with the firm's recruiting team for your college/university. Works like a charm if they like you, expect them to be unresponsive otherwise

Mar 23, 2012

It really can't hurt knowing as many people as humanly possible. They may only be second year analysts, but by the time you get a job they could associates at the IB or PE you are interested in.

Good luck.

Mar 23, 2012

I like your name lol

Mar 23, 2012

Ask them what the did post school that helped them/lead them into te HF business. Ask them ideas or comments on how you should start working towards a similar career path. Be to the poit and polite, keep in touch and it will pay off when you are finally ready to make the move.

Mar 23, 2012

Asking friends to "hook you up" is not networking. It also is not your best approach. If they are friends of yours, I would suggest taking them out for lunch or a drink, informing them that you are interesting in entering the field and asking them for pointers on the best way to do so. Subtle questions such as "Do you have any suggestions on steps I should take or people I should speak to on the subject." They should be more than willing to provide advice and/or some pointers.
And if you are considering approaching the boss of your friend with the angle of them sleeping together... don't. It is extremely tacky, counterproductive and likely to also get your friend fired.
I would also suggest heading to the local bookstore and picking up some books on the subject such as Carnegie's "How to Win Friends and Influence People" or Gitomer's "Little Black Book of Connections".
Good luck.

Mar 23, 2012

yea i get that, i am very subtle when it comes to these things, i was just wondering how much someone on the inside can benefit you in terms of employment. obviously i wont go up to my friends boss and use "that angle" to get myself a job, its all about those little social events where you can get to know someone who is responsible for employment better. but i was just wondering how much leverage these people can have in terms of internships and such, like what can an associate do?

Mar 23, 2012

Use them to get names of people senior, who you then email...

Mar 23, 2012

^good one guitarguru, you just gave me an idea! lol

Mar 23, 2012

Networking is about meeting people and building relationships. Try reaching out to people in the industry, utilize your alumni base, and if you don't have access to that yet perhaps consider sites such as LinkedIn

Mar 23, 2012

Couple things I did: talked to my Dad to use his contacts, and sent out random emails and letters to people of smaller companies in Chicago. A few of them actually wrote me back saying they would love to meet with me. Think of neighbors/friends anything.

Mar 23, 2012

Think of it this way: what would you expect someone to say if you asked them how to make friends? What would you tell them if they asked you? If you are a friendly and semi-engaging person, then I'm sure you will have no trouble befriending people whom you meet. Do new friends have lunch and then email every day asking about a job? Or do they keep in touch with one another like friends would, touching base every 4 - 8 weeks? And how to meet them? You tell me. Where would you find people in strategy consulting? How many consultancies are there? Are there any alumni working there? How would you contact them?

Mar 23, 2012

Are you a girl and hot? Should be very easy if so.

Mar 23, 2012

thx guys...i know dat was kinda dumb question...i m trying my best.....its just dat wen iever i try to make dat first contact, i cant get it outta my head dat i m just contacting his/her for biz (and making it sound like a frndly conversation).
..But i guess dat feeling will go away w8 regular practice :)

@themacroguys: thx dat is wat i thought.

@GoldenEagle: thx forthe post. will start doing dat too

@Tier2Sta: ...am a dude

Mar 23, 2012

That sucks that you don't have a network. Smaller shops (at least for AM & ER) tend to have a "professionals" page. EMail addresses are often posted. Just email and ask if they could chat on the phone for a few minutes (I would reach out by email rather than phone). A lot of these guys like to give advice, so you should make some connections.

Try not to come off like a salesman. Ask about their firm, their career and their current role. They might eventually ask what your plans are. Then you can ask about an internship.

This sounds lame but it works. I got an interview today after having this kind of call in this morning. Be prepared, though: Most of the time, I get into a cool conversation, but they tell me the firm isn't hiring. The worst case is, you learn something about finance, and make a long term contact.

Mar 23, 2012

Also do searches through linkedin for alum.

Mar 23, 2012

A few weeks ago we released a networking guide that might be helpful for you. It's only $9 and you can use the link below to read about it before purchasing.

Good luck,
Patrick

Invite People Here: //www.wallstreetoasis.com/invite
$9 WSO Guides: //www.wallstreetoasis.com/page/wall-street-interview...

Mar 23, 2012

Go to the meeting and focus on both him and his wife. Try to inculde her in the conversion. Remember that it is not an interview so just talk about thing you are intersted in and ask for feedback. When closing up ask if he think he may know any people that could tell you more about what they do directly. Maybe even ask this in a follow up email.

I have have many jobs come my way via networkings. Remember to stay in contact with people not just when you need them. And keep them informed in what is going on with you.

Mar 23, 2012

International Businessman ? That's pretty vague, try to find out exactly what he does first. If he's arms exporter he's not gonna be of much help to you.

Mar 23, 2012

if he's an arms exporter, he'd be so loaded that hes bound to have connections. I think he's the president of a company thats got offices around the world doing industrial machine parts.

I mean this is just a friendly get together. Its very nice of him to follow up with me. But you know i'd just like to know what it means to network and whether or not this is a situation that i can actually make something out of it.

Mar 23, 2012

you don't even have to ask him on the first meeting. just get to know them, build a good rapport with them and then maybe in a subsequent meeting bring it up. just a thought. sometimes people get turned away if you're too pushy. it's a fine line. u gotta be the judge.

Mar 23, 2012

yeah, I agree it seems to pushy to ask on the first meeting, leave it to a follow up e-mail or call or something.

Mar 23, 2012

Stop trying so hard. Find some common ground you have (same school is a good start). You don't have to force a meetup right away. Talk over email, maybe a phone call or two and try to build a relationship. You can get the chance to meet in their office, shadow them for a little etc

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Mar 23, 2012

I've found LinkedIn to be totally useless for networking. People don't really check it on a regular basis anyway. I would leverage the alumni network extensively. That's how I got my full time position. I also wouldn't ever directly ask for a job without getting to know the person first. Make sure that during the short meeting, you make known what your intentions are. You should go in with knowledge about why the firm would be of interest to you for future opportunities but at the same time you should make known that your goal for the meeting to get a better feel for whether or not it's a fit. If the meeting goes well, I would ask whether or not there are opportunities available at the very end of the meeting and then follow up on that later on.

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Mar 23, 2012

You should try to think of networking with the goal of broadening your social sphere than on getting a job. In my experience, the best kind of networking happens from your own social network. Forcing connections is like asking a random person at the train station for coffee or soliciting in my mind.

Bottom line, leverage your personal network -- family, friends, classmates, coworkers. Then, friends of those friends of those friends, etc. Plus, even if you don't "get the job" or the direct result you wanted to, having a solid personal network for social and professional support later is invaluable.

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Mar 23, 2012
Monkiest:

You should try to think of networking with the goal of broadening your social sphere than on getting a job. In my experience, the best kind of networking happens from your own social network. Forcing connections is like asking a random person at the train station for coffee or soliciting in my mind.

Bottom line, leverage your personal network -- family, friends, classmates, coworkers. Then, friends of those friends of those friends, etc. Plus, even if you don't "get the job" or the direct result you wanted to, having a solid personal network for social and professional support later is invaluable.

Exactly. You aren't just networking for a job right now but for your future as well. Building a personal relationship is crucial and will benefit you throughout your career. In 3 or 4 years you may get a call from someone you built a relationship saying they have an opening and would like to interview you.

Mar 23, 2012

Also interested...I'm in the same boat but I transferred to a different school and my old gpa doesnt carry over so fresh start, its something you might want to consider if thats an option. I'm trying to bury my freshman year but I'm afraid I won't be able to hide it very long

Mar 23, 2012
Mar 23, 2012

Thanks!

One more question - would it help my case if I listed my 1st and 2nd year GPA (well, 2nd year GPA to date) to show a trend of improvement? If I continue to do improve academically then I was thinking I could try to pass off my first year GPA as a one-time thing.

Mar 23, 2012

So i'm going to paste in a response I sent to someone who PM'd me with a similar question, Hope this helps:

Key to networking is talking to anyone and everyone. When I realized that I wanted to get into investment banking...I started talking to anyone who I was even remotely connected to who was in investment banking. I'm talking friends of friends, friends of professors, anyone.

1)Sit down and think about which of your friends have parents in finance, do the same for your parents friends, etc and just start writing names down. E-mail those people for informational interviews.

2)Whether or not you go to a target, you most likely have a alumni directory. Find a friend or someone who graduated recently and get their login to the alumni directory...search for people in IB/PE/HF/AM and send them emails asking for informational interviews...the alumni connection helps out a lot

3)When I would get an interview with a bank or saw a bank post something on OCR...I would go on linkedin (only works if you have a good amount of connections) and in the search box, search companies and type in the bank I was interviewing/wanted to interview with to see who in my network knew people at that bank. I would then ask them to connect me, ask for an informational interview, and then utilize that relationship when interviews started.

Really you need to spend 80% of your time on recruiting on networking...it is more important than grades, your technical knowledge, and your background.

Don't give up. Hope this helps

Mar 23, 2012

after a relationship has been established, i used to be upfront with my contact and just say "I'm actually applying to XYZ's i banking summer analyst program and was wondering if you could help out in any way with the process"

i'm from a non target and got multiple FO interviews just by being upfront and asking for it. most kids will beat around the bush and avoid being so direct.. that's why i got the interviews and they didn't =P

Mar 23, 2012
Chris_Marlin:

after a relationship has been established, i used to be upfront with my contact and just say "I'm actually applying to XYZ's i banking summer analyst program and was wondering if you could help out in any way with the process"

i'm from a non target and got multiple FO interviews just by being upfront and asking for it. most kids will beat around the bush and avoid being so direct.. that's why i got the interviews and they didn't =P

I agree Chris as I was in the same position. Establish some rapport with your contacts (email them once a month with a question or anything that will help keep you on their radar). Be humble, and display a lot of interest in their career and success. When you have them where you want them, pull the damn trigger (Ask for contacts, forward resume, or any assistance with the process). I for one understand that it is difficult to do all the work on your own, and that goes for anything in life, and your contact probably understands this. The squeaky wheel gets the oil, so ask for what you want. That being said, timing and positioning is critical.

Mar 23, 2012

You are doing the right things. The ones who have requested that you keep in touch are perfect targets for the "...with recruiting around the corner I was wondering how to best position myself for an interview at your firm..." email.

One more point, don't worry about the frequency of the exchanges, most times these people are quite busy. Email once a month with a real and relevant question, anymore than that and you actually risk being a nuisance. Keep at it, continue to gather business cards - you are on the right track.

Good luck!

Mar 23, 2012

The thing is I have like... probably 30+ contacts(according to my records) from BBs... so which ones do I e-mail/focus on? Is dropping the "with recruiting around the corner I was wondering how to best position myself for an interview at your firm" a little too forward? I guess I have nothing to lose by e-mailing them and giving it a shot

Mar 23, 2012

Also, when I network, who should I focus on? I've read that I shouldn't just talk to the MDs but also the analysts and associates that can vouch for me...
But how low does that go? Can an intern that got a full time offer drop names to HR/ are they heavily involved in the recruiting process?

Mar 23, 2012

You do it like this:

I'm interested in prop trading in Chicago. If you find my resume interesting PM me!

Resume: https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&ch...hl=en

See not so hard :P

Mar 23, 2012

When speaking with HR, make sure to find a way to name drop. The more people you have talked to, the better, as it shows keen interest in their particular firm. Use the information you gather from contacts as talking points in conversations and interviews ie:"Bob Jones told me that the company was adding an alternative energy group. Can you tell me more about this....."

Analysts actually drive the recruiting process, so make sure you leave no stone unturned. Speak to anyone you can get a hold of because you may end up interviewing with someone you became close with through the process (happened several times for me). Of course a recommendation from a Senior MD will land you an interview, but this in not a commonality as they are more detached from the process. Analysts and associates are still familiar with the struggle of recruiting, and will be more apt to assisting you. Moral of the story is, talk to everyone, including analysts. It is a numbers game and all it takes is one. Be personal, passionate and tenacious.

After targeting the company I was most interested in, I talked to around 15 individuals within the company. However, HR was reluctant to speak with me due to my non target background. I emailed this poor lady over 10 times before receiving a response, but when she caved in, she was quite impressed by my persistence. That interaction led to an interview, and eventually an offer. Basically, avoid being a pain in the ass, but break through walls to display your interest and passion for the company you want to work for. The offer was at Burger King, head cashier, if you are wondering. And yes I am still happily employed, great exit opps.

Mar 23, 2012

Ask them questions. Comment on articles etc. You can probably find the answer to this in any general networking thread. Try to make a friend.

Mar 23, 2012

Tell them about something you've learned or taught yourself, or anything that shows you've been taking the right steps to be successful in w/e field you're shooting for.

Mar 23, 2012

well first, for future reference, don't ever cold add someone on linkedin. I would just send him a nice short e-mail telling him you are interested in speaking with him and his role at the bank.

KICKIN ASS AND TAKING NAMES

Mar 23, 2012

Don't cold add people on linkedin. It's like randomly adding people on facebook and is exceptionally stupid. Send them an email BEFORE.

"I do not think there is any other quality so essential to success of any kind as the quality of perseverance. It overcom

Mar 23, 2012

Haha but he accepted! and.... I'm saying now that I'm at this point what should I do?

Thanks I'll be sure to keep it in mind for future reference though.

Mar 23, 2012
timelyentrance:

Hey, everyone. First time poster here.

For the last month I've been immersing myself in finance (and, more specifically, I-Banking). Coming from a different intended major, the ideas of building connections between you and people who are in the investment banking industry seem to be a bit haphazard. As such, I'd like to make my [horribly uneducated] questions plain in the hopes that a kind higher-up might help me out.

-Does one start seeking summer internships starting during your sophomore year of college? More specifically, what age should one start looking for summer internships?
-How do you build connections to IBers from scratch? I have [obviously] no experience in the matter, but from what I've read, it's a lot of attending information sessions and cold-emailing?
-And on that note, taking into account proper cold-emailing etiquette, is the content of said email blunt?

If it matters, I'm going into Cornell ILR this semester as a sophomore. However, I'm strongly considering switching to AEM for both recruitment and educational reasons. Thanks in advance. (Oh, and if this is in the wrong forum, I'll delete/move the topic promptly.)

You can start looking for Summer internships specifically Summer Analyst positions in Sophomore year but they are very competitive. Even if you don't get any offers, use the recruitment process to begin making your connections/networking with the firms that you meet and you may have better luck in your Junior year. If you don't get anything for sophomore, you can always do stuff that is more small time, and local that can help fill your resume and make you more competitive for the next recruitment season.
Good luck.

Mar 23, 2012

Mention the deal and the bank. Say that you're interested in learning about the deal and then his group and then trying to interview.

EDIT: it may seem a little more genuine seeing as you don't have a connection and you're not just trying to use him; you're trying to learn more about the deal/firm/industry.

Mar 23, 2012

If anything, this is too long of a timeline. Why are you arbitrarily waiting 2 months to go see them in person? This is a business of now.

Also you should also be asking for more than just an internship-- ask for referrals to other people in his firm, his friends at other firms, whatever.

Mar 23, 2012

"I want a job at the Goldman Sachs"

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Mar 23, 2012

Lmaooooo!!!!

Mar 23, 2012

If you're talking to a banker from Citi, so does he.

Mar 23, 2012

'When was the last time you lead a team?' 'What's your greatest weakness?' 'What's the angle between the hands of a clock when it's 03:15?'

otherwise, pin your hair back, put on something pretty and get on your knees

Mar 23, 2012

bankers are people -- try to form a genuine relationship with the person first.

Mar 23, 2012

I always start off by asking how much he/she makes. Not sure why I never get any offers though.

Mar 23, 2012

Do you want to be a pitcher? If so, I can be your catcher.

Mar 23, 2012

Tell them about how awesome you think the OWS movement is MAAAAAANNNNNNNN

Mar 23, 2012

Tell them that you played a few years in the majors for whatever sport it is that they care about. Guarenteed VP level offer.

Mar 23, 2012

Tell him you never, ever fail to cup the balls during a blowjob.

Mar 23, 2012

Shoot the shit. It might be awkward for a little while, but the convo will flow naturally.

Mar 23, 2012

ilovency,

See this thread I just posted: //www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/one-cold-email-to-c...

Get their names from linked in, figure out the email address format, and email the most senior people you can--aside from C-levels.

In your email do the following to not freak them out:

  1. Who you are.
  2. How you found them.
  3. Thank them for their time, asked if they can pass you along/down to whoever needs you for the job.
  4. Tell them what you're doing now to get a job.
  5. Your experience, what can you do for them.
  6. Thank you for reading my cold-email. - These exact words.

Do not exceed half a page. Ask yourself if some creepy dude who saw you in the library emailed you an entire page email--would you get freaked out? Or would you like to have coffee with the cool kid who talks in fragments (and thus appears most interesting?).

Girls have an advantage for OCR during the interview and also through diversity programs. E.g., JPMorgan's Winning Women program.

There's no time to waste. If you miss this chance to land an in-cycle junior internship at a BB, it will be 100x harder to get an offer as a senior.

**Also you listed your school in your profile, which I guessed was XXX. XXX's job bank is one of the most extensive for PE/banking,etc. My friend randomly threw my resume onto your school's job bank, and I got a KKR interview.

Mar 23, 2012
wolfyserver:

In your email do the following to not freak them out:

  1. Who you are.
  2. How you found them.
  3. Thank them for their time, asked if they can pass you along/down to whoever needs you for the job.
  4. Tell them what you're doing now to get a job.
  5. Your experience, what can you do for them.
  6. Thank you for reading my cold-email. - These exact words.

Do not exceed half a page. Ask yourself if some creepy dude who saw you in the library emailed you an entire page email--would you get freaked out? Or would you like to have coffee with the cool kid who talks in fragments (and thus appears most interesting?).

Girls have an advantage for OCR during the interview and also through diversity programs. E.g., JPMorgan's Winning Women program.

There's no time to waste. If you miss this chance to land an in-cycle junior internship at a BB, it will be 100x harder to get an offer as a senior.

Have you ever read a post on WSO and you could immediately tell the person has Asperger's syndrome.

Mar 23, 2012

"6. Thank you for reading my cold-email. - These exact words."

rationale?

Mar 23, 2012

The rationale behind it is that you acknowledge that it's a cold-email.

I really like it, and I have used variations of it.

Mar 23, 2012

ilovency is actually my mentee--we didn't know each others' identities until a Facebook matchup. Small world.

Another version we worked on:

--

Hi Lyold,

I saw your name on the [fundraiser/recruiting/gs.com website]. As you probably guessed, I'm doing X and Y to earn an interview at your firm.

My dilemma is I am studying abroad this summer at [Insert study program] and am unable to attend the meet and greets. [Insert: where I can ask questions, what I can do to improve as a liberal arts major, DO NOT SAY FACETIME).

I'll be honest and say I don't have financial experience, but I worked at [THIS PLACE], I did this, and [HELPED MY SCHOOL/HELPED PEOPLE]----and would love to train with [Insert IB group] at Goldman.

I work hard at the ground level, won't ask stupid questions, can do excel, and am willing to learn. [<- MOST IMPORTANT]

If you're free for about 5-10 minutes, would you feel comfortable for a quick phone call?

You give me the time.

Thank you for reading my cold email.

Much appreciated.
Jaime D.

--

I read Mike Bloomberg's book while studying for a final round at BB LP--how the Mayor sold his Master Terminal to Merrill was, "5 minutes, it won't cost you a dime."

Just like approaching a girl at a bar, make it known that you are leaving in 10 minutes (comfort), your motives (can I get to know you), your value added (maybe I'll get us both drinks and share a dance), and your reasonable ask (can I see you again?).

-James

Mar 23, 2012

A great try, but not effective email (from the BlackRock Alumni group I moderate).

Very competitive Entry-Level candidate, May 2011

Dear Sir/Madam,

I am a senior at XXXX double majoring in XXXXX and XXXXX, and minoring in XXXX.
I am most eager to introduce myself as I am looking for an entry-level position in the financial services industry. I do have some specific areas I'm interested in, however I'd love to talk to an array of people that can expose to me as much knowledge as possible.

My studies, both inside and outside the classroom, have prepared me for a starting position in the highly coveted field of Finance. I read the Wall Street Journal daily as well as The Economist weekly. I have a deep passion for finance as well as the news that surrounds it, the economics that impact it, and politics that enforce it. While in college, I realized that it wasn't enough to be well-rounded and that developing management and leadership skills was really important too.

To develop my management skills, I have formed an organization on campus called XXXXXX Capital Management. We provide students with a hands-on approach to XXXXX, XXXXX, and XXXXX trading. We teach students about different asset classes and how to utilize different strategies. Through XXXX, I have developed exceptional leadership skills that set me apart from my peers. Our website can provide more details on our mission and current events.

Along with running an organization, I was selected to be part of the XXXXXXXXX Fund. With the help of seven students, I have developed the investment strategy for diversifying XXX. This gave me practical experience with trading securities. The main securities we invested in were linked toXXXXX, XXXXXX, XXXXXX, and XXXX.

If anyone would like to further talk about my interests or their opportunities please don't hesitate to contact me. I look forward to speaking with you. My resume is attached to this thread.

Sincerely,

XXXXXXXXX
New York, NY
[email protected]
XXXXX - Co-Founder
www.XXXX.com

5 days ago
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This guy is a leader, and he works hard--started a fund for his school too, just like yours truly. But:

  1. It's too long.
  2. It gives me to much information to process.
  3. Giving email, resume, and URL as well is hard to swallow.
  4. Not too pushy, but the length makes it pushy.
  5. It reads like an essay.
  6. There is no "identity" - He is just a senior majoring in X and Y.
  7. Because this was posted in a LinkedIn forum, it doesn't have the context of being a cover letter--which has certain expectations.
  8. The framing is wrong.

Remember focus on the "Big Ideal" -- find your key influencers -- make them invest in you somehow (go to bat) -- make them not regret it -- help others. That's the method to cold-email/cold-calling to a 1st - Final round.

If 3,000 juniors are sending the same email, wouldn't "I won't ask stupid questions" be like a HOORAY FINALLY RE: subjective affect?

Again, tell the guy reading your email.

  1. Everyone else is wasting your time, saying the same damn thing. I am not going to insult your intelligence. I want an opportunity, but I want to earn it. If you go to bat for me, I will go to bat for others--you won't regret it.
  2. I'm not going to lie. I am going to be honest and straightforward. So if I fuck up on the pitchbook or make a stupid mistake, I'll own up to it early on--and learn from it--so we won't fuck up the entire deal.
  3. I definitely appreciate your time: I won't ask stupid questions, and you won't lead me on this "why don't you read Wall Street Oasis" road. I want to see if you can either (A) take me or (B) refer me to someone else.
  4. Thanks for reading this cold-email: Because you know I am probably writing hundreds of these at 3am in the morning instead of dropping my resume into a blackhole. I know this game, and I know this industry--I need your help to navigate this jungle just as you have five years ago.

Approach an email to a MD as you would to your first girlfriend. Remember you thought about it for such a long time? It shows. I learned this in advertising.

Mar 23, 2012

I think what you're doing wrong is not cold-calling. I think calling is probably a better strategy since most people get tons of emails and it's hard to go through all of them. They're more likely to remember you if you talk to them by phone. I am not sure my advice counts for much since I haven't had that much success networking either, but that's what I would do if I were you since the methods you used so far seem fine to me. Think of it this way: persistence always pays off. No one is going to say anything bad if you call them too many times, since it shows you are passionate about a possible job in finance and initiative, can-do attitude, bla bla bla. All that stuff HR keeps talking about.

Mar 23, 2012

bump

Mar 23, 2012

I think the main problem here is cold anything. If you go to a target school you most certainly have a large alumni base in many of the firms that you are targeting. If you're networking correctly every interaction you have should at least be a warm call, email, or in-person meeting. Start with your fellow classmates and second year MBAs that have already interned at these firms (and maybe accepted offers) and work your way into the system. People are MUCH more receptive when your contact is first screened through somebody they know and trust.

Mar 23, 2012

I don't think it would hurt. I've gotten an interview through an analyst before. I think some do spring/winter internships, but it would depend on the bank.

Mar 23, 2012

Depends on the geographic region. I know in the UK winter and spring internships are common due to uni's trimester setup. I've gotten cold emails and calls before and was more then happy to chat a bit as I was in the same situation. Network with everyone regardless of position. Pretty much all the first and second years know each other through being SA togethers and drinks after work. So never hurts to pick up the phone.

Mar 23, 2012
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Mar 23, 2012
Mar 23, 2012
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if you like it then you shoulda put a banana on it