Johnson (Cornell) 2nd Year MBA Ask Me Anything AMA

Masterz57's picture
Rank: King Kong | 1,829

Inspired by a few of the other people (@"OpsDude", @"TheGrind", etc) who have posted AMAs on their b-school experience, I'm going to write about my experience at Cornell's Johnson School. If you're only interested in M7 MBAs, or you're HSW or bust, feel free to skip this, but for anyone who might end up at a school in the 10-16 range, hopefully this will be helpful. Throughout this post, I'm going to compare my experience with both my peer schools (which I consider to be Ross/Darden/UCLA/Stern/Yale, with Duke probably a bit ahead) and with M7/Tuck. I have friends at many of these schools and will point out where the comparison is anecdotal and where it is based on things such as employment reports. I'll almost certainly out myself by writing this post, so if anyone at Johnson knows who I am feel free to shoot me an email about any inaccuracies/biases you think I may have.

Background

I went to an Ivy undergrad (not Cornell or Brown) and basically had the attitude that getting to college was the end of the journey, so I spent little time on academics and a lot of time partying and drinking. As senior year rolled around, my 2.94 GPA came to bite me in the ass and I basically lucked into a job at a Tier 3 consulting firm (think Alvarez/FTI/Huron). I eventually landed in the internal strategy group at the firm and did quite well, being promoted 2 times in my first 3.5 years. However, I knew I didn't want consulting as a long-term career, and so I started interviewing elsewhere. Most of those interviews were for corp strat jobs at F500 companies. I got a couple of final rounds but no offers, but in talking to my interviewers it was clear that any of those jobs would be a 1-2 year commitment before I would be expected to get my MBA, so I went to get one. With my super-weak GPA, I cast a wide net, applying to 8 schools, getting into 4 (Gtown, Tepper, Johnson and Ross) and ended up choosing Johnson over Ross due to better east coast placement (I had been living in NYC the past 4 years) and smaller class size. I did my summer internship at a F500 company (not going to be more specific to avoid completely outing myself), loved my internship and signed the offer I got within a day of receiving it. Now, on to Johnson...

Johnson Culture (yes, stealing @"OpsDude" format, but I thought it was good)

1) Location: I'll start with this since "I'm not living in Ithaca' is often at the top of people's minds when they think of Cornell. Yes, it's fucking cold (currently -5 with wind chill). Yes, it's in the middle of nowhere. However, for a city of 50,000 people it's actually pretty nice. There are 8-10 restaurants that are quite good, there are a lot of outdoor activities, and there are enough college bars to go around. Also, NYC is a 4-hour drive away and most people go down every 4-5 weeks for a break from the cold. There's a bus that runs 3 times a day (Campus to Campus) which is very nice, Wifi, snacks, etc.

2) Networking: I put this after Location since it's greatly influenced by Ithaca. For better or worse, all of us are trapped here in Ithaca most of the time. We all have class in the same building and we all go to (mostly) the same bars. Because of this, I know each of my 275 classmates well enough to stop and have a conversation with them. By the end of your time here, unless you are a hermit, you will know every one of your classmates at least well enough to say hi. I view this as a major advantage of Johnson and it spreads to the alumni as well. It's sort of like Tuck Jr. in that they're all incredibly responsive and have a lot of love for the school (they're trapped in Hanover, we're in Ithaca).

3) Students: The student body overall is extremely friendly and everyone is very collaborative. It's so rare that this is not the case that those who are haughty/stand-offish have actually been publicly called out on it. About 10% or so come from Ivy undergrads, with Cornell being by far the biggest feeder. The rest are mostly concentrated in schools in the top 50 or so, with a Colgate or UCLA being about the median level of feeder school. Most people are very smart, but it's not a super competitive culture and people genuinely do help each other a lot.

4) Social Life: We're bschool students, and drinking is definitely up there on the agenda items for us. Given that we share Ithaca with Cornell undergrad, most bars are some mix of ugrad/grad students, with a couple being more grad-heavy. If you want, you can also go to downtown Ithaca and hang out with Ithaca College undergrads, as a small number of single guys do. There are also a lot of other grad schools to mix with, and we spend a decent amount of time with Law and Vet School students (vet being 80/20 women/men). People generally go out Weds/Thurs/Fri/Sat and there are always events of some sort going on.

Recruiting

Everyone's favorite topic. I'll break it down by discipline:

Consulting: Compared to the peer schools, this is probably Johnson's weaker area. We send about the same % to MBB each year as our peers do (5-6% per year), but we're not quite as strong in depth behind that. This year we have 8 to Bain, 4 to McKinsey and 3 to BCG. Bain and McK come on campus each year while BCG doesn't always. Last year it was 8 to McKinsey, 4 to Bain and 3 to BCG. For Bain and BCG, you can go to any office you get accepted to, while for McKinsey they tend to push Johnson people to offices like Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Stamford, etc. We're a core school for Deloitte, PwC, EY and Accenture, and this year those numbers are roughly 7, 7, 7, and 2 respectively (down year for Accenture). We will send people to ATK and LEK most years (this year it's 3 and 1), and after that it goes to more boutique-y places like Axia, IMS, etc. You can see from the numbers, but M7 sends 15-20% of the class each year to MBB. There are more interview slots for those schools. However, once you get the interview school doesn't really matter. Bain, for instance, interviews all 2nd rounds at their office, and so the Johnson people who got Bain beat people from any other school in that office. The big advantage at M7 is the number of interview slots and the alumni network, but once you get to the interview it's all pretty much the same.

IB: Fairly strong here, and improving every year. Recruiting is organized by a professor who was previously a Director at Citi, and he does a great job in prepping people and getting them into firms. This year we'll have about 45 people going to IB, with ~30 of those to BB/EB and the other ~15 to places like RBC, BMO, Baird, Jefferies, Guggenheim, etc. We're a core school for all BBs except MS (and we send 1 or 2 there each year anyway) and for a couple of the EBs. The biggest difference between us and M7 in this area is that our BB hires are concentrated at Citi, BAML, Deutsche, JPM with only 1-2 each year to GS/MS. Also, important note: if you do IB recruiting here, you will be going to NYC every Friday from mid-October to December to network/interview.

Marketing/GM: I'll lump these together since it's fairly similar in terms of recruiting. We have a lot of companies come here for these roles, in CPG we are a core school for Colgate, Unilever, P&G, Mars, SC Johnson, Johnson & Johnson, Whitewave and Big Heart Pet Foods. In GM you'll see names like Boeing, Corning, commercial banking (Citi, BofA, JPM), Liberty Mutual, etc. Some are very competitive, some are less so. We have a very strong CPG alumni base (at Unilever and Colgate we're the biggest/second biggest group).

corporate finance: Similar to Marketing/GM, a lot of options in the F500. People go to P&G, banks, CPGs, and other industries for this.

Tech: Ok but getting stronger. Amazon last year was our biggest hirer, and this year they liked Johnson MBAs so much they've come back for another round of 2nd year interviews after doing their hires in November. We place very well at Intel, with 3 of 9 MBAs this year coming from Johnson in their leadership program. EBay is also a big hirer, as is HP. We send a couple of people each year to Google, but they're not a huge presence here, and we have 1-2 people each year to Facebook/Apple/MSFT.

Equity Research/Buyside: If you want to go to PE from here, you need prior PE experience. We have 4-8 people do it each year, all of whom had prior HF/PE experience. They had to do all of their own networking for the most part and got jobs without help from career services. We send a few people each year to big Mutual Fund companies such as Fidelity, American Century, etc, and a few to sell-side Equity Research. There is a student-run hedge fund (the Cayuga Fund) and an Asset Management mentorship program in which alumni mentor students. Only about 10-15 people each year pursue non-HF/PE Asset Management and most end up with jobs like Fidelity, but we're certainly not as strong here as M7.

Academics

To start, we don't have GND. Grades matter for Consulting and IB (in IB they care about Finance/Accounting grades, in Consulting about overall GPA) but not for the other roles you can recruit for. We all take 6 core classes in the fall, which are mostly very well-taught. If you've done business undergrad or had a lot of business experience, it's more of a refresher than a ton of new material, but good overall. In the spring most people do Immersions. Immersions are a semester spent intensely studying one discipline, and they're offered in the following fields: Marketing, IB, Corp Fin, Sustainable Global Enterprise (a Johnson niche), Investment Management, and Ops. For some of them you work on a project for an outside company (examples being MSFT, Amex, HP, J&J, etc) throughout the semester. For IB, you get drilled on modeling/M&A each and every week, and the IB guys come out very well prepared (100% conversion from internship 2 years ago, 95% last year). Marketing, IB, and SGE seem to be the best, with CF,and Ops getting weaker reviews.

Second year, it's all electives, and there's good variety. Most of the professors are very good teachers, and there are some very interesting subjects to learn about. One big advantage is that you can take up to 1/4 of your credits from other schools at Cornell. Cornell is "the biggest Ivy League university", and it shows in the amazing variety of courses you can take at places like the Hotel School or in Industrial & Labor Relations, Urban Planning, Law, or a million other disciplines. I'm currently only taking one bschool class and loving the other classes I'm taking. Whatever your interests are outside of bschool, you can find a class here to pursue it.

That's it, I know it was long but didn't want to leave anything out.

Comments (106)

Jan 28, 2015

Thanks so much for posting! I will be applying to MBA programs this fall and am considering Cornell. My question is in regard to IB recruiting: is Cornell more or less NY only?

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Jan 28, 2015

More or less NY only. Out of the ~45 this year, we have 2 going to Houston, 1 to SF and 1 to Singapore. There's usually a few people interested in Houston each year and they generally organize a small Houston IB trek for that, but it's outside of the "main line" of NYC IB recruiting. It can be done, but it's harder and a less well-trodden path.

Jan 28, 2015

Thanks for the post! Very insightful and interesting read.

Jan 28, 2015

Can you talk about your admission stats/profile you built? What do you think set you apart to make up for your GPA? Great write-up by the way.

Jan 28, 2015

I didn't hire a consultant and did everything pretty much on my own. I ended up with a 700 GMAT, which is in range for this tier of schools but will not set you apart by itself. Honestly, I think the two things that helped me were great reccs, work experience and undergrad prestige. As for the last one, don't let anyone fool you, they do care about what kind of school you went to undergrad, and coming from a top 10 Ivy definitely helped me. As for work experience, as I said I was promoted twice in 3.5 years and managed a team of 4 by the time I left. I worked on multi-million dollar projects where when my direct boss was out I was the project leader (including liasing with a team of outside consultants). My boss reported directly to the CFO, and I took trips for work to Hong Kong, Singapore, London, Australia and almost all of our major US offices where I worked with the senior leaders of our business. I got a recc from our COO and my boss which I think were both stellar.

Lastly, but I don't think this is a big deal, I probably had a very strong interview. I'm a good interviewer, very outgoing and easy to talk to (I got every job I applied for first year).

I think all of the above helped offset my weak GPA.

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Jan 29, 2015

What was your standard response to interview questions (both for B-school and job interviews) about your weak GPA? I'm in a similar situation where I now have good+ experience but a middle of the road Ugrad school (but a very hard major) and a below 3.0 gpa.

Jan 28, 2015

These threads are outstanding.

You mentioned that some marketing and GM jobs were harder to get than others- what tended to be the most and least competitive jobs to get?

Jan 28, 2015

For those jobs, it's basically a matter of supply and demand, which varies a lot more in marketing+GM than in consulting/IB. In IB/consulting, there's a distinct hierarchy and most of the firms will have you doing similar work, so people just all go for MBB, then Deloitte/Strategy&, then on and on. For marketing/GM, demand tends to be very variable depending on industry, location and role. Within each industry, there may be firms that are viewed as "more prestigious" than others, but there are so many industries and so many companies that there might be 30 companies that are not viewed as more prestigious than one another, just different. Demand tends to clump around locations to some extent (a lot of people want to be in NYC/Boston/DC/SF/Seattle and a couple other places) and to some degree around "prestige" within industry. Here are some examples of the more competitive jobs to get:

Note: Marketing and GM are essentially two sides of the same coin in most situations. Marketing is GM in most B2C companies, whereas GM is GM in B2B

Marketing:
P&G (still often viewed as the GS of marketing but often suffers due to location)
Colgate- small intern classes (15-20), NYC draws a lot of people, one of only 2-3 CPGs who sponsor internationals
Unilever- NYC draws a lot of people
Diageo- small intern class (8 or so), NYC location, people love booze
Nike/Under Armor/Gatorade (sub of PepsiCo)- People love their products

GM-
Amazon (most positions here are GM/Ops, and people just seem to love Amazon)
Apple (people looove Apple)
Intel (great rotational program, great pay, small intern class)
others that I can't think of off the top of my head

Easier to get:

Marketing:
Tier 2 CPGs: Big Heart Pet Brands, Sara Lee, Land O'Lakes, Ocean Spray, Reckitt, Church & Dwight
CPGs in bad locations: Kellogg, Nestle, Mars
Any place where marketing is not owner of P&L (commercial banks, most other companies)

GM:
Companies in bad locations: Corning, GE (great program, awful locations)
Firms that are "just another company", i.e. no great program for MBAs, no "cool products": CIGNA, American/Delta Airlines

In general, the hardest firms are ones with some combination of 1. Cool products, 2. cool industry, 3. "prestige", 4. great location, 5. small MBA classes/great programs

The easier firms are those lacking in all or most of the above attributes.

Jan 28, 2015
Masterz57:

For those jobs, it's basically a matter of supply and demand, which varies a lot more in marketing+GM than in consulting/IB. In IB/consulting, there's a distinct hierarchy and most of the firms will have you doing similar work, so people just all go for MBB, then Deloitte/Strategy&, then on and on. For marketing/GM, demand tends to be very variable depending on industry, location and role. Within each industry, there may be firms that are viewed as "more prestigious" than others, but there are so many industries and so many companies that there might be 30 companies that are not viewed as more prestigious than one another, just different. Demand tends to clump around locations to some extent (a lot of people want to be in NYC/Boston/DC/SF/Seattle and a couple other places) and to some degree around "prestige" within industry. Here are some examples of the more competitive jobs to get:

Note: Marketing and GM are essentially two sides of the same coin in most situations. Marketing is GM in most B2C companies, whereas GM is GM in B2B

Marketing:

P&G (still often viewed as the GS of marketing but often suffers due to location)

Colgate- small intern classes (15-20), NYC draws a lot of people, one of only 2-3 CPGs who sponsor internationals

Unilever- NYC draws a lot of people

Diageo- small intern class (8 or so), NYC location, people love booze

Nike/Under Armor/Gatorade (sub of PepsiCo)- People love their products

GM-

Amazon (most positions here are GM/Ops, and people just seem to love Amazon)

Apple (people looove Apple)

Intel (great rotational program, great pay, small intern class)

others that I can't think of off the top of my head

Easier to get:

Marketing:

Tier 2 CPGs: Big Heart Pet Brands, Sara Lee, Land O'Lakes, Ocean Spray, Reckitt, Church & Dwight

CPGs in bad locations: Kellogg, Nestle, Mars

Any place where marketing is not owner of P&L (commercial banks, most other companies)

GM:

Companies in bad locations: Corning, GE (great program, awful locations)

Firms that are "just another company", i.e. no great program for MBAs, no "cool products": CIGNA, American/Delta Airlines

In general, the hardest firms are ones with some combination of 1. Cool products, 2. cool industry, 3. "prestige", 4. great location, 5. small MBA classes/great programs

The easier firms are those lacking in all or most of the above attributes.

Awesome write up; really helps someone understand the recruiting scene for those jobs. There seems to be a lot of info for consulting and banking recruiting, but not a lot for marketing and GM eventhough they are popular options for MBAs.

Jan 28, 2015

great job

Jan 28, 2015

Any comments on Financial Aid going in to the 2 year MBA program?

Jan 28, 2015

I didn't get any financial aid, but the major option for 2 year MBAs is the Park fellowship. It's a full ride for about 25 people per class and you have to do some extra leadership training/work during the MBA. I'm sure there are other smaller scholarships, but that's the major one.

Jan 28, 2015

Great post!

Jan 28, 2015

As an alum of the Cayuga fund, I'd say that the full time offers for Fidelity/American Century are extremely limited. Pre-2010 placement was much better for investment management for Johnson. Sell-side ER jobs are plentiful though.

Jan 28, 2015

Completely agree with you. Was using those as examples, but Fidelity only takes 3-4 MBA interns per year so thought it was worthwhile to mention.

Jan 29, 2015

Hi Sylverlee, I'm joining Johnson next year. Could you shine some light on the job placement stats for students who focus on Asset Management path (Cayuga fund)?

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Jan 29, 2015

Is your work experience pretty typical? It sounds like you had a pretty unique experience managing a small team while also getting to travel around the world. I'm not aware of too many jobs post under-grad, pre-MBA that allow you to do that by the time you're 25.

Jan 28, 2015

No, not typical at all, I got pretty lucky with my manager and the team I ended up on. I'd say the typical work experience at Johnson (as much as there is a typical one) is "silver" level job post-undergrad. So FLPs for F500, some other F500 jobs, Tier 2/3 consulting firms, some Big 4, a whole smattering of random one-offs (professional violinist, pro Euro basketball player, academic), and a bunch of engineers from various companies.

Jan 29, 2015

Hi, thanks for the excellent thread. I'm an international students joining Johnson next year. My aim is to go for trading or Asset Management. I have risk background in fix income. What do u think of the odds to pull this off?

Jan 28, 2015
iwpmhness:

Hi, thanks for the excellent thread. I'm an international students joining Johnson next year. My aim is to go for trading or Asset Management. I have risk background in fix income. What do u think of the odds to pull this off?

Spoken like a true FOB. Listen buddy, you can't just expect someone to assess your chances based on the little information you gave!

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Jan 28, 2015

I'll let syverlee answer the Asset Management half, but as for background there's a guy in my class who came in off 8+ years of being a professional violinist and is going to American Century full-time, so it can be done no matter the background. As for trading, we had 2 people intern in S&T and 1 go last year full time. It just simply is not a big MBA destination and almost no bank I can think of has a program for it or hires for it (only two I know of are Barclays and BNP and both are very small programs). It can be done, but it's very, very hard.

Jan 29, 2015

What was the conversion rate of people wanting to go into IB and actually getting into IB?

Jan 28, 2015

Last year there were about 50 people who seriously went after IB and as I said 45 or so got it, so pretty high. It varies a little year to year based on interest and quality of candidates. I think this year it was something like 45 going for it and 37 got it.

Jan 28, 2015

Did you notice any unifying factors among those who did not succeed?

Jan 29, 2015

I think this is a long overdue AMA, so kudos for doing this. Can you go into some detail about how you think your experience differs from the comparable schools you mentioned (Anderson, SOM, Fuqua, Ross)? Do you think it's more or less the same from a recruiting perspective by numbers, and the location placement is the only different factor? Additionally, can you speak to the support of the career services center and how helpful/unhelpful they are?

Jan 28, 2015

I have friends at Anderson, SOM, Stern, Darden and visited/was accepted by Ross, so I'll stick with those as I don't know Fuqua very well.

Overall, without getting into specifics, I'd say the culture here is more Tuck-esque than any of those schools with the exception maybe of Darden. As I said above, we're trapped here in Ithaca for better or worse and we see each other all the time. I have a very good friend at Stern who knows maybe 50 people in his class because NYC causes such a dispersion. I know everyone in my class on a first-name basis and could tell you something interesting about 3/4 of them. Alumni are the same, i.e. super loyal to the school and very responsive in recruiting.

Also, as you alluded to, in this tier location matters big time. Imagine everything is equal between these schools (student ability, alumni network, etc) and they're all applying to Company A. If company A is west coast, Anderson will have an advantage. If it's Midwest, Ross will. If it's NYC, Stern/Johnson/SOM will, if it's South/Mid-Atlantic, Darden/Fuqua will. This is reflected in both the alumni bases and the companies that recruit on campus. Corning recruits big-time at Johnson because they're located within a 2 hour drive. In marketing, Kraft recruits at Ross and not Johnson for the same reason. If you want Chicago IB, Ross is your place. If you want LA IB, go to Anderson.

As far as recruiting, here's where I'd honestly rank Johnson overall:

IB:
Stern
Johnson/SOM/Darden
Ross/Anderson

Consulting:
Darden/Ross
Johnson/SOM
Stern/Anderson (Stern suffers from finance focus, Anderson from tech focus)

Marketing:
Stern/Johnson/Ross
SOM/Darden/Anderson

Tech:
Anderson
Stern
SOM/Darden/Johnson/Ross

In some of these areas, the differences are tiny, in others they're a little more pronounced.

Jan 30, 2015

Masterz57, thanks for doing this. A few things I would like you to elaborate on more.

Could you speak a bit more about your admission interview experience at Johnson? And advice you have for current year applicants on that?

Sounds like there is no London IB track - could you confirm?

Overall, any European-leaning initiatives/classes/clubs that Johnson have that would be nice to explore/bring up during the interview for someone from Europe?

Thanks again!

Jan 28, 2015

The admission interview was pretty straightforward. I didn't do a ton of prep, but just be sure you know your resume inside and out and can speak intelligently about it. Questions ranged from work experience to strengths/weakness to managerial/interpersonal style.

There is no London IB track. Most years some students organize a trip to Houston IB and Asia IB, but I've never heard of one to London.

There's a European club, but not too familiar with what they do (except sponsor Octoberfest). As far as I know, there's no Europe-specific classes, most are much broader (International Finance, Emerging Markets, etc).

Jan 30, 2015

Thank you for the post, OP. Can you talk about the PE scene at Cornell? With it being such a hot field, I know a lot of people are trying to break into PE before grad school (from all backgrounds).

Do you know many classmates who are actively trying to get recruited into PE shops?

Do you know of any particular firm(s) that come on campus to recruit?

What % of the people who seek PE jobs get the chance to work in the field post-MBA?

Are PE internships available/near impossible to find?

Appreciate any feedback. Thanks

Jan 28, 2015

There are about 4-8 classmates of mine who are trying to recruit for PE this year. I know one or two who already have offers, but most are still recruiting and will not know until May or so. All of these people have some PE or HF experience before school.

No PE firms come on campus to recruit, which is exactly the same as what you'll find outside of any M7 school (and in some cases within it).

For % of people who seek them and get them, I honestly have no idea.

They are available and very hard to find. Every person in my class who did one did it through their own recruiting efforts, with career services mostly just helping them get in touch with alumni in the field. This is one area where being at Cornell helps, as there are a decent number of people from Cornell undergrad/other programs who work in PE and are willing to help.

Jan 30, 2015

Out of curiosity, from the 1-2 classmates who have offers already, do you know if these offers are with firms they were working at before Cornell or during their summer internship? Or if they were a local NYC firm that your classmates successfully networked with while in school?

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Jan 30, 2015

GO BIG RED!

Jan 30, 2015

Thanks for the insightful post.

From a recruiting standpoint, I would not consider Johnson a peer to Ross (for consulting). I have not gotten a MBA from either school so I have no personal stake in this comparison. I am a big fan of Cornell though.

Ross 2014 Placement: McKinsey & Co. (16), Bain (9), Boston Consulting Group (6), Accenture (14), A.T. Kearney (8)
Johnson 2014 Placement: McKinsey (8), Bain (4), BCG (3), Accenture (2), ATK (3)

Jan 30, 2015

Thanks for the insightful post.

From a recruiting standpoint, I would not consider Johnson a peer to Ross (for consulting). I have not gotten a MBA from either school so I have no personal stake in this comparison. I am a big fan of Cornell though.

Ross 2014 Placement: McKinsey & Co. (16), Bain (9), Boston Consulting Group (6), Accenture (14), A.T. Kearney (8)
Johnson 2014 Placement: McKinsey (8), Bain (4), BCG (3), Accenture (2), ATK (3)

Jan 31, 2015
pinenuts0:

Thanks for the insightful post.

From a recruiting standpoint, I would not consider Johnson a peer to Ross (for consulting). I have not gotten a MBA from either school so I have no personal stake in this comparison. I am a big fan of Cornell though.

Ross 2014 Placement: McKinsey & Co. (16), Bain (9), Boston Consulting Group (6), Accenture (14), A.T. Kearney (8)

Johnson 2014 Placement: McKinsey (8), Bain (4), BCG (3), Accenture (2), ATK (3)

No horse in this race either but keep in mind Ross' class size is 450 - 500 or so while Johnson's is around 280 - 290. Hard to compare raw numbers

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Jan 28, 2015

@"MokeAnalyst" basically made my point for me, but I'll say it too. Ross has 500 people per class, we have 275. So they send twice as many to MBB as we do. Also, if you'll notice above, I think Ross IS generally a better consulting school. Behind MBB they're deeper than Johnson is.

Feb 1, 2015

How does the one-year program fare on the job front? Are the students in a considerable disadvantage compared to those who are enrolled in a two-year program because they don't have summer internships or for other reasons (e.g. employers automatically ding one-year students for some reasons?) I am opting for an one-year program because of my age and I don't want to spend two years at school.

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Jan 28, 2015

A few things about the one-year program: 1. you need another advanced degree to do it (i.e. a Masters or Phd) 2. It's much more international than the 2-year program (I'd ballpark 65%+ international) 3. it's much harder to career-switch than in the two-year MBA program. As far as recruiting, all on-campus recruiting for full-time (not internship) positions is open to one-years, and a good number get their jobs this way. The lack of internships does make career-switching much harder though, and most people end up going into a variation of what they did before school. The one-years do tend to get very good tech jobs though as there are a lot of STEM Masters students, and tech recruiters tend to love the combo of STEM undergrad/grad+MBA.

Feb 2, 2015

Thank you for doing this. How much do you think your undergrad being an Ivy League help you get in? Do you think that it "made up" for the less-than-prestigious work experience? That last sentence is not supposed to be insulting like it may sound.

Jan 28, 2015

Didn't take it as an insult. I spent no time on academics undergrad and paid for it in recruiting.

To answer your question, I would say my undergrad certainly helped, but I would say WHAT I did at work was far more important. Honestly, once you get past the M7 (and even very much within it) a TON of the people there worked for "less-than-prestigious" companies. Even at HSW there's a large percentage of the class that didn't work for MBB/IB/PE. At the 10-15 level very few come from that background. What really matters (and what I think helped me a lot) is if you can demonstrate and talk to the following things at your job: leadership (i.e. management responsibility), progression (promotions) and importance of the projects you worked on. We have people here from all sorts of random backgrounds, but the key is that for the most part wherever they were they were a star. They were promoted quickly, given responsibility, and had great recommendations from their supervisors. Honestly, most bschools would rather take a superstar from F500 company X with an "ok" GPA and GMAT than someone who got a great GMAT and GPA and has "blah" work experience.

Feb 2, 2015

@Masterz57

poetsandquants, businessinsider, etc have all posted articles based on our AMA's, so be careful with personal information you put out there. A few students at Kellogg figured out who I was (which was a bit scary since my old account was 7.5 years old and had stupid comments I made when I was 20 haha).

Jan 28, 2015
opsdude1:

@Masterz57

poetsandquants, businessinsider, etc have all posted articles based on our AMA's, so be careful with personal information you put out there. A few students at Kellogg figured out who I was (which was a bit scary since my old account was 7.5 years old and had stupid comments I made when I was 20 haha).

That's why you need 2 WSO accounts - one for serious stuff and one for serious trolling.

Feb 4, 2015

Hey,

I am an MBA applicant from India.
I have admits from Cornell (no $), Emory($$), Georgetown($).

I want to go into Consulting industry and I also want to come back to India 2-3 years post the MBA.

My questions are as follows:-
(1) How tough is to land a consulting job being an international student? Are there many who are jobless post MBA education?

(2) Does Cornell have a wider reputation (internationally as well) compared to the other two schools I got admits from?

Looking forward to your response.

Jan 28, 2015

Congrats on getting in. To answer your questions:

1. Not really much tougher than for US nationals, as almost every large consulting firm sponsors. MBB, Big 4 all sponsor, as does Accenture I believe. It'll be tougher at boutiques as not as many of them sponsor, but overall you're in very good shape in consulting. In general, IB and consulting both sponsor widely while F500 and others do not.

2. If you mean wider, then definitely yes. If you mean better, then definitely yes. Internationally, it's not even close, as Cornell being an Ivy means the Ivy-obsessed people in other countries are much more likely to know it than the other two. In the US it's closer, but Cornell is still ahead. Gtown has a couple of other excellent grad schools (foreign service, law) but it's not even close to Cornell. Cornell has the world's best hotel school (which puts a lot of people overseas), best ILR school, best vet school, top 15 med school, top 14 law school, and some of the best grad engineering programs in the US (I'd say only behind Stanford, MIT, Caltech, Carnegie Mellon, UC-Berkeley and maybe GA Tech). With that kind of breadth, Cornell is much more widely known and respected than Emory or Gtown.

Feb 5, 2015

Awesome thread. I currently work in Strategy at a Big 4 (Deloitte/PwC) with 3 years experience in consulting. I would like to stay in consulting and I am interested in B-School in the near future to advance my career, and likely stay at my firm. Given that I want to remain in consulting, what are your thoughts on a Part-Time/Weekend program around my travel schedule (i.e., Booth/Stern/Kellog) versus a full-time program at Johnson or a peer school?

Jan 28, 2015

Wish I could be of more help, but I don't know enough about PT programs to give you a valid answer on this. I would suggest talking to people who are in/have done those to get a better idea. Only thing I can add is that you're not a career-switcher, which is one of the big advantages of full-time vs. part-time (in PT it's much harder to switch industries/functions). Since you're not looking to switch careers, that aspect of FT MBA isn't as valuable to you, but I can't say what you'll get out of a PT MBA so can't really give you a good answer.

Feb 5, 2015

Hi, thanks for the quality content here. Very much appreciated.

Could you elaborate a bit on the tech recruiting at MBA level? What type of roles do MBA students target at tech companies? (are they general leadership rotational programs?) Also, what type of pre-MBA background do the tech recruiters at MBA level require of candidates?

I heard one of the common post MBA position at a tech firm is being a product manager. But to my understanding, such position is exclusively filled by people with engineering backgrounds.

Thanks in advance.

Jan 28, 2015

Honestly the types of roles that MBAs take at tech companies are very similar to the types of roles they take elsewhere. The big ones would be GM (sometimes rotational programs but most often not), marketing (very common), finance or ops (only if they make physical products generally). Product managers roles are not as common because as you said they absolutely require you to have an engineering background to get that role. I'd say marketing and finance are probably the most common spots MBAs end up in, as those roles are fairly similar across industries and so they're more open to career switchers. The only companies that come to mind that have a rotational program are Intel and Amazon (which isn't realllly a tech company). Ops is a very common role at Amazon (they love to have MBAs run their distribution centers), somewhat common at Apple and less common elsewhere. Finance roles are generally available at any company (everyone needs finance people).

Feb 4, 2015

Hello,

(1) Being a second year student at Cornell MBA, can you please give a fair estimation of the program cost? How much have you ended up spending till now? How much program cost should I be prepared with for the 2 years?
Are there any major expenses that you had not foreseen before joining the program?

(2) Does the location of Ithaca play a problem when it comes to networking and socializing with prospect recruiters?

(3) Students of which MBA program are the biggest competition to us in recruiting?

Thank you for the detailed responses you post in the forum.

Jan 28, 2015

1. Tuition is the biggest cost obviously, and you can look that up online (I forget the exact number). Ithaca is fairly inexpensive, and can be made less expensive if you chose to (i.e. choose cheaper housing, don't go out as much). You could get by on a budget of $30k per year, or even $25k if you don't go out a lot and cook more often. The only big expenses I didn't expect were treks, which are optional school-organized trips to all sorts of places (Patagonia, Dubai, South Africa, etc). Those can cost a bunch (depends on the trek) but as I said are optional.

2. Depends. If the company comes to campus, then no, because they come to you. If they don't come to campus, it's a 4 hour drive to NYC which is not so bad. If you're interested in tech or energy, yes it's a bitch to get to Houston or SF, but that's true for any school not based in those areas.

3. Kind of a dumb question. There's not a company in the world that says "hey, I'm either taking a Johnson kid or a Darden kid, you two fight it out". You're competing against kids from every program who got an interview at that company. Whether they go to Columbia, Yale or Ross is immaterial.

Feb 15, 2015

OP:

I've got another question. I'm almost identical to you stats wise, with 5 years military experience and a resume that other B-school admissions teams I've spoken to have called "impressive" directly.

The kicker with my undergraduate is that I did not go to a school that is conventionally regarded as elite. However, my undergrad is easily the best military school in the country. They regularly have the highest cadet assessments in the country (more than twice as many students in the top tier rating as the next best competition), have produced multiple cadets rated #1 in the nation, and produce more generals (per capita) than any other school in the country.

How would you suggest I spin that?

Feb 15, 2015
Easy C:

OP:

I've got another question. I'm almost identical to you stats wise, with 5 years military experience and a resume that other B-school admissions teams I've spoken to have called "impressive" directly.

The kicker with my undergraduate is that I did not go to a school that is conventionally regarded as elite. However, my undergrad is easily the best military school in the country. They regularly have the highest cadet assessments in the country (more than twice as many students in the top tier rating as the next best competition), have produced multiple cadets rated #1 in the nation, and produce more generals (per capita) than any other school in the country.

How would you suggest I spin that?

As long as it wasn't a for-profit, you'll be fine. The prestige of UG school ranks so low on what admission committees look at, I wouldn't even worry. The way that your undergrad institution impacts your application is how it sets you up for your career out of school in terms of job placement. That is, Rutgers -> BB or MBB won't be viewed less than Ivy -> BB or MBB. No reason to spin it, no reason to bring it up.

Jan 28, 2015

Hard to answer this, better question for an admissions consultant. While I don't agree 100% with blueapple (a guy with a 3.3 GPA from Harvard has a much better shot than a guy with a 3.3 from Penn State, all else equal), as long as the school is "good enough" (i.e. top ~50 US News), it's not much of a differentiator. As I said, I think having gone to an elite undergrad helped, but not hugely. It probably made the low GPA just a little easier to swallow.

Feb 15, 2015
Masterz57:

Hard to answer this, better question for an admissions consultant. While I don't agree 100% with blueapple (a guy with a 3.3 GPA from Harvard has a much better shot than a guy with a 3.3 from Penn State, all else equal), as long as the school is "good enough" (i.e. top ~50 US News), it's not much of a differentiator. As I said, I think having gone to an elite undergrad helped, but not hugely. It probably made the low GPA just a little easier to swallow.

It's not a top 50 US news school. In fact it's only #60 regionally.

The other question that needs to be answered is whether this will be impacted by me attending a regional MSF program. For the program in question, I've got a very negative impression of the difficulty of their curriculum and the quality of their students. Even with an additional 10hr/week workload(I asked for and got an assistance-ship offer) I don't anticipate any difficulty with earning a 3.8 or higher GPA. At the orientation I only met one student who I felt would be serious competition academically, so Valedictorian/Salutorian is also a good possibility.

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Feb 15, 2015

Great thread.

Tough question but what kind of placements have the former engineers in your class secured? Generalities fully expected.

Jan 28, 2015

Very hard to answer this given that I don't really know who all of the engineers are. Anecdotally, they seem to do as well or perhaps a bit better than non-STEM candidates. They are going into all sorts of fields, but I'd say more biased to tech than the general population. A good number of the people going to Amazon have engineering backgrounds. For a lot of tech jobs (product manager type roles), engineering+MBA is an ideal background. In fact a lot of tech companies won't interview MBAs for that role without an engineering undergrad degree.

Sorry I can't be more specific, but it's hard to say. Short answer: same as everyone else with a slight bias towards tech.

Feb 15, 2015

Cool, about what I expected. I imagine that after going through all the IB prep and club stuff and what not, former engineers are on equal footing with regards to IB / corp fin positions as their finance background peers?

Feb 15, 2015

That's kind of the point. My impression is that I have a significantly higher work ethic than most of the entering class, a lot of them seemed more interested in partying.

The other difference is that I've got a much better idea of where I stand....as a 29 year old MSF student, in a podunk program I'm going to have to be in the top 5% of my class in order to get ANY job(less than half of the MSF students from that program get any job offer, something no other student I've spoken to there even realized). My generalist, government resume has so far not even got me any job better than customer service for an online brokerage company(a disreputable firm known for day trading platforms)

So...I don't think you understand. I'm not saying I'm so awesome that I'm going to be at the top of my class, I'm saying I don't have a damn choice if I want to keep my family from starving in the streets....the stakes are so high that I will (literally) kill myself of exhaustion rather than let my performance in the program drop below that level. Combine my extra motivating factors, work experience, higher level of preparation,(I've already been taking graduate level finance courses part time since 2013 and am completing relevant certificate programs) and the extremely small size of the program and it's easily possible.

Given the school's prior placement results (atrocious, most grads completely unemployed) and even being at the top of my class isn't good enough. The gulf between me and the class has to be astronomical for me to have even a remote chance at any worthwhile jobs after graduation......even if we don't factor the imminent debt market meltdown (2015.75-2016.4) into the equation.

And you know what? I've failed at a lot of things in life, but I've also never failed when I am in a situation where it's either succeed or die.

Feb 18, 2015

Holy shit, a 3.7 GPA in grad school = death?! A new bar has been set, boys!

Feb 15, 2015
RagingClue:

Holy shit, a 3.7 GPA in grad school = death?! A new bar has been set, boys!

If you don't believe me then take a look at where that school's alumni place on LInkedIN.

Then take a look at their MBA placement: http://www.bloomberg.com/bschools/rankings/full_ti...

Their MSF students have considerably worse placement than that....no figures released but it appears that less than half get ANY job, let alone a good job.

Feb 18, 2015

I'm still trying to figure out how we started in Ithaca, NY and ended up in Denver, CO?

Feb 15, 2015

Sorry, that's my fault. I reacted aggressively towards a hostile post and derailed the thread.

My question does still stand though. Does anyone think that having a 3.8 or higher GPA would effectively offset a low undergraduate GPA for the purposes of Cornell MBA admissions?

Feb 18, 2015

I would think yes, but I think you need to do a good job of explaining why you're doing an MSF and quickly following it up with an MBA. From the outside it seems like you do not have a career strategy and are just grabbing at anything and everything. If you spin it as I wanted to do the MSF to take quantitative course work and prove that I can handle the rigors of business curriculum then I think you should be fine. Having a minimum 680 GMAT with a 45+ quant score would bode well for you also.

FWIW in my experience adcom members love ex-military, so you do have that going for you.

Feb 15, 2015

Stats are 710 with a 44 quant score (will be taking the GRE to offset).

That said saying I "don't have a career strategy" wouldn't be accurate, but be accurate to say that I'm grabbing at anything and everything because I'm in a position where(same as several other combat arms officers who've posted in here) without any further education the best finance job I can hope for is "financial advisor", and I haven't succeeded at getting into any MBA program that's actually worth attending.

Also keep in mind that according to a LinkedIN search I performed a few minutes ago, the program only has two alumni that made it to NYC IB or S&T, and less than five who even made it to Denver IB firms....Across ALL programs offered by the university, not just the MSF.

Feb 18, 2015
Easy C:

Stats are 710 with a 44 quant score (will be taking the GRE to offset)

Pls don't waste time taking the gre with a 710 GMAT

Jan 28, 2015

Agree with @"paidoff". With a 710 GMAT it's a waste of your time to take the GRE. If you've applied to a number of top bschools and can't get in with your background and a 710 GMAT, I suggest taking the GMAT again until you're up into the 740 range. At that score the GMAT can start to cover up for other things, while at 710 it's just a "oh, that's nice". They do love vets at bschools, but the one issue they have is they don't know what a great military career is vs. an average one, so GPA becomes even more important.

Feb 15, 2015

Thanks for the advice, but I'm a bit hesitent to take it. Based off my practice performance it's going to be considerably easier for me to get a quant score above the 95th percentile in the GRE than on the GMAT so wouldn't it make more sense to go that way?

On Cornell is the OP familiar with placement results for the 1-year program? My current plan of action is to complete the MSF program, then attempt to complete a 1-year MBA at a top-tier school. As a top ranked school with a targeted 1-year program Cornell is a natural target for me.

Feb 18, 2015

@"Easy C"

I dont think you absolutely need to get in a top tier program.. you make it seem like your background is a complete sob story. If you want a good mba because you want a solid job, take a look at Washu. I attended olin for undergrad and have gotten to know many veterans who came because the school makes education very accessible for them.

@"Masterz57"
Thank you for the AMA.

Was is tricky for you to get recommendation letters? Were they all from your last position? Thanks

Jan 28, 2015

It wasn't hard for me to get recc letters. I got them from 3 people: my direct supervisor (did all my apps), a senior executive at my firm (for 2 apps) and a former supervisor who had left for another company (the rest). What helped most of all was that as it was a consulting firm, it was very common for people to leave for MBAs and was tacitly supported by the company. Many of the senior consultants had MBAs, and so they were mostly happy to support younger people pursuing the same route. My manager and I also had a great relationship and I told him I was leaving a year before I went to school so that he could transition effectively. He was very supportive of my decision even though he said he'd miss having me around. So overall, getting reccs was quite easy for me.

PS they were all from my last position as I was only at one company since graduating undergrad.

Feb 19, 2015

As of now, Cornell Johnson is my number one choice. My brother is in the Cornell engineering school. How successful have Johnson grads been in getting jobs as hedge fund analysts?

RIght now I'm debating between management consulting ( hopefully in the entertainment and media industry) or Hedge fund analyst on the buy side( I know, chances are slim) .

The problem is I will be a career switcher from marketing/customer service in the healthcare industry. I will be applying for MBA programs in the fall. Any ideas on what I can do to strengthen my chances of working as a hedge fund analyst between now and MBA graduation?

I heard a common path is Investment banking > hedge fund. What are your thoughts? Thanks

Jan 28, 2015

I hate to say it, but your chances at Johnson>hedge fund are not just slim, they're electron microscope tiny. Each year there are 3-6 people who go that route, and every single one of them was working either for a hedge fund, PE fund, or (in a tiny fraction of cases) IB before school. With your background (not saying it's bad for bschool, just for hedge funds) you will have a hard time even getting an interview, much less a job. If you're dead set on eventually getting to a hedge fund job (and please take the time to really evaluate whether you have interest in the profession or it's all about $$), the best path to take is either IB or Asset Management/Equity Research. All of those jobs are readily achievable for a career switcher and give you a good launching pad to reach the hedge fund industry. However, you'll still have a harder time than those who went IB after undergrad, as recruiting for HFs from IB/ER/Asset Management tends to be harder the older you get.

As for management consulting, no problem. People with all sorts of backgrounds get those jobs from here.

Feb 19, 2015

Thanks for the honest feedback, although its disappointing to hear about my chances to hf. I'm pretty confident I could line up an internship to a hf,( have some connections but was wondering about Cornell's) just have to really know my stuff to transition to a full time job.

Any ideas on why consulting has such high turnover and if you get to choose your industry after a period of time?

I saw that you can't take the Asset Management, ib, or consulting immersions with each other. How important do you feel the immersions are in terms of connections, experience, etc.

Also is it a death sentence to do any traveling abroad 2nd year fall? Seems like a lot of recruiting is going on then.

And if you were in my position what immersion would you take if you were deciding between a path to hf and consulting or IB then HF? Thanks

Jan 28, 2015

I hate to keep raining on your parade, but I doubt you could get a HF internship even with connections. I have as many connections as anyone (through undergrad and my father, who spent 40 years in the industry) and those will get you a courtesy interview but at this level they won't get you a job. Your competition will be people at M7 who have HF/PE/IB backgrounds. I had an internship at at HF as an undergrad that was obtained mostly through connections, but it was not the type of internship that leads to a FT job.

Answering your question about consulting would take a couple of pages of writing. I suggest you check out the consulting forum here or other consulting sites on the web. Short answer: hours, travel wear on people.

The immersions matter a lot for a career switcher such as yourself, as you have to prove that you know what you're talking about in interviews. If you're at Cornell to switch to IB or Asset Management, the recruiter is going to wonder how you're learning that skillset if you're not in that immersion. Consulting, it doesn't matter as much.

If by traveling abroad you mean doing a semester abroad, it depends. The only people who did it this year either already had jobs from their internship or were recruiting for jobs (tech mostly) that hire more in March/April. Not sure why you'd want to do it in the fall when the vast majority do it in the spring and the programs offered are exactly the same.

Not sure what you mean with the last one. Are you saying you'd go HF then to consulting? Basically, if you're trying to get into HF out of school (again, which I think is mostly wishful thinking) you really should do the Asset Management immersion. If you're trying to do IB out of school, do IB.

Mar 10, 2015

This is really helpful

Mar 10, 2015

This is really helpful

Feb 15, 2015

Masters:

Thanks for touching on the immersion program. I had the chance to speak with someone in the department today, and based off that conversation I'm going to attempt to complete an application for the full time program and have it turned in quickly.

I've finally been able to get some feedback and it appears that my stumbling block is difficulty articulating my understanding of the career switch. Would you have any further advice for that taking my military background into consideration? My specific functional area was as an Artillery Officer, so I have the advantage compared to many military applicants of having been in what is the military's most mathematically intensive "combat arms"(military equivalent of front office) job. I also spent a lot of time as an Operations manager/analyst where I had to compile large excel/powerpoint reports on both a daily basis and even larger ones (up to 30 pages) when planning for major operations.

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Feb 19, 2015

No, the reason I brought up the IB immersion was because a lot of people were telling me the usual path to HF is through investment banking and that IB has a lot of exit opportunities to other finance jobs.

I want to try for HF but also have a backup in case I fail.

So if you were me you would forget the IB immersion and do the Asset Management immersion and if that doesn't pan out try to interview for consulting jobs.

Also, didn't know there were abroad trips in the spring. Thought it was only in the fall.

Thanks for all the info. Appreciate it.

Feb 15, 2015

Speaking of IB immersion, that's the factor of the program that really stood out to me. What I'm hearing sounds good but could you elaborate on how it's good for career changers? What are some of the specific activities involved beyond what's mentioned on the website?

Jan 28, 2015

Sorry, totally forgot to respond to this. The IB immersion is definitely one of the strongest immersions offered (with Ops and Managerial Finance probably being the weakest). Side note: next year they're introducing a new Tech immersion co-taught with Cornell's Computer Science program (one of the best in the country), which should be awesome for those looking to go that route.

Back to the IB immersion: it's actually completely designed for career switchers. I can count on one hand the number of people going back to banking who did it before school, so basically 90-100% of IBers each year are career switchers. It essentially is banking boot camp for 3.5 months. It's run by an alum who was a Director at Citi and every week is a new modeling exercise, ranging from M&A to LBO to equity/debt issuance. Each week you work on a team for that "deal" and you present to the class several times during the semester. It does a great job preparing people for their internships, with the internship to full time conversion at 100% for class of 2014 and 90% for class of 2015.

In general, Johnson is a great program if you want to go to IB. This year 15% of the class is going to IB, which is on par or better than everything short of Columbia/Wharton/Stern, and from what I hear from the first years it will be even higher next year.

Apr 29, 2015
Masterz57:

note: next year they're introducing a new Tech immersion co-taught with Cornell's Computer Science program (one of the best in the country), which should be awesome for those looking to go that route.

This sounds really interesting, is there somewhere I can find more info on this? A google search didn't really provide anything. Also this is different than the Cornell Tech MBA in NYC right?

Feb 15, 2015

Thanks for the responses, that sounds pretty good. I'm going to be finishing my application for this year now. I was planning on waiting until 2015 R1 but with an acceptance in hand from my 2nd choice school there aren't going to be any 2015 applications for me.

I've got some pretty decent essays written up. Any suggestions for how I could address the weaknesses in my application? With my GMAT and strong performance in my PT graduate courses I can easily make the argument that I'm cut out for Johnson's academics and IB, but I'm still worried about getting dinged because of that undergrad.

It is addressed marginally in my main essays because I point out that my GPA climbed dramatically during my last two undergraduate years (includes a year of PT work at another school) following a success in other areas that turned around my outlook in life, and that the militaryschool I attended made sense for my goals because a higher % of their alums become generals(even higher than West Point) and that their students dominate any other college when it comes to the cadet assessment course( almost twice as many receive the top rating as the next best contender).

Any feedback on those points? And thanks again for the help.

Apr 29, 2015

What made you pick Johnson over Ross? Just curious since I'm facing that same decision.

Jan 28, 2015

Came down to two things really: size of the program and location. I'm from the NE originally, and while there are some places outside of here I would work (Chicago, Seattle, SF), I'd prefer to stay in the NE region. From that perspective, Johnson was a no-brainer. While you can definitely get jobs in any region from either school, it's much easier to get NE jobs out of Johnson (and much easier to get Midwest jobs out of Ross).

As for program size, I wanted a smaller program. Ross is almost twice the size of Johnson. Here at Johnson I know probably 250-260 of my class of 275 well enough to say hi. I really value that and I think it makes the network and community stronger. Ross has great people too, but with 500 per class that type of closeness just isn't possible.

Apr 29, 2015

Thanks Masterz. I'm leaning toward Johnson in part because of the reasons you mentioned. Glad to hear that you've found the small class size to be a plus. I do worry a bit that being out in Ithaca with a smaller class size could feel limiting, but am hoping it's actually quite the opposite.

Mar 15, 2017

Does anybody have the stats for Consulting this year? Is it better, same or weaker?

Mar 15, 2017

Great thread. SB'ed

Mar 15, 2017

Awesome thread. One of the best B-School AMA's i have read.

Apr 12, 2017

Great AMA!

Feb 26, 2018

@Masterz57 Quick follow up question on this -

I might have missed something - but are you sure Boeing has an MBA program and recruits from Johnson?

Jan 28, 2015

I know that Boeing came to campus to recruit when I was there in 2014 - I'm not entirely sure what the program was but they had a briefing and conducted interviews. The best way to check would be to email one of the Johnson career services people or reach out to a current student - company recruiting changes over time.

Feb 26, 2018

Sent an email to a student ambassador. Thank you!

Feb 26, 2018
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