WOMEN IN PE - Easier recruiting?

Seeing as so few women stay in finance or PE - is it easier (if ever so marginally) to get looks as a woman during PE recruiting? Do firms want to take a quota of women? Do most of you guys see that the class is majority male-dominated? 

If there are women that could speak on this, that would be helpful as well.

Comments (98)

 
Most Helpful
  • Analyst 1 in CorpDev
Feb 16, 2021 - 11:53am

if you are a woman, or black you will always get more looks in 2021. This is the case for any white-collar job. 

 
Feb 17, 2021 - 9:40pm

100% I was looking to lateral to JPM and I was denied the role for this reason. It was unreal and the hiring manger told me this (I knew him for a few years) so no hard no foul but its surreal.

Array
  • 1
 
Feb 22, 2021 - 12:30am

"the male s*icide rate went up by 30% from 2010-2021, but No WoN knWOs yYYY!"

the fake news conglomerates and wingant cucks will always beg for girls' validation even at the cost of men. I gave up and wife, kids and I are checking out SEA for commercial opportunities. So far we found the same fucking slatternly women. it's a global crusade against families I feel.

 

Isaiah 35_4 do you feel like weighing in?

 
Feb 22, 2021 - 7:50pm

 

if you are a woman, or black you will always get more looks in 2021. This is the case for any white-collar job. 

You're not wrong, but frankly I'd still rather be a straight white male in this industry. I've worked at two banks and a big PE fund and I've never had a single female MD/Partner and each analyst/associate class I've been a part of has been less than 20% female. These types of environments are simply not conducive to advancing women's careers and that sucks for women. So honestly, if they have an easier time with recruitment that seems fair to me. 

 
  • Incoming Analyst in IB-M&A
Feb 16, 2021 - 11:55am

Had a pe partner tell me to my face, women have significantly better chances to make it in private equity than men nowadays

 
  • Analyst 1 in IB - Gen
Feb 16, 2021 - 3:27pm

Have you guys seen women who you would not thing would get a spot in X firm get the spot?

 
  • Analyst 2 in IB-M&A
Feb 17, 2021 - 10:12am

I get significantly more one-off requests / calls from some female associates on our sell-sides. Could be purely anecdotal and it is just their particular style. Has encouraged me to just do the same when I'm on the other side of the table and save myself the headache of being confused / wasting time.

 
  • Associate 1 in PE - Other
Feb 16, 2021 - 4:36pm

100%. This was an actual factor that people would be pretty direct about to me while I was recruiting. As a female in PE, I always felt conflicted about this. It's nice to have the opportunity and be "sought out", but really don't like the idea of being hired just because I'm a female and would like to think I'm actually competent and earned my place.

 
Feb 16, 2021 - 5:08pm

Both can be true at the same time. There's no reason to play your accomplishment down considering that if you were actually incompetent for the job - you wouldn't be successful during your 2(+) year stint.

 
Feb 19, 2021 - 3:57pm

Agree with the liquidiot (love the username btw lol). I have a friend who thought the same way, but once she got into banking, people recognized that she does good work and is competent. I think you can only make it so far if you're bad at your job, but on the flipside, nobody can deny a strong worker and that becomes very apparently pretty quickly in a field like finance. Just my 2 cents.

 
Feb 22, 2021 - 2:48am

No one is denying the bias exists, there are literally dedicated recruiting channels. What is in contention is the idea that diversity hires are somehow inferior to those who come through standard channels.

 
Feb 17, 2021 - 12:36pm

In short, yes to everything. I have no interest in debating whether that is good or not. This is just the hand you are dealt at this time and I would strongly encourage you to take advantage of said hand. Most everyone else would and I see no reason why you shouldn't do so as well. Also I think more women in general are becoming interested in the field so it's not like the D candidate is going to beat an A candidate purely on the basis of sex anymore. The best analyst candidate I've interviewed in my entire career happened to be a female. Perhaps a B candidate will beat an A for diversity reasons so play the card, get a seat at the table, and bust your ass to show everyone that you deserve to be there. 

 
  • Intern in IB - Gen
Feb 17, 2021 - 2:58pm

Yes. My cousin works in PE and was talking to him after getting rejected from a SA super day that a girl from my class ended up getting. His take was that's the way it works nowadays in most male-dominated professions. Not sure about a specific quota but his firm, and most, take a woman over a man all else equal. Not saying it's a good or bad thing, just the way it is. 

 
Feb 17, 2021 - 3:23pm

I was told word for word by a Principal at a PE firm that I was interested in lateraling to that they were looking to make their team more "diverse" and then he told me that their LPs were putting pressure on them to make more female hires (I am a white male - with plenty of prior PE experience, but clearly not a diverse candidate).  

So yes, I would say that in some situations it can give you an edge. There are certainly not any LPs out there telling firms to "go hire more white males"  

 
  • Associate 1 in PE - Other
Feb 17, 2021 - 3:40pm

I dont think there are quotas necessarily, except at the larger firms with actual diversity programs / targets since they are more in the public eye, but at the same time, there's just not a lot of women in finance in general from an interest perspective even, and at my firm (LMM), it's all dudes and people are trying (unsuccessfully because the female talent gets snatched up by larger firms), and we would like to hire qualified female talent simply because otherwise it's all dudes and nobody wants that. Maybe similar if opposite way around, maybe it wouldnt be great to work in an all women office.

 
Feb 17, 2021 - 4:04pm

This 1000%.

MM and LMM PE firms in London, from my personal experience, have little to no emphasis on diversity recruitment. MFs can afford to allocate slots to diversity candidates, however MM and LMM firms usually hire on merit.

 
Feb 17, 2021 - 8:44pm

Strongly disagree about on the job. Maybe in a very small subset of situations, but even the largest firms can't afford to carry deadweight. Both women and men that progress in this industry to mid/senior levels are almost always there on merit. Nobody is paying that much money to people that don't produce, even if LPs ask about diversity efforts; which they do, and I'm in favor of, but don't get it twisted on what ultimately matters at those levels. Having seen this firsthand, I would be extremely surprised if an LP turned down an allocation in a high-performing firm's next raise because they lacked diversity (gender, race, sexual orientation, whatever).

 

As an aside, I think what a lot of fratty white men miss is that many times they're getting dinged because they simply don't profile as a successful senior investor. I say this as a white male that was in a frat, but it's not just about how well you nail your technicals or the fact that you went to Dalton or that you played lax at Cornell. Those are all good things, but you also need to have the requisite EQ, creativity and finesse such that I can project you as a future moneymaker for the firm (even MFs with strict 2 and out rules prefer "scalable" candidates). It's easy to blame the system for not being fair, which it isn't, but a lot of people miss the opportunity to actually reflect on why they're not getting the opportunities or success that they think they deserve.

 
Feb 18, 2021 - 3:37am

Entendu

Strongly disagree about on the job. Maybe in a very small subset of situations, but even the largest firms can't afford to carry deadweight. Both women and men that progress in this industry to mid/senior levels are almost always there on merit. Nobody is paying that much money to people that don't produce, even if LPs ask about diversity efforts; which they do, and I'm in favor of, but don't get it twisted on what ultimately matters at those levels. Having seen this firsthand, I would be extremely surprised if an LP turned down an allocation in a high-performing firm's next raise because they lacked diversity (gender, race, sexual orientation, whatever).

 

As an aside, I think what a lot of fratty white men miss is that a lot of the times they're getting dinged because they simply don't profile as a successful senior investor. I say this as a white male that was in a frat, but it's not just about how well you nail your technicals or the fact that you went to Dalton or that you played lax at Cornell. Those are all good things, but you also need to have the requisite EQ, creativity and finesse such that I can project you as a future moneymaker for the firm (even MFs with strict 2 and out rules prefer "scalable" candidates). It's easy to blame the system for not being fair, which it isn't, but a lot of people miss the opportunity to actually reflect on why they're not getting the opportunities or success that they think they deserve.

Agreed the firms need more blonde women and fewer Asians to be more diverse!

 
Feb 18, 2021 - 6:34am

My experience has been very, very different. Across the LMM funds I have worked at, I have seen the following:

 

1) Direct instructions to a headhunter to only source female candidates for a Vice President vacancy. While male candidates required prior banking + PE experience to even have a conversation, no such criteria existed for the women. We tried for months to find someone suitable before ultimately abandoning the search because the candidate pool was so limited (note, this was in a third tier city not known for finance).

2) For pre-MBA recruiting, somewhere between 5-10% of applicants were women. The bar to interview these candidates was lower than their male counterparts. 

3) Some of our LPs had funds set aside for minority or women owned businesses (the requirement wasn't 100% ownership, but had to be meaningful). I'm talking about the PE fund's management company. This was a meaningful contributor to a particular individual's 'success' in the firm.

I have plenty of other examples but won't go into details to protect the individuals that would be referenced. The summary is that firms absolutely can and do hire and carry underperformers in order to achieve diversity targets. This approach has been magnified x100 in the last year with the BLM movement combined with social pressure to put women in more board seats / executive roles. The pressure is very real and I think the composition of firms will look very different in 10-20 years (time lag due to the fact that it will take a long time for new hires to progress to senior roles).

 

That said, there is a wide range of talent. Just like men, some women are absolute rockstars and others are below the bar. However, I will say that having done dozens of deals, I have NEVER encountered a female lawyer who didn't dominate literally everything she touched. I don't know what it is. Partners, experienced associates, paralegals. They are consistently all over every aspect and detail of every deal and I am thoroughly impressed each time.

CompBanker

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Feb 17, 2021 - 10:18pm

I am an LP. I can tell you that from the top down (ie. on orders from our IC/Bosses) that we are looking at teams and how diverse they are. We have not made any decisions yet, but we are definitely collecting data and figuring out what to do with it... There are three general responses from fund managers on this issue.

1. "Get bent. We have and hire who we want. You can take your money elsewhere if you want." (They often change their minds after Yale/Harvard etc threaten to pull out). Some don't. It's a game of chicken. Does the LP have the balls to dump the relationship and some great returns? Some do. Some don't. Does the Firm really want to lose another prestigious LP and then have to fend off the hordes of other LPs as to why this happened knowing that LPs (like any group of investors) are a herd?

2. "We are way ahead of you but promote internally so we have hired/are hiring diverse candidates (Mostly Asian Women and Men). We have also hired someone and paid them a lot of money to help/do this for us in a glorified HR role" . This way our top level people look the same and will for a long time since few junior people stay/make it but we have covered out butts. For now at least.

3. "We are too small for this but will do what we can" or "We are an international firm not based in the US/UK so everyone is a minority but we all look the same"

What bothers me, having sat on both sides of the table is this...

1. LPs are generally just as homogenous-looking/sounding as the funds are. You would think that a university endowment could easily go recruit some diversity candidates who are bright, eager, in the beginning of their careers and live like right on campus...But they never seem to make any real effort. I mean finding the people couldn't be easier. What a joke. Do as I say, don't do as I do, right?

2. I see a lot of complaining on this board nearly every day about diversity stuff. Look I'm a dude, I get it. In the end, I have seen tons of people in this business get fired/passed over for promotion/underpaid because they didn't look the right part or sound right or "fit" culturally (ie drink/go to strip clubs/like sports/similar hobbies etc). And a lot of that is definitely gender/race etc.

So yes, a diversity candidate may get in, but most won't succeed (since most people generally leave or get weeded out anyhow)..And on top of that as one rises, he/she has to play the politics game/work at being liked much much more than doing some excel model/ppt. And that's when things get really tough ie. cultural fit as I mention above...

Finance is nowhere near as meritocratic as many people make it out to be. If it was, there would be far fewer people and funds in this business today. I should know. All I do is look at track records and listen to pitches... All.. Day...Long... I used to spend all...day...trading and it is far more of a bro club (in many places) than I thought it would be.

My two cents as a guy who has been in this business for a long time in a number of different roles.

I used to do Asia-Pacific PE (kind of like FoF). Now I do something else but happy to try and answer questions on that stuff.
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  • Analyst 1 in IB - Gen
Feb 18, 2021 - 8:37am

Because diversity is our strength, how dare you question the dogma? Honestly people keep on repeating this catchphrase but I have never, ever seen a convincing theoretical argument that would explain this or some studies that back this up. And btw before you cite some random overffited statistical study, gimme any dataset and time and I will find some spurrious correlation too.

Broadening the pool of candidate is good, as such by all means promote to segment of the population that may not know about those opportunities etc. but hiring should remain based on merit.

 

 
Feb 18, 2021 - 9:10am

If you ran a scientific experiment or correlational model; it would most likely be statistically insignificant simply because the majority of people get rejected. It has to have a p value

In addition, so few women are both qualified and seeking to work in PE that it would be difficult to find a representative sample and track a minority group (women) within a representative sample. 

I believe if these were to be proved to be true that employer would be sued by the state government if you live on one of these states. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equality_Act_(United_States)#:~:text=The%….

 
Feb 18, 2021 - 5:50pm

"Women's average scores on the SAT have always been lower than men's-even though they receive higher average grades in all courses in high school and college."

https://msmagazine.com/2018/02/15/highest-performing-women-still-scorin…

My own personal experience was that the girls tried harder / the boys tried less during class.

Totally agree that women are drawn less to STEM and Finance, and more to Arts and Humanities.

 
Feb 19, 2021 - 1:54am

I'm a female in PE. I keep hearing it's easier for us to get a job in PE and even on the job that the "bars" are lower and I just don't know what the F you guys are talking about. It may be easier to land an interview, that's it. Honestly at the actual jobs I keep having to work way harder than my male colleagues, I'm more "watched" and thrown under the buss by my female (and male) bosses ALL THE TIME. Any small mistake and I hear how useless I am despite obvious over performance. Not to mention that the male equivalent of my position was being paid way more because "he had 1 year more work experience" even though I had to literally take on his work because he was so lazy and bad. Women are always the ones getting fired as well. Some people just think we're retards from the get go and look for confirmations all the time, especially if we are "pretty". The tolerance for women in finance is much lower. Men get second chances, we don't. Even in interviews the assumption is ALWAYS that we are less technical and analytical so we have to work harder at proving others wrong. 

It's horrendous, not surprised why many women leave finance altogether. 

Again, that's my experience. I work at a much better place now and don't experience any of that anymore thank goodness. 

 
  • Analyst 2 in IB - Ind
Feb 19, 2021 - 4:03am

You obviously were let go due to performance (actually know a bunch of women like you, who blame it on everything and everyone else than you). Maybe, little lady, start reflecting on yourself first 

 
Feb 19, 2021 - 4:29am

Jane02 - I obviously don't know your individual circumstances and can only guess at what you've experienced. That said, I think it is worth commenting on a few of the things you mentioned because I have seen certain patterns that may be helpful for women when assessing their workplace environment:

1) "I keep having to work way harder than my male colleagues, I'm more 'watched' and thrown under the bus by my female (and male) bosses ALL THE TIME."

- I lost count at the number of times I was thrown under the bus by colleagues when I was working my way up through the ranks. I've been guilty of doing it myself plenty of times as well before having it pointed out to me and then making a conscious effort to absorb culpability rather than deflect it. This is super common in the industry given the amount of successful type-A personalities. I promise you that your male colleagues are also getting thrown under the bus regularly and are similarly super pissed about it.

2) "Any small mistake and I hear how useless I am despite obvious over performance."

- This has happened to me and my male colleagues on countless occasions throughout my career. This is characteristic of the industry. The style of some managers is to berate people for mistakes, regardless of whether they are top performers or got 99% of the other things right. 

3) "Not to mention that's the male equivalent of my position was being paid way more because 'he had one year more work experience' even though I had to literally take on his work because he was so lazy and bad."

- Putting aside bonuses, private equity compensation is nearly always fixed based on years of experience. Every PE firm I've ever heard of has a set salary and bonus target for new hires (these numbers are shared regularly on this website). This set salary and bonus target persists for probably the first 10 years of someone's career and one can only really break the mold by getting promoted early. So while I sympathize with you having to take on your male colleague's work, this happens regularly throughout the industry. You're encountering this problem not because you are a female, but because you are a better performer than your colleagues yet compensation levels are fixed.

4) "Women are always the ones getting fired as well."

- I haven't seen any evidence to support this in my career - just the opposite in fact. I've seen firms bend over backwards to accommodate female employees (permitting more work from home pre-COVID, implementing maternity leave policies where none previously existed, etc.). That said, I don't doubt there are firms that take the approach you've seen.

5) "Some people just think we're retards from the get to and look for confirmations all the time, especially if we are 'pretty.'"

- Sadly I agree with you here. This certainly happens with women, ethnic minorities, and relationship hires. I sympathize, it sucks when you start off with people doubting your capabilities.

6) "The tolerance for women in finance is much lower. Men get second chances, we don't. Even in interviews the assumption is ALWAYS that we are less technical and analytical so we have to work harder at proving others wrong."

- I've led recruiting efforts for a couple different PE firms for nearly 10 years. I can promise you that it is an exaggeration to say that the interviewers ALWAYS assume you are less technical. I usually conduct technical interviews and the women enter on equal playing field as the men. I do make some assumptions on capability prior to interviews, but that is based on undergraduate major, GPA, and test scores and not gender.

 

Given the above, I encourage you to reflect on whether each of these experiences is unique to you or something that is also happening to your male colleagues. I have read a lot of articles, LinkedIn posts, etc. from women about the struggles they face in the workplace. Many of the struggles are ones that males face as well. As a male, it can be very frustrating listening to shouts of sexism for struggles that are universal. As I've mentioned in a separate post, sexism absolutely exists (both in favor of and against females) and it is painful when it cuts against you. Unfortunately the moment a female adopts a victim mentality she will find her colleagues distance themselves from her. I'll end with a final example:

One of my former PE funds hired MBA interns each summer. We had a female MBA from Harvard. Very bright and very hard working. We were informally talking about a deal over lunch (all male employees from associate to Partner level). As is the case with all of our meetings, people were constantly interrupting each other (in a collaborative way during the natural flow of conversation), supporting / refuting ideas, etc. The intern joined in on the conversation and participated. Maybe 10 minutes in a Partner cut her off and shot down her idea. She got upset, stood up, and declared that if we weren't going to listen to her she might as well not be part of the conversation - proceeding to walk out of the room. This was a few weeks into the internship. From that point forward she wasn't going to get the job no matter how hard she worked. I promise you to this day she feels like she was treated unfairly due to being a female.

CompBanker

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Feb 19, 2021 - 1:10pm

Thanks, and yes of course, I do not disagree with you. A lot of my points are due to the industry, not me being a female. I am just trying to point out that women do not have an advantaged position in the workplace because they are women, sometimes the opposite and I was just giving examples of that. Basically: it's shit all around sometimes regardless of gender :) 

 
Feb 19, 2021 - 12:07pm

All of you complaining just aren't good enough to get the job and are upset that the system currently favors URMs as opposed to white men... before, you had to play golf and go clubbing to get the job; now you need to be a URM. Someone gets the short end of the stick either way, but I'll take the current system over the old one every day. And fact is if you can make a GP a lot of money, they'll hire you... stop complaining about how some woman/URM took this job from you and just get better because end of day, you are the only reason you aren't getting the job (assuming you're coming from a good school as a white male).

Also, you can claim studies are bullshit all day but last I saw, Vista is absolutely murdering every other fund... it's no coincidence they are also the most diverse large fund out there.

- white male in mfpe

 
Feb 21, 2021 - 1:37pm

anonymous100223

All of you complaining just aren't good enough to get the job and are upset that the system currently favors URMs as opposed to white men... before, you had to play golf and go clubbing to get the job; now you need to be a URM. Someone gets the short end of the stick either way, but I'll take the current system over the old one every day. And fact is if you can make a GP a lot of money, they'll hire you... stop complaining about how some woman/URM took this job from you and just get better because end of day, you are the only reason you aren't getting the job (assuming you're coming from a good school as a white male).

Also, you can claim studies are bullshit all day but last I saw, Vista is absolutely murdering every other fund... it's no coincidence they are also the most diverse large fund out there.

- white male in mfpe

My guess is most people complaining in this thread are asian who get fucked from both directions 

 
Feb 19, 2021 - 12:21pm

Perhaps, but do you want the reason for landing a job to be your skills or your reproductive system?  The sad part of this is I've worked with plenty of highly skilled women who worked their ass of to get ahead and the last thing they want is to have their success and effort be boiled down to having a vagina.

Only two sources I trust, Glenn Beck and singing woodland creatures.
 
  • Associate Consultant in Consulting
Feb 19, 2021 - 1:02pm

I interviewed at a MF a few weeks ago for an associate position. Didn't get the role despite doing 13 hours of interviews (you know how it goes). I later asked the headhunter, hey why didn't I get the role. He said oh the fund is aiming for a 50/50 split between boys/girls of their classes, so I didn't get the job. For context I'm a Hispanic, First-Gen, Male who was interviewing at a basically all white fund.... I'd argue that being a woman definitely helps.

 
  • Associate Consultant in Consulting
Feb 19, 2021 - 5:05pm

Sure, my performance wasn't as good as the 50% of males. You can't say that the 50% of women's performance was better than mine though... 

Furthermore, an all white male firm is saying gender is important, but diversity in race isn't. They should try to do both instead of just arbitrarily focusing on their gender split. 

 
  • Associate 1 in PE - LBOs
Feb 19, 2021 - 2:26pm

I'm a female in PE and will be the first to admit that yes, I may have had more opportunities to get my foot in the door when it comes to initial screens / getting interviews. But never have I felt that standards were lowered for me during the interview process or on the job - I had to go through the same modeling tests / case studies, intensive technicals, etc and felt that I had to overperform to prove that I deserved my spot at the table both then and now. At the end of the day, there's no room for slack on the job and it's a joke to see posters here think that life is easier for females when we're all grinding at 2am just the same. My advice to chronic complainers here is to do the best you can do - you can't control other factors and what firms are doing but you can control your own performance. I'm sick of seeing the excuse of not getting something because "some diversity candidate" took it - if you're that upset, why not just work harder and make sure you're the best of the ORM / male pool and focus your energies there instead of complaining about how your life is unfair. 

I've now been at the other side of the table when evaluating potential candidates and while my firm does have a mission to recruit diverse talent, we've never lowered our standards for those candidates. 

 
  • Intern in IB-M&A
Feb 20, 2021 - 1:22am

His point was it was easier to get into the industry as a female. Your point is the industry is hard for everyone. These two are not mutually exclusive. At least you have a better chance of getting the opportunity to grind until 2am every day at a great firm and then complain about it. The OP didn't.

 
Feb 20, 2021 - 1:36am

twinky white boys make up 70% of PE so you might be onto something

To live is to suffer, to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering.

  • 1
 
Feb 21, 2021 - 11:50am

Some of the PE funds where my friends work in London are looking just for girls.... just to comply with diversity shit. 

This is the world we live in boys. It does not matter who is better at work, now it is about complying with "society values".... it is disgusting.. 

  • 1
 
  • Analyst 1 in IB - Gen
Feb 21, 2021 - 3:00pm

No. It's because it's overall harder for women to stay and maintain a job in an industry dominated with men who are sexist, believe you're inferior, less for for leadership, less "social" because you don't give a shit or talk about Tom fucking Brady and so on... I could go on and on about the blatant sexism I've faced at a top tier BB from my associates (comments about dress, saying I look pretty and cute in the middle of a zoom?? When I'm asking questions about work and the client, etc). This is why women leave and this is why there needs to be a tangible effort made for women to have a space so they can be comfortable and not be overwhelmed with sexism. This only happens when there is space specifically for females. Not because you're smarter and we need a space to work in otherwise we wouldn't get the job (we would...) and not because we're smarter than you. It all has to do with equality and creating an equitable industry you fkn idiot.

 
Feb 21, 2021 - 6:58pm

It seems someone is having a bad day. Maybe you should fuck more often. Cheeeeers!! 

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Feb 24, 2021 - 12:13am

Anonymous Monkey

Seeing as so few women stay in finance or PE - is it easier (if ever so marginally) to get looks as a woman during PE recruiting? Do firms want to take a quota of women? Do most of you guys see that the class is majority male-dominated? 

If there are women that could speak on this, that would be helpful as well.

I'm answering as a woman.
Yes, firms clearly state goals to have women in their firms. This is for a potentially interesting/relevant reason. If you have military contracts, then 30% of the money you put toward that has to be from a diversity owned business. For the DoD it's 3%.

That's a big piece of the pie you could have even after having given investor equity deductions etc. Now, who would you want to talk to as a Diversity Officer at a fund...?

Women have a tendency toward sales because we have been socialized our whole lives to be attuned to the needs of others: as a salesperson you're a consultant first and foremost. It doesn't hurt to look at a pretty face or hear a clear, soft voice either, frankly.

All of my coworkers - save one who does transactional and operational things - in my very small firm (4-5 people) are men. Same goes for our extended, virtual sales team.

Always think of the bottom line with this stuff: how does PR help marketability? Is there a niché to be served? Some PEs know the former and say, "Hell yeah" to the latter.

I don't blame my sex or use it as a crutch. Only the man who loses and puts his tail between his legs blames it as an industry "gamified" against him or - as i have heard with women...that they've hit a "glass ceiling". It's about sales, networking/communications, and knowing your product.

Buck up, babes.

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98.5
2
Jamoldo's picture
Jamoldo
98.4
3
Secyh62's picture
Secyh62
98.3
4
CompBanker's picture
CompBanker
97.9
5
redever's picture
redever
97.8
6
frgna's picture
frgna
97.6
7
Addinator's picture
Addinator
97.6
8
bolo up's picture
bolo up
97.5
9
NuckFuts's picture
NuckFuts
97.5
10
Edifice's picture
Edifice
97.5