You all have a lot of growing up to do...

I register just to post this. I read through these posts and could not get over how immature many of them were. I was in banking from 1996-1998 and have since moved on in my career. I see so much talk about private equity/hedge funds making millions and retiring, it makes me feel like this board is made up soley of freshman college kids who have never worked a day in their lives. Let me give you some facts that might make you all rethink being able to retire at 35.

After taxes investment bankers that aren't VP, will not make enough money to retire. If you are an associate post-mba making 400K a year pre-tax(that means your a top associate) you will take home roughly 240K. If you want a family, that will support you nicely, but it won't get you a fancy life and you will still be working around the clock for this money.

Most ex-analysts who get into Private equity or hedge funds, never make it to partner. PE shops and HF's are smaller organizations with low turnover. The partners of these places don't want to give up equity to a salaried employee unless they are a superstar (meaning incredible investor, or incredibly connected like your dad is Richard Fuld). Even if you get in at the associate level Pre-MBA you are guarenteed nothing.

If you go into the current hot field, in 10 years you may be dissapointed. Investment banking and Corporate Development will always have a market, but other jobs like hedge funds or private equity are oversaturated. Think about the 80's everyone was going into junk bonds, the 90's everyone going into tech. Business is cyclical.

Your odds of making MD at a bank, PE house, or HF are incredibly stacked against you even if you are willing to trade in your entire 20s and 30s to get there. That is were jobs like being a lawyer has banking beat. If you dont make partner at a big law firm you could probably make partner at a smaller firm. This is not the case in banking, although many people do transition to other banks.

Most of you will change your careers many times along your life. Don't think if you just got a great gig at Goldman you will work in the finance field forever. There are tons of hot industries that pay well and have better quality of life.

If you dont like finance, you will not make it to the top. Thats a fact, if you are in it for the money, you wont last.

Comments (73)

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 3:10pm

I know so many kids who have this cookie cutter life in mind. It's really ridiculous.

Old Timer just dropped the Ether napalm bomb on them and brought some serious truth to this forum.

It's time to stop jerkin' it to "exit opps" and just be thankful to begin with that you have such a great job straight out of school. Yes, it's something to keep in mind, but some people just OBSESS over the shit.

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 3:26pm

There are some lessons though, that people will only learn by experience, even when they are laid out as clearly as this one was.

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 3:27pm

What industry do you work in now?

Banking > VC > Tech PE; PM me if you would like any advice I'm happy to help
 
Nov 30, 2006 - 3:57pm

I've been doing a lot of thinking and research about I-banking as a field and I am still intrigued by it; but having posts like the one by OldTimer help put things in perspective. Thank you.

I know that I am a punk 22-year old college kid, know-it-all. I've faced all sorts of challenges where people said "you can't do it," or "you'll end up killing yourself" and the like and I've managed to come out on top everytime. When I tell my professors I'm thinking about I-Banking as a career, they typically say "good luck, but its tough!" Before I came to this site, I just kind of shrugged them off. I figured I won every other time, so how would this be any different? Being a recent register on this site has opened my eyes a lot and has me looking at reality with less-rosy shades (that and the chance of me getting hired at a BB being so microscopic also helps with the gut-check).

Let me pose this question to the people of the forum: I am enamored with the concept and allocation of capital. I love studying it in history, and I love learning about it in my Finance courses. I also like negotiating and debating with people as well as finding my own research to back up my points. I like leading people and prefer having people rely on me (some might say that I rely on people to rely on me, if you can follow that paradox...). I love working on challenging things and need to stay busy with "stuff" to function up to my potential. Am I cut out to be an I-Banker, or is there another branch of corporate finance/banking that fits my personalities/abilities better, if at all?

As usual: Honesty (brutal or otherwise) enjoyed.

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 4:17pm

OldTimer:
After taxes investment bankers that aren't VP, will not make enough money to retire. If you are an associate post-mba making 400K a year pre-tax(that means your a top associate) you will take home roughly 240K. If you want a family, that will support you nicely, but it won't get you a fancy life and you will still be working around the clock for this money.

Depends on your life style.

All of this is old news repackaged in a new box.

Thanks.

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 4:17pm

This is exactly why Law School is actually a nice option for smart people. You do 3 years of school, where you can slack the last two after landing a big law gig, go to a big firm and make $200-$300 for a few years, and then go to a smaller firm and make partner. If you make partner at the big firm, you'll still make $1.5-2.5mm a year, which is the same as many MDs.

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 6:01pm

I like your thinking young Skywalker...lol...It is important that young people know that there are other avenues within the gargantuan world of finance that can still propel your career into the "good life" within a respected and challenging field. While I do respect the original forum topic discussion proctor and his stance, his opinion and "realist" outlook on life, it incites people such as myself to do everything in their natural abilities to falsify his theories as we journey through our years in banking...

OldTimer:
If you go into the current hot field, in 10 years you may be dissapointed. Investment banking and Corporate Development will always have a market, but other jobs like hedge funds or private equity are oversaturated. Think about the 80's everyone was going into junk bonds, the 90's everyone going into tech. Business is cyclical.

Not to philosophize on a board filled with bankers, but the youthful exuberance on this board expresses the most A-Type, hopeful and unexperienced personalities that epitomize the very folly and brilliance of youth. Most of us who are sincere about banking, genuinely believe that the sky is the limit for most of us, regardless of what we hear. So in all your paternal advice at least reward us with a more positive inspiring conversational departure line that challenges those with resilient spirits that the road to the top of the HF or IB world is arduous, but it can be done OldTimer...

Sincerely,
Vadremc "I'm not even a quarter of a century young, please don't kill my dreams" Monkey...

"Cut the burger into thirds, place it on the fries, roll one up homey..." - Epic Meal Time
 
Nov 30, 2006 - 4:23pm

And you should like law and be willing to bust your butt until you make partner. Many people go in-house after working at top firms. Its nice and all to plan, but my point is, that life has so many twists and turns over a 10 year period, I'm 32, so I'm speaking from experience, that one can not realistically plan that far in advance.

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 5:00pm

So you think Law would be a better choice/fit for what I've stated above? I just finished my law school apps a couple of days ago and plan on going to law school after I graduate anyways, but its nice to hear that I might have made a better choice in choosing to continue my schooling than getting out and trying my hand at IB.

And for the person who said Investment Management: Thank you for that intriguing possibility. What do the people in IM do that is different from the people in IB? Are hours different? Compensation? Quality of life/coworkers? Advancement prospects?

Thanks again

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 4:24pm

"$200-$300 " It takes a few years to get over 200 at a lawfirm. And figure on 40% taxes at least

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 4:45pm

I would say that the life of a junior corporate lawyer sucks even more than that of a junior IBer. No matter what time you leave and how early you get in, you're guaranteed to have received another draft of xyz agreement overnight from the law monkey putting through your comments

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 5:05pm

Well put, I find it so humorous that as soon as my peers land a job they are immediately worried about "exit-ops", even people who havent even landed the job yet. I am proud and lucky to say that I will begin my career as an analyst this summer at a BB out of college and I am doing it for one reason, to learn. Lets face it, $130K a year pre-tax in New York is peanuts.

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 5:11pm

I'm not an investment banker, so I don't know how difficult it is to make MD. But I have been practicing law for several years and can tell you that there are not that many large firms that average $1.5 million+ in profits per partner. In order to make that kind of cash you usually have to pull in and maintain some enormous clients which is no easy task.

It has become much more difficult to make equity partner at large law firms since at least the year 2000 when firms really jacked up associate salaries. It is true that some big firms will make you partner after maybe 7 or 8 years, but they typically make you a non-equity partner. Some big firms will keep you as a non-equity partner for another 7-8 years until making you an equity partner (if they advance you at all - it's not a guarantee and people get screwed over all the time). I'm sure that the non-equity partners at big New York law firms do well, but I don't think there are too many making close to $1 million per year.

Law tends to be steadier than banking, although there certainly were a number of associates fired between 2001 and 2003 when the amount of corporate legal work quickly dried up. But if you look at how hard lawyers have to work for the amount of money they make, investment bankers have them beat.

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 5:19pm

first off no one cruises through law school and gets a legit job; law school is almost as intense as banking. also from all my law school friends and lawyers i know they say you really must like being a lawyer or you will hate your life. one must also factor in the 3 years of lost wages and 150k+ in debt that you will have. i'm not saying one is better than the other just don't pick one because it pays more or its eaiser, do what you enjoy.

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 5:31pm

Why don't you give me a reach around? Huh, fucker? Listen cheif, it's all about optimism. Nobody wants to bust their ass through high school, only to bust their ass through college, only to bust their ass their whole life. People need motivation. And thinking one can hit it big is quite a bit of optimism bundled into a nice little fucking box. It is one thing to think for sure that IB is the thing that is going to make you rich automaticaly. It will not. It's different though to work hard, get places, and dream for the sky. Start listening to fucking music, "because when you dream it might come true..."

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 5:43pm

what we see here is college students, who think that just because they have a college degree, they are now entitled to millions.

Dan your posts would sound a lot smarter, if you didn't curse as much. And its nice to dream, but you gotta be realistic, chances are that you will never make partner at Goldman.


Disclaimer: The post above has been made by someone who is not currently employed in IBD, and has not had an interview yet...

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 5:58pm

aspiringmonkey:
what we see here is college students, who think that just because they have a college degree, they are now entitled to millions.

Dan your posts would sound a lot smarter, if you didn't curse as much. And its nice to dream, but you gotta be realistic, chances are that you will never make partner at Goldman.


Disclaimer: The post above has been made by someone who is not currently employed in IBD, and has not had an interview yet...

I don't think it is a function of people thinking that they are entitled to millions: rather, I think it is (at least for me) trying to decide where my potential and my education can give me the greatest return, financially and personally. Now, I would be ignorant if I didn't say that there are some people (particularly Ivy types) who think the world owes them a million per year from age 22 to 65; but I can say that it seems that most people just want to see if they can cut it in something as rigorous/demanding as IB.

And while it would be nice if people said "I just want to learn," it would also be foolish to think that someone would be willing to deal with the 100+ hour weeks and other things I read on the forums without getting some sort of generous pay package. I do want to learn; but I also want to get paid handsomely and test my mettle.

AM, while I agree with you in principle about college kids thinking they are entitled--it's just that I don't agree in practice because I am a college kid, I've worked my ass off, and, as Tony Montana said "I want what's coming to me...the world and everything in it."

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 6:06pm

This is a completely unrelated question: Does anyone else have a problem with the structure of this forum? It's tough to see who is responding to whom and about what. The only way anyone can get any sort of structure is if the person uses the "quote" button and responds underneath. Am I the only one kinda frustrated by this? Can this be rectified with a new, more streamlined structure?

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 6:10pm

I've worked 6 months in total in Banking in summer internships and I can safely say that I haven't learnt much. And both companies offered me a full time job so I probably didn't do too bad.

Let's be real here, what value do bankers add ?? We'r not doctors, scientists or entrepreneurs. All we do is paint a rosy picture of a company just to get the deal done, and to hell with what happens later.

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 6:47pm

Seanc:

Let's be real here, what value do bankers add ?? We'r not doctors, scientists or entrepreneurs. All we do is paint a rosy picture of a company just to get the deal done, and to hell with what happens later.

It's just the way you look at it. I have had a similar amount of experience in banking (2 summers), and I can see the value that bankers add.

If they were adding no value, believe me, the market would have gotten rid of them a lot sooner to save on the transaction fees. People have been predicting the end of bankers since the 1980s because they don't really do anything, and how their monopoly on market information is gone, but 20+ years later, the industry still exists. At the end of the day, we provide a service (advice, contacts, guidance, etc.) that companies find useful.

I don't understand how you can say you haven't learned much as a summer though.. One can accuse banking of being a bullshit profession, but as an analyst, you definitely learn a lot (or at least I can say I have).

 
Nov 30, 2006 - 10:06pm

My father has been a corporate lawyer for over 20 years (a bit over too) and is a senior partner at one of the best / largest law firms in the U.S. The advice he gave me growing up: "Don't become a lawyer." He also told me that having gotten a job as an analyst, I have the potential to far exceed his paycheck. Given he specializes in M&A and Underwriting, I'd say his advice is pretty sound. Of course, no one has walked both paths so I guess we'll never know.

Oh, and one more thing. He is in his 50s and I can't remember the last day he didn't do significant work on a weekend.

CompBanker

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 7:41am

Doctors will tell you don't be doctors, and my friends who did banking had their vp's say "get out before it traps you"

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 10:52am

Better in what sense?

I think all the people that say don't go into this career(lawyers,doctors,bankers), realized that they have nothing to show for their 20s/30s/40s except a fat gut and a fat bank account.


Disclaimer: The post above has been made by someone who is not currently employed in IBD, and has not had an interview yet...

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 11:16am

My point is that Physicians don't have a fat bank account. They don't start earning until their 30's, and even then they don't make that much. What does the average Physician make? $150k? A first year lawyer makes $145k + $35k bonus. First year associate banker makes more than that.

Dentists are a different story b/c they aren't nearly as affected by managed care, and just have to do their 4 years of school and can start to practice immediately afterwards.

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 11:36am

Ronald R:
My point is that Physicians don't have a fat bank account. They don't start earning until their 30's, and even then they don't make that much. What does the average Physician make? $150k? A first year lawyer makes $145k + $35k bonus. First year associate banker makes more than that.

Dentists are a different story b/c they aren't nearly as affected by managed care, and just have to do their 4 years of school and can start to practice immediately afterwards.

You fail to adjust the salary for risk. Except for lawsuit risk (which you insure against - granted, at some cost), there is absolutely no risk of a doctor loosing his job, ever.

It's quite the opposite in banking (remember 2001-2002?)

 
Dec 3, 2006 - 7:09pm

Ronald R:
My point is that Physicians don't have a fat bank account. They don't start earning until their 30's, and even then they don't make that much. What does the average Physician make? $150k? A first year lawyer makes $145k + $35k bonus. First year associate banker makes more than that.

Dentists are a different story b/c they aren't nearly as affected by managed care, and just have to do their 4 years of school and can start to practice immediately afterwards.

Statistically, dentist is the profession with the highest rate of suicide...

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 12:32pm

Lots of corporate attorneys were laid off between 2001 and 2003. Silicon Valley was especially hard-hit. At the time none of the big firms in the area were hiring and the laid-off either had to take a substantial pay cut or move to a different part of the country to get another decent law firm job.

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 12:54pm

If you really want to make it big in this world, you're gonna have to work your ass off. If you get a good break, definately take advantage if it because not evreyone does. Everyone will at some point get a raw deal, but its the work ethic and drive to succeed that has probably landed each one of us where we are in the first place. It should be this ability that is applied to all endeavors, regardless of where we might end up.

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 1:22pm

What this goes to show is that you really have to enjoy what you are doing to make it in this industry. I do not think it is possible to survive the hours (or to even be good at your job, for that matter) if your primary motivations are greed and prestige, and unfortunately, it does seem like a lot of the people on this forum (including myself) are focused in on those two things. This is especially true if you do not end up making partner/MD (which statistically most of us won't), you can still wake up in the morning without being consumed by hate and jealousy.

I'll say this too: as a 22 year old recent college grad, it's hard not to get caught up in money culture. I went to a top 5 college, majored in a really tough area and worked pretty freaking hard. Recently I got an offer from a prestigious hedge fund. When I saw my comp package it was hard not feel like my hard work had finally paid off and that I deserved every penny that I was earning. The truth is though, I don't. My mother has worked hard for over 20 years as a research scientist, doing a job that probably requires a more advanced level of education than mine, and yet I my starting salary is higher than her current one. My father pulled 80 hour weeks as a professor at another top 5 university, yet I will make more money than him. The truth is, as Barton Biggs (former head of MS Institutional Asset Management) put it, our profession is the most grossly overpaid field in the history of the world. It's a shame that we've become fixated on greed instead of appreciating the excellent opportunities (and luck) that we've been given.

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 3:32pm

Confusil:
The truth is, as Barton Biggs (former head of MS Institutional Asset Management) put it, our profession is the most grossly overpaid field in the history of the world. It's a shame that we've become fixated on greed instead of appreciating the excellent opportunities (and luck) that we've been given.

I don't agree with this though. Sure we don't cure cancer or solve world hunger, we make capitalism work.

I'm both an idealist and objectivist. So:

a. Bankers are not overpaid. It's not like anyone forces companies to pay large transaction fees, and banking is far from a cartel industry. Companies pay bankers what they see fit, and Banks agree. Simple as that, there are no courts or guns that force companies to accept paying advisory fees, unlike in liligation law.

b. Bankers allocate unused capital to businesses that need capital, thus making capitalism work. While I won't call it selfless ort altruistic, I beleive it's importnant.

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 3:39pm

ginNtonic:
Confusil:
The truth is, as Barton Biggs (former head of MS Institutional Asset Management) put it, our profession is the most grossly overpaid field in the history of the world. It's a shame that we've become fixated on greed instead of appreciating the excellent opportunities (and luck) that we've been given.

I don't agree with this though. Sure we don't cure cancer or solve world hunger, we make capitalism work.

I'm both an idealist and objectivist. So:

a. Bankers are not overpaid. It's not like anyone forces companies to pay large transaction fees, and banking is far from a cartel industry. Companies pay bankers what they see fit, and Banks agree. Simple as that, there are no courts or guns that force companies to accept paying advisory fees, unlike in liligation law.

b. Bankers allocate unused capital to businesses that need capital, thus making capitalism work. While I won't call it selfless ort altruistic, I beleive it's importnant.

Funny how its mostly in America over the past 25 years that financial people have been earning this kind of money.

I don't agree with you at all, we can never compare to Doctors, Scientists, Engineers, soldiers, in terms of the value we add to society. I'll celebrate the day this sort of capitalism collapses, and hopefully I'll be as far away from it as possible.

 
Dec 4, 2006 - 1:15pm

Confusil,
This is another book that you've obviously read too much of. If you feel so guilt stricken and ethically courageous, why don't you reject your offer in the pursuit of higher education for a more morally fullfilling career? Reality Check. Money does not determine your intrinsic value to society or anything else for that matter. But in banking, it does. If you have issues with that, why are you still going to work for a HF?

So from your "deserving everything that you are earning" remark (you know for those 4 or 3.5 years of drudgery you were so unfortunate to have to experience) to your emotionless remorse for the inequity b/t career salaries for your parents, your points are mute, snobbish and contradictory.

BTW - I'm 24 and I ALSO MAKE A RELATIVELY LARGE AMOUNT OF OF MONEY! (Just thought I'd ignore all the flowery language to say what you really sound like you want to say.)

"Cut the burger into thirds, place it on the fries, roll one up homey..." - Epic Meal Time
 
Dec 5, 2006 - 5:03am

Vadre,

A. I'm not turning down the hedge fund b/c the work is genuinely interesting to me and I can honestly say that I'd be willing to do it for a lot less money. That said, it's not like I'm going to ask for a pay cut.

B. Never do I argue that other professions are morally superior; I am simply pointing out that there are people in other professions (most other professions in fact) who are just as smart and work just as hard (and probably take just as much risk) as those in finance but are compensated significantly less for it. I'm arguing we are overpaid in relation to the amount, difficulty, and level of risk inherent in our line of work.

C. It's neither snobbish nor contradictory to openly admit to feeling an undue sense of pride in my salary; in fact that was the whole point of the post, to say that I feel this way and I suspect a lot of other people do to, and it's not a particularly healthy way to look at things.

D. To reiterate: I'm not claiming that bankers don't contribute to society, or that finance is somehow morally inferior to medicine or law or any other profession. I have a ton of respect for the capitalist system and I think we serve a useful and necessary purpose within that system. That said, this profession is overpaid because A. the services we provide are not as valuable as how much we charge for them (and businesses/investors are coming to realize this) and B. those services are sufficiently easy to replicate that the margins that financial firms currently enjoy will necessarily contract in the coming years. This is not me bs'ing out of my ass; I heard several versions of this same story from different MDs at bulge bracket banks.

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 8:26pm

Seanc:
I don't agree with you at all, we can never compare to Doctors, Scientists, Engineers, soldiers, in terms of the value we add to society. I'll celebrate the day this sort of capitalism collapses, and hopefully I'll be as far away from it as possible.

Since the profession of doctor keeps coming up, let me say this. I'm not sure how many of you know doctors personally, but that gives you a much different sense of the profession.

The general public's idea of doctors is that they save lives, which is true to a certain extent. Here's the thing though: doctors are not philanthropists, and there are a lot of unethical things a doctor can do (prescribe a certain brand of medication for the "kickbacks" from the medical representatives), shovel off the hard to treat/uninsured patients to other clinics so they don't have to deal with them, bill patients (or insurance companies) for more than they did, etc.

Don't get me wrong. I appreciate doctors for their work, but at the end of the day, they are providing a service in exchange for (substantial) payment. If you show me a doctor that is treating patients for free (in third world countries and such), that's when I will admit they are "socially responsible".

In history, there haven't been many doctors, so the one doctor in a town was seen as very special, because he was the only one that could treat people. Nowadays, the medical profession is as capitalistic as law or banking. Doctors are in it for the money. They are not treating people for free.

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 8:49pm

streetbuck:
Seanc:
I don't agree with you at all, we can never compare to Doctors, Scientists, Engineers, soldiers, in terms of the value we add to society. I'll celebrate the day this sort of capitalism collapses, and hopefully I'll be as far away from it as possible.

Since the profession of doctor keeps coming up, let me say this. I'm not sure how many of you know doctors personally, but that gives you a much different sense of the profession.

The general public's idea of doctors is that they save lives, which is true to a certain extent. Here's the thing though: doctors are not philanthropists, and there are a lot of unethical things a doctor can do (prescribe a certain brand of medication for the "kickbacks" from the medical representatives), shovel off the hard to treat/uninsured patients to other clinics so they don't have to deal with them, bill patients (or insurance companies) for more than they did, etc.

Don't get me wrong. I appreciate doctors for their work, but at the end of the day, they are providing a service in exchange for (substantial) payment. If you show me a doctor that is treating patients for free (in third world countries and such), that's when I will admit they are "socially responsible".

In history, there haven't been many doctors, so the one doctor in a town was seen as very special, because he was the only one that could treat people. Nowadays, the medical profession is as capitalistic as law or banking. Doctors are in it for the money. They are not treating people for free.

Nor would I want Drs. treating people for free. If the problem of government-(mis)managed insurance (Medicaid) is any indicator of quality of care from doctors who aren't paid, I would prefer to continue paying my doctor to take care of me. Bingo!

 
Aug 7, 2007 - 3:47pm

StreetLuck:
Seanc:
I don't agree with you at all, we can never compare to Doctors, Scientists, Engineers, soldiers, in terms of the value we add to society. I'll celebrate the day this sort of capitalism collapses, and hopefully I'll be as far away from it as possible.

Since the profession of doctor keeps coming up, let me say this. I'm not sure how many of you know doctors personally, but that gives you a much different sense of the profession.

The general public's idea of doctors is that they save lives, which is true to a certain extent. Here's the thing though: doctors are not philanthropists, and there are a lot of unethical things a doctor can do (prescribe a certain brand of medication for the "kickbacks" from the medical representatives), shovel off the hard to treat/uninsured patients to other clinics so they don't have to deal with them, bill patients (or insurance companies) for more than they did, etc.

Don't get me wrong. I appreciate doctors for their work, but at the end of the day, they are providing a service in exchange for (substantial) payment. If you show me a doctor that is treating patients for free (in third world countries and such), that's when I will admit they are "socially responsible".

In history, there haven't been many doctors, so the one doctor in a town was seen as very special, because he was the only one that could treat people. Nowadays, the medical profession is as capitalistic as law or banking. Doctors are in it for the money. They are not treating people for free.

Actually you would be surprised to see how many doctors treat patients for free in the 3rd world countries. It's not a government ordained policy,it's thier own decision. There are doctors that go to villages specially to open up small clinics where they take care of the people for FREE!! I'm sure they get somethings in return for thier services; food, place to live, clothes etc, but it's still a great deed in itself!

 
Dec 1, 2006 - 9:00pm

How many people actually put themselves through the expensive, rigorous and time-consuming med school to "save lives"? I'm sure there are people out there who enjoy helping people, but the initial motivation is to be in a profession that is respected, stable and pays well...for most people anyways.

Being a doctor can be just as risky...if not more. One malpractice and you can be pretty fucked over.

 
Dec 12, 2006 - 3:13am

gordonwe:
I'll have to disagree with you on that. If a prospective Doctor's main motiation is money, he/she will never make it through med school and residency.

you obviously don't know many doctors. prestige, money, social acceptance and the ability to play god. these are all relatively selfish factors that influence the decision to go into medicine for many. are any of your friends surgeons?

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bolo up
97.5
7
frgna's picture
frgna
97.5
8
NuckFuts's picture
NuckFuts
97.5
9
Edifice's picture
Edifice
97.5
10
Ricky Rosay's picture
Ricky Rosay
97.3