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Thanks for the input.

Comments (25)

  • Ricqles's picture

    Do what you want, a career in banking isn't by any means a golden ticket to becoming a millionaire (assuming you stick it out for only 2 years). I would just read about the industry lifestyle on this forum and speak with other people who have gone through it. It's not the pretties life you can live but it pays and you learn a ton. Even if you turn out hating it and leave the industry under 1 year, at least you can tell yourself that you tried it and it just didn't work out

  • econ's picture

    Internships. Each summer, choose a different internship in a field you might want to work in. That'll give you a much better sense of what you really want to do. In fact, maybe even work part-time during some academic years, if you can swing it. That's my regret from undergrad.

  • brutalglide's picture

    Double majors/dual degrees = waste of time. Keep GPA as high as possible and never take anything that might hurt it if you have a choice (ie. figure out who that "easy" professor is, figure out what classes are "easy", etc). By far my dumbest mistake (in addition to not starting early enough)

  • acs_london's picture

    Well don't take my word for it. I have spent almost 4 years here (BSc + MSc) so I might just be a bit jaded with it. Plus the infrastructure is so shoddy, I can't believe they have 200-300 extra foreign exchange students extra per year to burden the facilities meant for its own students. LSE is a money making racket.

  • Kenny_Powers_CFA's picture

    Two chicks at once.

    There have been many great comebacks throughout history. Jesus was dead but then came back as an all-powerful God-Zombie.

  • ILOVENYGUY's picture

    If you go to a top school a) take economics/finance classes and get all A's b) take the stuff that really interests you - you will never have a chance to experience it again and frankly as long as you get good grades in core econ/finance stuff you can enjoy yourself in other stuff

  • tdave's picture

    Wow! Is this what life has come to? High School seniors asking about careers in investment banking? Stop being foolish. Enjoy college; take classes that interest you and do extremely well in all of them. Above all, have fun, make tons of friends and get laid! You'll probably never get as much free time to explore again!

  • In reply to tdave
    Rupert Pupkin's picture

    tdave wrote:
    Wow! Is this what life has come to? High School seniors asking about careers in investment banking? Stop being foolish. Enjoy college; take classes that interest you and do extremely well in all of them. Above all, have fun, make tons of friends and get laid! You'll probably never get as much free time to explore again!

    It never fails. A high school kid is ambitious about learning the ins and outs of IB and someone from IB wants to tell him not to. I think we can all agree that these kids are doing other things aside from hanging out on WSO all day, but I also think it's time to give them some credit.

    The consistent 1st bucket Analyst will be the one offered a straight promotion to Associate, who will hit VP faster than any of his peers, and become an MD at a ridiculously young age. I'm sure that 1st bucket analyst was the same type of person who was researching his career path a few years ahead of his cohorts when he was in high school as well.

    These kids aren't watching funnyordie videos or chatting on facebook. They're on WSO looking for information for their future. I highly doubt that they're the kinds of kids who are going to go back outside and play catch no matter how many times we tell them.

  • nutsaboutWS's picture

    Agree with @brutalglide.

    Keep the GPA as high as possible, and don't take unnecessary classes. Keep the GPA up, stay involved in EC's, network and find good internships. Tough stuff but you'll be at the top after.

    --
    "Those who say don't know, and those who know don't say."

  • In reply to brutalglide
    econ's picture

    brutalglide wrote:
    Double majors/dual degrees = waste of time. Keep GPA as high as possible and never take anything that might hurt it if you have a choice (ie. figure out who that "easy" professor is, figure out what classes are "easy", etc). By far my dumbest mistake (in addition to not starting early enough)

    It's sad that our education system gives students an incentive to do this. I don't blame you brutalglide, so don't take this as a knock on you... I'm just saying it's sad that colleges are set up in a way that some students shy away from learning more and expanding their world view because grades are so important.

  • Banker88's picture

    Regrets:
    -Not applying to a stronger target / Ivy league (applied ED to semi-target)
    -Not doing internships early on - get a finance-related internship every summer starting freshman year. Internships during the year too if possible
    -Not discovering WSO and M&I.com until junior year (after SA interviews)
    -Not studying abroad

    -(not a regret of mine, but keep your GPA at 3.7+)

    You live and learn, but good for you that you're starting this early. That said, don't make college all about finding a job. Enjoy it cause you only live once.

  • UBmonkey's picture

    Reading some of your answers honestly makes me angry. College is a luxury, remember that. Its the only time in your life where you can fully dedicate yourself to things that interest you, that will eventually shape who you will become as an adult. Not taking classes because you think they'll hurt your GPA is foolish, you will never again get the chance to LEARN about different cultures, or history, or even economics in such a dedicated and free way.

    I took a class in Hebrew and biblical text purely because i thought it would be interesting. It was widly known to be very challenging, and i barely got a C. Despite that its still the best class i ever took. It changed the way i viewed certain things and thats what college is for, it should not be viewed as a stepping stone for a job.

    As far as regrets
    -I wish i would have learned earlier in life to "fail fast" and learn from it.
    -Dont memorize things, learn them. I did that way too much in college.
    -Ask people. Surprisingly people are more than willing to help if you show sincere interest and you dont approach them wanting X right away.