2/19/12

I am currently interviewing for a Consultant position with openings in Chicago and NYC. During the interview process I told them I was shooting for $70's for compensation if living in Chicago. However, later on the Firm said they would prefer me to be located in the NYC office.

However, after looking at this COL calculator (http://cgi.money.cnn.com/tools/costofliving/costof...) .

It looks like if I make $75,000 in Chi I would need to make $143K to be equivalent in Manhattan...even Brooklyn is $119K.

This seems a little absurd to me! I know rent is double in Manhattan compared to Chicago, but is it really comparable to need to double your salary from Chicago to Manhattan in order to have the same standard of living?

I can not see the firm increasing my compensation package to 6 figures just because I live in NYC...

Comments (98)

2/19/12

I just don't see how accurate that calculator is...

It says 70k in manhattan is equivalent to 24k in my hometown (and I'm from a decent-sized city), but but there's no way that's correct, trust me. In that case a fast food manager in my city is almost equivalent to high finance jobs in NYC.

I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

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2/19/12

I would suggest doing your own cost of living calculations (look for comparable rentals, restaurants, transportation, income tax, etc.) instead of using a site. It will be more accurate and let you learn about the differences.

Not sure why you didn't do a cost comparison yourself if you want to be a consultant...

2/19/12

^ Agreed, typically the COL calculators draw way too many assumptions about you that are inaccurate on a case by case basis. Just to give you a little personal experience though, I've lived West, East and Midwest, and typically the big East Coast metropolitan areas are about 1.5-1.9 x the COL of a Western City (with the exception of San Fran), and about 2.1 x the COL of a Midwest city. This is obviously factoring in everything like whether or not you need a car, parking, taxes, etc. NYC/Manhattan could be more than that depending on your eating and social habits I guess.

"Who am I? I'm the guy that does his job. You must be the other guy."

2/19/12

-Rent is twice as expensive in New York
-Tack on 25% for everything else.
-State and local income taxes are 10% in New York so you need to earn more to bring home the same money.

3/15/13

IlliniProgrammer:
-Rent is twice as expensive in New York
-Tack on 25% for everything else.
-State and local income taxes are 10% in New York so you need to earn more to bring home the same money.

11% actually...

My drinkin' problem left today, she packed up all her bags and walked away.

3/15/13

IlliniProgrammer:
-Rent is twice as expensive in New York
-Tack on 25% for everything else.
-State and local income taxes are 10% in New York so you need to earn more to bring home the same money.

This.

Housing in NYC is incredibly expensive. I grew up near NYC but I now live in Baltimore.

When I accepted my first full time position out of undergrad in Baltimore, I was making in the range of 85-90k/year (civilian + military reserve pay).

I easily afforded the luxury 2 BR 2 BA 1200 sq. ft. fully furnished apartment with 2 reserved parking spaces all to myself in a great area of Baltimore for $1300/month. The same would easily cost you >$10,000/month in Manhattan. I would have needed to make nearly $210,000/year or more in Manhattan just to afford the same quality of life and this does not even account for the additional expenses of living in NYC.

Cost of living such as housing cost has a HUGE impact on standard of living.

zerolife:
I think those COL calculators compare buying a 4000 sq ft house in NYC vs. buying a 4000 sq ft house e.g. in Chicago. A big house is probably going to cost ya quite a lot more in NYC but then NYCer tend to live in smaller places. Not sure but that's my assumption.

That's a fairly good assumption.

2/19/12

For my summer internship last year, I was in new york from June 1st to August 31st (I leased), and I only spent around $3000 (including rent, food, etc) the entire 3 months... no joke. There were 3 of us crammed in a studio apartment ($700 per month per person) and I ate seamless in the office almost everyday, haha (I'd go into the office on Saturdays for like 4 or 5 hours just to get lunch and dinner!). There was a Mexican open-air market where I did all my grocery shopping near my apartment, so on those rare free days I roasted beats and chicken... I'm really cheap, haha. New York is as cheap as you want to make it! Add a little per month for fun, and there was about all the money I spent.

3/15/13

I moved to Chicago from Florida a little over 3 years ago. It's been great. In terms of the "speed" of the city, you wont notice a difference between here and NYC if you've lived in Florida your whole life. It's reasonably priced as well.

3/15/13

I'd go with chicago, but then again I would live almost anywhere before I moved to nyc. chicago is really a great city overall and the people are much friendlier.

3/15/13

Chicago is cold and windy...

To the starving man, beans are caviar

3/15/13

New York City.

3/15/13

New York City.

3/15/13

If you're concerned about cost of living, Chicago is your answer hands-down. Everything is cheaper, your quality of life will be higher, plus you have immediate access to Lake Michigan and all the activities it offers. Weather can be a downside, but New York winters aren't pretty either. The girls are less tight-wound, too.

Most people do things to add days to their life. I do things to add life to my days.

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3/15/13

Chicago is better for COL and has hotter girls.

NYC wins out in terms of career opportunities, cultural amenities, restaurants, and being around really smart interesting people (if that's your thing). Also, NYC's winters are not as bad as Chicago's.

3/15/13
Macroecon:

Chicago is better for COL and has hotter girls.

NYC wins out in terms of career opportunities, cultural amenities, restaurants, and being around really smart interesting people (if that's your thing). Also, NYC's winters are not as bad as Chicago's.

thanks Brady

3/15/13

Having lived in both, I would do Chicago. A Big 4 audit salary would go a lot further here. But if you are looking into finance exit ops after 2 years in audit, it will be easier to network/interview in NYC.

3/15/13
3/15/13

I currently live in Chicago (and went to school here), and I would take Chicago over NYC any day of the week. I spent 2 out of the last 3 summers in NYC, and while it is a good time for a few months, living there every day would not be ideal in my opinion. I pay cheap rent for an incredible nice apartment in Lincoln Park (all-in w/ bills I pay half of what my NYC buddies pay for closets in NYC, and my apartment is not only much nicer, it is A LOT bigger). Plus I have much more fun in Chicago than NYC. It's cleaner, less crowded, hotter girls in my opinion, significantly less douchey, bars are less crowded (in a good way), and the spring/summer environment in Chicago with the lake and the festivals blows NYC out of the water.

All of that being said, if I could move to a more exciting job within the bank I work at, I would drop everything and move to NYC in a heart beat. I would want to be back in Chicago by my late 20's (I'm 22 now), but the early career movements in finance in NYC, especially within the big banks, trump that of Chicago by leaps and bounds.

At the end of the day, do what you think would be best for the career. When you're young that is really all that matters. Both cities are playgrounds for anyone in their 20's, so that isn't an issue. If you bust your ass for 2-5 years and impress the right people, then you can worry about basing your next move on location, but career matters more now.

I would agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

3/15/13

I'm moving to Chicago after grad school and I'm absolutely pumped about it - I've been there 15+ times over the past couple years so I knew it was a good fit and where I wanted to be. Have you ever been to Chicago? If so, was it recently? ... I'd be interested to hear your opinion on the city in general, but I'll give you a pitch for it as well.

"If you're concerned about cost of living, Chicago is your answer hands-down. Everything is cheaper, your quality of life will be higher..."

QUALITY OF LIFE (i.e. stress, money problems, lack of sleep, etc) is key and often gets overlooked. I know some people in NYC making around a Big 4 salary and with their compensation one of two problems inevitably comes up and stresses them out every single day:

1) They live in a great location, prime area in Manhattan, very short commute... BUT the rent just destroys their paychecks. Now they have to worry about pinching pennies everyday and can't enjoy everything that their prime location has to offer.

2) Their rent is more affordable so they aren't as stressed about money on a day to day basis and have a little more financial freedom ... BUT they live in a not so nice area, or they live further away (i.e. NJ) and their commute is very long so they lose 2+ extra hours of their day in commute time, don't sleep as much as they could if they lived closer... also they have a tougher time outperforming those who live closer because they can't be in the office at the drop of a hat and also have shown up late multiple times due to commuting issues.

Anyway, I know all that simply means that trade-offs exist but they are MUCH less severe in Chicago. I know someone paying less than $1,000/mo for a studio in Old Town (a very nice, fun, cool neighborhood about 1.5 miles north of the Loop) and his commute is a 15 minute train/subway ride. Also, he had very little time to find a place and put in minimal effort and found a place like this... no chance any of this is happening in NYC.

3/15/13

Chicago is a Cadillac, NYC is a Mercedes. Just depends which you prefer

3/15/13

I lived in NYC for several years out of undergrad and live in Chicago now. I am chomping at the bit to get back to NYC. It's just a completely different city with a completely different vibe. Chicago is a bit slower, more friendly, and more cost effective, but after tasting New York it is definitely a solid step backward (for me specifically, not trying to argue Chicago is objectively worse). New York is just an insanely special place and I really think everyone who gets the opportunity to live there should give it a shot.

However, an important caveat is that NYC is much harder to build a network of close friends in. I moved with my SO, so that made it easier, but even then it took us over a year to settle down into a close group of friends that we saw frequently and went out with often. Chicago is a bit easier in that respect as far as I've seen. So if you are someone that has a tough time making friends, or if you feel like you'll be miserable if you don't have a close group of friends for awhile, NYC can be pretty tough to stomach. I still think it's worth it. There is no other place in the world like it.

3/15/13
Boothorbust:

I still think it's worth it. There is no other place in the world like it.

I honestly never understood this mentality for NYC. Sure, it has good food but if you travel enough you would have tasted enough authentic food of different cuisines to put nyc to shame. Partying? There are far better international cities than nyc. Historical sites? I would take boston over NYC. Career progression? This is probably the one thing nyc is good fod but that just means it's the financial hub of the US...that doesn't make it a cool place to live. I've lived in quite a few cities (NYC included) and could never understand why people thought NYC was so great.

3/15/13

neomanxllp:
Boothorbust:
I still think it's worth it. There is no other place in the world like it.

I honestly never understood this mentality for NYC. Sure, it has good food but if you travel enough you would have tasted enough authentic food of different cuisines to put nyc to shame. Partying? There are far better international cities than nyc. Historical sites? I would take boston over NYC. Career progression? This is probably the one thing nyc is good fod but that just means it's the financial hub of the US...that doesn't make it a cool place to live. I've lived in quite a few cities (NYC included) and could never understand why people thought NYC was so great.


Dude - it's about the confluence of great things. Can you get better pad thai on the streets of Bangkok? Sure, but I don't live in, nor do I have time to travel to, multiple international cities every year. The fact that you can get delicious food from every corner of the globe delivered to your doorstep - or attend one of many 3-Michelin star restuarants, or get amazing street food is pretty amazing.

Partying? Ok yeah, Ibiza is a better place to party, but who wants to fucking live in Ibiza.

Don't even get me started on Boston, that place is terrible. Full of arrogant blowhards who are pissed off their city isn't New York. History? The god damn freedom trail and a few colonial buildings? NYC was the nations first capital, the site of George Washington's inauguration, the epicenter of US immigration for two centuries, the site of the world's tallest building for 7 decades, etc etc etc.

It's not for everyone. There are things other cities do better. But after living in half a dozen major US cities I don't think there's anyplace else that brings it all together the way NYC does. But haters gon' hate.

3/15/13

neomanxllp:
Boothorbust:
I still think it's worth it. There is no other place in the world like it.

I honestly never understood this mentality for NYC. Sure, it has good food but if you travel enough you would have tasted enough authentic food of different cuisines to put nyc to shame. Partying? There are far better international cities than nyc. Historical sites? I would take boston over NYC. Career progression? This is probably the one thing nyc is good fod but that just means it's the financial hub of the US...that doesn't make it a cool place to live. I've lived in quite a few cities (NYC included) and could never understand why people thought NYC was so great.

There's a certain kind of "energy" in NYC that doesn't exist in any other city. I guess it probably has to do with being at the cultural epicenter of the world. I've spoken to a lot of people who've also lived in other big cities and the majority of them have all said the same thing.

I've never been to Chicago. But based on my research, it seems like Chicago and NYC have completely different vibes. Seems like Chicago is packed with midwesterners while NYC is much more cosmopolitan. I'm sure that Chicago probably has a more down-to-earth vibe while NYC is more...consumerist and prestige-driven? But then you have a ton of hipsters in NYC too.

Either way, there's a lot more to this decision than COL (unless your life revolves around pinching pennies).

3/15/13

JDawg:
Seems like Chicago is packed with midwesterners while NYC is much more cosmopolitan.

This x 10. People come from around the world to live in New York. People come from around the middle of the country (and sometimes Canada) to live in Chicago. I'm obviously exaggerating a bit, but it's true - New York has far more cultural, linguistic, ethnic, and culinary diversity than does Chicago.
3/15/13

I'm slowly starting to hate NYC more and more. So, there's that...

I hate victims who respect their executioners

3/15/13
BlackHat:

I'm slowly starting to hate NYC more and more. So, there's that...

That's how it's been for me as well. First couple of years, it seems great. Next 5 years, progressively more irritating. Years 10+, absolutely obnoxious. Can barely stand it now.

3/15/13

SirTradesaLot:
BlackHat:
I'm slowly starting to hate NYC more and more. So, there's that...

That's how it's been for me as well. First couple of years, it seems great. Next 5 years, progressively more irritating. Years 10+, absolutely obnoxious. Can barely stand it now.

Hear that. I can only imagine with time it gets even more tiresome. I'm literally moving.

I hate victims who respect their executioners

3/15/13

BlackHat:
I'm slowly starting to hate NYC more and more. So, there's that...

I can second this. Everyone else I talk to who's been here 5 years says that is the amount of time it takes to be 'done' with the city.

My drinkin' problem left today, she packed up all her bags and walked away.

3/15/13

You get what you pay for.

Yeah, Chicago COL is significantly cheaper than NYC. NYC is expensive for a reason.

I lived in Chicago for one year, and live in NYC now. NYC blows Chicago out of water, in almost every social aspect. More people to network with. More diversity. Higher energy. More cosmopolitan. And, NYC really is the truly international city, where as Chicago is more isolated and feels like a local city comprised largely of midwest folks.

Having lived in NYC, whenever I visit Chicago, everything feels suburban. Even Chicago downtown area feels suburban to me, compared to NYC.

If you are truly a city person (like me), there isn't any place like NYC. However, as mentioned, if you are interested in saving every penny you can, and if that is your priority, go to Chicago.

3/15/13

IvyGrad:
You get what you pay for.

Yeah, Chicago COL is significantly cheaper than NYC. NYC is expensive for a reason.

I lived in Chicago for one year, and live in NYC now. NYC blows Chicago out of water, in almost every social aspect. More people to network with. More diversity. Higher energy. More cosmopolitan. And, NYC really is the truly international city, where as Chicago is more isolated and feels like a local city comprised largely of midwest folks.

Having lived in NYC, whenever I visit Chicago, everything feels suburban. Even Chicago downtown area feels suburban to me, compared to NYC.

If you are truly a city person (like me), there isn't any place like NYC. However, as mentioned, if you are interested in saving every penny you can, and if that is your priority, go to Chicago.

While I agree with this to an extent, there is no shortage of networking (or energy) in Chicago. Granted, I went to UChicago and majored in economics, and more people stay in Chicago and work in finance than move to NYC from UofC (10 from my fraternity alone in the class of 2012), so I am a little biased. But between myself and my 4 roommates, as well as the analysts we work with and all of the other grads from UofC around the city, we easily have a network of 50-100+ finance people under the age of 25. And that's without trying. Not to mention the NYC network built up from other UofC grads who moved there, and the 200+ people we all met in NYC during training this summer. Plus, with the money I save in rent (not that I go out of my way to save money by any means, just got lucky with our apartment), I can fly to NYC twice a month if I really wanted to, and still have ~$400 left over in rent savings for bar tabs while I'm there.

And to say that the NYC social scene blows Chicago out of the water is a reach. I will say it is a little better just because more people go out during the week, but if you go to the right places in Chicago you can have a great time any night of the week.

I would agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

3/15/13

You get what you pay for.

Yeah, Chicago COL is significantly cheaper than NYC. NYC is expensive for a reason.

I lived in Chicago for one year, and live in NYC now. NYC blows Chicago out of water, in almost every social aspect. More people to network with. More diversity. Higher energy. More cosmopolitan. And, NYC really is the true international city, where as Chicago is more isolated and feels like a local city comprised largely of midwest folks.

Having lived in NYC, whenever I visit Chicago, everything feels suburban. Even Chicago downtown area feels suburban to me, compared to NYC.

If you are truly a city person (like me), there isn't any place like NYC. However, as mentioned, if you are interested in saving every penny you can, and if that is your priority, go to Chicago.

Lastly, what's up with those Chicago Cubs fans? They literally are the most lame, pathetic group of sports fans ever. The team is like the most pathetic sports team in the history of modern sports. Not to mention, baseball is a terribly boring sport to watch. (Football and basketball, all the way) I found it annoying that all the young social circles in north shore chicago area (lincoln park, etc) talked non-stop about this retarded baseball crap, and just drink beer.

3/15/13

IvyGrad:
You get what you pay for.

Yeah, Chicago COL is significantly cheaper than NYC. NYC is expensive for a reason.

I lived in Chicago for one year, and live in NYC now. NYC blows Chicago out of water, in almost every social aspect. More people to network with. More diversity. Higher energy. More cosmopolitan. And, NYC really is the true international city, where as Chicago is more isolated and feels like a local city comprised largely of midwest folks.

Having lived in NYC, whenever I visit Chicago, everything feels suburban. Even Chicago downtown area feels suburban to me, compared to NYC.

If you are truly a city person (like me), there isn't any place like NYC. However, as mentioned, if you are interested in saving every penny you can, and if that is your priority, go to Chicago.

Lastly, what's up with those Chicago Cubs fans? They literally are the most lame, pathetic group of sports fans ever. The team is like the most pathetic sports team in the history of modern sports. Not to mention, baseball is a terribly boring sport to watch. (Football and basketball, all the way) I found it annoying that all the young social circles in north shore chicago area (lincoln park, etc) talked non-stop about this retarded baseball crap, and just drink beer.

I've never lived in a city, so I'm definitely not a city person. Thats why I was thinking maybe a little bit slower of a city might be better. And pinching pennies isnt my only priority, however, I'm not gonna be on a banker's salary, I'm planning on Big 4 audit. So I have to be somewhat frugal.

I personally love baseball. I'm a diehard NY sports fan, and it would be great to be in the city where my teams play so I can catch some games more than just on mlb.tv on my computer. But I cant base my decision on just that.

NYC is a great place and I would probably enjoy it, but I also hear nothing but great things about Chicago, plus the fact that its cheaper.

3/15/13

Put it this way, if you really want to save money in NYC on rent, you can. Just live in outer boroughs, like Queens, Brooklyn, or NJ. NYC subway transit is first class, and runs 24/7. NYC is the only city in the country where you really don't need a car. Manhattan is expensive because of supply vs demand. If anything, the high rent prices in Manhattan confirm the speculation that more people want to live in this locale, compared to Chicago.

Different strokes for different folks. Having experienced NYC, I would personally never, ever, live in Chicago again. I found that Chicago is too midwestern, too local, lack international diversity, not cosmopolitan enough, feel too suburban, too fucking cold in winter, and lack the 'city energy' that NYC has.

Women - although I was born/raised in US, and white-American, I appreciate the diversity in women. In NYC, I really appreciate the fact that I can meet and date much larger pool of women, from diverse national and ethnic backgrounds. In NYC, I've met some absolutely gorgeous Asian and European women, and I suspect I wouldn't have been able to meet them in Chicago. Chicago, like I said, is 90% comprised of Midwest natives, and significantly lack international dimension in its population.

However, that is just my experience, and I could see how some others would prefer Chicago over NYC.

3/15/13

IvyGrad:
Put it this way, if you really want to save money in NYC on rent, you can. Just live in outer boroughs, like Queens, Brooklyn, or NJ. NYC subway transit is first class, and runs 24/7. NYC is the only city in the country where you really don't need a car. Manhattan is expensive because of supply vs demand. If anything, the high rent prices in Manhattan confirm the speculation that more people want to live in this locale, compared to Chicago.

Different strokes for different folks. Having experienced NYC, I would personally never, ever, live in Chicago again. I found that Chicago is too midwestern, too local, lack international diversity, not cosmopolitan enough, feel too suburban, too fucking cold in winter, and lack the 'city energy' that NYC has.

Women - although I was born/raised in US, and white-American, I appreciate the diversity in women. In NYC, I really appreciate the fact that I can meet and date much larger pool of women, from diverse national and ethnic backgrounds. In NYC, I've met some absolutely gorgeous Asian and European women, and I suspect I wouldn't have been able to meet them in Chicago. Chicago, like I said, is 90% comprised of Midwest natives, and significantly lack international dimension in its population.

However, that is just my experience, and I could see how some others would prefer Chicago over NYC.

Holy shit dude, have you seen two cities in your life? First off NYC is FAR from first class. In fact, it's pretty terrible. It's dirty, subways are often delayed and there is constant construction on parts of the tracks. Second, NYC is far from being the only city in the US that you don't need a car. And if you thihnk NYC is diverse in terms of people you really need to leave the country and travel a bit. Chicago has a surprisingly high number of asian and european immigrants and quite a few ethnic areas.

Anyone who talks about NYC having "energy" clearly hasn't lived there long enough to get rid of that "just moved to nyc" glow. I lived in NYC for 5 years before so trust me when I tell you that most feel see that hype for nyc leave after a few

3/15/13

^

Dude. The thread is about Chicago vs NYC. NYC, compared to Chicago, is first-class, in many aspects, and much, much more diverse.

I am very happy with what NYC has to offer. I was not very happy with what Chicago could offer. However, that is purely my experience, and others may find different experiences with the two cities.

Another thing that NYC had going for me, was that I went to an Ivy for college and literally more than 50% of all my college friends now work/live in NYC. I found that basically at any top 10 college, huge portions of the alums end up at NYC. So, if you went to a top college, you may want to settle in NYC just to be around your college buddies.

At any rate, I've been having a fucking blast in this town, and can't imagine myself living in Chicago, anytime soon. (Chicago may be a better place to live, after I retire and when I am like 60, because it's cheaper to live)

3/15/13

I hear a lot of people who are on the NYC side of the argument say that it has more energy, "more to offer", etc., but I just really havent heard anything solid as far what it is that Chicago is lacking. I dont see how another major city like Chicago wouldnt have just as much energy and things to offer as NYC. How many bars, clubs, and restaurants do you need? I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm genuinely looking for benefits to NYC over Chicago.

So far my only reason to go NYC would be my family and friends being there, as opposed to being alone in Chicago. But I figure saving $1000 a month on rent alone in a comparable apartment is a big plus to Chicago. Thats why I'm looking for other distinguishing items.

3/15/13

Art.Vandelay:
I hear a lot of people who are on the NYC side of the argument say that it has more energy, "more to offer", etc., but I just really havent heard anything solid as far what it is that Chicago is lacking. I dont see how another major city like Chicago wouldnt have just as much energy and things to offer as NYC. How many bars, clubs, and restaurants do you need? I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm genuinely looking for benefits to NYC over Chicago.

So far my only reason to go NYC would be my family and friends being there, as opposed to being alone in Chicago. But I figure saving $1000 a month on rent alone in a comparable apartment is a big plus to Chicago. Thats why I'm looking for other distinguishing items.

I put this question in an earlier response but you probably missed it ... You're friends and family are in NYC so I'm sure you've been there p;;entry, but have you ever been to Chicago? If so, was it recently and what is your opinion? If not and you have the extra time and money I would really suggest taking a weekend trip up there. IMO its one of those places where if its going to be a good fit you will pretty much know right the immediately when you get there.

3/15/13

The Kid:
Art.Vandelay:
I hear a lot of people who are on the NYC side of the argument say that it has more energy, "more to offer", etc., but I just really havent heard anything solid as far what it is that Chicago is lacking. I dont see how another major city like Chicago wouldnt have just as much energy and things to offer as NYC. How many bars, clubs, and restaurants do you need? I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm genuinely looking for benefits to NYC over Chicago.

So far my only reason to go NYC would be my family and friends being there, as opposed to being alone in Chicago. But I figure saving $1000 a month on rent alone in a comparable apartment is a big plus to Chicago. Thats why I'm looking for other distinguishing items.

I put this question in an earlier response but you probably missed it ... You're friends and family are in NYC so I'm sure you've been there p;;entry, but have you ever been to Chicago? If so, was it recently and what is your opinion? If not and you have the extra time and money I would really suggest taking a weekend trip up there. IMO its one of those places where if its going to be a good fit you will pretty much know right the immediately when you get there.

I have never been to Chicago. I'm trying to plan a trip this upcoming december, if I an get the days off of work. I'm not so sure how much it will tell me about how life will be there after such a short visit, but its certainly better than nothing.

3/15/13

Art.Vandelay:
I hear a lot of people who are on the NYC side of the argument say that it has more energy, "more to offer", etc., but I just really havent heard anything solid as far what it is that Chicago is lacking. I dont see how another major city like Chicago wouldnt have just as much energy and things to offer as NYC. How many bars, clubs, and restaurants do you need? I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm genuinely looking for benefits to NYC over Chicago.

So far my only reason to go NYC would be my family and friends being there, as opposed to being alone in Chicago. But I figure saving $1000 a month on rent alone in a comparable apartment is a big plus to Chicago. Thats why I'm looking for other distinguishing items.

You aren't going to save $1000 a month on rent in a comparable apartment...

3/15/13

rufiolove:
Art.Vandelay:
I hear a lot of people who are on the NYC side of the argument say that it has more energy, "more to offer", etc., but I just really havent heard anything solid as far what it is that Chicago is lacking. I dont see how another major city like Chicago wouldnt have just as much energy and things to offer as NYC. How many bars, clubs, and restaurants do you need? I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm genuinely looking for benefits to NYC over Chicago.

So far my only reason to go NYC would be my family and friends being there, as opposed to being alone in Chicago. But I figure saving $1000 a month on rent alone in a comparable apartment is a big plus to Chicago. Thats why I'm looking for other distinguishing items.

You aren't going to save $1000 a month on rent in a comparable apartment...

After utilities, I pay $750 less each month than my buddy that lives in NYC, and my place is significantly nicer. Granted, he has a 2bd room and I have a 5bd room, but my place has more sq ft per occupant and 4 bathrooms to 5 people vs 1 bathroom for 2 people. And we have two stories to work with, with two living rooms and a much larger kitchen and balcony. But 5 bedrooms always go for less per person.

I'd say on average comparing two more similar apartments, you're looking at saving ~$300-500 per month.

I would agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

3/15/13

rufiolove:

You aren't going to save $1000 a month on rent in a comparable apartment...

I've compared listing in "trendy" neighborhoods for both cities, and many times I saw comparable places in Lincoln Park in Chicago for 1500 whereas one in Williamsburg in Brooklyn would be 2500. This might be near the upper limit for discrepancies between the two, but I think its very possible to find a difference that big in similar places.

3/15/13

Art.Vandelay:
rufiolove:

You aren't going to save $1000 a month on rent in a comparable apartment...

I've compared listing in "trendy" neighborhoods for both cities, and many times I saw comparable places in Lincoln Park in Chicago for 1500 whereas one in Williamsburg in Brooklyn would be 2500. This might be near the upper limit for discrepancies between the two, but I think its very possible to find a difference that big in similar places.

I would agree that these are at the upper limit for discrepancies. Paying $2500 per month in Williamsburg is failing... I pay half that and live in Midtown and have a 10 minute door-to-door walk to work. My point was more that you're looking at outliers. I would find it hard to believe that someone could have my apartment and location for $250 per month in Chicago. You can find certain areas and price points that will result in a $1000 discrepancy but I agree with the post above... $300 - $500 per month is more realistic. No mistake here, NYC is obviously far more expensive on average and especially in trendy neighborhoods, but in reality that's not where someone in your price point would reasonably be looking.

It should be noted also that the value proposition really isn't there for getting 1 person studio at the upper end of what anyone would be willing to pay when you could have a roommate or two. If you are making a decision based on cost of living, I just think you need to consider that you can pay less than $1500 per month in both cities and more than $2000 in both cities but that is a choice. You can comfortably do NYC on a Big 4 auditing salary, as I have friends that do. They party as much as I do, they just don't save anything...

3/15/13

Honestly the vibe between the two cities are world apart. The two cities are very, very different. Some may prefer Chicago, while many others would prefer NYC. (as higher demand for the rent in NYC testifies)

I don't quite understand what the hell is the point of considering to move to NYC in the first place, if the cost of living is such a big issue. You should know what you are getting into. It is like asking "what? I can't believe a BMW costs 50k, I think I would rather get a Honda for 25k because I can still get to place X,Y,Z the same as BMW anyway". Like I said, if all you are interested in is saving every penny you can, move to Chicago.

Wait. If the cost of living is your #1 priority, hell with Chicago. Move to Texas. (Houston, Austin, Dallas) Dirt cheap COL and no state income tax.

3/15/13

IvyGrad:

Wait. If the cost of living is your #1 priority, hell with Chicago. Move to Texas. (Houston, Austin, Dallas) Dirt cheap COL and no state income tax.

Doesnt the fact that I'm not considering Texas, or just staying where I am in Florida, give away that COL isnt the ONLY thing I care about? Houston to Chicago is not as close a comparison as Chicago to NYC. I'm trying to decide between to huge cities, and I happen to weighing pros and cons. Pros of Chicago happen to be substantial less COL, so I was trying to figure out what it really lacks, besides not being on the east coast.

3/15/13

Yeah, you won't save anything close to 1k a month on rent by going Chicago over NYC.

I have 2 roommates, but live in a sick modern high-rise apartment building that has a sick view, indoor swimming pool, gym, rooftop bar area, etc etc just 2-3 blocks away from Time Square, all for 1600 a month. Whenever I bring my friends or girls back to my place, they always comment on how fucking nice my apartment is. So, interpret that as you'd like.

There is no way in fucking hell that I would get that level of an apartment in similarly desirable location in downtown Chicago, for 600 bucks a month.

At most, if we are comparing similar level of apartment in similarly desirable neighborhoods within two cities, you would save 400-500 bucks a month. And, I think I am being very generous with that estimate.

Lastly, aside from prices of rent, COL between two cities don't differ much at all. Last time I checked, a Chipotle burrito costs 8 bucks here in NYC. Back in Chicago, it was like 7.55 per burrito or something. Ok, so it's cheaper by like 1% in Chicago on food.

For me, it is absolutely worth it to pay a bit of premium to live in NYC over Chicago. I just love the modern, energetic, cosmopolitan, liberal, and international vibe that NYC offers. Chicago vibe is completely different. Chicago vibe is just 'back water' compared to NYC, much more conservative, slow-paced, 'suburban' feeling, not international at all, feels isolated/provincial, and just did not cater well to my tastes.

Is it worth it to pay premium to live in NYC over Chicago? Only you can answer that question. It depends on individual. But, hey, if you are trying to move to a big city to truly taste what a big city has to offer, you might as well go for the best city. Like I said, if COL was a big concern, fuck Chicago. You would be better served just moving to Texas.

3/15/13

IvyGrad:
Yeah, you won't save anything close to 1k a month on rent by going Chicago over NYC.

I have 2 roommates, but live in a sick modern high-rise apartment building that has a sick view, indoor swimming pool, gym, rooftop bar area, etc etc just 2-3 blocks away from Time Square, all for 1600 a month. Whenever I bring my friends or girls back to my place, they always comment on how fucking nice my apartment is. So, interpret that as you'd like.

There is no way in fucking hell that I would get that level of an apartment in similarly desirable location in downtown Chicago, for 600 bucks a month.

At most, if we are comparing similar level of apartment in similarly desirable neighborhoods within two cities, you would save 400-500 bucks a month. And, I think I am being very generous with that estimate.

Lastly, aside from prices of rent, COL between two cities don't differ much at all. Last time I checked, a Chipotle burrito costs 8 bucks here in NYC. Back in Chicago, it was like 7.55 per burrito or something. Ok, so it's cheaper by like 1% in Chicago on food.

For me, it is absolutely worth it to pay a bit of premium to live in NYC over Chicago. I just love the modern, energetic, cosmopolitan, liberal, and international vibe that NYC offers. Chicago vibe is completely different. Chicago vibe is just 'back water' compared to NYC, much more conservative, slow-paced, 'suburban' feeling, not international at all, feels isolated/provincial, and just did not cater well to my tastes.

Is it worth it to pay premium to live in NYC over Chicago? Only you can answer that question. It depends on individual. But, hey, if you are trying to move to a big city to truly taste what a big city has to offer, you might as well go for the best city. Like I said, if COL was a big concern, fuck Chicago. You would be better served just moving to Texas.

I appreciate your input IvyGrad, even if it seems like I was disagreeing with you. I'm simply listing the pros and cons of each, how I see them.

I didnt really mean getting a 1600/month place for 600/month in Chicago. I meant more like the upper prices being a difference of 1000, but anyway, I hope what you say is true, and I will certainly look into it. I just find that almost every single COL calculator I've come across have had housing prices substantially higher.

I certainly would pay a bit of a premium to have friends and family near instead of starting off with no one around, but I also want to take advantage of being able to put away as much cash as I can. And I am certainly looking for a big city, which is why its going to be either Chicago or NYC, not Texas. I'm going to Chicago soon, so I guess I'll see if I get a good feeling or vibe or energy or whatever its called from it.

3/15/13

Art.Vandelay:
IvyGrad:
Yeah, you won't save anything close to 1k a month on rent by going Chicago over NYC.

I have 2 roommates, but live in a sick modern high-rise apartment building that has a sick view, indoor swimming pool, gym, rooftop bar area, etc etc just 2-3 blocks away from Time Square, all for 1600 a month. Whenever I bring my friends or girls back to my place, they always comment on how fucking nice my apartment is. So, interpret that as you'd like.

There is no way in fucking hell that I would get that level of an apartment in similarly desirable location in downtown Chicago, for 600 bucks a month.

At most, if we are comparing similar level of apartment in similarly desirable neighborhoods within two cities, you would save 400-500 bucks a month. And, I think I am being very generous with that estimate.

Lastly, aside from prices of rent, COL between two cities don't differ much at all. Last time I checked, a Chipotle burrito costs 8 bucks here in NYC. Back in Chicago, it was like 7.55 per burrito or something. Ok, so it's cheaper by like 1% in Chicago on food.

For me, it is absolutely worth it to pay a bit of premium to live in NYC over Chicago. I just love the modern, energetic, cosmopolitan, liberal, and international vibe that NYC offers. Chicago vibe is completely different. Chicago vibe is just 'back water' compared to NYC, much more conservative, slow-paced, 'suburban' feeling, not international at all, feels isolated/provincial, and just did not cater well to my tastes.

Is it worth it to pay premium to live in NYC over Chicago? Only you can answer that question. It depends on individual. But, hey, if you are trying to move to a big city to truly taste what a big city has to offer, you might as well go for the best city. Like I said, if COL was a big concern, fuck Chicago. You would be better served just moving to Texas.

I appreciate your input IvyGrad, even if it seems like I was disagreeing with you. I'm simply listing the pros and cons of each, how I see them.

I didnt really mean getting a 1600/month place for 600/month in Chicago. I meant more like the upper prices being a difference of 1000, but anyway, I hope what you say is true, and I will certainly look into it. I just find that almost every single COL calculator I've come across have had housing prices substantially higher.

I certainly would pay a bit of a premium to have friends and family near instead of starting off with no one around, but I also want to take advantage of being able to put away as much cash as I can. And I am certainly looking for a big city, which is why its going to be either Chicago or NYC, not Texas. I'm going to Chicago soon, so I guess I'll see if I get a good feeling or vibe or energy or whatever its called from it.

Chicago isn't all that much bigger than Houston. Sure ~500k more people but it's not as if you'll notice a difference between 2.2MM people vs. 2.7MM. Something to consider, although it is worlds apart from Chicago culturally as well. Neither compare to NY in my opinion.

3/15/13

I would go with Chicago. For a number of reasons. COL I think it is fair to say you will save at least $500/month but also for a much nicer and larger place. $1500/month in any good area in NYC will get you a shoebox apartment. $1000/month in Chicago will get you a pretty nice place in most neighborhoods. In terms of the weather, both cities are cold as hell in the winter- maybe we are comparing a difference of 5 degrees, but the fact is you are wearing a coat and freezing your ass off. Chicago summer beats NYC summer- accessibility of Lake Michigan is huge- sure, there are beaches near NYC, but Lake Michigan is literally right there. Regarding needing a car, the L is an incredibly good public transit system, and I don't know anyone living in Chicago that has a car. I actually prefer the L to the NYC subway system personally, but they are both solid. Sports- yea, if you are a NY sports fan it would be nice to be home, but Chicago sports are pretty huge and games fun to go to regardless of if you are a fan of the teams. NYC will have more networking opportunities in finance, but honestly Chicago is number 2 in the country, so while it won't have as many, it will still have a bunch. Both cities have thousands of clubs and restaurants, you won't notice the difference- NYC has better ethnic foods- Chicago has as good of ethnic foods as you will find in most American cities- really not something to base a decision off of.

3/15/13

No San Francisco? In my (biased) opinion, it's best of both worlds: friendlier and more laid back than NY, but much more cosmopolitan than Chicago. And if you're looking into a more "suburban" life, the whole South Bay (Palo Alto, Menlo Park, San Mateo, etc) is right up your alley.

3/15/13

triplectz:
No San Francisco? In my (biased) opinion, it's best of both worlds: friendlier and more laid back than NY, but much more cosmopolitan than Chicago. And if you're looking into a more "suburban" life, the whole South Bay (Palo Alto, Menlo Park, San Mateo, etc) is right up your alley.

From what I've heard from people living in the area, and read online, its almost as expensive as NYC, and a little far from home.

3/15/13

Since you will be on a Big 4 salary, I'm not sure why there is even a debate. Chicago all the way. I'm not trying to hate on your job by any means, but COL adjustments for the Big 4 are tiny, and you will be struggling to keep your head above water. A good friend of mine took that route, and while he doesn't express any regret, I know that money is really tight for him. Better to live comfortably in Chicago (or somewhere even cheaper). Another factor, there is no real career upside to being in NY.

That said, I think NYC is incredible. Different strokes for different folks, I know it isn't for everyone, but for someone who loves culture and novelty, it can't be beat. The energy there is real and almost overwhelming at times, it makes you feel so alive. NYC women are much more intelligent, sophisticated, and beautiful. Yes, there is a mercenary element to the people (both men and women) that never lets you feel fully comfortable with anyone. People never settle down. Tight knit groups of friends don't really exist. Even if you are doing pretty well, career-wise, you are constantly reminded of how poor you really are. But one day when I am old, if I had never lived in NYC for at least a few years, I would view it as a massive failure to fully experience what is out there.

3/15/13

Not everyone in NYC is balling with a 6 figure salary working in IB, PE, or HF, yet they just do fine. The key thing is to get roommates, don't splurge on bottles, and skip out on high end restaurants. Then you will be more than fine.

The girl I am dating now is a yoga instructor, yet she seems to get by ok and lives in manhattan. I met many people in NYC who work unorthodox careers, including a movie car stuntman, lead vocalist at neighborhood bar band, full-time dessert food critic, or "models" that I've never seen/heard of before. All these folks still manage to put roof over their heads and eat ok.

I can guarantee you, from my experience, that Chicago COL isn't that much cheaper than NYC. As mentioned earlier, you will save 300-500 bucks a month in rent, at most, by going Chicago over NYC if we are comparing comparable apartments/neighborhoods. The prices of other things are basically equivalent between the two cities. I think it is totally worth it to spend extra 300-500 bucks a month to live in NYC over Chicago. Besides, if you live out of manhattan, the rent gets significantly cheaper. (NJ, Queens, etc) Heck, I would pay 1k per month premium, over Chicago, to live in one of the best cities in the world, during some of the best times of my life. Put it this way, Chicago may be the best city in Midwest. NYC is arguably the best city in the entire world. (at least top 5)

Funny, I had a chance to meet an MD at an investment bank at the NYC alumni event last month. As he told me: "I've travelled to many different places around the world, and I worked in Europe and Asia for a decade. Yet, I still feel that there is really no other place like New York." And, I think I agree with him.

3/15/13

>>to live in one of the best cities in the world, during some of the best times of my life. Put it this way, Chicago may be the best city in Midwest. NYC is arguably the best city in the entire world. (at least top 5)

(1) You don't have much to live for if you, and others, think "Gee, 20s are the best years of MY life!" I hope you can tell that to your future spouse, if you ever get married.

(2) Glory hunting much? Well yea. It's WSO.

>>As he told me: "I've travelled to many different places around the world, and I worked in Europe and Asia for a decade. Yet, I still feel that there is really no other place like New York." And, I think I agree with him.

You can say that for almost any other city. There's no place like LA, or Chicago, or London or Paris or Tokyo etc.

3/15/13

Lol Chicago is way more than just cheaper on rent. You pay what, 5% tax vs. 8% state and 4% city.

NYC is cool, but let's all be real.

3/15/13

Art.Vandelay:
to approachability of women to date.

Once I read that you're worried the women in a certain city won't be "approachable" enough to date, I figure you're just another total WSO geek like @mbavsmfin aka Brady. Stop being such a pussy.

Also, diehard NYC sports fan who grew up in Florida... You mustve been the man running around Jupiter, FL with your Yankees hat and Jeter jersey.

3/15/13

adapt or die:

Art.Vandelay:

to approachability of women to date.

Once I read that you're worried the women in a certain city won't be "approachable" enough to date, I figure you're just another total WSO geek like @mbavsmfin aka Brady. Stop being such a pussy.

Also, diehard NYC sports fan who grew up in Florida... You mustve been the man running around Jupiter, FL with your Yankees hat and Jeter jersey.


It's a valid point, if not a disqualifying one. I bet girls in the South are way easier to start a conversation with than in NY. Girls put up big walls in big cities.

That makes me think though that a larger portion of schmucks are meeting cuties in cities where the cuties are more receptive to introductions, so if you're able to navigate around a girl's protective bitch shield, you may be better off in NY. Like, a trout's trout's gonna die in the ocean (or at least not get laid), but a shark's gonna die in a lake. Dig? Yeah.

He says, having never lived in NY or the South.

heister:

Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad.

Best Response
3/15/13

Women being easier to bang in x vs y is such bullshit. Unless you're trying to game in a nunnery women respond to the same shit everywhere. Have something interesting to say and the balls to say it.

I mean seriously, Wtf is up with this crap.

3/15/13

Lol you guys are putting way too much focus on one minor thing I said. I didn't make my decision (which I've made already and am living in already) based on that. It was one of many factors, a point of discussion. Get off your fuckin soapboxes.

3/15/13

So which did you choose, and what was the ultimate deciding factor?

3/15/13

Chicago, and cost of living. If you compare apartments in the "hip" areas in each city, you're looking at prices that are about half that of NYC. Not exactly half, but close. Yeah, I know, I don't HAVE to live in the best areas or the nicest place but I can't see NYC being so much better that I'd rather live in a shoebox in not the best area vs a nice place in Chicago. Maybe others need the biggest city but I've never lived in an urban environment, Chicago is plenty and I'll be saving a lot more cash. Just my view on it.

3/15/13

NYC way*n better than Chicago if you do not consider cost of living.
I am international stu in Chicago and find this place diappointed. Someone said people here are friendly but that is not case for a foreginer. Neighborhood need be carefully chosen because there are some really bad places with high crime rate. And, it seems to me that people in the same race tend to stay together and segregation sprawls. NYC is far more open-minded for people with a different culture background. Rentals are cheaper overall compared to rentals in NYC, which is the only merit of Chicago I find compared with NYC.

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2/19/12

Second, IP.

3/15/13

Thanks. That's the funniest joke I've heard all day.

3/15/13

Gonna bite by posting here, but way to make my day a little brighter by reminding me again why NYC is the center of the business universe in the US.

3/15/13

I've actually never been to Chicago, so I can't chime in on that. I'm very fond of New York, but there are many great cities in the US. On the east coast, I personally love New York and DC. Boston is cool, not really my thing. Philly has some cool spots as well. You can find fun pretty much anywhere, it all depends on what you're looking for.

3/15/13

I happen to agree with you Chicago (and I have spent a good deal of time in both cities), but who cares? Obviously, NY has the better finance opportunities. I think most people who give it a fair chance would agree that Chicago is a better city outside of the NY name (but not all). But, ultimately, its a personal choice. You like Chicago, as I do, others like NY - its really ok either way.

Are you sponsored by the Chicago Area Tourist Society or something? If not, I don't understand the point of posting.

3/15/13

Chicago has hotter chicks than NYC? Please.

Is it better to live there? Possibly, based on what you want. Lower COL, cleaner city, relaxed culture. Less long-term opportunity. Uglier broads. I think that many people just head over to NYC without properly evaluating their alternatives, but for the truly ambitious (and horny), it's the place to be.

3/15/13

oasising,

you should visit chicago and check out the upscale clubs/lounges in west loop and river north and the plethora of bars in lincoln park. the girls you'll see at these places blow away the chicks in NYC. the hottest sorority girls from Big 10 colleges move to chicago, not NYC.

3/15/13
ChicagoRules:

the hottest sorority girls from Big 10 colleges move to chicago, not NYC.

Well I guess that settles it. NYC only has educated, cultured women. Chicago wins.

3/15/13

and models but they are so 2006

ehf3660:
ChicagoRules:

the hottest sorority girls from Big 10 colleges move to chicago, not NYC.

Well I guess that settles it. NYC only has educated, cultured women. Chicago wins.

3/15/13

Chicago is a great starter city. When you are ready to play with the big boys come back.

Either you sling crack rock or you got a wicked jump shot

3/15/13

You never have to worry about a DD in NYC. For example, last night at dinner my fiance and I decided to have 2 bottles of wine, in Chi-town or pretty much anywhere else that wouldn't be an option. In NY, I walked outside and got a dirt cheap cab, if it had been earlier I would've hopped onto the dirt cheap subway. In Chi-town I would've probably driven to dinner in the first place so I would have to either not have drunk the wine, take a cab home and then pickup the car in the morning, or something else unreasonable.

--There are stupid questions, so think first.
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3/15/13

hey douchebag, go back to the leveraged sellout.

do you even have a job or do you spend your days trolling wall street message boards instigating this ridiculous debate?

------

"its the running joke now, we now have fair trade with china so they send us poisoned sea food and we send them fraudulent securities."

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"its the running joke now, we now have fair trade with china so they send us poisoned sea food and we send them fraudulent securities."

3/15/13

to read, but not worthy of a serious response.

I just had to show my appreciation to those that ridiculed the original poster.

Ha ha ha. Well done.

3/15/13

i understand that you guys are jealous of Chicago's superiority over NYC, but get over it. everyone i know who are familiar with both cities agree that Chicago is better in every way.

3/15/13

Look at jj1122s comment:he was "looking forward to coming to NYC"
http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/chicago-1

now u no y he's so hating on NYC, he got rejected by columbia:
http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/rejected-at-...

http://modernyuppie.blogspot.com/

The musings and antics of a Meathead college wrestler turned asset backed securities trader.

3/15/13

Interesting, but I'm still locking this thread.

2/20/12

I don't think you get it ES2121, you could have done that for 1500 in Chicago, or 1000 in Dallas.

2/20/12
protectedclass:

I don't think you get it ES2121, you could have done that for 1500 in Chicago, or 1000 in Dallas.

Haha, I guess my sarcasm didn't come across very well!

6/30/12

That calculator is funny. It doesn't even have my state's capital on it.

Anyhow, it takes in transportation and this is at least one thing that you can cut out. For about $100 you can get a subway pass for the entire month. If you need it to be, you can make this your only means of transportation (with the occasional cab). In this sense, transportation is actually much cheaper in NYC as opposed to the $250 Ive been spending in gas every month where I live. Thats savings of about $1,800/yr - easily a month's worth of rent. Also, if you're really trying to make ends meet the first few years, live on PB&J. A thing of bread, a jar of PB, and a jar of jam will cost you around $7-8 in NYC and it can feed you for multiple days.

Best yeah, Chicago is still unbelievably cheaper.

6/30/12

chicago is cheap, opportunities are better in nyc though

7/8/12

I think those COL calculators compare buying a 4000 sq ft house in NYC vs. buying a 4000 sq ft house e.g. in Chicago. A big house is probably going to cost ya quite a lot more in NYC but then NYCer tend to live in smaller places. Not sure but that's my assumption.

7/8/12

my own experience, grew up in ny spent the past 2 years in chi.

For comparable apartments NY is double at least, but your not going to get comparable, you would get a really nice apartment in a high rise in Chicago and share a walk up for the same $1200 in NY.

Going out for most lunches and dinners NY is a bit more expensive with the normal restaurants but WAYYY more expensive with the good restaurants, so your just not going to go in NY.

Bars and drinks in NY its way more expensive, but itll just change the caliber of bar and club you go to.

7/9/12

Partying in NYC is definitely more expensive. As other posters have said rent will be higher and good restaurants will be higher priced, but I spent almost $100 the other day for a happy hour where we each bought our own beers. I think the salary they offer you would have to be about 20% higher for NY for it to be worth it. Good luck!

7/9/12

Are there any current consultants based in NYC who could share some insights?

I am under the impression that a consultant would be out of town 4/7 days, and during these 4 days there would be no food/transportation expenses- since everything is billed to clients. Am I mistaken?

7/9/12

You will have no/little expense if you are traveling. But NYC has such a large client base, you may end up being in town. You still have to pay for rent and all the basics.

My firm does 15%+ adjustment for high cost areas like NYC.

7/9/12

You all answering questions realize that he asked the question 5 months ago, right? He likely made the decision already.

7/9/12

Don't forget NY sales tax is outrageous as well

"One should recognize reality even when one doesn't like it, indeed, especially when one doesn't like it." - Charlie Munger

7/9/12

Someone asked a question today.

7/9/12
abacab:

Someone asked a question today.

This question was posted on 2/19/12

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