...you have the ability to do what you want to do.

If you want to buy a 10,000 square foot house in the Hamptons and have 4 sports cars, then you'll need to be rich in order to "make it". However, if you want to be an Olympian, you could "make it" in life without necessarily being rich. Set your goals high, but your goals don't always have to be money-related. All you have to do is reach your goals or put yourself in a position to do what you want to do, and then you've "made it".

 

Dude I don't know, people are so liberal with the MS for the most uncontroversial shit. I guess everything is controversial these days.

heister: Look at all these wannabe richies hating on an expensive salad. https://arthuxtable.com/
 
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The answer to this is absolutely relative. It depends on culture, race, wealth background friend group, expectations, marital status, parental status,etc. A postal worker in a rural area making $20/hr may feel like they made it when most of their peers are making minimum wage or are on welfare. An over leveraged MD may feel like a failure because he rakes half a mil at a boutique while some in his analyst class he feels he's smarter than rake in millions. A neurosurgeon might feel unaccomplished because she is childless and comes from a cultural or religious background that places a premium on kids. Whereas a poor mother from a rural area might feel accomplished because her only son graduated university as the first gen student of his family.

tl. dr -- it's all relative, and there's no point to compare. Just gotta be the best version of yourself you can be.

 

This is so hard to focus on when you're surrounded by people of your same background doing 1000x better than you.

 
NoJobProspectsInSight:
This is so hard to focus on when you're surrounded by people of your same background doing 1000x better than you.

Take my advice with a grain of salt, but I'll share something that worked for me. I've always been a "striver", like I suspect the majority of this community. I have also accepted I'll never be completely content. Every achievement leaves me wanting more. So I have in no way cracked the "happiness" code or whatever. This method just helped me visualize my personal achievements and helped me gain some perspective on life when I had different setbacks while my peers seemed to progress unimpeded through life.

1- If you find that not just a couple, but the majority of the people you grew up with (similar background, upbringing etc) are more successful than you, that means that at some point in your life, you've underachieved. Could have been circumstances beyond your control, but some where you messed up. 2- Think of life as a formula 1 race or a marathon. Sure, they've passed you, maybe even lapped you, but focusing on them won't help. You'll just be reminded of how wide the gulf between you is. So the question to ask yourself is the following: where's the closest realistic point in life where you feel you can be at a level you're personally satisfied with? 3- What do you have to change about yourself to get there? 4- Establish a plan and have different milestones or checkups. Could be weeks, could be every three months, could be a year. Any incremental change will make a difference, and eventually you'll get at a point where you'll realize that the gulf between you and your friends isn't that wide anyways. 5- Put it all in perspective. if you're North American, the simple fact you get to live here already makes you more fortunate than the vast majority of the planet.

Anyways, let's say that, like I suspect most people on here, your parents were at upper middle class or at least comfortably middle class. You may have gone to private school or a good public school and made it to either a target, or at least a decent non-target/state school. Maybe you goofed up and graduated with a 2.1 GPA/no internships etc...while your friends are making 6 figures in IB or 60k+ in nice consulting or corp jobs. Your username says you have no jobs or prospects, so you probably feel envious when your mbb or deloitte friend posts an IG story of them traveling for business or something. You've applied to a bunch of similar jobs but know you have no chance.

What if instead, you took that 30k sh*tty sales job & made a plan to hustle and parlay that into an MBA in 5/6 years? Or used that experience to get a F500 job 3/4 years ahead? That'd be a more productive and more efficient way of tackling that "gap" between you and your peers, instead of sitting at home and bemoaning your situation.

tl:dr stop comparing and instead be honest with yourself, establish a roadmap, and come post a glorious humblebrag thread here in 5 years on how you made it to consulting or ib or wtver. I believe in you man, as cheesy as it sounds.

 

You're missing the point. The subjective nature of this question opens the door for a wide variety of interesting perspectives. He wasn't asking for THE answer- he was simply asking for YOUR answer.

 

You're missing the point. The subjective nature of this question opens the door for a wide variety of interesting perspectives. He wasn't asking for THE answer- he was simply asking for YOUR answer.

 

Was expecting way more facetious douchery in this thread...disappointing.

*When you make enough money that people give you props for being humble instead of calling you cheap, when you're being cheap.

*When you have enough office-clout to rock pinstripes without looking like a tryhard.

*When you can show up late to the office, without an elaborate excuse.

*When you start closing your office door to look busy so no one bothers you, when the reality is the Analysts are taking care of all the grunt work and you're just making phone calls and trolling through WSO.

*When you take the corporate card for a spin to get lunch with brokers and can order whatever you want without fear of ever having to explain the clearly unnecessarily expensive wine bottles you ordered.

*When HR knows you have more office-clout than them and becomes more concerned about you liking them than vice-versa.

*When you can say something bizarre and irrelevant and the interns will still nod their heads and vigorously jot it down into their notebooks to try and impress you.

 
<span class=keyword_link><a href=/resources/templates/excel-financial-modeling/real-estate-private-equity-template>REPE God</a></span>:
*When you can show up late to the office, without an elaborate excuse.
Ah, I made it! :)
REPE God:
*When you have enough office-clout to rock pinstripes without looking like a tryhard.
Oh, I'll never make it! :/
I have a friend who lives in the country, and it's supposed to be an hour from 42nd Street. A lie! The only thing that's an hour from 42nd Street is 43rd Street!
 

For me, it was after I got my final offer during my investment banking internship. I'd left a small town, and I remember looking around Manhattan, still a little dazed that I'd gotten my offer, and thinking about all the times I used to visit the City as a kid and dream about living here. And now I'd made it a reality through sheer work. That, to me, was huge.

I look at a lot of kids stuck at home now and they're struggling, and so for me, "making it" was getting out and being able to carve a path unlike anybody else from my hometown.

 

It's hard to define, there are a lot of factors which would need to combine for me to consider myself to have made it, the minimum being a financially comfortable, happy, and healthy family. But I think that isn't overly hard to achieve.

If we're pushing to what I would dream of - at least an 8 figure net worth, a knighthood, and being an influential figure (in any area, and no, not an influencer on Instagram)