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Cold Emailing for Internship

Mojito's picture
Rank: Senior Baboon | banana points 213

I was wondering how someone might write an email asking for internship opportunities. My school is not in the city and there are no i-banks here so I can't really set up coffee meetings. So, how would you structure your email and should I attach my resume with it?

Any help is much appreciated.

How to Cold Email for an Internship?

Cold emailing is often essential for the purposes of networking and in the case of the OP - it is critical. Below we review the process and the dos and dont's.

Finding Contacts

The first thing to note is that your first point of contact should be alumni from your school. Whether or not you come from a target school - alumni will be the semi-warm contacts who will be inclined to read your email when it hits their inbox. Find the firms where they work and start there. You can find these alumni through your career center database or through LinkedIn searching. Use the advanced search feature to look for alumni that work in the finance industry at firms you may be interested in.

When reaching out to bulge bracket banks you should start with analysts and associates from your school and then try and get passed along through that process. End every phone call by asking - "Is there anyone else that you would recommend that I speak to in order to learn more?" If there are more senior people that are alumni at the bank - talk to some junior people first if possible. This helps you develop talking points about the firm.

It is important to keep in mind that associates and up are the ones that typically can have a good amount of impact. When reaching out to smaller firms - cold emailing VPs and MDs is more likely to lead to an internship offer than emailing the analysts.

MIchael2:

Junior bankers and analysts are best to contact informally (friends of friends at social events, etc). They are great for advice to get your foot in the door, but they offer little knowledge of career trajectories or the upper workings of a firm.

Contact associates, VPs, and MDs - They are the ones that matter. They have the experience and knowledge to share, and, most importantly, they will be the ones that can help out come recruitment. Everyone you speak with at a firm will be judging you and seeing if you are a fit for the firm. If you are, then it is likely they'll put in a good word come recruitment.

Once you have the names of people that you want to reach out to look for the email formats in our company database which provides the email convention for each firm in the database.

Email Content

When cold emailing you need to strike the balance of passionate but not desperate and focus on finding a common connection that will lead to the professional getting on the phone with you. If you come from the same school your subject line should read: First Name Last Name | School Name or something to that effect.

Example Email:

Hello Linda,

I hope that this email finds you well. My name is Jamie Blankfein and I am a sophomore at XYZ University. At school I am involved in the Wildcat Trading Society at XYZ University which has led me to develop an interest in learning about Sales and Trading careers on Wall Street. If you have any availability, I would love to have the chance to get on the phone with you and learn more about your experience working at XYZ Bank. I look forward to hearing from you.

Best,
Jamie Blankfein

Cold Networking Email Timing

Not every cold networking email will lead to a response. However, you can time them so that you are more likely to receive a response. Send your cold emails during business hours and not on Mondays and Fridays if you can avoid it. Inboxes are especially full on Mondays and you don't want to get lost in the shuffle. On Fridays - people are simply trying to get out of the office so you are a very low priority.

Send your emails between a range of 10 am - 4 pm.

If you don't get a response you can email again around 7 - 10 days later. Email in a new thread and do not reference your previous email.

Resume Inclusion

Generally speaking - when cold emailing it is not advised to include your resume on the first message. This can seem to aggressive / presumptive.

jlk5500 - Real Estate Analyst:

Secondly, I wouldn't attach my resume to the first email and I certainly wouldn't make it sound like you're gunning for an internship right off the bat, that can be a turn off to a lot of people. I think you'll have better luck setting up a general phone call for a discussion of the "industry" and their experience etc., hit them with the idea of emailing your resume while on the call.

However, user @cartman, a corporate finance manager, offers a different perspective:

cartman - Corporate Finance Manager:

I would definitely attach it. I've had people forward my resume to other people that could help without ever responding to my initial email. Don't know if that would've happened if they didn't have my resume to look at in the first email.

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Inside the WSO Finance networking guide, you'll get a comprehensive, all-inclusive roadmap for maximizing your networking efforts (and minimizing embarrassing blunders). This info-rich book is packed with 71 pages of detailed strategies to help you get the most of your networking, including cold emailing templates, questions to ask in interviews, and action steps for success in navigating the Wall Street networking process.

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Comments (465)

May 26, 2014

Here's something you will only realize as you get older... these types of emails are much more effective if they are brief and less formal (but still professional). Its definitely an art and something rarely seen from a kid still in college. It can really separate you from everyone else if you can pull it off.

Learn More

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May 26, 2014
Mr.Magau:

Here's something you will only realize as you get older... these types of emails are much more effective if they are brief and less formal (but still professional). Its definitely an art and something rarely seen from a kid still in college. It can really separate you from everyone else if you can pull it off.

I want to try this approach, but I find it hard to keep it brief because I feel compelled to give them a reason to email me back. I.e. stating some achievements/skills.

May 26, 2014

Good instinct, but try something like this...

"Good morning, I am a junior at Target University and I am very interested in pursuing a career in investment banking once I graduate. Would you possibly have time for a quick call sometime over the next couple of weeks to discuss potential internship opportunities at your firm this summer? I have outlined a few of my relevant skills and experiences below to provide some insight. Thank you for your time, it is much appreciated.

*I've built a business from the ground up and then sold it for a healthy profit (40 employees).
*I have a robust knowledge of accounting and I can build financial/valuation models quickly and accurately
*Some other sentence that communicates motivation."

May 26, 2014
Mr.Magau:

Good instinct, but try something like this...

"Good morning, I am a junior at Target University and I am very interested in pursuing a career in investment banking once I graduate. Would you possibly have time for a quick call sometime over the next couple of weeks to discuss potential internship opportunities at your firm this summer? I have outlined a few of my relevant skills and experiences below to provide some insight. Thank you for your time, it is much appreciated.

*I've built a business from the ground up and then sold it for a healthy profit (40 employees).

*I have a robust knowledge of accounting and I can build financial/valuation models quickly and accurately

*Some other sentence that communicates motivation."

Hey Magau! I really like this format, but isnt it slightly weird to state bullet points in an email?

May 26, 2014

In typical formatting yes, bullet points are quite weird, but at the end of the day, at least for me, I wouldn't care! Essentially, the bullet points are easy for me to glance over and understand (and thats all I want from an email like this: MAKE IT EASY ON ME). The bullet points are like a pseudo resume without me actually having to read a full resume. I may even just glance at the bullet points after I glaze over the part about "internship opportunities".

May 26, 2014
Mr.Magau:

In typical formatting yes, bullet points are quite weird, but at the end of the day, at least for me, I wouldn't care! Essentially, the bullet points are easy for me to glance over and understand (and thats all I want from an email like this: MAKE IT EASY ON ME). The bullet points are like a pseudo resume without me actually having to read a full resume. I may even just glance at the bullet points after I glaze over the part about "internship opportunities".

Yeah thanks this is good advice.

Also, I was considering attaching a pitchbook I made for national investment banking competition to give them a sample of my work. I think this may reassure them that I wont require as much training as other potential interns. What do you guys think?

May 26, 2014

Going to use this email template over the summer!

May 26, 2014

I'm a bit curious, if you were able to have 40 full time employees for the business you sold, why are you still in college and want to do banking haha? I'm just thinking, 40 employees for a white collar business would prob sell for in the millions

May 26, 2014
packmate:

I'm a bit curious, if you were able to have 40 full time employees for the business you sold, why are you still in college and want to do banking haha? I'm just thinking, 40 employees for a white collar business would prob sell for in the millions

I'm a general contractor. I do mostly residential and commercial renovation contracts. The thing is that its seasonal so you lose lots of your employees during winter and also there is only about 10-15% of annual sales that are recurrent. In other words, every year you need to redo all the work to get back to the same revenue. This type of business only sells for a decent amount after being active for 10-15 years, where you don't need to cold call/canvass anymore to generate revenue. It was sold near a 1x EV/EBITDA multiple.

May 26, 2014

Your English is quite poor in my opinion. There are small changes you could implement which would make your email read much more smoothly. I have rewritten your email with these changes in brackets (I don't know how to do bold etc.). I would also adopt the changes SSits has made.

Hello X,

My name is John Doe, I am a sophomore finance student currently studying at Target Uni with a very high strong interest in pursuing a career in investment banking. I'm emailing you today to inquiry (inquire) about any (remove any) potential internship opportunities at your firm.

I understand (that) you are very busy and must get these types (this type) of emails (change to singular) fairly often (comma) so I will try and (to) keep this email short.

I have a very unconventional background, which involves starting a business from scratch during university, building it up to 40 employees and then selling it. However, I assure you (am confident) that I have the modeling skill set (skills), knowledge about (of) finance and drive required to fulfill (succeed in) the role of an analyst (an analyst role and add value to your firm) (full stop) and I believe I could add value to your firm. (Remove all of this) I would be grateful if you (would) allowed (allow) me the opportunity to further present myself by phone or in person.

Thank you in advance and I hope to hear from you soon.

Best regards,

May 26, 2014

It's a numbers game, so good on you for casting a wide net. However, be careful that you don't fire emails out too quick and leave in another company's name, etc. you'll obviously get dinged immediately. It happens more frequently than you'd think. Best of luck.

May 26, 2014

Come to think of it, the whole tone of the email is wrong. You seem to mix casual with formal. You should do one or the other, and if you opt for the latter, then it needs to be significantly better than it currently is. If you try to be formal and don't pull it off, you look like a clown. Frankly, your English is not good enough for formal in my opinion, so I would not take this approach if I were you.

Something that really annoys me is your use of the word "however". It implies that you would make a good analyst in spite of your achievement in business, as if it is some sort of hindrance. If you had been building schools in Africa or working for Greenpeace, I could see how the use of the word "However" might be appropriate as you would have been very far removed from the corporate world, but in this case, it's not appropriate at all.

Further, as someone else has already pointed out, studying finance and starting a business in university doesn't really qualify as an unconventional background.

Perhaps worth taking Mr Magau's advice on this one. Casual but professional.

Good morning X,

I came across your details on XXX and wanted to get in touch.

I'm an aspiring investment banker studying XXX at XXX, and I was hoping that you might be able to spare a few minutes of your time for a chat, as I'm particularly interested in your sector and would be very grateful for some career advice from you.

Many thanks,

That might not work on Mr Magau, but it would work on me.

May 26, 2014
Ironuts:

Come to think of it, the whole tone of the email is wrong. You seem to mix casual with formal. You should do one or the other, and if you opt for the latter, then it needs to be significantly better than it currently is. If you try to be formal and don't pull it off, you look like a clown. Frankly, your English is not good enough for formal in my opinion, so I would not take this approach if I were you.

I agree with you, I think I should try and make it more casual.

May 26, 2014

So now that Im in a position to receive cold emails I have received ~5 in the last couple weeks. I never did a template, and after getting a template cold email I hit delete. Have something in common with me or at least look at my linkedin and say something personal. Or just something to sound normal. Also keep it sweet. Bankers are professional bullshitters and turn off as soon as they see it (at least me and my circle of friends in IB). We may be the exception though

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May 26, 2014

Hey!

I figured I'd give you guys feedback, considering you have helped me out quite a bit! After about 20 emails, I got my first interview (kinda). I cold emailed the CEO of a PE firm and he replied to give him a call on monday. I'm fairly excited and going to prepare as if it was an interview! I had a quick question regarding this.. when I sent the email I called him by his first name, so I am guessing when I talk to him on the phone I do the same?

Thanks!!

May 26, 2014
takenotes08:

Hey!

I figured I'd give you guys feedback, considering you have helped me out quite a bit! After about 20 emails, I got my first interview (kinda). I cold emailed the CEO of a PE firm and he replied to give him a call on monday. I'm fairly excited and going to prepare as if it was an interview! I had a quick question regarding this.. when I sent the email I called him by his first name, so I am guessing when I talk to him on the phone I do the same?

Thanks!!

yeah, also, don't take this harshly, but keep sending emails. When I was hunting for my first internship, I had MANY initial phone calls.

May 26, 2014
Loki777:
takenotes08:

Hey!

I figured I'd give you guys feedback, considering you have helped me out quite a bit! After about 20 emails, I got my first interview (kinda). I cold emailed the CEO of a PE firm and he replied to give him a call on monday. I'm fairly excited and going to prepare as if it was an interview! I had a quick question regarding this.. when I sent the email I called him by his first name, so I am guessing when I talk to him on the phone I do the same?

Thanks!!

yeah, also, don't take this harshly, but keep sending emails. When I was hunting for my first internship, I had MANY initial phone calls.

How do these cold calls playout? Like do I elevator pitch him when I call him?

May 26, 2014

I reply to every person who reaches out to me. But I must say. I'm not a fan of multiparagraph emails. This template is basically a one sided convo and will make a person develop a view or opinion of you. May be positive, may be negative, may be righr or may be wayyy off base. Emails can often be read and interpretted in different ways. I pesonally use e-r semtences asking chat to learn more about the industry and get some advice. Again just my opinion, long form is obviously working for you

May 26, 2014

Also, meant to add.. Keep up the hustle and don't give up. All you need is 1 yes.

May 26, 2014

BS in Commerce? @takenotes08lol you go to UVA, dont you?

May 26, 2014

Awesome post, could not agree more. It doesn't happen too often but whenever I get an e-mail or Linked-In message from a college kid or someone looking for advice I always try to help. Can't just take and not give something back.

Give me a kid whose smart, poor, and hungry...............

May 26, 2014

Awesome post @Nefarious- +1

I've always appreciated the people who have tried to help me along my way and will continue to appreciate those who help me get where I am truly going to be happy. I have no doubt I will do what I can for the people who reach out to me in the future.

May 26, 2014

Nefarious, Thanks for posting this on the site as I feel like that is what has been going on with me and some of the newcomers. I find it interesting that those who are new that are looking for guidance or a mentor or simply some help are brushed aside. When I stumbled onto this site, that is what I thought it was, a place where to get advice, help, or a mentor. Not a place to brushed aside. I would have expected a experienced professional to be exactly that, a professional. If I was in such a position, I would give back. I still hope to be able to contribute to this site in giving back when I reach that position.

When life hands you lemons, make lemonade

May 26, 2014

Absolutely love this post! Thanks @Nefarious for posting..Such a great reminder to us all! Life is like a wheel that keeps rolling, sometimes you're on top, other times you're at the bottom, but you never know when you will hit rock bottom.

May 26, 2014
Mr.BananaB:

Nefarious, Thanks for posting this on the site as I feel like that is what has been going on with me and some of the newcomers. I find it interesting that those who are new that are looking for guidance or a mentor or simply some help are brushed aside. When I stumbled onto this site, that is what I thought it was, a place where to get advice, help, or a mentor. Not a place to brushed aside. I would have expected a experienced professional to be exactly that, a professional. If I was in such a position, I would give back. I still hope to be able to contribute to this site in giving back when I reach that position.

The thing about WSO is each user plays an evolutionary type role, if you will. Most people come here seeking help and looking for guidance, such as yourself, until they can evolve to a point where they are giving the advice and guidance.

Take what you learn here and apply it to the real world. Eventually you will build your network, make your contacts, sharpen your skills and find your path. Don't get discouraged.

Unfortunately, a lot of the "professionals" you will encounter sat through some of the most booming periods in our country's economy and were able to ride that wave to success - they don't realize how difficult it truly has been for younger generations and don't care to sympathize unless you have something that can greatly benefit them.

That is really what sparked my wanting to write this piece - to remind everyone what they had to do or are currently having to do to get to where they want to be and to not forget that once they are sitting on the power side of the desk.

    • 1
May 26, 2014

Good stuff Nefarious, definitely been a long ride for me since I joined WSO.

The HBS guys have MAD SWAGGER. They frequently wear their class jackets to boston bars, strutting and acting like they own the joint. They just ooze success, confidence, swagger, basically attributes of alpha males.

May 26, 2014

Great post. I've heard this sentiment a lot from alumni that I have reached out to over the past few months. You never know where people are going to be in 5-10 years from now, and it might just turn out that the person you helped may be in a position to help you down the line. Definitely good karma and look forward to hopefully assisting as many people as I can when I'm in a position to do so.

May 26, 2014

Agreed. You never know who you'll meet and who you can potentially learn from by responding to these e-mails too.

Who knows? Maybe you'll share some similar hobbies/interests, perhaps they'll be in a great position to help you out 5 years down the line.

May 26, 2014

What if no one ever helped me in my past and had to do everything on my own to get to where I am? I tried networking, cold calling and all of that but got rejected, ignored, and fell flat every time. I guess I'm a bit bitter about this and not sure if I can relate to this thread

May 26, 2014

PM me.

May 26, 2014

I'm not trying to be a dick or anything, but...

If you really have had to do everything on your own than you should take a good, long hard look at the people you are trying to associate yourself with and/or yourself and how you present yourself. Even in an industry filled with a great deal of narcissistic assholes there are a ton of great people who are willing to go above and beyond for young guys.

    • 1
May 26, 2014

@cass I've been there too. I think the best way of seeing it is that you have the opportunity of doing for someone what you would have liked to receive but never got the chance (lets say you couldn't find your Harvey).
One small note: Networking is also making it on your own. I come from a small city in a country in LatAm, moved to Europe for a Masters and had to make a name of my own and build contacts and friends. Nobody gave me anything for free, looked after every opportunity I got. And along the way I got advice and TIME from amazing people.
Is true that without me trying I wouldn't have got anything; but without their willingness to help and mentor I definitely wouldnt have either.
Just think about it as if you could make someones' life better and how much you would have liked if someone did it to you! Now you have the chance!

May 26, 2014
cass:

What if no one ever helped me in my past and had to do everything on my own to get to where I am? I tried networking, cold calling and all of that but got rejected, ignored, and fell flat every time. I guess I'm a bit bitter about this and not sure if I can relate to this thread

So by all means, do nothing to change the way the game is played.

May 26, 2014
cass:

What if no one ever helped me in my past and had to do everything on my own to get to where I am? I tried networking, cold calling and all of that but got rejected, ignored, and fell flat every time. I guess I'm a bit bitter about this and not sure if I can relate to this thread

This is me

May 26, 2014

I think there's a lot of karma in maintaining the bridge that you crossed.

That said, I wasn't from a target and I wasn't a fast talking networker. So the bridge I crossed was a different one. I got in because I was a decent programmer and I got a set of fair interviewers who didn't have a prior view about coders from state schools. And I got a fair FO hiring manager on an internal transfer who saw I knew my stuff and did a good job in analytics.

If you crossed a different bridge into banking or the FO, karma dictates you keep that bridge working, rather than someone else's bridge. It's great to help people who send you cold emails, but not at the expense of your bridge.

    • 1
May 26, 2014

+1 and I firmly believe in "what comes around, goes around". I got my career break from a guy who became my mentor - still good friends to this day. If a cold email sounds intelligent, has potential and an touch of humility, I will give the guy the benefit of the doubt.

May 26, 2014

Amazing post. Definitely agree with everything.

As a college student at a non-core school about to go through the recruitment process this fall, I have truly appreciated all the people I have reached out to that have actually responded and been willing to help me out. These people are what is keeping the industry alive with a resemblance of humanity; without these people this industry would be completely cutthroat and inhumane.

Coming from a very modest background, I definitely agree with giving back. Even though I have yet to even get a summer analyst position yet, I have helped out the freshmen and sophomores who ask me for advice and tips on how to position themselves.

I tell myself everyday that when I am successful in the future, all the people that have helped me without expecting anything in return will be greatly benefited.

May 26, 2014

These are all great points and are the ones that should be focused on, but from a more selfish standpoint, it is still good to help college kids. That college kid might just need a boost or a recommendation to secure a job. After two or three years when he/she leaves for PE, HF, etc., that is a contact you have at the PE, HF, etc. shop. Even my MD takes time to network with kids who e-mail him.

May 26, 2014

Fantastic post. A few months ago I shared my story about how WallStreetOasis and unintentional networking has bolstered my career over the last six years. Anecdotal evidence that what Nefarious says is absolutely true. Here is the link: http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/blog/how-wso-has-en...

One thing to note though, particularly for the people that are having a hard time relating to this post, is that sometimes it can be very difficult to help everyone that reaches out to you. For those of us on this website who are active, we often get bombarded with messages from folks looking for advice. It takes a lot of time to give each person meaningful attention. If you want to minimize the amount of rejections you get, you need to put effort into each cold-email / cold-call you make. For example, today I met up live with a WSO member for an hour because he sent me a very personalized email that referenced the time we spoke at the WSO conference and demonstrated he was listening. Meanwhile, I got a PM this morning from a guy looking to meet up during his trip to NY. It isn't hard for anyone that has read my posts to know that I don't live in NY, have never worked in NY, and have purposely never applied to a job in NY. While I did respond to him, I'm certainty not going to go out of my way to help him out (sorry if you're reading this bud). I don't mean to derail this thread with networking advice, but I don't want folks to think that people who don't answer their cold-emails / cold-calls are selfish and unwilling to help others.

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May 26, 2014

@CompBanker

Thanks for posting that link - I must have missed it at some point. Good read.

May 26, 2014
Simple As...:

I'm not trying to be a dick or anything, but...

If you really have had to do everything on your own than you should take a good, long hard look at the people you are trying to associate yourself with and/or yourself and how you present yourself. Even in an industry filled with a great deal of narcissistic assholes there are a ton of great people who are willing to go above and beyond for young guys.

Oh, not at all. People mentored me. But they approached me. They were so outgoing with their generosity that I didn't have to ask- I wouldn't have asked- I wouldn't have wanted to impose- but I am extremely glad they helped me.

Likewise, I found my mentees. They were usually the quietly competent people.

If you went out of your way to ask people for help, and they helped you, you need to pass on the favor to other people who ask you for help.

If you didn't go out of your way to ask people for help, but people helped you because they were good people and they figured you could benefit from it, you owe the world the same kind of help.

I ultimately didn't need to annoy people. I still got help- I am still incredibly grateful for that help. Karma means something different for everyone- and we all have to help people on the road behind us, but we have to maintain the bridges we crossed.

May 26, 2014

First post on WSO, but thought this was appropriate (and I believe this is what many of you are alluding to):

An old man going a lone highway,
Came, at the evening cold and gray,
To a chasm vast and deep and wide.
Through which was flowing a sullen tide
The old man crossed in the twilight dim,
The sullen stream had no fear for him;
But he turned when safe on the other side
And built a bridge to span the tide.

"Old man," said a fellow pilgrim near,
"You are wasting your strength with building here;
Your journey will end with the ending day,
You never again will pass this way;
You've crossed the chasm, deep and wide,
Why build this bridge at evening tide?"

The builder lifted his old gray head;
"Good friend, in the path I have come," he said,
"There followed after me to-day
A youth whose feet must pass this way.
This chasm that has been as naught to me
To that fair-haired youth may a pitfall be;
He, too, must cross in the twilight dim;
Good friend, I am building this bridge for him!"

May 26, 2014

Great post op!

May 26, 2014

I am currently in the process of cold-emailing and calling and I can only hope every person who receives my emails/calls has the same outlook as you. Awesome post, gives me even more hope that there are more people out there like you.

May 26, 2014

This goes both ways as well... I had a kid recently (intern at a boutique bank, still a college student) on LinkedIn email me regarding a time to chat about my experience with my bank. I casually responded, asking him if he was interested in changing his current field of finance to mine because they are vastly different but that I was open to chatting if he was, in fact, interested... I replied with a decent length email asking a few questions, etc... he has since re-viewed my profile and ignored my email (no reply, week later). In my mind, I've now written this kid off completely. The courteous thing to do would be to kindly respond, thanking me for my response but that in the interest of not wasting each other's time, he'll now pass (or whatever). Just because I don't work in a certain field, doesn't mean I don't know others who do... he just burnt a bridge, in my opinion. Don't do that.

May 26, 2014

Great post Nefarious... Starting to cold call/email you could only hope to be able to get in contact with somebody that has that mind set and will help give you some direction on how to land that dream job.

May 26, 2014

I think it's worth mentioning that you don't have to be an "experienced professional" to pay it forward. With the exception of the guy at the end of the line, there's always someone behind you on the progression line that could use your help. Some merit it, some don't. But if you're a first year and a raw, clueless college kid asks for advice the same way you did, it's a great opportunity to pay it back. I think of all the fluke/opportunistic/surprising help I've received along the way in just two years, and I'm deeply inclined to help the next person.

Great post.

May 26, 2014

I owe my success to my alumni who are very loyal to my alma mater. I now help kids at my target (duke, brown, Dartmouth, Yale) and even a bunch of non target kids cos I just love doing that. Give back as much as possible and you will get rewarded someday.

May 26, 2014
ChiTown82:

This goes both ways as well... I had a kid recently (intern at a boutique bank, still a college student) on LinkedIn email me regarding a time to chat about my experience with my bank. I casually responded, asking him if he was interested in changing his current field of finance to mine because they are vastly different but that I was open to chatting if he was, in fact, interested... I replied with a decent length email asking a few questions, etc... he has since re-viewed my profile and ignored my email (no reply, week later). In my mind, I've now written this kid off completely. The courteous thing to do would be to kindly respond, thanking me for my response but that in the interest of not wasting each other's time, he'll now pass (or whatever). Just because I don't work in a certain field, doesn't mean I don't know others who do... he just burnt a bridge, in my opinion. Don't do that.

Just to play devil's advocate, that college kid might have just been intimidated by your questions. He/she might be thinking "Oh, shit. I do not know any of that, so I will just not reply to avoid looking like an ignorant fool."

May 26, 2014

Awesome post

The purest form of giving is anonymous to anonymous..

May 26, 2014

Nefarious, thank you very much for this thread. I'm sure you'll get your Mike soon brotha! Great episode Wed too lol. Also, Great under quote. +1

" The art of good business is being a good middle man" - Eddie Temple (Layer Cake)

May 26, 2014
Kiron:
ChiTown82:

This goes both ways as well... I had a kid recently (intern at a boutique bank, still a college student) on LinkedIn email me regarding a time to chat about my experience with my bank. I casually responded, asking him if he was interested in changing his current field of finance to mine because they are vastly different but that I was open to chatting if he was, in fact, interested... I replied with a decent length email asking a few questions, etc... he has since re-viewed my profile and ignored my email (no reply, week later). In my mind, I've now written this kid off completely. The courteous thing to do would be to kindly respond, thanking me for my response but that in the interest of not wasting each other's time, he'll now pass (or whatever). Just because I don't work in a certain field, doesn't mean I don't know others who do... he just burnt a bridge, in my opinion. Don't do that.

Just to play devil's advocate, that college kid might have just been intimidated by your questions. He/she might be thinking "Oh, shit. I do not know any of that, so I will just not reply to avoid looking like an ignorant fool."

Solid point - but I tried to not come off with that message... I left it completely open for him to reply and/or hop on a call to chat if he was interested in learning about a sector that he may have previously not considered or had exposure to in his current internship/education. Oh well, to each their own.

May 26, 2014

Thanks for the post!

As someone who is still cold-calling and emailing random people, I have had fairly limited success so far. However, the few people who have reached back have been extremely helpful. This post does give some insight to that.

May 26, 2014

Great Post! I am going to be a senior at a Non-Target, but have landed my previous and current internships through cold calling! (Most of us college students are looking for our Harvey!)

May 26, 2014

I see you watch Suits?

May 26, 2014

Why can't we delete comments?

May 26, 2014

Very nice.

First break came from fellow non-target alum who'd made it through 7 rounds of layoffs as an analyst. Hooked me up with phone number of another alum who was the Chairman of a BB. Cold-called him; answered himself and told me he'd see me if I could be there in 15 minutes. Got in front of him with a resume for 45 seconds; three weeks later, I had a BB Street internship. Changed my life.

Since then, I've done IB, VC, and now CF. Every lever up has been relationship-based. I've proven myself once I was in the door, but those doors open from the inside.

One of the most satisfying things in the world is being the one to open that door for someone.

    • 2
May 26, 2014

Great points, thank you for posting!

"Sorrowful and great is the artist's destiny."

- Moi

May 26, 2014

Thank you for posting such brilliant article. I feel exactly same when one or two professionals throw me back a email or Linked message; it is like treasure to me to read it, understand it and cautiously write it back. I just graduate from school and really appreciate some people, who can really offer advice and give me a hand at this moment. It is so inspiring to read post like this on WSO. It is admitted when some professional see your email or message, they believe you are asking for a job and would politely reply that they dont have any; this is very frustrating but better than nothing still. I did have met a few people who would like to share their thoughts and look at me as a kid giving me some suggestions. Wish more professional people could share their successful stories with us and give people like me more guidance and tips.

May 26, 2014

Some very good points are raised.

What most people seem to fail to realize is that these correspondances and random encounters may develop into future mutually beneficial business relationships.

May 26, 2014

Thank you for writing this. I am currently studying for my actuary exams and had a few setbacks in my college career at stony brook. You have no idea how much encouragement this has given me. Thank you for keeping my fire still burning.

May 26, 2014

This was a great post - thanks!

May 26, 2014

great post. my take as a potential cold caller is...most times we give up after the 99th rejection just when the next was going to be answered.

there is no truth! it's just your word against the next guy's.

May 26, 2014

thank you for this post, Nefarious. You just gave me more motivation to send out cold emails.

May 26, 2014

Glad I could push you to keep going

May 26, 2014

Good stuff.

May 26, 2014

SB+1

May 26, 2014

Also never underestimate the power of any type of connection. I had decent success with alumni of my mostly non-target but I got my first break through someone I met once through a hobby. I realized he was group head at a BB and after speaking with him once arraigned to meet with him. He took me to lunch and started the ball rolling for me to get into their last round of interviews.

May 26, 2014

When I was an intern, some guy cold emailed me asking me about the job, tips for the interviews and so on. I replied accordingly and he never emailed me back, didn't even bother to apply either. Kind of frustrating because some people that cold e-mails doesn't really care about you taking the time to reply.

May 26, 2014

Great topic and I definitely agree.

I can sympathize with WaccaWacca above. A few college kids cold email me, I respond back to set up a time to chat, and they just go ghost. It's definitely frustrating and makes me think less positively of them.

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May 26, 2014

If you were applying to established companies with structured internship programs, then saying you want an "unpaid" job is like saying "I'm not good enough to compete with the rest, but I will do it for free".

Or your email is not good. Too long, too vague, one-out-of-thousands.

May 26, 2014

Hey bud,

Just wrote a thread on this, might be helpful: http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/no-alumni-in...
PM if you have any questions.

May 26, 2014

Also, re: my link, read the section on "background info", i.e. who to email.

May 26, 2014

It all depends on your targets. Are they BB, MM, etc? You need to research the firms before you just shoot out calls and emails. Like the first response said, if they have structured internship programs, then you're not going to accomplish anything by cold calling them. Focus on regional firms and you will see your success rate skyrocket. That's what I did and it worked wonders. "Hi, I'm calling to inquire about possible internship opportunities at _____" The receptionist will then transfer you to whoever handles that process. If you get a voicemail, hang up and call back again later in the day or the next day. Be persistent.

May 26, 2014

The way you are approaching may be bad, email may be too long, methods may be too confusing. PM me, I was able to break into IB cold emailing and cold calling

May 26, 2014

Im actually targeting MMs and foreign firm, in which some of them I know they don't have structured internships. Thanx all for your insights though! I guess mentioning the word "unpaid" was a bad idea. Puts me in an "underdog" position after all. Any further advice would be appreciated. Thanx!!

May 26, 2014

dont ask for unpaid internship opportunities in your initial cold email. ask to speak with someone and learn more about their role in the firm/how they got there, more about themselves etc. build at least a little bit of a relationship before inquiring about potential internships

May 26, 2014

Thanx leveRAGE, got that quite clearly now. Imma try another 100 or so emails, this time asking for "advice" not internship.

May 26, 2014

Hey, I recently started using a strategy that seems to be working better than random cold emails for non-alums - I search on google the position I want, my city and linkedin. Then I stalk (let's just be honest here) these people's linkedin profiles and look at where they did past relevant internships in my city. I then target these firms in my cold-emails. My reasoning is this: firms that have had experience with interns tend to be more receptive to taking in new interns either because they realized how useful having smeone there to do all the grunt-work is, because they have a system in place for interns, or quite possibly both.

May 26, 2014

Thanx Lily, thats quite a good idea. I should try that :)

May 26, 2014

I did exactly what Lily suggested and received an internship last year. Works well!

May 26, 2014

yes. troll?

May 26, 2014
May 26, 2014
May 26, 2014

keep working hard! make sure to personalize

"To achieve satisfactory investment results is easier than most people realize; to achieve superior results is harder than it looks."
--Benjamin Graham

B.K.

May 26, 2014

sounds like he doesnt really want to connect.. give it one more shot, if no reply move on. BX/LAZ/PWP is extremely tough unless you are from a target

May 26, 2014

What's the success in this?

May 26, 2014

This is just sounds like a courtesy "leave me alone"

May 26, 2014

Isn't it already late in recruiting?

May 26, 2014

Do both. You'll have a much better chance talking to individuals than just sending around a resume. Also, I hope you're looking at more than just one company. You need a backup plan. Talk to friends and relatives. Someone must know somebody in PWM, and your chances will be much better if you're introduced by a mutual contact.

May 26, 2014

You're not really asking or telling the recipient of the email for the internship. Its more notifying him of your plans. Some jackass might point you in the direction of another crappy internship just because you didnt explicitly ask for the internship where you sent the email.

I would integrate that into your email and you should be fine.

    • 1
May 26, 2014
FinancialNoviceII:

You're not really asking or telling the recipient of the email for the internship. Its more notifying him of your plans. Some jackass might point you in the direction of another crappy internship just because you didnt explicitly ask for the internship where you sent the email.

I would integrate that into your email and you should be fine.

Thanks bud, really appreciated.

May 26, 2014

Presumably they are in your geographical region (since you're looking for a fall internship, during which time you'll also be in school), so you should ask if people are willing to meet up or chat on the phone about their firm and how you can position yourself to interview for an internship with them.

If you don't explicitly ask them for something, you're more likely to get ignored.

May 26, 2014

"For the upcoming fall semester I was hoping to find an internship in investment banking to learn more about the field as well as gain some experience" ---> :For the upcoming fall semester I was hoping to find an internship in investment banking to learn more about the field." Well... duh, you want to gain experience and then go into I-Banking.

you should ask if people are willing to meet up or chat on the phone about their firm and how you can position yourself to interview for an internship with them.

If you don't explicitly ask them for something, you're more likely to get ignored.

Bingo. Make it seem like an informational interview instead of plainly saying, "Hi, I'm a random person and I want and internship, please!", especially if you're emailing someone specific.

May 26, 2014

Contact the alumni via email, not LinkedIn. Tell him you'd like to speak to him over the phone or meet in person to learn more about his career path and to learn more about the industry. Ask if they are looking for interns. He will most likely send in your resume and maybe give you a hand in getting an interview.
Do not email all the bankers there, you don't want to be a nuisance.

May 26, 2014

Thanks for the input, I only have 19 days until the application deadline so I'll try his email tomorrow. If it's not the right format and the email doesn't go through, should I still try to contact him over the phone or in person since you said LinkedIn is a no? I feel like I make a better impression in person than over the phone, so I would be more apt to try to walk in there and ask if he's free for coffee sometime.

May 26, 2014

If it's the wrong format it should bounce back and you can try again. If you have the format and his name it shouldn't be a problem. I'd personally go for the phone call and ask for a meeting. Walking is a bit too assertive and he may not even be in/busy.

May 26, 2014

Alright thanks for clearing it all up.

May 26, 2014

What's in it for them and what you bring to the table that makes you better than everyone else. Send more emails.

May 26, 2014

oh ok thanks

May 26, 2014

I would say it depends. I recently secured mine through a friend of a family member so it was rather informal. I'm guessing you have no prior contact with the individual so I'd say to establish a relationship if you have the time. So, I would email the person asking if they can spare a few minutes to talk in person or over the phone about the industry. If they agree, then meet with them, follow up after with a thank you and then ask about the internship. They are more inclined to help you out if they have met you before and have a good impression.

May 26, 2014

Perhaps spin it and say you wanted some more information and didn't want to formally apply yet? You could also be direct. If you feel you won't get it through the normal process than the worst that could happen would be the MD also saying no.

May 26, 2014

"Hi my name is X, I'm a student at X, and I was wondering if there were any internship opportunities available."

If they say no, be persistent--> so when do they typically open up?

If there is no internships--> I have previous experience in X and I also taught myself how to compose financial models, so the learning curve won't be as steep.

If they still say no--> ask for the person's name and email should anything pop up and shoot them an e-mail with your resume

May 26, 2014

If you haven't talked to him since that email, tell him you've graduated, what you've been up to and what you are looking to do. Since he told you to follow up, I would definitely ask him about any opportunities at the firm.

Prospective Banker. Gentleman. Bodybuilder.

    • 1
May 26, 2014

Thanks for your opinion. I'll do that!

May 26, 2014

Ask for a call, or a meeting if you're in town.

    • 1
May 26, 2014
Phyifer:

Hi everyone,

I'm currently in the process of networking my way into investment banking. I got this email from an MD that I cold emailed 4 months ago.

"you certainly have an impressive resume - unfortunately, we have already filled a summer intern position for this year - I wish you the best in your search - best regards"

"feel free to follow up - we are not a high growth shop and do anticipate any near to mid-term hires, but it never hurts to check!"

Now, I graduated. Should I email him asking for new opportunities directly or should I request for a call to chat or something to increase my possibilities to land an interview? Any comments are appreciated! Thank you.

Good lord yes you should contact him.

Hit him up for coffee or a phone call and "ask his advice." If he has openings, part of his advice will be "apply here." If he doesn't, and likes you, he could refer you elsewhere too.

    • 1
May 26, 2014
CRE:
Phyifer:

Hi everyone,

I'm currently in the process of networking my way into investment banking. I got this email from an MD that I cold emailed 4 months ago.

"you certainly have an impressive resume - unfortunately, we have already filled a summer intern position for this year - I wish you the best in your search - best regards"

"feel free to follow up - we are not a high growth shop and do anticipate any near to mid-term hires, but it never hurts to check!"

Now, I graduated. Should I email him asking for new opportunities directly or should I request for a call to chat or something to increase my possibilities to land an interview? Any comments are appreciated! Thank you.

Good lord yes you should contact him.

Hit him up for coffee or a phone call and "ask his advice." If he has openings, part of his advice will be "apply here." If he doesn't, and likes you, he could refer you elsewhere too.

CRE, Thanks for your great comments. Since the MD and me are in the different cities, perhaps a call is the only choice by far. Although I have my own script of cold email and networking email, I'm still a little intense when it comes to email like this one. So what do you suggest me to say in the follow-up email and what to be talked about over the phone? Thanks!

May 26, 2014
CRE:
Phyifer:

Hi everyone,

I'm currently in the process of networking my way into investment banking. I got this email from an MD that I cold emailed 4 months ago.

"you certainly have an impressive resume - unfortunately, we have already filled a summer intern position for this year - I wish you the best in your search - best regards"

"feel free to follow up - we are not a high growth shop and do anticipate any near to mid-term hires, but it never hurts to check!"

Now, I graduated. Should I email him asking for new opportunities directly or should I request for a call to chat or something to increase my possibilities to land an interview? Any comments are appreciated! Thank you.

Good lord yes you should contact him.

Hit him up for coffee or a phone call and "ask his advice." If he has openings, part of his advice will be "apply here." If he doesn't, and likes you, he could refer you elsewhere too.

Do this. My goodness please do what @CRE is telling you to do.

"My caddie's chauffeur informs me that a bank is a place where people put money that isn't properly invested."

    • 1
May 26, 2014

Thanks a lot! I'll do that!

May 26, 2014

@CRE is spot on. Try and take him out for a coffee. At the very least, guys like him are typically plugged in and might be able to help you elsewhere.

    • 1
May 26, 2014

Thanks a lot Nefarious! Your comments give me some hope! What do you suggest me to write in the follow-up email and what to be talked about over the phone?

May 26, 2014

DO NOT EMAIL HIM!!! He politely told you to fuck off.

Are you fucking serious?! Does your mom dress you in the morning too?

    • 2
May 26, 2014

Thanks a lot for your opinion! Would you mind letting me know what kind of email I should expect as a positive response to my cold email other than an formal interview invitation?

May 26, 2014
BreakingInDamnIt:

DO NOT EMAIL HIM!!! He politely told you to fuck off.

Are you fucking serious?! Does your mom dress you in the morning too?

"feel free to follow up - we are not a high growth shop and do anticipate any near to mid-term hires, but it never hurts to check!"

How is that telling someone to fuck off?

    • 1
May 26, 2014

Follow up with an email, but don't ask yes/no response questions. Be smart about it and make sure you can have a sit down with him/her and then take it from there.

G'luck

"Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a Champion" - Muhammad Ali

May 26, 2014
pacman007:

Follow up with an email, but don't ask yes/no response questions. Be smart about it and make sure you can have a sit down with him/her and then take it from there.

G'luck

Thank you very much for the suggestion. Unfortunately, a call is the only choice that I'm able to do since we are in the different cities. What do you suggest me to write in the follow-up email and what to talk about over the phone? I'm a little intense about this.

May 26, 2014

The goal is to get yourself in front of him, whether it's a formal interview or just for a coffee. Based on his response, the door is still open, so give him an update & get him to agree for a meet, even if it's just 15-30 minutes. GL

May 26, 2014
Red Barchetta:

The goal is to get yourself in front of him, whether it's a formal interview or just for a coffee. Based on his response, the door is still open, so give him an update & get him to agree for a meet, even if it's just 15-30 minutes. GL

Thank you so much for the suggestion. I'll definitely do that. Since I can only choose to call due to the long distance, what do you suggest me to write in the follow-up email and what to talk about over the phone? Thanks in advance.

May 26, 2014
Bobb:
BreakingInDamnIt:

DO NOT EMAIL HIM!!! He politely told you to fuck off.

Are you fucking serious?! Does your mom dress you in the morning too?

"feel free to follow up - we are not a high growth shop and do anticipate any near to mid-term hires, but it never hurts to check!"

How is that telling someone to fuck off?

You can't see it!!! Blind, blind I tell you...

You must be a gem to hang out with, you know with your great sense of humor and everything.

    • 1
May 26, 2014
CRE:
Phyifer:

Hi everyone,

I'm currently in the process of networking my way into investment banking. I got this email from an MD that I cold emailed 4 months ago.

"you certainly have an impressive resume - unfortunately, we have already filled a summer intern position for this year - I wish you the best in your search - best regards"

"feel free to follow up - we are not a high growth shop and do anticipate any near to mid-term hires, but it never hurts to check!"

Now, I graduated. Should I email him asking for new opportunities directly or should I request for a call to chat or something to increase my possibilities to land an interview? Any comments are appreciated! Thank you.

Good lord yes you should contact him.

Hit him up for coffee or a phone call and "ask his advice." If he has openings, part of his advice will be "apply here." If he doesn't, and likes you, he could refer you elsewhere too.

@CRE, Thanks for your great comments. Since the MD and me are in the different cities, perhaps a call is the only choice by far. Although I have my own script of cold email and networking email, I'm still a little intense when it comes to email like this one. So what do you suggest me to say in the follow-up email and what to be talked about over the phone? Thanks!

May 26, 2014
Phyifer:

So what do you suggest me to say in the follow-up email and what to be talked about over the phone? Thanks!

Remind him of who you are, what you talked about before, let him know that you graduated and are actively looking for a job, and ask him if he would be willing to talk about his experience "breaking in" and any advice he may have for you.

May 26, 2014

Great points! Thanks a lot! I appreciate it!

May 26, 2014
Phyifer:

Great points! Thanks a lot! I appreciate it!

Hah, I forgot the last part:

Tell him about this awesome guy named CRE on the internet who is also looking for a job.

May 26, 2014
CRE:
Phyifer:

Great points! Thanks a lot! I appreciate it!

Hah, I forgot the last part:

Tell him about this awesome guy named CRE on the internet who is also looking for a job.

Not a problem! Lol

May 26, 2014

Over the phone DON'T mention the internship/resume in the first sentence. The guy on the other end whether it's consciously or subconsciously will realize you're just "using" him to put in a good word. Start by talking about him! Then after 10-15 minutes you should ask about opportunities at the firm.

Robert Clayton Dean: What is happening?
Brill: I blew up the building.
Robert Clayton Dean: Why?
Brill: Because you made a phone call.

May 26, 2014

Thanks, but I should've mentioned that I am directly calling the recruiters. It's too hard to get numbers for people who actually work in the industry. What I have been doing is calling the main phone number and asking the operator to please transfer me to the recruiting department.

May 26, 2014

It's a bit late - it's already January. Your best odds are to get some kind of MM SA now. Networking is a long and arduous process. Start by using LinkedIn to find analysts in the firm that graduated from the same college/fraternity/have something in common with you and email them to set up informational interviews and coffee dates. Hopefully they'll spot you fall recruiting.

You should also try to leverage your BB (albeit they are from OPs) contacts; they might be able to direct you to people in ibd.

Good luck.

May 26, 2014

calling recruiters won't help. there's your error. no matter how much you beg them.

May 26, 2014

My strategy:
1) Cold call analysts. Not HR - they hate calls.
2) *Email* HR, preferably the person who's working on the job (searched LinkedIn and see who tends to handle internship/entry-level jobs - look at who is posting the jobs on the company's LinkedIn page). They don't mind emails as much as calls. Don't expect immediate responses, but more often than not I've been able to get responses out of HR reps via email.
3) Fix up your LinkedIn page, you'd be surprised how many smaller companies do a check on you via that before phone interviews.

Your cold call script is super weak. They don't care where you applied. The way you're phrasing your phone call makes it seem like you're just going to give them an audio rendition of your resume. Boring!

Instead, I'd rewrite it entirely and do a 30-second elevator speech. Tell them who you are, what you're interested in doing, and why you want to work at their firm. Example:

"Hi, the name is John Doe and I'm a junior majoring in Economics. I've been speaking to some analysts at your company and am interested in gaining more experience in COMPANY DIVISION HERE. My background in Operations and PWM have given me a strong foundation in XYZ (financial basics, dealing with buyers, etc.) and I would be a strong candidate for your summer internship due to my (attention to detail, perseverance, some crazy experience that taught you a lot, whatever). Please give me a call at 123-456-7890 or shoot me an email at [email protected]. Thanks!"

The goal is to not sound wishy-washy. Your original script sounds super beta. Think confidence. No "just wondering" or "maybe" or "I'm sorry". Never ask permission - that gives them a way to say no (and requires more phone calls). TELL them about yourself. They'll contact you if they're interested.

May 26, 2014

Wow best advice I've ever heard. Thank you!

May 26, 2014
JGarvin:

Wow best advice I've ever heard. Thank you!

What city are you in? Shoot me a PM, might be able to connect you with a few analysts who can at least give you an informational interview/networking opps.

May 26, 2014

Don't get discouraged. Like someone mentioned earlier, networking is a long process. Keep your head up, and keep grinding!

May 26, 2014

Hello fellow Scandinavian, I grew up there although I study in the U.S. now. My first tip is getting a hold of a list of all the boutique investment banks in your city/country and actually giving them a call rather than just sending a cold email.

Furthermore, try turning to your schools "Career Center" to see if they have any postings that fit your needs.

WallStreetOasis Contributing Author - Intern

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May 26, 2014

I forgot to mention that my mission was to get an unpaid internship at an investment banking boutique in London. But getting one in my country would be great as well.

Thank you for your reply Goldf1inger, do you think I should cold call the boutiques in London instead of cold emailing?

Problem with the jobs/internships advertised in our career center is that almost all requires that you are a second or third year student.

May 26, 2014

Most summer internships in investment banking specifically are reserved for juniors, and to some extent sophmores; like you say. Thus you might run in to the same problem with the boutiques in London.

However, I would definetly recommend calling instead of just emailing, as the majority of random email applications seem to be overlooked/neglected, at least as I understand things.

WallStreetOasis Contributing Author - Intern

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May 26, 2014

If the call goes well, follow up in a thank you email and ask to meet for a coffee. From there you can ask about an internship. I wouldn't do it on the phone. But in reality, the person that you're calling probably already knows that you want an internship.

May 26, 2014

Are you talking about NYC financial district? Because if so, good luck making it past the lobby just walking in.

I would imagine that nobody would really appreciate people just walking in looking to talk to them when they don't know them or aren't expecting them either.

Stick to cold emailing and cold calling.

May 26, 2014

Hi, I'm talking about Ottawa, Canada. But yeah, I think you might be right, I didn't get past any receptionists at all. Any other opinions? Should I stop going in? I thought it showed initiative.
Another question, is leaving a message on an answering machine asking for a call back a bad idea?
Thanks

May 26, 2014

By the way, by cold calling you mean calling the actual bank right? Example searching on google for the number of RBC's investment branch located on 244 example street, then calling it - right?

May 26, 2014

You're not applying for a host job at the outback. You're applying for a finance job. You don't just walk in and ask if they're hiring.

By cold calling you have to take it a step further. Don't just find the generic office number where you will just be gatekeepered anyways. You need to find the number of the exact person you want to speak to and call them.

Log every cold email/call and make notes on what the results are. If you left a voice mail and they didn't call back in a week, give them another call. If they still don't answer.. probably cross that one off the list.

    • 1
May 26, 2014

Hi, that is a good point. Who is it that I'm looking for? I just called, who I believe, was a firms co-owner, and although extremely intimidating to speak to, he gave me a chance to send in my resume via his e-mail. Unfortunately he mentioned he's already hired interns for the summer. Your call/e-mail log is a good idea that I'm going to start incorporating right now.

Do you think my approach this time was better? Should I continue on this way or would calling firm owners/head managers be rude and possibly bother them during work? I've only called one so far, and I've e-mailed another.

May 26, 2014

Like ValueBanker posted, it is possible to annoy people when you call them randomly so it is almost better to just do cold emails.

One part where I digress from is who to send emails to. Since you are just starting off with this it would be a good idea to start with junior employees as their say really doesn't matter THAT much and you'll get some practice in so not to ruin your chance with someone that matters more. I usually would only send emails to VP and up as they are the true money makers and if you can get someone in a position like that to vouch for you it's a lot better than SA John vouching for you.

May 26, 2014

I see. Thank you for being helpful. You've given me enough pointers for me to go about this much more professionally.

My last question is this: Would you take a co-op opportunity instead of a internship? Why or why not? I ask because someone has e-mailed me back stating that a co-op opportunity MAY be possible. Unfortunately it will be during the school year (sept-dec) I've just finished reading that co-op means spending an extra year in school so I'm not sure if this is the right step to take.

Can you weigh in with any advice on this subject?
Thank you.

May 26, 2014

Co-op may or may not mean an extra year in school depending on how hard you feel like working. In my undergrad I worked full time and went to school full time. I don't know if the hours a the co-op would allow you to take classes at night or on the weekend but it's possible that you could do that so you don't get behind, or take an extra class during a couple of semesters. If you really want something, you'll do what you need to do to get it.

If I was in your situation, I would take what I could get. If I had 0 internship opportunities but I had a co-op opportunity, you best believe I'm taking the co-op.

May 26, 2014

I see.. Well then I think I'll follow up on it and see if I can get the position. I like your "wan't something, do what you need to get it" attitude

By the way, you mentioned starting off talking to junior employees, but how would I go about doing that? Would it really matter what they say since they wouldn't have control over internship opportunities? Should I ask them if there are available positions? What exactly should I talk to them about? And most importantly...how would I get their information/numbers/emails?

By the way would cold calling for internship opportunities this summer, or at the very least full/part time during the school still be possible? Should I keep trying for it or is it useless?

May 26, 2014

If you're interested, I have a post going live tomorrow that answers all your questions.

May 26, 2014

Hey ValueBanker14, I'm going to try to check out your post as soon as it starts

May 26, 2014

Cool. Should be up at around 5 pm ET

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May 26, 2014

ANYTHING is possible.

If you look up a company on here in the company database it'll give you the email format. So if you wanted to contact David Schuester at Goldman, in the database it might say something like [email protected] so you just have to replace the name and keep the same @ part of it.

You want to push for informational interviews whether on the phone or in person first. This way it doesn't come off as you straight up asking for a job. After the inf. int. you can keep in contact with them and then ask them if they have heard of any openings. This way if you've made a good impression on them, they will be able to give you a positive reference for the job instead of just a resume dump to their HR person.

I almost feel like cold emailing is part of the interview process. If you can't even do some research to be able to get their email address how are you supposed to be able to dig deep and find out information on a company! haha

May 26, 2014

Hey Skinnayyy, I'm going to read and reply to your post in a few hours. I'm trying to sort out some marking issues I have with my prof right now and the information you provided looks very useful. I'd like to give it my full attention.

May 26, 2014

Hey Skinnayyy,

I don't think I'd be able to sign up for the database here at that price, I'm not working right now. Are there any alternative methods to it? You mentioned I just need to replace the name but how would I find it? Would the database provide it or would I need to find them elsewhere?

Thanks

May 26, 2014

You don't have to pay for it. Or at least I don't remember having to pay for it?

Up on the top bar to the right of Resume Help and to the left of Video Library is the Company