What are the Strongest Non-Target Schools for Undergrad Recruitment?

topboy's picture
Rank: Neanderthal | 3,998

I've noticed that there is not a thread exactly like this for prospective monkeys to take a look at. I'm currently an undergrad second year applying to some targets/semi's as a transfer, and this would have been helpful if I didn't know exactly where I wanted to be.

What are some strong non-core universities that students can apply to, whether out of HS or as transfer students?

Some schools that come to my mind are:

  • William & Mary (Dog St. to Wall St. Program)
  • Penn St. (Nittany Lion Fund)
  • Syracuse (Orange Value Fund)
  • UMD (FBIS)

Those of you with experience on the street or with recruiting as an undergrad, what do you think? Throw some recommendations out there!

Mod Note: You can read more about Target Schools here on WSO.

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Comments (139)

Jan 17, 2018

Virginia Tech places pretty strongly for a semi-target. Surprisingly, I also hang with a couple dudes from UGA/Auburn that work in IB, albeit not in New York.

The Target/Semi-Target/Non-Target classification is definitely a gross oversimplification of the way recruitment works.

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Jan 17, 2018

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Jan 17, 2018

Virginia Tech.....semi-target?.....LOL

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Jan 17, 2018

Lol, exactly why I don't like the classification of Target/Semi/Non, I know a few dudes who have gotten S&T or IB roles, but a lot of them were Engineering student. Whether that classifies as Semi-Target or Non-Target is up for debate.

Jan 20, 2018
LReed:

Virginia Tech places pretty strongly for a semi-target. Surprisingly, I also hang with a couple dudes from UGA/Auburn that work in IB, albeit not in New York.

The Target/Semi-Target/Non-Target classification is definitely a gross oversimplification of the way recruitment works.

Can't speak for Auburn. However, I do have several friends currently studying/alumni of UGA who have been successful at breaking into IB. None of my friends have made it to New York, but there is a handful of students that do make it every year. If you can get into their Corsair Society, I'd say you have a pretty solid network for getting your foot in the door.

I would consider UGA a semi depending on the bank. I've heard UGA grads aiming for IB will most likely land at Citi, but I could be wrong.

Jan 19, 2018

Yeee, I think SunTrust is also a big recruiter there.

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Jan 17, 2018

Wisconsin...students from Wisconsin call it a non-target to BB / EB but I'm not sure how it is perceived

I don't care who your dad is

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Jan 17, 2018

I think the top large public schools all do well. Wisco, Mich, UVA, UT, Cal come to mind right away.

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Jan 17, 2018

UVA & UMich are strong targets, their undergrad business schools are top tier. But yeah, top publics do well! Nobody has mentioned UNC-KF. Def a target for southern banks.

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Jan 18, 2018

They have the investment banking club, which as far as I can tell is somewhere in between IU Kelley's IBW and PSU's Nittany Lion Fund.

Jan 17, 2018

Usually, good non-target liberal arts colleges tend to place well for NYC, probably because the alumni network is so tight. Some that come to mind:

  • Washington & Lee
  • Davidson
  • University of Richmond
  • Middlebury
  • Colgate
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Jan 17, 2018

Great point. I didn't even think of all the elite liberal arts colleges out there. I didn't imagine U of Richmond with a pipeline into NYC though, that was a school I almost went to. Great suggestions

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Jan 17, 2018

A bunch of analysts & associates I have met with in the Atlanta & Charlotte area went to W&L. Apparently has an IB track that is very highly regarded within MM Boutiques.

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Jan 17, 2018

Also, OP - those are pretty weak schools when discussing IB. There are definitely better "non-target" options such as USC, Georgetown, top LACs, etc.

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Jan 17, 2018

Well that was kind of my point! I'd consider USC a strong semi at the very least to be honest, from what i've seen it places very well for west coast IB. And GU as a non-target?? What the hell, I'd take GU over half the Ivy League; I think it deserves to be called a target.

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Jan 17, 2018

As previously stated, the line between non-target and target is very subjective. Sure, some banks def recruit at GU but it is by no means above half the ivy and a strong target. Calling it a a non-target was unfair, but i was just trying to get a point across....there are way stronger non-targets than the schools you presented

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Jan 17, 2018

bruh georgetown is definitely a nyc target school. sure it's not Penn or Harvard, but just about every bank goes to DC.

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Apr 8, 2018

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Jan 17, 2018

Here's some strong non-targets that come to mind(some may be repeats):

-Northeastern(they have front office co-ops)
-Claremont McKenna(for west coast)
-Syracuse
-Penn St
-Wisconsin
-Illinois(UIUC)
-UC San Diego
-Rutgers
-Baruch

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Jan 17, 2018

^ agreed. I see many students from Baruch at top IB/EB/PE firms lately. If you're starting out freshman year you definitely have the time to hustle your way in no matter where you come from, just keep the GPA high and get strong offcyle internships.

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Jan 18, 2018

I definitely agree on Northeastern. That's an increasingly respected school.

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Jan 18, 2018

Good list, Claremont places well on the West Coast (also does well with McKinsey/Bain and KKR of course). For the east coast, Penn State and Rutgers have strong alumni presences on Wall Street. I can attest that many BBs recruit on campus at Rutgers, including GS and JPM

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Jan 17, 2018

Let it be known that if you hustle at any flagship state school and grind your way to the top <5% of your class and network you can land something - it doesn't matter which average state school you go to.

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Jan 17, 2018

I think u of m and uva place pretty well.

Jan 17, 2018

UVA and UMich and their undergrad business programs are not non-targets, they are targets.

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Jan 17, 2018

??

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Best Response
Jan 17, 2018

University of Phoenix - strong non-target

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Jan 22, 2018
iggs99988:

University of Phoenix - strong non-target

People say this a lot, but you have to wear the red socks in the interview to get any respect.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Jan 17, 2018

Notre Dame. UT.

Honestly once you fall out of target territory its irrelevant. Just go to a flagship state school and your ability to get a top gig will be up to you.

Jan 17, 2018

Indiana University and the Investment Banking Workshop

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Jan 17, 2018

Ivy student here. Have a good friend at Kelley. Can confirm recruiting opportunities are more expansive at Kelley - IB Workshop than Brown and prob many of the elite LACs.

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Jan 17, 2018

Eastern Mississippi Community College has a strong alumni network. Know a few BB analysts that played football there

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Jan 17, 2018

Georgetown is a strong target. Every BB, nearly every EB and most MM recruit. There are always at least 4-5 people that go to MF's out of undergrad ever year, particularly because they have an undergraduate business school. This year, 3 PWP, 2 EVR, 2 CVP, 3 HL, 3 Lazard etc...BB have at least 4-5 at each one. Fantastic placement.

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Jan 17, 2018

Currently in the same situation as you and I have been doing similar research. A couple of things to keep in mind with any of the schools, particularly some of the schools on your list..

  1. The difficulty of the transfer. Some of these schools make the transfer extremely difficult to weed out the students who are looking to get to a different school for the wrong reasons. Shouldn't be a major problem if you work hard enough.
  2. Some of the funds have year requirements. What I mean by that is some of those funds mentioned don't want juniors joining because they will likely be behind the ball compared to the freshman who have been working with the fund all year. Something to think about.
  3. The prerequisites for the transfer. Some of these schools require specific classes to be taken before you can transfer. Some also require classes to be taken at a branch campus before the transfer. I was talking to admissions at Penn St and they said they required business transfer students to take 44 credits at a branch campus before being eligible for a transfer.

I know this post was looking for school suggestions but I figured I would toss my thoughts down since I have been going through this process for the past 2 years. My advice for people looking to transfer to a better semi or non target is to start talking to admissions ASAP.

Jan 17, 2018

University of Florida and Rochester do well, for non targets.

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Jan 17, 2018

If the problem is mediocre high school performance, I'd say that Indiana is one of the best places to go if you're solely focused on getting into IB. The IBW(Investment Banking Workshop) doesn't care if you were a direct admit to Kelley, and if you have the grades/drive to get into IB you'll get into Kelley as a standard admit. For anyone looking at Indiana, google Kelley IBW and on that site you can see the resumes of all the kids currently in the workshop. The IBW obviously doesn't guarantee anything, but a 95%+ placement rate is not bad at all.

Jan 17, 2018

I'd say most schools with "XYZ" funds are strong in the sense that if you get into those funds you'll be ahead of the curve. For example here is a list of the past placements for Penn State's NLF / PSIA students.

http://sites.psu.edu/nittanylionfund/career-placem...

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Jan 18, 2018

Do you know of any transfer students that have made it into the fund?

Jan 18, 2018

I'm not quite sure (in the sense that it's never come up in conversation with anyone). Generally transfer students spend freshman year at X university then transfer their sophomore year to Y university. Freshmen aren't eligible to enter the Fund so I don't think it would hurt your chances. I'll give you a general overview of how the fund manager interview process works.

Freshman Year and first half of sophomore year:
- Most students join the Penn State Investment Association (PSIA) as members and they gain general accounting, economics, and finance "crash course" experiences. (The club basically covers most of the "big picture" information you would gain in an introductory Accounting / Finance classes. A lot of this covers big picture topics like DCF vs Comp. analysis etc.
- Students have homework they can do and submit through the PSIA if they are serious about joining the fund.
- PSIA students can also compete in the mock portfolio competition as well as group stock pitches.
- PSIA also has weekend breakout meetings where current NLF managers discuss / explore investment opportunities with PSIA members to help them gain some exposure. (Each PSIA members picks an area of interest such as Financials, Retail, Healthcare, etc.)

2nd Half of Sophomore Year
- The stock pitch competition wraps up during this time and the top groups get selected to move forwards into the interview process to join the Nittany Lion Fund (I forget how many of the top groups move forwards but I think its about 4-5 a year (10-20 ish students)).
- These interviews are generally along the lines of what you would expect from an IBD interview, mostly technical questions and a few brain teasers.
- The NLF then accepts the top interviewees into the fund.

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Jan 26, 2018

Also - second follow up - transfer students have made it into the NLF. As long as you are not transfering as a junior you are good to go.

Jan 17, 2018

I can def verify that Syracuse is starting to get some IB exposure, MM recruits directly and as of recently citi IB takes a few too. Also a loot of big4 exposure. def need to be a top student tho

Jan 18, 2018

Umd has the Lemma Senbet Fund and wall st fellows as well but you must apply and pray to get in

Jan 18, 2018

I know some guys at the following schools that have successfully gotten into banking:

Washington and Lee
Davidson
UNC Chapel Hill
UT Austin

As mentioned in previous comments, definitely keep top liberal arts schools in mind. Good luck!

Apr 8, 2018
energyhoss9809:

I know some guys at the following schools that have successfully gotten into banking:

Washington and Lee
Davidson
UNC Chapel Hill
UT Austin

As mentioned in previous comments, definitely keep top liberal arts schools in mind. Good luck!

Lel. UT (McCombs) is a major target, bud.

Jan 18, 2018

I think there is some confusion between Non-targets and "elite" schools that simply do not place a lot into IB.

The difference is:

1) A Non-target (at least by this forum's standards) is a school that tends to have lower admissions standards and is less academically focused. Students here have a harder time getting into IB as banks don't see these schools as ideal places to recruit.

2) A [good] school that simply does not place a lot into IB usually has: good academics, stringent admissions standards, and high-caliber students. However, their students aren't necessarily interested in banking (hard to believe, I know); they are usually pursuing law/medicine/academics/etc. From my observation, I'm sure many would have a good shot at IB if they wanted it, but choose other career paths. It's mostly a matter of self-selection.

An example of a non-target would be Baruch, while LACs (Willams, Bates, etc.) would be good schools that just don't send a lot into banking.

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Jan 22, 2018
23mich:

I think there is some confusion between Non-targets and "elite" schools that simply do not place a lot into IB.

The difference is:

1) A Non-target (at least by this forum's standards) is a school that tends to have lower admissions standards and is less academically focused. Students here have a harder time getting into IB as banks don't see these schools as ideal places to recruit.

2) A [good] school that simply does not place a lot into IB usually has: good academics, stringent admissions standards, and high-caliber students. However, their students aren't necessarily interested in banking (hard to believe, I know); they are usually pursuing law/medicine/academics/etc. From my observation, I'm sure many would have a good shot at IB if they wanted it, but choose other career paths. It's mostly a matter of self-selection.

An example of a non-target would be Baruch, while LACs (Willams, Bates, etc.) would be good schools that just don't send a lot into banking.

I've never heard so much about Baruch until coming on WSO.

"If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." - Bruce Lee

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Apr 8, 2018

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Apr 8, 2018

Hmmm. I know a trader from BU and a number of folks from Columbia without a math/finance/econ background who work in the front office.

Apr 8, 2018

I know many people from BU in banking. I'd consider it, but would research into what the management program is and what it's like.

If your GPA is high there, you should get the interviews and your hard part is going to be how you explain your situation.

Apr 8, 2018

uhh Columbia dude, its a target

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Apr 8, 2018

Columbia and BU are both pretty solid, also Emory definitely places a lot of kids in FO positions... I saw Emory kids at most of my interviews... just food for thought...

Apr 8, 2018

Thank you for the quick responses guys. My only concern with Columbia is that i was admitted to the school of general studies and not Columbia college or SEAS. When searching for Columbia GS on these boards and collegeconfidential I found a bunch of negative remarks such as that students from GS arent treated the same as CC/SEAS kids, that they're discriminated against, etc. I am not sure if this is the actual truth or just people talking trash. What kind of options would I have with an econ degree going out of Columbia since they do not offer a business major? (Thats another option I am skeptical because I can come out of the other schools with a degree in finance). Also what do people think of Wake Forest, I know its top25 undergrad on US News & World Report and ranks well on Businessweek but I am not sure how banks treat it for FO and MO roles.

Apr 8, 2018

There was a Wake grad in the group that I will be working in... he did pretty well, though he left to work for Greenpeace or some shit like that... but yea Wake is a good school... bottom line is that you can make it in from anywhere if you are willing to work hard enough

Apr 8, 2018

Columbia is a target, so this is a dumb question. CollegeConfidential is retarded--don't bother with it. Realize that Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Princeton, Duke, UChicago, Amherst/Williams/etc., and many other targets have no undergraduate business program whatsoever.

Apr 8, 2018

Yeah I agree Jerome, problem was I might have looked too much into what people said. I know that Columbia College and SEAS (engineering school) are targets but I wasn't sure that the School of General Studies is even though it is one of the 3 undergraduate schools of Columbia University. Bunch of people on these forums and CC took a shot at it calling it a night school, extension school, etc.

http://www.

"Columbia University School of General Studies (GS) students are those with nontraditional backgrounds who seek a traditional education at an Ivy League university. What defines our students as nontraditional is that GS students have taken breaks of one year or more in their educational paths. GS students are returning and adult students who seek to complete a rigorous undergraduate degree. Despite these differences, GS students take the same courses as all other Columbia undergraduates, are taught by the same professors in the same classes, and are fully integrated into Columbia's undergraduate curriculum."

"Yes. GS students take the same courses with the same faculty, are held to the same high standards, and earn the same degree as all other Columbia undergraduates."

If I don't make it for IB from Columbia will I still have a fairly good shot at middle office in BBs with an econ major or do they prefer candidates with finance/acct backgrounds.

Another issue is money, if I get into Emory it might be a free ride, BU/Wake about $20k in loans per year, and Columbia is 36k though my parents should help out -- If I can definitely have better opportunities coming out of Columbia GS I do not mind taking an extra 16k out in loans. I know that in academia/grad schools/law schools don't discriminate GS but I heard that some bankers due (due to how important prestige/pedigree is in the profession).

Apr 8, 2018

just to clarify for people, although Columbia is a target school, he is referring to the "School of General Studies" which is the equivalent to (from a perception standpoint), for example, Harvard's Extension School (at Harvard you get an AB from Harvard College but you would get an ALB from the Extension school...both are real degrees but they are viewed very differently). So in the end you end up getting a real degree from Columbia or Harvard but most don't perceive it to be on the same level as the the more traditional undergrad programs and both don't give you the same recruiting opportunities. As far as I know, no BB recruits for IB, etc. at Harvard Extension (even for their Masters in Management program).

EDIT: Given your non-traditional background though I think that you can tell an interesting story in the recruiting process to BBs. However, you will have to be more proactive in finding the jobs yourself as opposed to relying heavily on SGS to do it for you...do you know if you are allowed to participate in the traditional OCR process? If the answer is yes then I would definitely take Columbia.

Apr 8, 2018
harvardgrad08:

just to clarify for people, although Columbia is a target school, he is referring to the "School of General Studies" which is the equivalent to (from a perception standpoint), for example, Harvard's Extension School (at Harvard you get an AB from Harvard College but you would get an ALB from the Extension school...both are real degrees but they are viewed very differently). So in the end you end up getting a real degree from Columbia or Harvard but most don't perceive it to be on the same level as the the more traditional undergrad programs and both don't give you the same recruiting opportunities. As far as I know, no BB recruits for IB, etc. at Harvard Extension (even for their Masters in Management program).

EDIT: Given your non-traditional background though I think that you can tell an interesting story in the recruiting process to BBs. However, you will have to be more proactive in finding the jobs yourself as opposed to relying heavily on SGS to do it for you...do you know if you are allowed to participate in the traditional OCR process? If the answer is yes then I would definitely take Columbia.

Absolutely wrong. Harvard Extension is nowhere near the level of Columbia GS. Not even close. Harvard Extension is just an extension school that grants the 'ALB in Extension Studies.' It does not get recruited.

Columbia GS is one of the official undergraduate liberal arts colleges at Columbia University that grants the exact same 'BA' obtained by all other Columbia undergraduates, which are conferred by the Trustees of Columbia University through the Faculty of Arts & Sciences. GS students also get the same OCR opportunities as other undergrads. (It's a small college and not as many people pursue BBs as those in the other colleges, though.)

Simply cannot compare the two.

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Apr 8, 2018

I figured I'd give my 2 cents on my first post. I graduated May 2010 from BU School of Management. It is definitely not a target school and is a well known grade-deflater. (google it) However I believe we have a strong curriculum and great teamwork emphasis that builds up your soft skills very well compared to other undergrad business schools.

With respect to landing a high paying job I believe that if you can build up best-in-class soft skills and demonstrate experience in the industry through your past internships then you should be good to go. A friend of mine is in Leveraged Finance at a NY IB, and several just got offers to start Summer 2011 in HSBC rotational program, and another friend of mine started this summer at Goldman ops.

I personally did not have as good grades as these peers of mine but I did have the drive to land and make strong impacts at my several internships at large banks/fortune 500 firms. I ended up working in a variation of CorpDev in the Retail Banking industry as an analyst.

If you're looking for specifically 55-60+ starting base salary before bonus then you should expand your targets. Strategy Analysts at consulting firms, corpdev, IB ops, rotational programs are all possibilities depending on experience + firm.

Apr 8, 2018

There's an associate at Allen & Co. from Wake Forest.

Apr 8, 2018

Definitely GS. Basically GS is no different from CC or SEAS. People treat you the same. You go to the same class. When you introduce yourself just say Columbia (off campus) and GS (on campus)> potentially open up an interesting convo with an MD.
That's just like barnard and columbia. they are the same. sometimes I think barnard girls are smarter even.

Apr 8, 2018

^Lol. Obviously someone who went to Barnard, or GS.

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Apr 8, 2018

Going into MO, any of those schools would have a decent chance. I would also say Columbia simply because I know their career offices are very good, not to mention you have the advantage of being near many finance firms.

Apr 8, 2018

I'm from a non-target in the midwest, and multiple recent graduates I know have landed positions in a few BB and MM firms in IBD. They worked their asses off and stayed in touch with alumni who pulled strings to allow them first rounds.....at that point it was up to them. The majority of them landed offers. Just goes to show......if you want it bad enough you'll figure it out wherever you are from.

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Apr 8, 2018

BU is a solid school and certain programs have a strong academic reputation.

That said nothing beats an ivy for prestige when it comes to recruiting. Columbia for sure.

Apr 8, 2018

I haven't seen any wake kids on the street except one who was a total idiot, no offense to the Calloway kids around here.

Apr 8, 2018

Can you guys explain the negative attitude toward columbia gs (makes me not want to go there) if its taught by same professors and you are integrated within all undergrad, whats the problem?

Apr 8, 2018

Wake is usually recruited by BB&T but I've heard from some alumni of my school in the BB&T program that the WFU kids haven't a clue as to what goes on in capital markets. I was pretty disappointed as I sat in the office of the president of BB&T cap markets in September to talk about possible opportunities regarding working in their Reston, VA office. He basically said my GPA is good but the school I'm at isn't a target school so "it'll be tough".

Long story short, I have an option to go to JP Morgan and an option to work at a boutique firm that works closely with Paulson & Co. Kings to me, dick.

Apr 8, 2018

Also, the alumni from my school in the same program aren't doing IBD. They're doing retail. For the first two phases of the LDP at BB&T, they mesh Cap Markets, Corporate, and Retail together. Not bashing BB&T as a corporation as I truly think they'll be a major player down the road. I just think they should stop looking so narrowly at who they'll take (school wise) for certain positions.

Apr 8, 2018

look at it this way. if you have a doubt about this school then dont do it. cut your losses

Apr 8, 2018

I found out that I was admitted to Emory this morning as well. If I get a full ride at Emory does it make this case closed?

In my opinion (obv. not much since i am a non-banker lay person) prestige wise Columbia > Emory => Wake Forest > BU > Maryland...but then GS has a bad rap..imo its mostly from people on forums (younger people) don't know so much about the real world. Not sure how bankers can look down on you if you went to GS and had a 3.7-3.8 in classes with SEAS/CC kids. Unless they go "well their admissions was harder."

Point is GS costs 35k per year, finaid sucks...If I am getting superior opportunities there than its obviously a no brainer, invest $ for a great degree/career. But if I won't be treated like I came from a target then no point and go to the school that gives best financial aid, correct? In terms of Emory vs Wake both are southern and have top ranked business schools and are top20-25 undergrads in us news. Boston is lower ranked but closer to the banking scene.

Apr 8, 2018

Here are my thoughts on GS btw

I have to be honest with you, at first I was really excited about getting in, kinda like "man i got into an ivy league school this is amazing!" and now I am starting to question if this achievement is even worth anything because of the way people talk about GS. I assume most people on forums are college students/hs students who do not really know much about GS vs CC vs SEAS or elitist people who wan't to talk trash (maybe arent happy with sharing columbia, want to make it more exclusive?) but I honestly have some reservations about going there. I am going to end up paying 35k per year because financial aid is awful (since it has separate admissions from CC/SEAS so you dont get the same funding)..I do not mind loans to pay this off but if in the real world employers and recruiters will not respect my diploma the same way they do with other Columbia undergrads even though I'll compete with them in all my classes, then it makes it seem like a waste >> pay a lot for a diploma everyone will question or view you as some continuing ed./backdoor kid. I definitely know that grad schools view GS on par with cc/seas as alums have been getting into top med, law, and phd programs. Not sure about recruiters. Regardless of where I go I know IBD is something thats not guaranteed and maybe the best 25-50 kids in a class get it (dont know exact numbers but its not where the middle 50% of a class is getting IBD offers unless they are network ninjas or have connections).

Ive always been a bit disappointed while in school because a lot of the students were not as smart as I was and did not really get engaged with classes but just gave some stupid comments to get their participation grade. I always wanted to study in a school where the majority of the kids are really smart. Unfortunately I was not serious in high school and blew my chances of going to a top 10 school. This is basically a moment to redeem myself but I couldn't apply to some of the other top schools because they do not want transfer students with 3 years of undergrad. So I was real excited about Columbia and being an ivy league student for the quality of education/prestige, but these negative comments really made me question if it was worth going. After all aside from quality of education the second reason (for some/many the first reason) of going to a school is prestige--if I wont be getting that Columbia pedigree to help me with recruiting and set me up for life like the CC kids get then its not worth it.

Apr 8, 2018

From what you've mentioned, I'd pick Emory. I don't know anything about Columbia GS though.

Apr 8, 2018

I would take Emory. Goizueta is very respectable, and I have met far more people from Emory in banking than any of the other schools on your list. You would have a great time going to college in the South too.

Also, I would not ignore the cost of these programs; there is no way that Columbia GS is worth 35k a year. I know one person who went there, and apparently those students get ignored in recruiting. Not to mention the tendency of other students to stigmatize GS students as "not real Columbia students".

While Emory is, in my opinion, optimal, BU and Wake deserve consideration if you get substantially better aid packages. A banking job is never a sure thing, even at a target, and graduating with 50k in debt and a 50k/ year f500 job is rough.

Apr 8, 2018

can you transfer to columbia college from columbia gs, granted you will have to wiggle your way in?

Apr 8, 2018

OP, PM me. I can help give some insight.

Apr 8, 2018

np1128 technically it is possible to transfer from gs to cc but you need approval from your gs advisers before you can even apply. can't really go there just for the hope of getting into cc. i just dont understand why folks would treat it differently, i mean ivy grads are highly sought after because you are getting some of the best students in the country. if you have a good gpa from gs it means you survived the curve as you competed with cc/seas and held your own. i think if i did not research forums about gs after being admitted i would have definitely gone there. the research i did on the actual school (not what people think) shows its a legit undergrad college/school at CU, you take classes with the same professors and CC/SEAS. i also did a little bit of reading on harvard extension, and other programs at ivies because those names came up when reading about gs -- and gs is completely different. but since the school might not have a good rep. for job offers if it gets flamed on forums then i guess i cant risk spending $75k on a degree that might be worthless on the street

Apr 8, 2018

So I take it advice is largely in favor of Emory?

Apr 8, 2018

bump please

Jan 18, 2018

I don't know if this means it's a "semi-target" or not, but I can vouche for Arizona State. It does have the party school rep and it's definitely way too much fun, but the b-school (WP Carey) is actually very highly ranked. Me and a handful of people I went to school with landed jobs at BB IBs in NYC, and I imagine we're not the only ones. So don't count ASU (or any school with a good b-school) out!

Jan 18, 2018

That 83% acceptance rate is brushing off the haters!!

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Jan 18, 2018

83% now? It was 97% When I started in 09...moving on up haha

Jan 18, 2018

I think that's true of any of the large public universities. The top however many students at ASU are going to be of Harvard/MIT caliber by virtue of the school's size. I don't know much about the business school there, but I think most people would take a top performer seriously regardless.

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Apr 8, 2018

What about applying to Vandy, Georgetown and the like? I would apply broadly and use Early Action/Decision.

Jan 19, 2018

so many people don't get this. the top 1% of any university are going to so close when it come to ability

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Apr 8, 2018

IU's Kelley School is a great non-target. Its a top 10 in undergrad business and is pretty respected. Also it's cheap. http://admit.indiana.edu/cost/tuition.shtml

Apr 8, 2018

Sounds like you have a shot at UW-Madison. If you cost is an issue, the in-state is your best bet. Minnesota will not provide you with nearly the same amount of recruiting opportunities that UW will. UIUC is a fine school that places fairly well - Lincoln International and Blair seem to like to recruit there. Additionally, they send a few people to BB's every year. I still believe the placement stats (Quality and Quantity) at UW are slightly superior.

The comment above is true. IU is a great school if you're interested in banking. Out of UIUC, UW, and IU, IU hands-down places the most people. With UW second, and UIUC third. But again, if cost is an issue, UW provides the greatest cost-benefit. That said, if you do what you need to do academically (3.6 for MM; 3.8 for BB) and network at UW, you've got a great shot at whatever you want to do.

Apr 8, 2018
TGICapitalism:

Sounds like you have a shot at UW-Madison. If you cost is an issue, the in-state is your best bet. Minnesota will not provide you with nearly the same amount of recruiting opportunities that UW will. UIUC is a fine school that places fairly well - Lincoln International and Blair seem to like to recruit there. Additionally, they send a few people to BB's every year. I still believe the placement stats (Quality and Quantity) at UW are slightly superior.

The comment above is true. IU is a great school if you're interested in banking. Out of UIUC, UW, and IU, IU hands-down places the most people. With UW second, and UIUC third. But again, if cost is an issue, UW provides the greatest cost-benefit. That said, if you do what you need to do academically (3.6 for MM; 3.8 for BB) and network at UW, you've got a great shot at whatever you want to do.

Not sure where you got those cutoff GPA's from. I know a handful of non-target people at BB's with GPA's ranging from 3.1-3.3. Most importantly, regardless of where you go, you must NETWORK! I am sure you have read about the importance of networking on this website, and how a good network can help you overcome any hurdles i.e. lack of relevant work experience, GPA issues, etc.

Do you want to aim to get the highest GPA possible? Obviously. However, there are by no means a "cut-off", although many BB's will say you need a 3.5 GPA; however, I have seen those BB's take people who don't meet that criteria.

Apr 8, 2018

I go to UW. The Investment Banking Club here places really well among BBs and MMs in NYC and Chicago. My GPA wasn't high enough so I'm not in the club, but if you get in you're golden. Since I'm not in the club, I've had to rely heavily on networking and have found there's a decent amount of alumni in NYC and Chicago. I've also found Big Ten alumni are great people to network with as well. I'd say UW probably ranks 3rd in the Big Ten besides Northwestern, Indiana (Kelley), and Michigan, and is basically even with UIUC for Chicago and better for NYC.

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Apr 8, 2018

Thanks for the responses. I think I'm probably going to set my sights on Madison. I'll also make sure to apply to a few reaches in the area(Northwestern, Uchicago, Michigan) and probably Indiana. My parents have told me they would have no problem paying for Madison since it's in-state and it'd be nice to not have any debt coming out of college.

Apr 8, 2018

You probably aren't mormon and I dont know how you would feel but BYU is a semi target with cheapass tuition and has plenty of people going to IB and some even PE right out of undergrad. You do have to follow their strict honor code though.. Your stats are enough to probably get you a small scholarship as well. Just an option

Apr 8, 2018

3.6 and 32? Madison should be your safety school. Reach for Michigan and Northwestern, and Chicago - I would think you'll have a great shot at all three.

Also, Big Ten schools are large enough that if you're smart and do well in school you will have opportunities w/ alumni connections. You'll have opportunities coming out of Madison, coming out of U of M - Carlson, coming out of Purdue or Illinois. Good luck!

Apr 8, 2018

IU grad here. IU Kelley is not a great non-target. It is a target for most Chicago banks with a handful of kids going to NYC, SF. I would go to Northwestern and then IU if you wanna go the banking route.

But beware that IU as a whole is a mediocre school. The usually Kelley kids are smart and ambitious but as a whole there are a lot of dumb kids at IU (which does help you to get laid). If you wanna know more about banking options and other stuff then feel free to PM me.

Jan 18, 2018

Has anyone mentioned any SUNY schools? Binghamton has a solid business school (SOM)

Jan 18, 2018

Bama - Harvard of the south

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Jan 19, 2018

I'm definitely going to get chirped for this, but Michigan State has placed pretty well (myself included ('sick brag bro')) in BB and MM IB and PE relative to how people perceive them. If you follow the right path there the alumni are extremely willing to help you out as they love seeing Spartans succeed.

Jan 19, 2018

What school you go to is irrelevant to the social capital or network that each school has. What I would do is look up on LinkedIn the alumni bankers from schools you want to go to/have a good chance of getting into. If a school has a lot of alumni on the street then target that school.

I go to a large private university in the west (non-target) that places between 30-40 kids in ibanking every year. Even though it is not Wharton, it still provides a great network to get the exposure and mentoring you need to land offers.

Jan 19, 2018

usc?

Jan 19, 2018

BYU

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Jan 20, 2018

UW-Madison has a decent program. The Investment Banking Club has placement at GS, BAML, JPM, MS, ect... But as with most of the other IB clubs/funds you have to apply into it and go through interviews ect...

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Jan 20, 2018

There's only one clear, strong non-target choice. The rightful national champs, UCF!

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Jan 20, 2018

Would anybody say Texas A&M (Mays) could be a strong Non-target?

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Jan 20, 2018

for O&G

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Jan 22, 2018

Definitely in the O&G space, places between 10-20 each year. (Horizons program mainly)

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Jan 20, 2018

pretty good list

Jan 21, 2018

UVA

Jan 23, 2018

UVA is a strong target

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Jan 23, 2018
collegeapps123:

UVA is a strong target

Not on the buyside

Jan 22, 2018

UNC

Target for southern MM & boutiques, particularly Atlanta and Charlotte. Most BBs do some form of on-campus networking event. GS MS and JPM usually take a few students each every year for NYC. BAML Lev-Fin and WF take quite a few for Charlotte. Rest are spread around other BBs and industry specific boutiques. The occasional Laz or HLHZ.

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Jan 22, 2018

What are our thoughts on Bucknell?

Jan 24, 2018

.

Jan 24, 2018

Rutgers
Binghamton
Baruch

all place well in NYC

Jan 24, 2018

Fordham University

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Jan 25, 2018
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"All men are alike in their dreams, and all men are alike in the promises
they make. The difference is what they do."-- Jean Baptiste Moliere