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You come from a non-target? Sucks to be you
You have a low GPA? Sucks to be you
You want a job in banking? Sucks to be you

I've been on this website for almost 6 years, and only recently re-started reading some of the posts. Most of them are pointless, but there is the odd post that will entertain me, and make me realise how bad you guys all have it. What really drives me nuts is the posts were people just exchange a lot of useless information and "inform" everyone wrongly.

So I will start with a few myths:

Quote:
I messed up this question in an interview, I'll never get the job

When I interview people I like to ask the following question: "How do you hedge your gamma?"
When I ask it, I KNOW that you will not know how to answer it. The only reason I am doing this is to see your thought process and how you re-act under pressure. End of.

Quote:
Should I were a suit with two or three buttons and a sock in the side pocket?

I don't care how you dress. I really don't, and nobody else does. If you are a student I don't expect you to come in tailored. Go to primark or some other cheap place, pick up a suit and a good white shirt and a tie; go even to a used shop to get it! Make sure the suit went through the tailor at the dry cleaner so he can make it look a bit better on you, and that should make it so that you don't look like a clown. You can get dressed for less than $200 including everything. That also goes with: should i wear my expensive watch? I don't care.

Quote:
The hours are so bad, you are treated like shit, etc...

True. Not a myth. Sucks to be an analyst.

Quote:
I come from a non target, I have a low GPA, I come from a target etc...

There is only one thing that works, and that is networking. At my old bank (think top BB), we would receive two books of 500 CVs each, that is the number of CVs that had made it through the HR screening out of 6000 to 10000 candidacies depending on the year. I can tell you that unless a kid made a genuine effort of reaching out to us, either on campus, or in some other way; there is a very low probability we will pick you from that book of CVs...
If you are not in that book, it probably does not matter either, if I like you and I see you made an effort to reach out to me, I will ask you to come in for an interview; formal or informal.

Quote:
Will extra education, courses, the CFA etc... Help me?

Unless you are a chartered CFA holder, no.
MBA, no - only if you are at a top school, it will give you access to me at networking events and that is the only thing that matters.
Excel courses? What the fuck? NO!

Banking is still an extremely rewarding job, but that depends entirely on what you do and whether you are suited for it. Everything is not the same, and if you don't make it in banking. It's ok. I have friends on food stamp smoking dope all day long and they are loving it...

One last piece of advice:
I will take a candidate that shows confidence (NOT arrogance, an arrogant prick will be escorted out of the room after 2 minutes). Determination, not why they want that job, but to show me they want to succeed in life.
Also: don't crush my fingers when you shake my hands, grab the hands not the fingers numb nuts.

A final note I work in equities, but this is valid for the future bankers as well. Trust me, my friends in M&A, DCM, ECM etc... are the same bread I am made out of: human, and they don't like pricks...

Comments (38)

  • Working9-5's picture

    Excellent points. Wish everyone read this before they start networking. A little effort goes a long way.

    CNBC sucks

    "This financial crisis is worse than a divorce. I've lost all my money, but the wife is still here." - Client after getting blown up

  • Oreos's picture

    your reasoning that you like people to make the effort to reach out but you dont reward those who funnel effort into learning modelling or CFA L1 for example, doesn't correlate.

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.

    .

  • AgentBishop's picture

    Thanks for the post and information.

    I just wanted to note though that when I talk to people about the exact difference between arrogance confidence, they all seem to have different answers and it seems like drawing a line in the sand at the end of the day. But based on my personal experiences, arrogance and confidence is just based on if the guy likes you in the first place and aren't that different.

    73 good sir!

  • In reply to AgentBishop
    Aldushy's picture

    kc2siq wrote:
    Thanks for the post and information.

    I just wanted to note though that when I talk to people about the exact difference between arrogance confidence, they all seem to have different answers and it seems like drawing a line in the sand at the end of the day. But based on my personal experiences, arrogance and confidence is just based on if the guy likes you in the first place and aren't that different.

    When interacting with people, you will most certainly pick up the vibe of a confident and/or arrogant person, eventhough people have a hard time making the distinction consciously.
    Personally, arrogant people tend to transmit negative atmosphere to spectators.

    Death is certain; Life aint.

  • In reply to Aldushy
    kidflash's picture

    Aldushy wrote:
    kc2siq wrote:
    Thanks for the post and information.

    I just wanted to note though that when I talk to people about the exact difference between arrogance confidence, they all seem to have different answers and it seems like drawing a line in the sand at the end of the day. But based on my personal experiences, arrogance and confidence is just based on if the guy likes you in the first place and aren't that different.

    When interacting with people, you will most certainly pick up the vibe of a confident and/or arrogant person, eventhough people have a hard time making the distinction consciously.
    Personally, arrogant people tend to transmit negative atmosphere to spectators.


    i think there's a big difference between confidence and arrogance. both may have a vibe about them that makes you notice them, but confident people don't look down on other people, and that respect shows i think.

  • In reply to Oreos
    Disjoint's picture

    Oreos wrote:
    your reasoning that you like people to make the effort to reach out but you dont reward those who funnel effort into learning modelling or CFA L1 for example, doesn't correlate.

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.

    "effort into learning modelling", I believe it is a useless effort, as you are going to learn all of that on the job, and pick up one year of modelling classes in two weeks of being under the pressure. If you have taken level I good for you, especially if you come from a non-business related background. I would be impressed if that was the case, true. Not if you did business as undergrad, as L1 is your 3-4 years of business undergrad in one exam...

    "People care how you dress"
    On that one - Please do not mislead people. What matters is who you are and that you know how to tie a tie, that's it. I don't need to see you in Gucci loafers and no need to worry about looking like a Ralph Lauren advert. If your suit does not look like it is 3 sizes too big for you, and you are not wearing clown shoes, that is all that matters. This is not an interview to become fashion director at Burberry's.

  • In reply to Disjoint
    Oreos's picture

    Disjoint wrote:
    Oreos wrote:
    your reasoning that you like people to make the effort to reach out but you dont reward those who funnel effort into learning modelling or CFA L1 for example, doesn't correlate.

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.

    "effort into learning modelling", I believe it is a useless effort, as you are going to learn all of that on the job, and pick up one year of modelling classes in two weeks of being under the pressure. If you have taken level I good for you, especially if you come from a non-business related background. I would be impressed if that was the case, true. Not if you did business as undergrad, as L1 is your 3-4 years of business undergrad in one exam...

    "People care how you dress"
    On that one - Please do not mislead people. What matters is who you are and that you know how to tie a tie, that's it. I don't need to see you in Gucci loafers and no need to worry about looking like a Ralph Lauren advert. If your suit does not look like it is 3 sizes too big for you, and you are not wearing clown shoes, that is all that matters. This is not an interview to become fashion director at Burberry's.

    they were examples, not an exhaustive list....

    i said "some" people (which is true), not all (which would have been false), ergo no misleading.

    do pay attention.

    .

  • In reply to BTbanker
    Disjoint's picture

    BTbanker wrote:
    Oreos wrote:

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.


    Agree with Oreos on this one, because I'm one of those people.

    Also, OP, are you in Dallas by any chance?

    Not Dallas - but neither Soho London in marketing.
    I repeat my point - it's not a fashion show, or maybe your place is BTbanker, but I didn't realise Wachovia still existed. A suit that is not 2x your size, no white socks, and other simple concepts that's all we ask of you.

  • In reply to Aldushy
    AgentBishop's picture

    kidflash wrote:
    Aldushy wrote:
    kc2siq wrote:
    Thanks for the post and information.

    I just wanted to note though that when I talk to people about the exact difference between arrogance confidence, they all seem to have different answers and it seems like drawing a line in the sand at the end of the day. But based on my personal experiences, arrogance and confidence is just based on if the guy likes you in the first place and aren't that different.

    When interacting with people, you will most certainly pick up the vibe of a confident and/or arrogant person, eventhough people have a hard time making the distinction consciously.
    Personally, arrogant people tend to transmit negative atmosphere to spectators.


    i think there's a big difference between confidence and arrogance. both may have a vibe about them that makes you notice them, but confident people don't look down on other people, and that respect shows i think.

    Thanks for your insights! That's actually a great point about not looking down on others. Still, in this case, it's some of the more obvious cases and rare cases that end up with people exchanging stories over coffee of when they met this really peculiar asshat.

    But to play devil's advocate, how about someone looking down on someone for a moral reason like a father leaving their child? Or looking down on someone who doesn't work hard at all and pulls the slack around? There are people who would argue that lacking the conviction to make a judgement and to just be nice to everyone shows a lack of confidence. I mean... if you believe someone who is truly scum as an equal then where does that place your self-opinion? Hell on WSO there are plenty of people who were looking down on the average American kid when there were threads about their math skills. Taking this a step further, aren't people who say others are arrogant (along with all the negative connotations) kind of looking down on others by giving them a negative character judgement?

    Of course, one can give me examples that counter the description I made to make the distinction, but it really does get murky with most people since it just isn't that clear where the line is and we don't really remember most people just the extremes. Extreme examples stand up on our minds and makes it feel like it's so obvious. However, if you begin to ask people what their opinions are on some... say rappers' confidence/arrogance, you'll definitely get varying answers.

    73 good sir!

  • In reply to Disjoint
    Ron Paul's picture

    Disjoint wrote:
    Oreos wrote:
    your reasoning that you like people to make the effort to reach out but you dont reward those who funnel effort into learning modelling or CFA L1 for example, doesn't correlate.

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.

    "effort into learning modelling", I believe it is a useless effort, as you are going to learn all of that on the job, and pick up one year of modelling classes in two weeks of being under the pressure. If you have taken level I good for you, especially if you come from a non-business related background. I would be impressed if that was the case, true. Not if you did business as undergrad, as L1 is your 3-4 years of business undergrad in one exam...


    OP maybe your post was meant to apply ONLY to the BB/top MM recruiting process, which is fine, just please clarify that b/c it's not the only way to get into the field. You seem to imply the only way to get into IB or high finance is through official fall/winter/whenever recruiting, either by getting your resume picked or networking your way into an interview.

    There's lots of boutiques out there, and many of them DO want you to have solid technical knowledge, and maybe even pass a modeling test, because you won't be formally trained on the job like at your "top BB." This goes double for ER which doesn't have much training and often requires some kind of modeling or stock write-up case study during the interview process. Also, I've had HF guys ask me for case studies or samples of my work before. They wanted to help me, but wanted to see that I was pretty competent before they opened doors for me to the bankers and ER guys they knew.

  • In reply to BTbanker
    SirTradesaLot's picture

    BTbanker wrote:
    Oreos wrote:

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.


    Agree with Oreos on this one, because I'm one of those people. It's a basic fact of life that if you dress well, not only will you get more pussy, you will be paid more.

    Also, OP, are you in Dallas by any chance?


    I think you're missing the point. Disjoint is saying all they have to do is be presentable. Namely, socks match suit, suit is not 3X oversize, etc. If someone came in for an interview for an Analyst position wearing an Hermes tie, $1,000 shoes, and a $10,000 watch, I think that would be more likely to hurt them than help them. People already know that the applicant hasn't accomplished anything, because they are just in college. People will just think he's a spoiled douche. I think that's all he's trying to get at.

    I would think the average person reading this cares more about what someone in the industry thinks about this (like the OP) rather than someone who is not working in the industry (like you BTBanker). Maybe I'm wrong though, some students might prefer getting career advice from other college students.

    adapt or die wrote:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • In reply to SirTradesaLot
    Oreos's picture

    SirTradesaLot wrote:
    BTbanker wrote:
    Oreos wrote:

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.


    Agree with Oreos on this one, because I'm one of those people. It's a basic fact of life that if you dress well, not only will you get more pussy, you will be paid more.

    Also, OP, are you in Dallas by any chance?


    I think you're missing the point. Disjoint is saying all they have to do is be presentable. Namely, socks match suit, suit is not 3X oversize, etc. If someone came in for an interview for an Analyst position wearing an Hermes tie, $1,000 shoes, and a $10,000 watch, I think that would be more likely to hurt them than help them. People already know that the applicant hasn't accomplished anything, because they are just in college. People will just think he's a spoiled douche. I think that's all he's trying to get at.

    I would think the average person reading this cares more about what someone in the industry thinks about this (like the OP) rather than someone who is not working in the industry (like you BTBanker). Maybe I'm wrong though, some students might prefer getting career advice from other college students.


    reductio ad absurdum is a weak retort in this situation. the point is, you, STL, may not care, you may not give a shit about square capped shoes, but you aren't the whole market, your opinion may or may not be shared by the majority, but for you not to be able to place yourself in another's view point (caring about clothing greater than your outlook ) and to claim that people who don't share your view don't exist is quite immature.

    .

  • In reply to SirTradesaLot
    BTbanker's picture

    SirTradesaLot wrote:
    BTbanker wrote:
    Oreos wrote:

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.


    Agree with Oreos on this one, because I'm one of those people. It's a basic fact of life that if you dress well, not only will you get more pussy, you will be paid more.

    Also, OP, are you in Dallas by any chance?


    I think you're missing the point. Disjoint is saying all they have to do is be presentable. Namely, socks match suit, suit is not 3X oversize, etc. If someone came in for an interview for an Analyst position wearing an Hermes tie, $1,000 shoes, and a $10,000 watch, I think that would be more likely to hurt them than help them. People already know that the applicant hasn't accomplished anything, because they are just in college. People will just think he's a spoiled douche. I think that's all he's trying to get at.

    I would think the average person reading this cares more about what someone in the industry thinks about this (like the OP) rather than someone who is not working in the industry (like you BTBanker). Maybe I'm wrong though, some students might prefer getting career advice from other college students.

    It doesn't take a fund manager to know square-toed shoes, three piece suits, three-button clown suits, white socks, dark shirts, colored handkerchiefs, and fake Rolexes are faux pas in the business professional setting. I never encouraged anyone on this site to wear $20k to an interview. You can look just as good with $700 if you know where to look. Also, you can spend $2,500 on a suit and still look like shit if it doesn't fit.

  • Black Jack's picture

    I will add something to this (and good post OP). When you are at a networking event, an interview, anything interacting with people who might or might not choose to hire you, think about the questions you ask them. Nobody wants to answer "what is your outlook on the markets" "where do you see the xxx industry going" or the same shit that they talk about and answer every day at work. And nobody is going to be 'impressed' by these sorts of questions either. People like talking about themselves and their experiences- ask questions accordingly.

  • In reply to Oreos
    SirTradesaLot's picture

    Oreos wrote:
    SirTradesaLot wrote:
    BTbanker wrote:
    Oreos wrote:

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.


    Agree with Oreos on this one, because I'm one of those people. It's a basic fact of life that if you dress well, not only will you get more pussy, you will be paid more.

    Also, OP, are you in Dallas by any chance?


    I think you're missing the point. Disjoint is saying all they have to do is be presentable. Namely, socks match suit, suit is not 3X oversize, etc. If someone came in for an interview for an Analyst position wearing an Hermes tie, $1,000 shoes, and a $10,000 watch, I think that would be more likely to hurt them than help them. People already know that the applicant hasn't accomplished anything, because they are just in college. People will just think he's a spoiled douche. I think that's all he's trying to get at.

    I would think the average person reading this cares more about what someone in the industry thinks about this (like the OP) rather than someone who is not working in the industry (like you BTBanker). Maybe I'm wrong though, some students might prefer getting career advice from other college students.


    reductio ad absurdum is a weak retort in this situation. the point is, you, STL, may not care, you may not give a shit about square capped shoes, but you aren't the whole market, your opinion may or may not be shared by the majority, but for you not to be able to place yourself in another's view point (caring about clothing greater than your outlook ) and to claim that people who don't share your view don't exist is quite immature.

    If a person wears a suit that fits, a white shirt, cheap but plain shoes, and a $30 tie, they will be fine. My claim is that most people would agree with me about college graduate recruiting who already work in the industry.

    You think I'm immature because most people I know wouldn't judge a kid on their fashion (assuming what I said before about being presentable)? That is absurd, but you are entitled to your opinion.

    Frankly, if a 35 year old guy was judging a 21 year old by how they were dressing (especially if it wasn't 'high fashion'), I would think that is pretty immature of them.

    Since you seem to be so knowledgeable about this topic, what exactly are you expecting them to wear?

    adapt or die wrote:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • In reply to BTbanker
    SirTradesaLot's picture

    BTbanker wrote:
    SirTradesaLot wrote:
    BTbanker wrote:
    Oreos wrote:

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.


    Agree with Oreos on this one, because I'm one of those people. It's a basic fact of life that if you dress well, not only will you get more pussy, you will be paid more.

    Also, OP, are you in Dallas by any chance?


    I think you're missing the point. Disjoint is saying all they have to do is be presentable. Namely, socks match suit, suit is not 3X oversize, etc. If someone came in for an interview for an Analyst position wearing an Hermes tie, $1,000 shoes, and a $10,000 watch, I think that would be more likely to hurt them than help them. People already know that the applicant hasn't accomplished anything, because they are just in college. People will just think he's a spoiled douche. I think that's all he's trying to get at.

    I would think the average person reading this cares more about what someone in the industry thinks about this (like the OP) rather than someone who is not working in the industry (like you BTBanker). Maybe I'm wrong though, some students might prefer getting career advice from other college students.

    It doesn't take a fund manager to know square-toed shoes, three piece suits, three-button clown suits, white socks, dark shirts, colored handkerchiefs, and fake Rolexes are faux pas in the business professional setting. I never encouraged anyone on this site to wear $20k to an interview. You can look just as good with $700 if you know where to look. Also, you can spend $2,500 on a suit and still look like shit if it doesn't fit.


    Maybe we're just talking about the same thing in a different way. I'm reading what you guys are saying as the guy needs to be wearing name-brand expensive stuff and maybe that's not what you mean. White shirt, blue suit, black shoes and you're fine is what I'm saying. It doesn't need to be 'high-end'. Fuck, it could be from JC Penney, for all I care as long as it fits and I think very few people would disagree with that for Analyst interviews.

    adapt or die wrote:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • In reply to SirTradesaLot
    Oreos's picture

    SirTradesaLot wrote:
    Oreos wrote:
    SirTradesaLot wrote:
    BTbanker wrote:
    Oreos wrote:

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.


    Agree with Oreos on this one, because I'm one of those people. It's a basic fact of life that if you dress well, not only will you get more pussy, you will be paid more.

    Also, OP, are you in Dallas by any chance?


    I think you're missing the point. Disjoint is saying all they have to do is be presentable. Namely, socks match suit, suit is not 3X oversize, etc. If someone came in for an interview for an Analyst position wearing an Hermes tie, $1,000 shoes, and a $10,000 watch, I think that would be more likely to hurt them than help them. People already know that the applicant hasn't accomplished anything, because they are just in college. People will just think he's a spoiled douche. I think that's all he's trying to get at.

    I would think the average person reading this cares more about what someone in the industry thinks about this (like the OP) rather than someone who is not working in the industry (like you BTBanker). Maybe I'm wrong though, some students might prefer getting career advice from other college students.


    reductio ad absurdum is a weak retort in this situation. the point is, you, STL, may not care, you may not give a shit about square capped shoes, but you aren't the whole market, your opinion may or may not be shared by the majority, but for you not to be able to place yourself in another's view point (caring about clothing greater than your outlook ) and to claim that people who don't share your view don't exist is quite immature.

    If a person wears a suit that fits, a white shirt, cheap but plain shoes, and a $30 tie, they will be fine. My claim is that most people would agree with me about college graduate recruiting who already work in the industry.

    You think I'm immature because most people I know wouldn't judge a kid on their fashion (assuming what I said before about being presentable)? That is absurd, but you are entitled to your opinion.

    Frankly, if a 35 year old guy was judging a 21 year old by how they were dressing (especially if it wasn't 'high fashion'), I would think that is pretty immature of them.

    Since you seem to be so knowledgeable about this topic, what exactly are you expecting them to wear?


    You're missing the point. I have no view towards fashion and it's not the act of judging people on fashion that I would deem immature, it's your lack of ability to empathise.

    .

  • In reply to Oreos
    SirTradesaLot's picture

    Oreos wrote:
    SirTradesaLot wrote:
    Oreos wrote:
    SirTradesaLot wrote:
    BTbanker wrote:
    Oreos wrote:

    and yes, some people do not care what you dress like, but guess what, some people really do.


    Agree with Oreos on this one, because I'm one of those people. It's a basic fact of life that if you dress well, not only will you get more pussy, you will be paid more.

    Also, OP, are you in Dallas by any chance?


    I think you're missing the point. Disjoint is saying all they have to do is be presentable. Namely, socks match suit, suit is not 3X oversize, etc. If someone came in for an interview for an Analyst position wearing an Hermes tie, $1,000 shoes, and a $10,000 watch, I think that would be more likely to hurt them than help them. People already know that the applicant hasn't accomplished anything, because they are just in college. People will just think he's a spoiled douche. I think that's all he's trying to get at.

    I would think the average person reading this cares more about what someone in the industry thinks about this (like the OP) rather than someone who is not working in the industry (like you BTBanker). Maybe I'm wrong though, some students might prefer getting career advice from other college students.


    reductio ad absurdum is a weak retort in this situation. the point is, you, STL, may not care, you may not give a shit about square capped shoes, but you aren't the whole market, your opinion may or may not be shared by the majority, but for you not to be able to place yourself in another's view point (caring about clothing greater than your outlook ) and to claim that people who don't share your view don't exist is quite immature.

    If a person wears a suit that fits, a white shirt, cheap but plain shoes, and a $30 tie, they will be fine. My claim is that most people would agree with me about college graduate recruiting who already work in the industry.

    You think I'm immature because most people I know wouldn't judge a kid on their fashion (assuming what I said before about being presentable)? That is absurd, but you are entitled to your opinion.

    Frankly, if a 35 year old guy was judging a 21 year old by how they were dressing (especially if it wasn't 'high fashion'), I would think that is pretty immature of them.

    Since you seem to be so knowledgeable about this topic, what exactly are you expecting them to wear?


    You're missing the point. I have no view towards fashion and it's not the act of judging people on fashion that I would deem immature, it's your lack of ability to empathise.

    It's not that I think nobody could, it's my experience that nobody does in practice (once again, assuming we're talking about college kids and they're presentable).

    adapt or die wrote:
    What would P.T. Barnum say about you?

    MY BLOG

  • In reply to Disjoint
    chicandtoughness's picture

    Disjoint wrote:
    it's not a fashion show, or maybe your place is BTbanker, but I didn't realise Wachovia still existed.

    +1, just for that quip.

    "Accept no one's definition of your life; define yourself."
    Currently: saying goodbye to the financial industry... going into healthcare sector
    Previously: M&A consulting (Big 4), M&A banking (MM), academic research (HBS)

  • In reply to Disjoint
    brandon st randy's picture

    Disjoint wrote:
    A suit that is not 2x your size, no white socks, and other simple concepts that's all we ask of you.

    Shoot, I guess Michael Jackson would not have made the cut...

    Seriously thou, this is a great post. I especially appreciate the part where you mention that if a kid takes the initiative to reach out to you then you will consider giving him a shot even thou he is not in the pre-screened HR book.

    Too late for second-guessing Too late to go back to sleep.

  • Ichan's picture

    Nice post. Thank you

    It's not about the money. It's about the game between people.

  • WestCoastChimp30's picture

    Good insight from the OP. As an old-time user in this site (joined in 2007, so that might as well be 1990), I would add two points:

    1. About the OP - I agree that showing up to the interview dressed properly and not flashy or slovenly. The interviewer should remember you because of your energy, your insightful answers or train of thought (if you didn't get the answers right) not because of something superficial like how you were dressed.

    2. Networking - Even though I look at resumes and conduct interviews in my group, I still get cold calls by folks in college. What I always tell them is to look at their school's alumni database and start emailing folks in specific companies. The people that want to be contacted tend to have the most updated profiles so take advantage of that.

    Finally, this site is designed to help prospective monkeys and does that job well even though you get the occasional "Wear a Patek to work, yes or no?" or "I know everything about mezz lending because I've been at my group for 3 weeks" posts. If you're going to ask for help/insight/advice, make sure to get back to the people you PM. Sending a PM like "I have 10 questions about xyz" and not telling us whether or not you got the gig (or a simple "thank you") is poor form.

  • Girl Banker's picture

    Founder of GirlBankerDotCom, Author of To Become an Investment Banker