Do you care about having generational wealth?

It just seems like another dumb carrot to chase 

It's great if you can provide some nice things for your kids/grandkids (private school, down payment on a house, etc), but to worry about whether my great-grandkids' are set for life is stupid. i feel like nobody talked about "generational wealth" 10 or 20 years ago. 

Region

WSO Elite Modeling Package

  • 6 courses to mastery: Excel, Financial Statement, LBO, M&A, Valuation and DCF
  • Elite instructors from top BB investment banks and private equity megafunds
  • Includes Company DB + Video Library Access (1 year)

Comments (72)

Jan 26, 2022 - 2:24pm
Fast and Fiduciary, what's your opinion? Comment below:

There's a great quote that hard times make strong men, strong men make easy times, easy times make weak men, weak men make hard times. So I feel like if I left my son a lot of money he may grow up feeling entitled and being a pussy / not learning how to have a strong work ethic

Controversial
Jan 27, 2022 - 11:54am
Ozymandia, what's your opinion? Comment below:
Fast and Fiduciary

There's a great quote that hard times make strong men, strong men make easy times, easy times make weak men, weak men make hard times. So I feel like if I left my son a lot of money he may grow up feeling entitled and being a pussy / not learning how to have a strong work ethic

If you actually think that quote has any kind of value beyond right wing memes, I can almost guarantee you, handing down generational wealth isn't going to be an option for you.

Jan 28, 2022 - 1:44am
jamescross581, what's your opinion? Comment below:

You'd be surprised; the aforementioned quote holds a lot of truth.

About 70% of wealthy families lose their wealth by the second generation, and 90% do by the following generation, so the notion of generational wealth is often blown way out of proportion.

Jan 26, 2022 - 2:47pm
UCSDThrowaway, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I don't think anyone here is actually striving to have their kids "set for life". Fuck that. I want enough money to quit my job and chill, while still living comfortably.. kids can have my house and whatever is left over in the 401k when I die 

Learn More

300+ video lessons across 6 modeling courses taught by elite practitioners at the top investment banks and private equity funds -- Excel Modeling -- Financial Statement Modeling -- M&A Modeling -- LBO Modeling -- DCF and Valuation Modeling -- ALL INCLUDED + 2 Huge Bonuses.

Learn more
Jan 26, 2022 - 5:02pm
Short Caller, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Ah, the good old boomer mindset that brought our society to where we are now.

Jan 26, 2022 - 7:08pm
UCSDThrowaway, what's your opinion? Comment below:
Short Caller

Ah, the good old boomer mindset that brought our society to where we are now.

What you want me to do.. work until I'm 80 years old, for my kids? Shut up zoomer

Jan 27, 2022 - 2:52pm
thebrofessor, what's your opinion? Comment below:

the guy you called a boomer literally wrote a thread called "are boomers the worst generation?" https://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forums/are-boomers-the-worst-generation

what a lazy retort. historically parents provided for the kids so the kids could provide for the parents when they became old and decrepit, the idea of the non-upper class leaving wealth behind is completely novel which is part of the reason why I think it doesn't usually work well. it's your parents' job to prepare you for life, not financially insulate them from having to do so themselves

Jan 26, 2022 - 2:52pm
johnny-mnemonic, what's your opinion? Comment below:

My parents raised me with the understanding of a clear cut off after college. I think it's generous since 18 is also a common cut off. I'll probably do the same for my potential kids since they'll have the opportunity of college, but will be forced to make their own money after. I don't know how beneficial dropping a paid-off house and car, trust fund, etc. on a kid could ever be. Nobody should start a video game they've never played in 'new game plus' mode. A classmate of mine has access to a lot of money and it's made it difficult for her to relate with some of our friends who grew up middle class. Really only works if you're betting they'll just interact with other rich kids.

Jan 26, 2022 - 4:32pm
Mr Incredible, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I know some people who's parents "spoil" them yet they're incredibly hardworking 

Jan 27, 2022 - 11:36am
Angus Macgyver, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I know a guy who was born in India, went to public schools and college there, moved to the US to get a master's at some state school, worked as an engineer for a bit, then got an M7 MBA, and now he's the CEO of a large tech company that sells, among other things, video game systems, operating systems, and productivity programs.

Still doesn't mean starting out in the Indian middle class gives you great odds at ending up leading Microsoft.

Most Helpful
Jan 26, 2022 - 4:48pm
Layne Staley, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Do I care? Sure. Is it a driving force that overwhelms my other goals in life? Nah. I'd like to work on projects and investments that interest me and are lucrative, and creating multigenerational wealth is a positive side effect, not the end goal in and of itself. Like most people, I have a quality-of-life threshold that I'm not willing to cross for the next marginal dollar (which, in addition to my talent level and risk appetite, is why I'll never be a billionaire).

I like the idea of creating a safety net for my kids - I don't want to gift them a stipend so they can do whatever they want, but I want them to be insulated from catastrophic events. If they get hit by a car, I don't want them popping pills to manage the pain so they can work through it in order to pay the rent. I want them to be able to escape an abusive situation without wondering if they'll have a place to sleep or if they'll be able to feed their own kids.

I could be convinced that investing in their future is a way to help them create their own safety net. Paying for education seems like a logical thing to fall under that bucket. Maybe investing in a place to live - haven't decided on that one.

If my wife and I do a good job, then subsequent generations will continue the cycle and take care of the rest. I'd like for my kids to worry about (and be responsible for) creating a safety net for their kids, as opposed to looking to us to do it.

"Son, life is hard. But it's harder if you're stupid." - my dad
  • 26
Jan 26, 2022 - 5:27pm
Video Tape Store, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Here's my philosophy: You should put everything you have into growing them as introspective, thoughtful adults. You don't need wealth to do that, however you need a minimum amount of resources to do it well, such as quality time together, good education, opportunities for them to explore themselves

Jan 26, 2022 - 6:39pm
Arroz con Pollo, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Layne's response is great. My parents raised me upper-middle class. Bought me a car before I could even drive. Paid for college and luxury college apartments. Never worked a job growing up besides a campus job freshman year college that I quit after 3 weeks. Sent me money in college and paid the credit card bill. Let me live at home after graduation to save money and still paid my credit card bill. Bought me my first new car that I couldn't really afford (have paid them back). Even now for Christmas and my birthday they give me $1k just because.

I don't have the best relationship with my parents, but I respect both of them. They worked extremely hard to provide me with a life they never had growing up, and now that I have my own money, I've started giving back. Just spent several thousand on a luxury vacation for them that they could easily afford but would never splurge on themselves.

We might argue, but actions speak louder than words. I've seen them help both family members and those outside the family to extreme lengths. I know I can go to them if I ever need financial support. My dad once sold a Cadillac we had to my coach who wasn't well off. Sold it to him for $11, which was my jersey number.

Now that I have money, I've started thinking in a grander scheme. I've set up a 529 for my cousin who isn't as well off. I have the means to do so, so I view it as my duty to help. My cousin is my family, and you are supposed to take care of family.

I plan on making enough money to spoil my family. My parents will never need money from me - they're well off.

I'm not concerned about generational wealth - I'll have enough money to send my kids to private school and college, but I don't view that as a luxury for them. I believe you should provide for your family - I find it disgusting when people have kids and can't afford them.

I will raise my kids properly and they will grow up and be successful. This cycle will continue, and whatever wealth my kids inherit will grow and snowball as they will have strong moral values and will pass wealth on to their kids and so on.

Jan 26, 2022 - 8:00pm
WolfofWSO, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I lost all respect for this term after Master P had a masterclass on it. People paid $1k to meet Mr. "Make em say Uhhh!"

Array

  • 1
Jan 27, 2022 - 7:23am
TheBuellerBanker, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I care about it in the sense that I want to accumulate enough wealth that it will become generational. I'll never think about it from the perspective of wanting to have a ton of money that I can pass on as a legacy, but yes at a minimum I'd want to make sure my kids are taken care of from an education perspective. I never want my kids to lean on my wealth and quite frankly if I reach a significant level of wealth, I'd seriously consider keeping it in a charitable trust in lieu of passing it on. Obviously my opinions might change when I have kids as actually having kids triggers the whole parental protective instinct I don't posses right now. Bottom line is I'd want my kids to make it on their own. I'd be happy to indulge them in family things such as nice vacations etc but I'd want them to work as soon as they're able to and start earning their own. Bit of a tangent but to me generational wealth is totally tied to your children given they'd be the primary beneficiaries.

  • 5
  • 1
Jan 27, 2022 - 9:45am
CarsnWatches, what's your opinion? Comment below:

My personal goal at the minimum would be to have my kids be more well off than I was/the previous generation. This trend has continued for a few generations in my family at this point and I'd like to keep it up. If my kids decide to take a less lucrative path that is okay too as money is not everything. 

Generational wealth is on another level though at least from my perspective. From my experience though trust fund kids typically two generations removed from the wealth creators more often than not don't handle the money well. 

Jan 27, 2022 - 9:55am
thebrofessor, what's your opinion? Comment below:

not at all, I want to provide for them during life, teach them well, and then spend as much as humanly possible so I die with zero

www.diewithzerobook.com

I see wealth change hands all of the time, it's mostly a waste for the recipient, I rarely see big sums of money enable someone to have lasting life changing experiences, more often than not, it makes them greedier, doesn't change miserliness, and makes them hate taxes more. I can think of one specific situation where it rescued an unfortunate divorcee out of destitution, but beyond that, fuck it. pay for kids/grandkids education during their lives (or if they're young, fund those accounts now), make your charitable contributions NOW, and give your benefactors the money when they need it not when they're 60 or 70

and while misses brofessor has been dropping hints, I did write a thread on how I don't want kids, so who tf knows

Jan 27, 2022 - 10:21am
Layne Staley, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Yet again, I'm gonna have to read a book you've recommended.

It's hard for a tiger to change its stripes. Someone who has leaned on frugality and sacrifice to generate meaningful wealth over decades (or, believes that those have been important inputs, even if they haven't really) develops an emotional attachment to saving and wealth preservation. It's not a logical argument, it's an emotional one. I've seen a lot of baby boomer business owners spend far less than their means and accumulate fortunes because, basically, they're behaving in a way that would have made their Depression-era (or immigrant) parents proud, and that brings them peace.

It can be couched in all kinds of defensible arguments about what it can do for subsequent generations, but it's not really about the grandkids. It's about the ego and the security of the saver. It makes them feel good, even superior, like they're doing the right thing.

Not a criticism, just an observation. I've caught myself in this mindset often, and I have to challenge myself - is this gift really for the recipient, or is it for the giver (me)?

P.S. Baby fever is real. Also, can themrsbrofessor make an account please?

"Son, life is hard. But it's harder if you're stupid." - my dad
  • 5
Jan 28, 2022 - 1:29pm
thebrofessor, what's your opinion? Comment below:

very fair points, it is ego driven I think as well as a security blanket rather than a logical if this then that calculation. may be rational, but at some point when you've got $10mm in the bank with a $100k a year pension and only take out $50k a year from your investments, you have to ask yourself what all of this is for. to that end, many of my conversations these days are encouraging people to make my AUM smaller (you've won, fly first class, don't skimp on anything, TREAT YO SELF)

and sorry layne, next time we get together maybe we can get the wives involved, but until then, mrsbro has next to no online presence and I like it that way

TREAT YO SELF

Jan 27, 2022 - 9:57am
gufmo, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I haven't taken a penny of my parent's money since I was 21 and I wouldn't expect my kids to either. 

Jan 27, 2022 - 10:01am
Sequoia, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I'd like to leave each of my kids $5ml (in today's dollars, so growing in line with inflation) when I pass on. Aside from this, want to spend plenty of money on their education, fully pay for their colleges, give them good vacations, potentially pay for the down payment on their first houses, etc.

I'm not going to destroy my life working harder than that, this is the most I feel I can provide for 2 kids (maybe 3 depending on how things go but that's a bit of a stretch when you're pricing in 4% 60yr inflation assumptions) fairly comfortably. Will probably reassess all this stuff once I actually have kids & modify as needed, just rough thoughts for now

Jan 27, 2022 - 11:53am
ironman32, what's your opinion? Comment below:

At the OP, I feel the term "generational wealth" is used in two ways.

(1) I agree it is another dumb carrot, but its also used as a short of wealth/elitism move. With more access to investments, more people are probably getting close to having $1M saved for retirement; a good amount, but not super rich. Saying "generational wealth" is just a way for someone with several million dollars of saving to separate themselves from people with "only" $1M.

(2) I think its the carrot used by people pitching their investment system or by "financial experts". Take it as, if you don't come from a family that has money, or really knows a lot of money, giving you the chance to build "generational wealth" sounds like an intriguing idea. 

In the wide, its close to that argument of being someone with $1M vs looking like someone/what society thinks is someone worth $1M. Or put another way, its people who believe in saving for a rainy day, vs people who think, what the point of saving if you can never use it?  

Jan 27, 2022 - 11:59am
Ozymandia, what's your opinion? Comment below:
ironman32

At the OP, I feel the term "generational wealth" is used in two ways.

(1) I agree it is another dumb carrot, but its also used as a short of wealth/elitism move. With more access to investments, more people are probably getting close to having $1M saved for retirement; a good amount, but not super rich. Saying "generational wealth" is just a way for someone with several million dollars of saving to separate themselves from people with "only" $1M.

(2) I think its the carrot used by people pitching their investment system or by "financial experts". Take it as, if you don't come from a family that has money, or really knows a lot of money, giving you the chance to build "generational wealth" sounds like an intriguing idea. 

In the wide, its close to that argument of being someone with $1M vs looking like someone/what society thinks is someone worth $1M. Or put another way, its people who believe in saving for a rainy day, vs people who think, what the point of saving if you can never use it?  

I don't think several million dollars is generational wealth.  Think about how much money that needs to be.  You need to have enough that dozens of people can spend six figures a year without adding a dime to the pot, all while having that income be taxed and estate taxes chipping away and all that.  As with most things, I don't think folks on this site truly understand what that entails.  Yes, for myself, having 5-10mm in the bank is enough that I'd never have to work again.  It's not "buy a yacht" money, but for a couple more generations to live like that is not possible on that amount of money.  Half of it is gone the moment I die.  Assuming I have an average number of kids (lets say 2), all of a sudden you need twice as much wealth to live off passive income and have the same net revenue.  Once they have spouses, make it 4.  If they each have two kids, you've got another 4 mouths to feed off that single income stream, and if they have spouses.... so on and so forth.

You need tens of millions of dollars, UHNW status, to have "generational wealth," not $8mm generating 5% returns a year.

Jan 27, 2022 - 1:05pm
ironman32, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I agree with all your points. That is the way to build generational wealth and definitely need more than $8M to do it. If you have true generational wealth, you are also not waiting until you die to hand it to relatives, probably have some good lawyers/investment vehicles and a lot of tax free gifts over the years.

What I'm saying is "generational wealth" is a term used by people with say, $8M, so make themselves seem more esteemed/established than they really are. Also, I'd add, theres the "TV/hollywood" way of generational wealth, vs how it actually happens. First one is probably more along the lines of say a Jeff Bezos, build Amazon from a working class family background; the family money with be around for a while and have a long tail. Second is more akin to Bill Gates, coming from an upper middle class family, probably more of a step function.

Jan 27, 2022 - 1:06pm
IcedxTaro, what's your opinion? Comment below:
Ozymandia

ironman32

At the OP, I feel the term "generational wealth" is used in two ways.

(1) I agree it is another dumb carrot, but its also used as a short of wealth/elitism move. With more access to investments, more people are probably getting close to having $1M saved for retirement; a good amount, but not super rich. Saying "generational wealth" is just a way for someone with several million dollars of saving to separate themselves from people with "only" $1M.

(2) I think its the carrot used by people pitching their investment system or by "financial experts". Take it as, if you don't come from a family that has money, or really knows a lot of money, giving you the chance to build "generational wealth" sounds like an intriguing idea. 

In the wide, its close to that argument of being someone with $1M vs looking like someone/what society thinks is someone worth $1M. Or put another way, its people who believe in saving for a rainy day, vs people who think, what the point of saving if you can never use it?  

- expand -

I don't think several million dollars is generational wealth.  Think about how much money that needs to be.  You need to have enough that dozens of people can spend six figures a year without adding a dime to the pot, all while having that income be taxed and estate taxes chipping away and all that.  As with most things, I don't think folks on this site truly understand what that entails.  Yes, for myself, having 5-10mm in the bank is enough that I'd never have to work again.  It's not "buy a yacht" money, but for a couple more generations to live like that is not possible on that amount of money.  Half of it is gone the moment I die.  Assuming I have an average number of kids (lets say 2), all of a sudden you need twice as much wealth to live off passive income and have the same net revenue.  Once they have spouses, make it 4.  If they each have two kids, you've got another 4 mouths to feed off that single income stream, and if they have spouses.... so on and so forth.

You need tens of millions of dollars, UHNW status, to have "generational wealth," not $8mm generating 5% returns a year.

This.  I keep seeing videos on social media pitching generational-wealth.  I feel its overly-hyped and people do not fully grasp the kind of wealth needed to make it happen.

Jan 27, 2022 - 5:15pm
billackmanschauffeur, what's your opinion? Comment below:

I used to think I wanted to pass on generational wealth,..but I'm way more interested in experiencing my life and using up pretty much everything I earn (will earn), giving it away, eating really great food, seeing special things, buying things I like. 
 

I send my kids to private school, will pay for college if necessary, if not they can have their 529s and buy a house, start a business etc. 

I arrived at that mindset before reading die with zero. It only reinforced the sentiment. 

Jan 27, 2022 - 5:16pm
C.R.E. Shervin, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Care is a nebulous word, and probably not very precise in this case.

Is generational wealth evil in and of itself, no, is Good(?), sometimes. It is the end result of what every ambitious person, and what some/most parents want.  At one end it represents value created for society.  People use your services and products, by exchanging their services and products.  You created a product that was so useful that people willingly, at an arms length transaction, decided to give you money(the medium of exchange) for their products and services.  This seems like you have been rewarded by society for helping it.  That is what capitalism is all about.  Just think of all the libraries, foundations, hospitals, and universities that people with generational wealth have helped build/fund/create.

Here is the kicker, generational wealth likely only lasts 4-5 generations, at most.  The only way to keep it is to make sure trusts are set up are through primogeniture. The math is easy, let's take 400 million, because the generational wealth number of 200mm was given to me about 20 years ago. Founder = 400mm, 2 kids = 200mm(per kid), grandkids(lets say 4), so now, 100 hundred. Each smaller family has broken the capital up to below generational wealth.  All it takes is one idiot kid to sink the ship.

Jan 27, 2022 - 7:55pm
crabostrich, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Long story short, yes.

My parents are getting older, my younger siblings will go to graduate school.

I would like there to be a point when I can provide for them, because they have given me so much…

Jan 27, 2022 - 7:55pm
crabostrich, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Long story short, yes.

My parents are getting older, my younger siblings will go to graduate school.

I would like there to be a point when I can provide for them, because they have given me so much…

Jan 27, 2022 - 9:03pm
Kevin25, what's your opinion? Comment below:

after you die, nothing will matter for you.

people who care about generational wealth are just boring fucks who have no hobbies and don't know what to do with life, and the only thing they know is to obey commands at work and feel gratification from dropping checks every couple of weeks. so they prefer to trick themselves into thinking that their life has a meaning because they're building generational wealth, whereas they're just wasting their worthless life.

Jan 27, 2022 - 9:17pm
Bananalytics, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Most accumulated wealth is actually lost in only a few generations. More than 80% of millionaires here are self made. Being obsessed with generational wealth is more than likely not even a logical goal due to the simple tendency of entropy of money in any system. It'd be better to focus on living a full life and also raising responsible, introspective and well balanced kids rather than obsessing over their trust fund. My $0.02

Jan 28, 2022 - 1:46am
jamescross581, what's your opinion? Comment below:

This is the comment I was looking for lol. The notion in itself is often misconceived.

About 70% of wealthy families lose their wealth by the second generation, and 90% do by the following generation.

+1 SB from me!

Jan 28, 2022 - 9:02am
Remy06, what's your opinion? Comment below:

The only way to have true generational wealth is to raise your kids to be good character, productive citizens of society. Money comes and goes like a vapor in the wind, but good character men and women can make lasting effects on the people around them. 

Jan 28, 2022 - 12:36pm
2rigged2fail, what's your opinion? Comment below:

your legacy is an illusion. we will all be forgotten about in. a few generations. tombstones won't even be visible. 

  • 1
Jan 28, 2022 - 1:12pm
AnalyzeANDchill, what's your opinion? Comment below:

more important in my opinion to worry about teaching good values and work ethic and how the world works. Then pass on a few mil and you can be fairly confident it will grow instead of shrink. My goal is not simply to pass on money but a future. 

Jan 28, 2022 - 2:25pm
kiltedlowlander, what's your opinion? Comment below:

My parents were lower middle-class and didn't have the means to help with my college or really anything once I moved out of their house. I turned out fine. Had to work harder than some. I would rather instill good values in my kid than spoil them. Spoiling them won't get them anywhere. If I can instill good values, AND THEN help with their education, and have a few million for them left in the 401(k) when I die at the early age of 60 from day drinking all the Scotch I've collected every day after I retire, then great, because I know they'll be way less likely to blow it if they understand the value of it and how much work it takes when you start with very little. 

Jan 29, 2022 - 1:41am
SunTzu, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Having generational wealth is such a coin flip, but there are only 2 primary ways to get it IMO:

  1. Build a business and sell it and multiply that liquidity event through sensible

Investing

  1. Be a great investor with other people's money over the medium/ long term

The NFT and Bitcoin bros will be weeded out if they keep coming back to the table…

I'm simply focused on creating enough wealth to create a comfortable life for me, my wife, and my kids. But they will work, i see what the Default rich parents life does for kids… mostly not good

Life is more than dollars
  • 2
Jan 29, 2022 - 1:07pm
PaulAllen'sCorpse, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Dolores autem tempore possimus dolorum quasi excepturi. Ut qui nemo deserunt tempora fuga aspernatur laudantium. Ratione saepe consequatur saepe quibusdam pariatur porro. Dolore consequatur fugiat rerum atque. Voluptates quam quo ullam voluptatem explicabo reiciendis consequatur. Perferendis provident ut ut saepe non sed dolores earum.

Repellendus voluptatem repudiandae praesentium illo natus. Fugiat possimus voluptas temporibus iste dolor maxime rerum. Occaecati voluptates velit omnis praesentium veniam voluptatem sit. Fugiat sapiente sit voluptas ut. Nobis repellendus est sed perferendis eos corporis doloremque.

Feb 2, 2022 - 7:48pm
Yankee Doodle, what's your opinion? Comment below:

Magni eum fuga consequatur sit magni vitae voluptatem. Distinctio in a cum.

Atque quibusdam ipsum cumque alias ab dolorum. Temporibus neque eos optio accusantium. Non unde laudantium quasi. Mollitia nihil aut quo ipsam hic qui.

Doloremque magni fugiat cum consequatur praesentium. Enim quia similique cumque velit et. Odit dolor atque nisi sunt. Aperiam nam molestiae non nihil. Libero sequi cumque commodi ipsam. Quia et sed cum modi voluptatem praesentium. Sed et ut magnam est corporis.

Dolores quas quo sed nihil et cumque. Et ducimus consequuntur voluptatem nihil quia consequatur. Sint ipsa qui sint optio enim officiis libero.

"Work ethic, work ethic" - Vince Vaughn

Start Discussion

Career Advancement Opportunities

May 2022 Investment Banking

  • Jefferies & Company (▲03) 99.6%
  • Lincoln International (= =) 99.2%
  • RBC Capital Markets (▲06) 98.7%
  • Bank of America Merrill Lynch (▲01) 98.3%
  • Houlihan Lokey (▲07) 97.9%

Overall Employee Satisfaction

May 2022 Investment Banking

  • Jefferies & Company (▲12) 99.6%
  • Rothschild (▲02) 99.1%
  • Lincoln International (▲04) 98.7%
  • Truist Securities (+ +) 98.3%
  • Greenhill (▲05) 97.9%

Professional Growth Opportunities

May 2022 Investment Banking

  • Jefferies & Company (▲04) 99.6%
  • Lincoln International (▲04) 99.2%
  • Bank of America Merrill Lynch (▲05) 98.7%
  • RBC Capital Markets (▲08) 98.3%
  • Houlihan Lokey (▲06) 97.9%

Total Avg Compensation

May 2022 Investment Banking

  • Director/MD (9) $661
  • Vice President (36) $393
  • Associates (181) $246
  • 2nd Year Analyst (109) $161
  • 3rd+ Year Analyst (17) $156
  • 1st Year Analyst (349) $148
  • Intern/Summer Associate (74) $147
  • Intern/Summer Analyst (272) $91