How to reject offers (not reneging) politely and professionally?

zentiger's picture
Rank: Baboon | 139

I have a few offers, and it's a great position to be in. That being said, I now need to tell many banks that I will not be signing and that I've selected a different summer analyst program. It's been surprisingly difficult for me and I wanted any advice.

For some, I had indicated strong interest (and was fairly genuine about it), and others have congratulated me and pushed me to sign. Others have been aggressive, trying to get my verbal acceptance right away when they called. Some have political ties to me (helped me get the job but I'm not taking it). How do I navigate this? Do I tell the places where I will be going, or just leave it vague?

I plan on just sending some thoughtful emails, but maybe I should call as well (at least for the MDs who went out of their way to congratulate me)? Especially for the higher ups (MDs) that have reached out and put pressure on me to sign, I want to not burn any bridges since the street is small.

Comments (146)

Feb 10, 2015

If you're really close with a personthat helped push you through, it's probably best to give them a call. I recently had to do this, and while it wasn't fun, the guy definitely understood. I'd imagine most people go through some form of this, so they'll probably understand.

If you're sending an email, just be polite and be sure to thank them for the opportunity. I usually don't tell them where I accepted unless they ask in a follow up email.

Feb 10, 2015

I would definitely call the places where you have connections/people going to bat for you. Places where you just did resume drop and don't have any kind of connection with, a polite email will suffice to whoever is coordinating the recruiting process.

Feb 10, 2015
B2Banker:

I would definitely call the places where you have connections/people going to bat for you. Places where you just did resume drop and don't have any kind of connection with, a polite email will suffice to whoever is coordinating the recruiting process.

I agree with the idea to call. It will be much more difficult, but much more professional. Prepare for someone to not handle it correctly, but in all likelihood, they will be very professional and understand. Most of the people that get aggressive are simply trying to close out the recruiting and hiring process, and come off as pushy. I've dealt with this type of behavior during my last job search, and they usually understood when I came back with a "no thanks". I would still make sure that you take the SA offer that you want to take FIRST, then immediately call and let the others know that you aren't taking it. That way you don't run into any issues with taking the position you want. Also, anyone that you are particularly close to in the process might deserve a quick handwritten thank you note.

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Feb 10, 2015

Oh and to OP, congrats on the offer! Nice to have options.

Feb 10, 2015

Congratulations on the multitude of offers. No offense, but while you are definitely a competitive candidate, you are just a number. No bank will get pissed because you decline their offer. Just send HR a simple "Thank you for the opportunity, but I have decided to accept another employment offer" type email. If someone pushed your resume, send them a personal email. Do not call out of the blue. That is just annoying. Good luck. You definitely earned it.

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Feb 10, 2015
Sil:

Congratulations on the multitude of offers. No offense, but while you are definitely a competitive candidate, you are just a number. No bank will get pissed because you decline their offer. Just send HR a simple "Thank you for the opportunity, but I have decided to accept another employment offer" type email. If someone pushed your resume, send them a personal email. Do not call out of the blue. That is just annoying. Good luck. You definitely earned it.

I don't know why this got ms. I find this to be pretty accurate. You should only be calling people if they sacrificed an arm/leg for you and you have a pretty tight connection. Otherwise it's just a little annoying.

Feb 10, 2015
nkhanlegend:
Sil:

Congratulations on the multitude of offers. No offense, but while you are definitely a competitive candidate, you are just a number. No bank will get pissed because you decline their offer. Just send HR a simple "Thank you for the opportunity, but I have decided to accept another employment offer" type email. If someone pushed your resume, send them a personal email. Do not call out of the blue. That is just annoying. Good luck. You definitely earned it.

I don't know why this got ms. I find this to be pretty accurate. You should only be calling people if they sacrificed an arm/leg for you and you have a pretty tight connection. Otherwise it's just a little annoying.

I made a trollish post in another thread, which must have pissed someone off enough to find other posts of mine to throw MS at *rolls eyes*

Feb 10, 2015

Well done on nailing these offers. First thing you should do is accept your preferred offer.

I think it's always a good idea to call. You have been through a few rounds of interviews, and an email brings an abrupt end to that process. You will be able to control and convey the tone better on the phone. If they ask where you are accepting an offer, no harm in being open about it since you did not accept this firm's offer in the first place (Would not recommend this if you are reneging.)

Recently, I had to turn down a final round interview at a firm where I had several connections, and people typically understand; you want to make best decision for your career.

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Feb 10, 2015

First, congratulations on lining up a number of offers.

Second, I believe the advice on calling those who put forth effort to get you the offers is wise. When speaking with some and emailing others, just be honest. They'll respect that.

Third, make sure no red tape or other snags prevent your desired offer from becoming set in stone. If the offer windows permit, wait until your offer is completely finalized before declining others.

Again, congrats and good luck.

Feb 10, 2015

They'll likely have backup candidates that they are slow rolling while they wait on your decision. I have no hard feelings towards people who want to go elsewhere, but I'd rather get a quick no so I can extend an offer to the next person in line instead of waiting around for a week and losing that person to another bank as well.

As others said, if you have a close personal connection, call them first, thank them for all their help but explain that you feel you were a better fit with XYZ bank and group and have decided to accept that offer. Then just email the recruiting coordinator, thank them for all their help and consideration, and politely explain that you've decided to go to XYZ bank instead.

Congrats on the multiple offers, it's a good position to be in. Be professional/polite and they'll be fine with it.

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Feb 10, 2015

Accept and sign your top offer then delicately decline your other offers. Do not burn any bridges. You never know you may need a job for FT or make work with those guys one day.

Robert Clayton Dean: What is happening?
Brill: I blew up the building.
Robert Clayton Dean: Why?
Brill: Because you made a phone call.

Feb 10, 2015

Like others have said, if you had someone close pushing for you - you must call them to politely thank them for the opportunity, but decided to go with another firm because of reason (must be delicate of the reason too, can't be too truthful).

If its something you don't have close ties with, just call them and say thanks for opportunity but you felt you fitted in with other's culture better.

Feb 14, 2015

Just man up, be honest, and tell them you're accepting another offer. This is finance, they'll understand.

I'm bi-winning. I win here, and I win there.

Feb 14, 2015

By phone first, and then by email/letter.
Don't lie about taking another position. Your paths will almost certainly cross again, so you are correct in wanting to keep it professional. The tricky part is the "why" you're declining. You don't initially have to give a reason for declining. Just graciously thank them and decline the offer. They'll certainly ask why.

You might try saying that the interview process allowed you to learn more about the boutique just as they learned more about you, and you find yourself feeling like you'd be a better fit at other firms where you are interviewing. If they ask why, you can suggest that it's a combination of factors ranging from product focus, opportunities for analysts, and fit.

You don't want to nor should you feel that you need to go into great detail. Even if they probe, don't feel like you need to talk about the other places you're interviewing. Tell them it's not really relevant as you feel comfortable with your decision and don't want to get into an issue-by-issue debate with them. Be gracious throughout and you'll be fine. In this market they'll find someone else they like to fill the slot.

How to Decline an Offer - http://bit.ly/3x51Pl
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Feb 14, 2015

This is fairly simple and you're over-thinking it. If you have been corresponding via email, then just send an email "Thank you very much for this opportunity...However, this internship is not the right fit for me...thanks for your time. Best regards,..."

If you have been convsersing by phone then just say the same thing politely by phone. Firms don't give a crap if an intern rejects them, they can always find interns.

Feb 14, 2015

I felt like crap for a while rejecting a great firm who has really been gunning for me to be a part of their team... it's almost worse than being rejected outright...

Feb 14, 2015

just call them.

Feb 14, 2015

Thanks, but no thanks.

Sincerely,

bossman

Feb 14, 2015

I assume by letter you mean e-mail? If so, be quick and to the point. No need to bs. However, if you have a solid contact at the bank that may have went to bat for you, I would call him/her up personally and thank them for the help, explain your thought, etc. Best to avoid bad blood whenever possible.

Feb 14, 2015

Thanks guys.

I interviewed with MD and few other ppl. Then MD called me about the offer and then the HR. Who do i write the email/call? The MD or HR?

Do what you want not what you can!

Feb 14, 2015

You need to call MD first and call HR as well (even though MD would have informed HR immediately, at least for my case)

Feb 14, 2015

Call the MD, then call HR.

Be a man and don't take the pussy route of emailing....lets put it this way, do you ever want to get dumped by email?

Feb 14, 2015

email is FINE you are just antoher numbre to them they do not care

Feb 14, 2015

Just call and be honest

Feb 14, 2015

I am highly in favor of calling as well. It helps take the sting out.

But, if you really need to write a letter, you can structure it this way:

Dear Mr.Smith,

It was really wonderful to meet you and learn about The Company this weekend. I am a little hesitant with what I am about to tell you. I'm happy that you have favorably considered my interest in The Company but I am sad that I am withdrawing my application.

I think very highly of The Company and it's one of the most respected companies to work for. I hope that in being honest with you about the change in my situation, and the resulting withdrawal of my application, that I am not disallowed to continue considering The Company as a top opportunity in the future.

Thank you again for considering me. I apologize for any difficulty my withdrawal may have caused. Hopefully by being honest with you as early as I could, I have minimized any inconvenience. I hope I can stay in touch.

Best,
Erin

Feb 14, 2015

No one cares. You're fine.

Feb 14, 2015

I had the same issue - as long as you rejected nicely, left a door open for future communication, and didn't talk sh*t, you are fine.

"The only thing history teaches us, a wise man once said, is that history doesn't teach us anything."

Feb 14, 2015

Yeah just don't be like that guy who turned down KBW and said he had a "better offer" at JPM, that "Unfortunately I will not be able to bless KBW with my presence and talent...", and then linked Dave Chapelle's White Supremacist skit.

Feb 14, 2015

I seem to have had a variety of responses, but as would be expected. The people I had better relationships with were disappointed yet still happy that I ended up in a good place. The ones I didn't have as great relationships with didn't seem to take it as well, but no one seemed to be offended.

Feb 14, 2015

just be polite, dont take yourself so seriously.

Feb 14, 2015

This is a very complicated ritual, not just anybody can pull it off: Start by sending a gift basket (any kind) to each and every person who has interviewed you at that firm. Don't leave anyone out, even a 1st year analyst, because that would fuck it all up. Then call up each one and engage them in a lengthy conversation; try to steer it toward their feelings about the possibility of you interviewing with another firm on the Street besides theirs. Here's where you have to use your judgment - if he/she doesn't seem to mind if you interview elsewhere, then call them back in 3 weeks and tell them that you're sorry, but you're taking another offer. If they sound like the jealous type, you're going to have to show up in person. Go to the office in your best suit and track down all of the guys who came off as the jealous type... then ask them if they have a few minutse to sit down and talk. Break the news gently, and if it gets violent just walk away and keep it professional. Don't fight back if they get physical.

Feb 14, 2015

MKMD seems out to terrorize every analyst on this board..so lame.

Feb 14, 2015

Danny maybe you can add it as something not to do on your "how to be the best associate you can be" thread? Even more lame.

Feb 14, 2015

Mark. Are you serious? All that to tell someone your not going to take their job? Hell, I would just call and say sorry I have already accepted a position somewhere else. Leave it at that.

Gift baskets? Are you serious?

Feb 14, 2015

He's clearly kidding.

Feb 14, 2015

Ok good. Sorry I'm new here I dont know Mark's sense of humor yet.

Feb 15, 2015

-

Feb 14, 2015

From a bank's perspective, we like to know why someone is choosing a competitor. Obviously we think the person is making a mistake, after-all, we seem to think we do a pretty good job. I'd say just give the truth unless it is something nasty like -the MDs all seemed like assholes- or anything demeaning. If location was a factor, just say it. To be completely honest, you will be forgotten rather quickly. Heck, I've already forgotten the names of a number of people I interviewed who signed on for next year!!

Feb 14, 2015

Fold the offer letter into a very poorly made paper airplane. Throw it at HR. When it crashes, say "This offer don't fly. Peace."

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Feb 14, 2015

"Fold the offer letter into a very poorly made paper airplane. Throw it
at HR. When it crashes, say "This offer don't fly. Peace.""

i'll give this one a shot.

Feb 14, 2015

Mark Klen MD's reply cracks me up.. I have been laughing for 5+ mins.. hahaha

Ling~

Ling~

Feb 14, 2015

Just be honest and tell them although they are a great firm and you were really impressed by them blah blah that you really want to pursue another option. If there was someone that you had developed a relationship with through the recruiting process that was pulling for you call them and try to remain in touch with them.

Feb 15, 2015

"Thank you for interviewing me. While your firm's credentials were very impressive, due to the highly competitive market we will not be moving forward with the offer process. I wish you success in your future recruiting efforts."

Feb 15, 2015
models_and_bottles:

"Thank you for interviewing me. While your firm's credentials were very impressive, due to the highly competitive market we will not be moving forward with the offer process. I wish you success in your future recruiting efforts."

Feb 15, 2015

umm the market is anything but competitive right about now... just tell them you really enjoyed speaking with them, but you're pursuing another option. And be sure to thank them for their time.

Feb 15, 2015

Dear bank,

Thanks, but no thanks.

-Signed, your name-

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-

"We are lawyers! We sue people! Occasionally, we get aggressive and garnish wages, but WE DO NOT ABDUCT!" -Boston Legal-

Feb 15, 2015

Models_and_bottles has the best answer to rejecting offers...haha

Feb 15, 2015

just email HR.

And if your interviewer took special interest in you - then email him too. Might turn out to be a useful contact in the future.

Feb 15, 2015

What if you've already signed??? :o gulp

Feb 15, 2015

It's not that hard. Just keep it gracious and polite.

Feb 15, 2015

why not call?

Feb 15, 2015

I would agree with host above posts. keep in polite and thank them for the opportunity. But, personally, I would call them and felt obligated to thank them personally or whatever. It goes a long way and will definitely help promote a better relationship with that company down the line.

Feb 15, 2015

lol rejection template.

Feb 15, 2015
oldmansacks:

lol rejection template.

To OP: ask and you shall receive. This is something that I actually use.

Dear Mr. (John Doe),

I am really impressed with the people that I interviewed with and thank you for giving me the opportunity to work at (insert subject company name). Recently, I have accepted an offer for a position I got through my (insert contact, friend, coworker, mentor); therefore, I would no longer be able to work at (insert subject company name).

I look forward to keeping in touch as I continue to learn more about the industry. Once again, thank for your time and for your consideration.

Warmest regards,
First Name Last Name

Feb 15, 2015

Jeezus kid, think for yourself! Just write a bloody email, WSO isn't going to hold your hand through every email you ever write.

Feb 15, 2015

Just be polite and explain that you have found something else. Just make sure you don't slam behind you, as you never know if you will be applying there again.

"It's outrageous, egregious, preposterous. "

Feb 15, 2015

Always call. No emails to reject an offer.

Feb 15, 2015

Dear TTT firm,

Thank you for your interest but I signed with a more preftigious firm. I'm sure you unpreftigious mad jelly as fuarkkk bros understand.

  • Alpha bro
Feb 15, 2015

"Thanks for the offer, I really enjoyed meeting everyone and hearing about the firm, but I've decided to go a different direction that I feel is the best fit for me right now. Thanks again, would like to stay in touch, etc...."

Less is more, so try not to go rambling on explaining your whole decision process - keep it simple and to the point. They have heard "no" before so keep that in mind. While this is a big deal for you, they likely interview dozens (if not hundreds) of kids year in and year out.

I've had to turn down a handful of offers, and after saying the above it is surprisingly painless. Only with one full-time offer did they ask me any follow up questions about my decision. The rest said congrats, maybe asked which firm I chose, and that was that. Congrats on getting a few offers.

Feb 15, 2015

i'm getting more money elsewhere.

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Feb 15, 2015

I would call the MD and HR representative and reject the offer in person. That firm obviously valued you as an individual and has confidence in your abilities - the least you can do is to tell them thanks (and apologize) like a professional. E-mail is much too impersonal and somewhat rude regarding a sensitive issue like this.

Feb 15, 2015

I would call HR and then after your conversation ask them if they would like you to reach out to the MD. They usually say no unless they don't want to do it themselves.

Feb 15, 2015

I've gone another direction. Just be very thankful and tell them another opportunity that is a better fit just presented itself.

Feb 15, 2015

Can you describe some of the red flags?

Feb 15, 2015

The interview process was unorganized and it felt like they were in a rush to just pick someone for the position. They skipped the phone interview with me which I thought was odd. A lot of poor communication coming from the firm, like the wrong time for the interview, or who i was and wasn't going to meet with. It wasn't a smooth process.

And no written offer...

I was only interested in taking the interview for practice. The actual position doesn't line up with my career goals. It's not really a step forward in my career.

Feb 15, 2015

Subtweet them.

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Feb 15, 2015

lol

Feb 15, 2015

dont explain anything or give reasons just say thanks for the opportunity etc

Feb 15, 2015

Do you really need help with this?

Just say you very much appreciate the interest but have accepted another offer. Ask to stay in touch going forward.

Aint rocket science.

Feb 15, 2015

Don't write a letter. While it is a bit uncomfortable, you need to call your contact in HR or at the company and decline via phone. Thank them for the opportunity and say that you've chosen to go in another direction or have accepted another offer. It's nothing more complicated than that.

Feb 15, 2015
craigmcdermott:

Don't write a letter. While it is a bit uncomfortable, you need to call your contact in HR or at the company and decline via phone. Thank them for the opportunity and say that you've chosen to go in another direction or have accepted another offer. It's nothing more complicated than that.

+1 Man up and call

Feb 15, 2015

I mean I get where people are coming from by saying "man up and call" but when banks reject you often times you don't even get a personalized response, its usually just a form letter. Not very nice or personable by them...

Feb 15, 2015
Dubsfan7:

I mean I get where people are coming from by saying "man up and call" but when banks reject you often times you don't even get a personalized response, its usually just a form letter. Not very nice or personable by them...

"Not very nice or personable of them" - is exactly what you're interviewer will think if you wuss out and email.

Feb 15, 2015

Calling seems pointless in general, but definitely pointless since they are somewhat foreign and things are easily misconstrued and stuff then. So definitely not for the situation at hand, but maybe other times I would consider. I would definitely consider if I hadn't accepted and thought I might negotiate some or something.

And I figured asking couldn't hurt, to the guy who wanted to know if I really needed help. No, I didn't, but you can ask and see others' experiences at the same time, as it once again can't really hurt.

Feb 15, 2015

I think you need to call. Don't give reasons but be polite and thank them for the opportunity

Feb 15, 2015

Call, no reasons, be vague.

Feb 15, 2015

lol just turned down an offer...felt pretty bad saying no after I had them convinced i really wanted to work there...

Feb 15, 2015

Call if they have maintained contact with you that way.

Feb 15, 2015

They offered me the job by phone, then followed up with printed materials, but other than that the contact has mostly been e-mail.

Feb 15, 2015

Be professional and call - follow up with an email. It won't be that bad.

Feb 15, 2015

you should call. be polite and professional, but don't insult them with an email.

to clarify given the same-time post above: email afterwards ok, but delivering news by email is a bit ehh.

Feb 15, 2015

I would also suggest calling your HR/recruiter. Even though when banks reject you they typically do it be e-mail, so it is a bit ridiculous that they should hold you at a higher standard.

Feb 15, 2015

OK thanks guys! I'll call first thing in the morning.

Feb 15, 2015

i really dont think it matters

Feb 15, 2015

More description on the new job please. Whats your role and why is it a "dead end"?

Feb 15, 2015

I don't think those details are necessarily important as the general question is: does applying for, interviewing for, being offered, and then turning down a promotion look bad enough to limit future growth with the company?

FWIW, the new position is in the Cash Management group and is considered a dead end as this group works on a more broad level than the other groups at our location and would not provide the property/deal level experience needed to move to better position in another group. If I take the position my options would be to try and advance within Cash Management, make a lateral move, or try and get a supervisor position in my current group (assuming one ever opens up).

I know someone here has been in this position or has seen this happen.

Feb 15, 2015

it definitely won't be a big positive, but it will probably just piss off the people in the group that wanted you and maybe some HR people....so down the road if there is another position open in another group, they may be a bit more reluctant to give you the offer, but I don't see it as being a huge deal if you dont want to go into that group.

You can say you have done more research and feel that the group you are currently in actually is a better fit. Issue is you'll probably have to lay low for a bit, but this is just basic office politics. If the group really is THAT bad, then I'd probably pass and wait it out. If there isn't too much interaction between your current group and the one you applied to, it should not be a HUGE deal, but you are the closest one to the situation, so us guessing about your office politics is a bit tough. If the senior guys say it is a big No No to turn down an internal promotion to another group, then I'd listen to them.

Either way, good luck.

Feb 15, 2015

It might be a problem within the bank, but who says you can't take this new position and then If you end up being pigeonholed, just going to another bank. This isn't a scarlet letter.

Take the promotion and see what happens.

Feb 15, 2015

I would go with the advice of the senior bankers at your firm who would know far better than anybody on this forum what you should do in this situation at your bank:

"They said that if I get the offer however I should accept as applying for and turning down a promotion looks terrible and will keep me from getting promoted in the future. They said the best bet is to work in this position for 9-12 months and then make a lateral move into another group."

Make the higher salary for the next year then lateral out when a better opportunity presents itself.

Feb 15, 2015
PSH2:

I would go with the advice of the senior bankers at your firm who would know far better than anybody on this forum what you should do in this situation at your bank:

"They said that if I get the offer however I should accept as applying for and turning down a promotion looks terrible and will keep me from getting promoted in the future. They said the best bet is to work in this position for 9-12 months and then make a lateral move into another group."

Make the higher salary for the next year then lateral out when a better opportunity presents itself.

Yeah seriously, why is he asking us? Reassurance? Well here it is. I can't imagine anyone in their right mind disagreeing with the advice of the higher ups at the very bank you work for, lol.

Feb 15, 2015

Thank-you for the advice guys, I am leaning toward accepting the position. I have learned my lesson to do some more research before applying next time...

Feb 15, 2015

Rejecting a position you applied for is the worst thing you could do. It will make you not credible and immature. Since you say you can lateral from it later on then it's not a dead end. Take it and do a good job there. Good luck!

Feb 15, 2015

Call both of them, especially if you want to maintain a good relationship with the firm. Remember to be grateful on the phone.

Feb 15, 2015

Call the person extending the offer.

Best Response
Feb 15, 2015

I would call the person who extended the offer to you and then email HR (since I'm assuming that even if a banker gave you the news, HR had some communication with you regarding offer terms, etc) just to take the time and let them know your decision. Additionally, I would consider reaching out to any of your contacts who really pushed for you and/or knew you received an offer - you don't want them to think that you had them make a big push only to blow off the opportunity. Essentially, just cover your bases, let everyone quickly know your decision, and briefly why you went that way - thank them again and sign off - this should help you to not burn any bridges. Beyond that, accept the other offer and good luck.

Feb 15, 2015

Call both. You'll need that person's help later. I had to decline a few offers and boy was it awkward but just make sure to not burn any bridges

Feb 15, 2015

call, will be awkward, but I also think emailing is fine too

Feb 15, 2015

Call her and let her give you some advice if she wants, make her feel like you value her opinion and let here recognize it's a tough thing to do. Maybe offer to stay in touch.

Feb 15, 2015

call him

Feb 15, 2015

Call him and tell him in person what you've written down. Also tell him what you are looking for...maybe he can get you in somewhere else..you might never know

Feb 15, 2015

Yeah, call him and tell him. That's the right thing to do.

Feb 15, 2015

If you turned it down without a competing offer, he might think you are entitled.

Feb 15, 2015

There really isn't much to this. Tell them the truth, be respectful, and thank them for the opportunity. This is common sense.

Feb 15, 2015

Step 1: Call recruiter
Step 2: Tell recruiter you won't be accepting their offer
Step 3: Pat yourself on the back - problem solved!

Feb 15, 2015

"Hey John, it's Aphamos from XYZ University. I'm calling to let you know that I have to decline the offer to work as an intern this summer at ABC Corp for D,E,F reasons. I look forward to any opportunities that may arise at ABC in the future."

Feb 15, 2015

What if they ask where you are doing to? Do you tell them straight up or what?

Feb 15, 2015

I have been wondering the same thing.. do you have to call the recruiter, or is ok to just email them with all of your reasons (so much less awkward...)

Feb 15, 2015

I actually had to turn down my offer from the sophomore internship I did at a BB last summer as well. I did the following:
1)Called my HR contact
2)Explained to them the difficulty I was having with making the decision because I enjoyed the experience
3)Mention broadly why I was exploring the opportunity.
When they ask where I am going, I just say "I'd prefer to keep that to myself at the given time," just because I personally think it is my own business.

Feb 15, 2015

Just send them an email. Not worth your time. Props to you for identifying an issue a head of time and doing something about it.

Feb 15, 2015

Yeah, just say "Thank you for your employment offer, but I have found future opportunities elsewhere."
Done in one line.

Feb 15, 2015

OK great, thanks for the advice! Appreciate the help

Feb 15, 2015

You could always tell them no by taking a page out of George Constanza's book from when he was trying to get fired from the Yankee's:

While driving around in circles in the parking lot with world series trophy dragging at the end of his car attached by a rope and speaking out of a bull horn:

"Attention Steinbrenner and front-office morons! Your triumphs mean nothing. You all stink. You can sit on it, and rotate! This is George Costanza. I fear no reprisal. Extension five-one-seven-oh."

Feb 15, 2015

hi sketchy ibank

I appreciate the offer of employment, but I won a contest.

best

Feb 15, 2015

What was so sketchy in the agreement letter?

Feb 15, 2015

sounds like FTP

Feb 15, 2015

The Seinfeld reference was the fact that Jerry has guidelines to how many dates you can go on before you have to do the face-to-face breakup or the over the phone breakup.

The paragraph stated that I had to stay at the firm for at least 3 years and if I left for another securities firm or bank then I had to give them back all of the remuneration they paid me plus a exorbitant amount of money (think $150k-$250k) for each of the 3 years left. So if I left after a couple months I would have to pay them ~$600k. It was obviously more concretely stated than this in the contract but this is basically what it mapped out.

Mind you, this is for an analyst position. I thought MD's and CEO's only get non-compete clauses in their contracts?

Feb 15, 2015

wow...what is the name of this bank?

Feb 15, 2015
Comment

People like Coldplay and voted for the Nazis, you can't trust people Jeremy

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