Can I get into investment banking from non target school?

rafitaa's picture
Rank: Chimp | banana points 8

I will be attending UW-oshkosh this fall, and want to get into investment banking. I realize that Oshkosh is not a target school, so I was wondering how I can't get into IB still. I read that if I graduate from Oshkosh, work 2-3 years, then go get and MBA at a target school, I can get a job as an associate. Is that true? and where would I have to work for those 2-3 years. Also are there investment banking jobs in Wisconsin? and are those less competitive then New York jobs? I just feel stuck because I didn't try in high school, so couldn't get into a target school, and now it seems like my chances are very slim of getting into IB. If anyone with experience or knowledge on this can help me out that'd be great.

Comments (155)

Aug 12, 2017

1) Stop feeling bad for yourself
2) Kick ass your freshman year (4.0, clubs, etc)
3) Transfer to a better school and kick ass at your new school

See: KeyBanc and Stephens for midwest banks

Array
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Aug 10, 2017

No, bai boi

Aug 12, 2017

Thanks for sharing your story, congrats

WSO's COO (Chief Operating Orangutan) | My story | My Linkedin

Aug 12, 2017

Congratulation. Its not easy when you have uncertainty.

Aug 12, 2017

Congrats!

Aug 12, 2017

Congrats buddy!

"Suffer today and live the rest of your life as a champion!"

Aug 12, 2017

Congrats. And that last bit is so relevant for any non target alum- be able to handle constant rejection.

Aug 12, 2017

(Please Delete)

Aug 12, 2017

Mind sharing a little bit about the MSF program you're coming from? How did your peers do in recruiting? Where did it "rank"?

Aug 12, 2017

According to some earlier post I found, think:

Tier 1A Claremont McKenna, Vanderbilt, WUSTL, Virginia

A majority of my peers are international students. It has been difficult for them to find placements. American students do well assuming they know how to interview/network.

Aug 12, 2017

congrats, also interested in some more specifics about the program.

Aug 12, 2017

Thanks. Program is pretty rigorous, especially the first semester when you're balancing the coursework alongside the recruiting process. Every class you're in has a mix of MBA (graded pass/fail) and MSF's (graded on GPA scale) so that makes for an interesting dynamic. MSF's are working 4-5x as hard as MBA's IMO. Definitely like drinking from a firehose the first 5-6 months.

Aug 12, 2017

Congrats! I'm assuming this was for a FT position?

Bitch please, I love bananas! If you found my advice useful, hit me up with one.

Aug 12, 2017

Thanks, Yes it was an FT position.

Aug 12, 2017

What MSF program was it? If you aren't comfortable telling us the school, can you at least give us an indication of similar programs to the one you attended?

Use more debt than your competition or get out of the business. Any other policy is either self-limiting, no-win, or a bet that the competition will go bankrupt before they displace you. - Bruce Henderson

Aug 12, 2017

Yeah I guess it would fall in this category according to a post I found earlier:

Tier 1A Claremont McKenna, Vanderbilt, WUSTL, Virginia

Aug 12, 2017

I have always wondered how many of these success stories are complete BS or relatively large exaggerations. I feel like this one may be an example of the latter.

Aug 12, 2017

Apologies for the late response. Definitely not BS or exaggerated.

Aug 12, 2017

So when I have nothing better to do, I enjoy trying to track down these success stories. I usually never mention anything when I get a hit, but this one I have to call out b/c I'm an alumnus of the school. I have a contact at the school and (s)he confirmed with me that this guy did not get BB, nor did he get IBD. He got non-IBD at an arguably soft MM bank (in the Midwest). My contact was also concerned that this guy was making public posts that were blatantly false that could so easily be traced back to the school.

I say all of this because I hope those of you still in undergrad (or out of undergrad for that matter) realize how easily you can **ck up your reputation by one narcissistic post on an internet forum. It will be interesting to hear if any of this gets back to his future employer or the school. I out this guy because finance, especially IB, is built upon trust and respect and if you can't even cultivate those attributes anonymously on the internet then IMO your veil deserves to be pulled away.

For those of you who think I am possibly just trolling, look up the characteristics he mentioned on LinkedIn. He literally mentions the company's he has worked for and the school he goes to - all in the midwest (hint: worked on the shores of Lake Michigan, went to undergrad where the hawks have eyes and are black/gold, grad school along the Mississippi river). Thats how I found him. Per WSO user guidelines, I can't actually link his profile, but its easy enough to find. Just watch it over the next couple months and see if I am right.

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Aug 12, 2017

Chill out bro. How did you even find his school and work experience? This is some impressive detective work.

Aug 12, 2017

Really not that hard considering he gave approximate examples of the places. LinkedIn Advanced Search is great for networking and seeing what is behind the curtain.

But in all seriousness, put yourself in my (and lots of other alumni) shoes. You find out someone is knowingly lying not just to one person, but multiple people... doesn't reflect well on the school or the people associated with the school.

The other aspect is that I graduated from the undergrad program at the school and sure I hear the MSF is tough, but not nearly as tough as knocking out 4 years at the school. Word has already gotten around to some of the alumni network here in the city.

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Aug 12, 2017
JamesFranco2323:

Really not that hard considering he gave approximate examples of the places. LinkedIn Advanced Search is great for networking and seeing what is behind the curtain.

But in all seriousness, put yourself in my (and lots of other alumni) shoes. You find out someone is knowingly lying not just to one person, but multiple people... doesn't reflect well on the school or the people associated with the school.

The other aspect is that I graduated from the undergrad program at the school and sure I hear the MSF is tough, but not nearly as tough as knocking out 4 years at the school. Word has already gotten around to some of the alumni network here in the city.

Who gives a shit? It's an anonymous message board. Frankly, I think you reflect poorly on whatever organization you are involved with for being such an unbelievable tight ass.

Go stand in the corner and think about what you've written.

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Aug 12, 2017
DickFuld:

Go stand in the corner and think about what you've written.

Omg! I died.

Aug 12, 2017

you jelly?

Aug 12, 2017

Nope. I am wrapping up my 2nd analyst year and heading directly into associate so I am pretty content for now. Thanks for asking.
I don't think many people would be jealous of someone going into public finance at a lower half bank...

Aug 12, 2017

you publicly blasted someone based on the little information that he provided. I think you're the one that reflects badly on your school the identity of which remains unknown because this is an anonymous board where people can speak freely without having to put their or their school's reputation on the line.

Aug 12, 2017

I guess online anonymity is a double-edged sword, hence WSO's verified user feature.

Aug 12, 2017

Cheers to you my friend. You put your mind to it and received exactly what you put in.

People on this site drive me insane sometimes - telling stories of how impossible the transition is / how you need to go to XYZ University to be even remotely considered... That is just absolutely absurd! Hard work, possessing an interest to learn, common sense, a TON of networking, and having a hard enough head to keep swinging until you land one is all that is required!

I went to a non-target state school and didn't know what investment banking was until my senior year of college. I realized quickly that it was exactly where I needed to be. So I worked at it - networking, reading, and surrounding myself in the industry. Boom, a year later I stick it to the man and land a job that I would have never dreamed of.

Buck, you just get it. Congrats to you my friend. Keep up the crushing.

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Aug 12, 2017

Congrats, sounds well-deserved. I hope that the position is all you desired and more.
Your story is a bit of an inspiration for me; I'm currently debating whether to go to NYU for my MBA (admitted for the fall full-time) to career switch into equity research from a non-finance background (policy analysis and compliance). Given your experience, would you recommend MFE/MSF programs over the MBA for this? I face a similar situation to you in that I have a comfortable, well-paying job now, so it would entail opportunity cost and risk for sure.
What specific hustle and networking strategies did you find most helpful? Reaching out to alumni? Faculty connections? Just cold reaching out to target firms?

Aug 12, 2017

You need to do at least one internship (preferably two) before anyone will think about hiring you as an analyst. As for studying IB skills, you do not really need to do that unless you like learning thing twice, because they will train you about all that stuff when you do the internship. The main reason they say that you must do an internship is because they do not want to have to train you on those basic things when you start as a first-year analyst. As for recruiting, you can go to the companies' sites and apply there, but I would say networking is the best way. Networking can include things like information sessions with bankers, superdays, etc. As far as linkedin, you can follow banks such as Piper Jaffray, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan, and so on. But alumni from your school is a really good source. get connected with them because they have personal connections with the banks that you want to apply to and this can give you an advantage.

Aug 12, 2017

There is a page called searching for a summer internship under the IB forum on WSO. Search for it because it has the names of many banks ranging from bulge-brackets to boutiques. You can use this list and search the names in that list on linkedin and follow them. This will allow them to notify you when openings come up. Also, there is a site called Mergers and Inquisitions that has many good articles on getting hired and the like. That being said, let me know if you have any other questions, and good luck!

Aug 12, 2017

More information on your Major/prior internships would be helpful.

At this stage in the game, it's going to be a huge uphill battle to land IB post grad. Staying at school for another 2 quarters is definitely helpful so that way you can qualify for 2018 summer internships, but most everywhere is done recruiting for that already. Your best bet would be to look at very small/no-name boutiques with alumni you can network with. Good luck

EDIT:
forgot to address the part on how to actually connect with people on LinkedIn... usually the best strategy for that would be to find them through LinkedIn (using their search feature w/ school designation) and then emailing them directly at their work email address (pretty much every companies format could be found online - ie [email protected]). Much more effective than depending on LinkedIn messages only with the hope they actually respond.

Aug 12, 2017

Honestly it never seems like in my experience that LinkedIn worked. It was face to face connections that worked for me, but that may be different for you guys.

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Aug 12, 2017

It normally sits within ECM/DCM with DCM doing most derivs and ECM doing equity derivs. Typically team names will be something like "Strategic Equity Derivatives" or "Corporate Equity Derivatives" on the equity side and "Corporate Risk Solutions" on the debt side. I don't think they do a lot of work with governments, there's no need for any of that stuff to be done on the private side, with the exception of EQD hedging of remaining stakes in privatisations etc.

Don't know much about the US recruiting process unfortunately. In Europe, they either recruit separately (rarely) or from within the S&T pool. Usually the IBD skillset is not that compatible with the team so it might not be the best way in.

A lot of corporate clients are covered out of S&T as well, so you're probably better off looking there than at IBD if in terms of interests that's what you want to go for.

Aug 12, 2017

All of the banks do. You have to be a top student.

"Look, you're my best friend, so don't take this the wrong way. In twenty years, if you're still livin' here, comin' over to my house to watch the Patriots games, still workin' construction, I'll fuckin' kill you. That's not a threat, that's a fact.

Aug 12, 2017

Also, you didn't mention whether or not this was for a front office or back office position. Banks look at a completely different set of schools when filing back office positions.

Aug 12, 2017

JPMorgan recruits some front office from Baruch

Aug 12, 2017
jjcannon:

JPMorgan recruits some front office from Baruch

From an inside contact, the ones recruited by JPM from Baruch were for Equity research and Risk, not IBD nor S&T.

Aug 12, 2017
chubbybunny:
jjcannon:

JPMorgan recruits some front office from Baruch

From an inside contact, the ones recruited by JPM from Baruch were for Equity research and Risk, not IBD nor S&T.

Sorry, I thought this thread concerned the SA class

Aug 12, 2017

Yes, you can definitely get a position at a bulge or top boutique coming from a non-target (though bulges are easier b/c they take more people on as analysts). You may need to network harder to get your resume in front of someone but a top candidate is a top candidate.

Also, many top liberal arts schools are non-targets but banks regularly hire people from those places. At the end of the day, it's just much easier for a bank to spend its time recruiting at a larger school like Cornell where hundreds of kids are interested in banking than to go look for the ten kids (not an exact number) at Swarthmore who are interested.

Aug 12, 2017

All banks will take some non-target candidates. To break in though, you need to be a stand-out, either on paper (academically, extracurriculars, or stacked experience) or in person by networking like a legend. At my GS superday there was a girl from Manhattan College, I live in the city and literally hadn't heard of it, and I know some kids in the year ahead of me had kids from outside semi-targets and non-targets in their analyst class as well. Anything is possible.

Most people do things to add days to their life. I do things to add life to my days.

Browse my blog as a WSO contributing author

Aug 12, 2017

.

Most people do things to add days to their life. I do things to add life to my days.

Browse my blog as a WSO contributing author

Aug 12, 2017

Ok that is good to hear thanks for the info. I currently have a job in accounting but want to try to have some investment banking experience before I go back to school for my MBA. Will 2 years of work experience kill my chances for an entry level analyst posistion? I start working at the company in the fall and plan on trying to work in their M&A and business valuation department if this makes any difference.

Aug 12, 2017

Networking will make the difference, but I would do it fast. More work experience will make it even harder to come in as an analyst.

Even with 2 years work exp, you will need to look mostly at boutiques. Most BBs have very limited opportunities outside of their standard recruiting process.

At lesser BBs, you could potentially get in as a lateral hire with a strong contact and killer interview. Unfortunately, most GS/MS/etc. lateral hires will be people from banks a tier down looking to move up, and even transaction services won't let you compete with people who have actual banking experience.

Aug 12, 2017

Yea I would be happy to work for a boutique I would like any banking experience before I go to business school "hopefully Wharton" so this way I have a better chance for an associate posistion in a BB after getting my MBA

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Aug 12, 2017

Kid from complete nontarget with a chance at MM/BB here.

There is almost nothing harder than breaking into a NYC BB from a nontarget assuming you have no resources and have to do it from scratch. Start your freshman year with all knowledge and help? Doable.

I have had 1 day of free time in the last 2-3 years. Everything else is a constant grind. Wake up at 6AM every day, and if I am lucky I get to bed by 10PM (I am not very lucky). Those 16 hours? 90-100% of that is work... every single day. And you know what happens when I try to have fun? The gnawing thought of having to do homework and then if projects I could be doing. Kills anything. No matter how hard I work I will always be behind the kid who got went to a target school and has never known what it is like to work and go to school. He got a freshman internship at a firm that won't even look at my school.

On the other hand I worked up to 13 miles in 3-4 weeks from never running at all.

Let me hear you say, this shit is bananas, B-A-N-A-N-A-S!

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Aug 12, 2017

Breaking into IB is much harder. The difference is: you run a marathon for yourself (just have to complete it) and in IB, you have to convince other people that you can run the marathon (kiss ass, are competent, responsible, etc.). Persuading other people, while there are much more attractive candidates is the hardest thing you can possibly do, imo.

"Loser terrorists" & "bad hombres"

"Typical candidates are those who attended a top-tier academic institution"
-Most job applications

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Aug 12, 2017

solid points

Aug 12, 2017

Breaking into IBD is most definitely harder. To break into IBD you have to have at least two of these to get an interview, if you miss two, than you have no chance.
1.Went to Target
2.Fantastic Grades
3.Networked you ass off

ALSO you have to have been planning this since about sophomore or junior year. You can run a marathon at any point in your life.

Aug 12, 2017

You will have a better chance of landing a full time IB offer by bolstering your resume now with internships, participating in the school's investment management club, etc. and networking than running straight into a sub par masters program with no work experience.

If you have a good GPA and school involvement a MM or boutique bank internship will not be too far out of reach (still will require a lot of work) which will most likely turn into a full time offer or can be later leveraged into an offer at a more desirable bank later on. Depending on what year you are in school (if a freshmen or sophomore) your sole focus should be on landing internships, in my opinion.

You miss 100% of the shots you don't take

Aug 12, 2017

Thanks for the encouragement. I'm definitely not going to stop networking but I'm really not sure why my response rate is so low. Am I too late on the recruitment timeline?

Best Response
Aug 12, 2017

Wait a minute, did Goldstein just give constructive advice?

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Aug 12, 2017

It is quite a bit late for the recruiting in my opinion, not to say that it's impossible, but it's just a late. Most BB's and EB's (from what I've heard/read/seen) start recruiting for summer junior year around December - May the year before.

If you've exhausted your options in terms of BB's and EB's I would look into other regional banks and firms. There's plenty of them out there and your experience would definitely get notice. Along with that keep in mind that it's not just BB's and EB's that get full time offers. You'll read across this website, plenty of stories of people breaking into IBD with diverse backgrounds and different experience. Don't count yourself out, but work hard on networking.

Best of luck

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Aug 12, 2017

.

Aug 12, 2017

That's a bit of an arbitrary question because it really depends on how well the people at your firm like you. In all honesty, if they said they'd give you and interview and were adamant about not guaranteeing anything, then I wouldn't be too hopeful within the firm. That being said, make sure to really impress upon them the fact that you have the experience and love the culture etc...

Rotating in a firm isn't likely in general, but I wouldn't necessarily count it out. Every case is individual and there really is no telling until you just know yourself.

Aug 12, 2017

You should be fine, don't overthink it. Keep reaching out to boutiques & MM IBs, add associates and analysts on linkedin (or just email) and PM them asking to meet and learn about the firm. A common mistake is asking them to push along your resume, my advice (take it with a grain of salt if you want) is do NOT do this. Learn what you can, talk about non-IB things (not everyone working 90+ hours a week wants to discuss banking further in their free time), and try come across as a motivated and driven individual. Keep reaching out multiple times (Up to 3-4, waiting 2 weeks in between each message/email), always be polite and respectful, and just keep at it. I come from a non-target with a similar GPA and it took reaching out to 50+ firms before I found my PE internship, and i reached out to 75+ guys on linked in. To be fair, a lot (40+) of guys from my non-target break into IB, so I had a pretty high response rate on linkedin. In the end, my personal cover letter and ambition (not my networking abilities) got me the position, but this is relatively rare. You have great experience, a good GPA, and you just need to keep trying.

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Aug 12, 2017

Thanks for the tips. Do you mind sharing on what you did during your sophomore summer?

Aug 12, 2017

Ah dear :)

I wanted to bump an article I wrote many years ago to see if it would be of help to folks. Truthfully, I wouldn't express the commentary of the above in the same language (frankly the writing comes across as a bit overzealous and a bit over the top, ha), but I think most of the above is still applicable in all respects.

There's a closer meaning to my user name. Try reading it quickly. Perhaps you will then understand ;P

Aug 12, 2017

To be honest, I'd try to crush it your first year and transfer to Chapel Hill. Charlotte banks love Chapel Hill grads and I can't say I've seen a ton of UNC-C resumes pop up on team pages.

MM IB -> TMT Corporate Development

Aug 12, 2017

You can't "plan on a top 20 MBA" as a freshman, really. What you can do is aim for a 4.0 and transfer after one to two years as @SECfinance said. Focus on the now.

Aug 12, 2017

By the time he gets around to applying for MBAs, the schools outside the top 7-10 will be so obsolete that they'll probably be taking just about anyone who applies. But then again, it won't even really be that helpful since it will be obsolete.

Aug 12, 2017

regardless of transfers, etc., networking now can't hurt. might as well give it a shot

Make Idaho a Semi-Target Again 2016
Not an alumnus of Idaho

Aug 12, 2017

For your freshman year you should focus on getting good grades, getting involved in one social organization and one professional organization (try to get a leadership posotion), and start trying to find an internship which is applicable to what you want to do in the future.

The good grades will help for future requirements, the social and professional organizations will help serve as resume fillers, and the internship will help you figure out if you actually want to do something as a career.

Aug 12, 2017

Yeah, I was thinking about transferring to Chapel Hill after my freshman or sophomore year. Once I'm in CH, then what should I do?

Aug 12, 2017

Continue to get good grades, leadership positions, internship, etc.

Additionally, get drunk and get laid. Don't do needle drugs. Life advice.

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Aug 12, 2017

Focus on good grades and boobs, you'll be fine

Aug 12, 2017

Hey man, I transferred from UNCC to Chapel Hill and networked my ass off. Definitely make the switch if you can after Sophomore year. I went from not getting noticed at all to having multiple offers for SA opportunities in IB and S&T. Just focus on getting your grades right and solid internships in the summer.

Aug 12, 2017

Walk over to the finance dept and see if there is an investment banking group.

I got my interviews by literally walking over to the finance department and sending my resume with similar credentials to the alumni group. That's the easiest way. I was also at a complete non-target. There were 8-12 of us total I believe that were trying to break in in the total >30k person school.

Aug 12, 2017

Unfortunately, the University of Tennessee is a non-target, so you're going to have to network pretty hard to get interviews. I typed up a networking overview a week ago that you might find helpful.

I would also see if there are any boutique IBs close to where you are and try to get an internship during the school year to get some relevant experience under your belt. Good luck.

Aug 12, 2017

depends, unless your chill to pull ratio is at least a 5:5, you might as well throw in the towel

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Aug 12, 2017

what kind of LAC are we talking? NESCAC/Haverford type? Bucknell or below that?

Aug 12, 2017

Centennial Conference -- probably a step below Bucknell but I'm in the college's honors program and a triple major (German, Business, and Accounting)

Aug 12, 2017

From a non target and broke into IB. One thing I've realized about IB and "high finance" is that they could give a fuck if you triple majored.

You're better off majoring in art history at Yale hahahah.

Just keep grinding and you're good.

Aug 12, 2017

Nothing wrong with that-- I got waitlisted at Dickinson and Muhlenberg, between you and me, though I've never really been a good student. The thing about small LACs is that you always have to explain yourself to laypeople. Sometimes I wished I could just carry around the US News rankings, so I could be like "It's number 29, look!" Point: Use your alumni network in light of the weaker college brand name.

Try planting the IB & relo seeds early on in your internship, so that when are you given a return offer, your goals are well-established. They're both unlikely opportunities, but you should still shoot your shot. Otherwise, I think a CFA or MBA would be required to make the move to IB.

Aug 12, 2017

Keep networking as hard as you can. It is a game of numbers, see if you can improve your approach to newtorking and keep pushing until you get what you want. Unfortunately, there is no magic formula.

Aug 12, 2017

Get creative. Instead of alumni, start looking for other commonalities. A good place to start would be if you can find anyone who is from the same country you are from.

Aug 12, 2017

Drop out of the MBA program ASAP. Literally the worst thing you could do is use up your MBA at a school that will literally provide you nothing.

Aug 12, 2017

No bank that sponsors internationals is going to hire someone for an analyst role from a no-name 1 year MBA program

Aug 12, 2017

What makes you say so?

Aug 12, 2017

how did you bring up the conversation about passing on your resume?

Aug 12, 2017

I know these aren't in order, but the GPA and the Brand Names should be switched in importance. You can network with a 3.9 GPA and if you don't have ANYTHING which stands out, it gets EVEN harder to network and land that job. A brand name such as American Airlines/Kohls/(you get the point) at least allow them to give you a subconscious "nod" towards some recognition.

"It is better to have a friendship based on business, than a business based on friendship." - Rockefeller.

"Live fast, die hard. Leave a good looking body." - Navy SEAL

Aug 12, 2017

I listed them in more of a step-by-step order -- i.e. you can start networking and working on the GPA from day 1. The experience will follow, then come the ibd interviews.

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Aug 12, 2017

Thanks for the solid advice

Aug 12, 2017

Baruch is a solid place to go. It has strong placement across all the BB, and It's in the middle of Manhattan which puts you at an advantage from a networking perspective. Also consider, Villanova, UVA, UNC Chapel Hill, Williams College and Amherst. They have strong placement on the street

When luck shuts the door you gotta come in through the window - Doyle Brunson

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Aug 12, 2017

agreed. I like to say im a student at Baruch and theres strong placement as of now. Before that wasn't the case a couple years back. Just like in NYU, you have to reach out to fellow bankers on linkedin, alumni base, etc. That's what I am doing rather than just applying like everyone else. Goodluck and I hope you make the best decision for you. Btw is half the cost of Columbia and NYU. To each his own. There are a few target kids that disagree.

upod01:

Baruch is a solid place to go. It has strong placement across all the BB, and It's in the middle of Manhattan which puts you at an advantage from a networking perspective. Also consider, Villanova, UVA, UNC Chapel Hill, Williams College and Amherst. They have strong placement on the street

Aug 12, 2017
upod01:

Baruch is a solid place to go. It has strong placement across all the BB, and It's in the middle of Manhattan which puts you at an advantage from a networking perspective. Also consider, Villanova, UVA, UNC Chapel Hill, Williams College and Amherst. They have strong placement on the street

Not sure I follow this. If they can't get into Columbia, what makes you think Williams or Amherst are any easier.

Aug 12, 2017

Its starting to look like BO to FO now at Baruch.

Aug 12, 2017

I was in the same situation as you coming out of high school, ended up transferring to my states top public school (Umich, Virginia, Berkeley) and am currently a junior majoring in econ. Transferring is really common at large states school like the ones mentioned. If you want specifics you can pm me.

Aug 12, 2017

Second this. Go to the best school you can get into and plan on transferring from day one by keeping your grades perfect and getting involved in some cool activities. You may end up changing your mind and deciding there's no need to transfer but if you do those things, it will be very achievable to get into a public target like those mentioned above.

Aug 12, 2017

Thanks for all the replies. Appreciated.

Aug 12, 2017

If I could go back, I'd do my best freshman year and push for a winter transfer of my sophomore year to a target school. Whether you go to Baruch or any other school, keep the GPA above 3.5.

Aug 12, 2017

Many of the best private schools have some of the top financial aid rewards programs in the country. That coupled with scholarships could actually get you a very close or even cheaper tuition than in-state.

I know some low income kids at my expensive private school got a completely free education.

Aug 12, 2017

Its doable but you'll probably have to bust your ass.
Ex: https://www.linkedin.com/in/christopherhuetsch

Aug 12, 2017

Guaranteed that no IB firm is going to hire you since you're unable to use the god damn search button. If you can't use the search button how do I know I could trust you with the imperative detail oriented nature of making sure my coffee only has 2 sugars and one cream.

"It is better to have a friendship based on business, than a business based on friendship." - Rockefeller.

"Live fast, die hard. Leave a good looking body." - Navy SEAL

Aug 12, 2017

bump

Aug 12, 2017